×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

PayPal Credits Man With $92 Quadrillion

timothy posted about 9 months ago | from the ok-but-are-those-old-imperial-credits-or-new dept.

Bug 151

solareagle writes "Pennsylvania resident Chris Reynolds got quite a shock when he opened his most recent PayPal statement — it said he had a $92,233,720,368,547,800 balance in his account. 'I'm just feeling like a million bucks,' Reynolds told the [Philadelphia] Daily News yesterday. 'At first I thought that I owed quadrillions. It was quite a big surprise.' When asked what he would do with the money, he said, 'I would pay the national debt down first. Then I would buy the Phillies, if I could get a great price.' The Daily News speculates that the astronomical balance may be related to PayPal's new Galactic initiative, announced last month, to expand its business beyond Earth." He should have quickly minted a new coin.

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

151 comments

Don't tell the tax man! (2, Funny)

Alain Williams (2972) | about 9 months ago | (#44321999)

Otherwise he will be asked to pay tax on his income! :-)

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (5, Funny)

icebike (68054) | about 9 months ago | (#44322063)

We have yet to hear from the person who's account was debited by the same amount.
No doubt that guy is in hospital with a heart attack.

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322849)

If he is in the US, he probably couldn't get into the hospital since he owes too much money to get approved.

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322925)

Actually, what they did was debit 1 dollar from each other PayPal customer. Since there wasn't enough legitimate customers, they invented alternate universes till they got enough to front the deal.

Now he IS that rich, but it's busy busy busy!

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (2)

mysidia (191772) | about 9 months ago | (#44324007)

We have yet to hear from the person who's account was debited by the same amount. No doubt that guy is in hospital with a heart attack.

Naw... i'm sure he just fled the country.

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (2)

TWX (665546) | about 9 months ago | (#44322067)

Even the IRS' computers should choke on how to process that one for awhile...

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (3, Funny)

intermodal (534361) | about 9 months ago | (#44322083)

I know exactly how they process that one. Hold sign with name nad numbers, photo from the front, photo from the side, fingerprints, get in your orange jumpsuit.

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 9 months ago | (#44324019)

You have to fail to report and file your taxes properly, as required, and given reasonable time, before there is even a chance of that happening.

And to get the orange jumpsuit; I do believe you have to have committed fraud, or failed to pay after they sent an invoice, for a considerable length of time.

Just having a multi-billion$$ tax bill alone, doesn't land you in jail.

It may result in penalties and adverse asset forfeitures and seizures by IRS enforcement agents, however..

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322099)

It's a negative balance.

Per PayPal FAQ:
Q:What should I do if my balance is negative?
A: If your account balance is negative because of insufficient funds, please add funds to your account as soon as possible.

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (2)

Bork (115412) | about 9 months ago | (#44322111)

If he had that money for one hour, that would mean he had a average income of $10,528,963,512,391 for this year, not counting any other income he might have had.

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (1)

msauve (701917) | about 9 months ago | (#44322501)

Not really. The article is wrong. There was a picture of the statement on CNN - they debited his account, it showed he was overdrawn by that amount. Not as good a story, I suppose.

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 9 months ago | (#44324039)

. Was their debit, before or after he spent all the money they credited to him?

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 9 months ago | (#44324003)

Otherwise he will be asked to pay tax on his income! :-)

The 1099 form doesn't have enough space; the number would get truncated to 2,147,483,648

And he could easily pay off the IRS So his taxes would be more limited than one might think.

Re:Don't tell the tax man! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44324153)

Fuck it, he could buy the United States and outlaw taxes.

Wondering... (1)

sycodon (149926) | about 9 months ago | (#44322007)

...if any existing financial application actually has currency fields appropriately sized for that number.

Re:Wondering... (2)

RevSpaminator (1419557) | about 9 months ago | (#44322231)

I'm wondering how many other slobs rushed out to check their paypal accounts to see if something like that had happened to them. :)

Signed integer overflow (5, Informative)

GerbilSoft (761537) | about 9 months ago | (#44322021)

2^63 - 1 == 9,223,372,036,854,775,807

Assuming PayPal's currency values are stored in cents, dividing that by 100 results in $92,233,720,368,547,758.07. Looks like a 64-bit signed integer overflowed (or in this case, underflowed), resulting in integer wraparound.

Re:Signed integer overflow (5, Funny)

id10t_corner (527347) | about 9 months ago | (#44322077)

This sounds like a Mycroft Holmes joke.

Re:Signed integer overflow (1, Troll)

Areyoukiddingme (1289470) | about 9 months ago | (#44322223)

Where oh where did my expired mod points go.

+1 Funny, and anybody who doesn't get the reference should be drummed off the site.

Re:Signed integer overflow (1, Insightful)

Zalbik (308903) | about 9 months ago | (#44322549)

+1 Funny, and anybody who doesn't get the reference should be drummed off the site.

Because we should all have exactly the same tastes in literature and/or television.

How wonderfully inclusive of you!

P.S.
No, I didn't get the reference. My brain vaguely recalls a Sherlock Holmes reference (father? brother?), but I've only read a few of the stories....

Re:Signed integer overflow (4, Informative)

The Rizz (1319) | about 9 months ago | (#44322657)

My brain vaguely recalls a Sherlock Holmes reference (father? brother?), but I've only read a few of the stories....

Mycroft Holmes is Sherlock's brother, but that's not the reference he's alluding to here - it's a reference to the computer named Mycroft Holmes in Heinlein's The Moon is a Harsh Mistress [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Signed integer overflow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44324275)

Except that Mycroft, commony called Mike, did not have a last name.

Re:Signed integer overflow (-1, Flamebait)

Areyoukiddingme (1289470) | about 9 months ago | (#44322949)

I know you Aspies have trouble with it, but there's this thing called "being facetious." You should try it some time.

Re:Signed integer overflow (1, Insightful)

pspahn (1175617) | about 9 months ago | (#44322569)

...and anybody who doesn't get the reference should be drummed off the site.

But then what would the two of you talk about, and who would be there to moderate?

Listen, I get it, too many kids on the lawn and such. Personally, I've exchanged the not-quite-timeless phrase "get off my lawn" with the more apropo "no skateboarding".

Though I do appreciate that I've now looked up Mycroft Holmes and was surprised to find it wasn't the agoraphobic brother of the late, great (and I do mean great) John Holmes.

Re:Signed integer overflow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44324031)

Johnny Wad was 2nd on my list, but come on, a porn star who had a boa constrictor for a schlong isn't going to have a brother with a name like "Mycroft."

Was Mycroft Sherlock's Smarter Brother?

Re:Signed integer overflow (1)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | about 9 months ago | (#44322115)

But how did he manage to underflow the balance. That would mean he owed $92 quadrillion.

Re:Signed integer overflow (5, Informative)

Omega Hacker (6676) | about 9 months ago | (#44322161)

Not sure you quite get the concept of underflow.... If it's a 64-bit field in cents and he had $1, an unsigned subtract of $2 would result in a balance of $92,233,720,368,547,757.08 (give or take a few cents).

Re:Signed integer overflow (1)

mpeskett (1221084) | about 9 months ago | (#44322797)

Question to my mind is why they're using unsigned numbers. Are there no situations where they'd want to store a negative balance?

If for no other reason than to prevent this kind of embarassment when the "if (new_balance 0) { don't_allow_that() }" logic gets hit by a cosmic ray.

Re:Signed integer overflow (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 9 months ago | (#44323231)

Question to my mind is why they're using unsigned numbers. Are there no situations where they'd want to store a negative balance?

They clearly aren't using unsigned numbers since the huge number on the statement HAS A MINUS SIGN IN FRONT OF IT. And one of the two activities listed on the statement is also negative.

Re:Signed integer overflow (2)

Culture20 (968837) | about 9 months ago | (#44324093)

They clearly aren't using unsigned numbers since the huge number on the statement HAS A MINUS SIGN IN FRONT OF IT.

You can put a minus sign in front of anything. printf("-%u", X);

Re:Signed integer overflow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322939)

Except El_Muerte_TDS is correct. Your math is for 63-bit unsigned integers.

Re:Signed integer overflow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322177)

But how did he manage to underflow the balance. That would mean he owed $92 quadrillion.

The summary says that's what he thought it said at first. maybe he has a reason to suspect that was possible.

Re:Signed integer overflow (0)

icebike (68054) | about 9 months ago | (#44322151)

Seems unlikely to be a computational error.

If that were the case, after all the years PayPal has been in business an underflow would have happened a million times before.
I'm going with a gamma ray hit on memory somewhere flipping a bit on 3 cent negative balance or something.

Re:Signed integer overflow (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322435)

It seems very likely to be a computational memory error.
bit BIN:
111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
Byte
11111111
hex:
7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

"If that were the case, after all the years PayPal has been in business an underflow would have happened a million times before."
because on one ever updates software?
You aren't thinking, please start.

Re:Signed integer overflow (0)

icebike (68054) | about 9 months ago | (#44322497)

Ok, lets take your way.....

Someone updated the paypal software. And it affected EXACTLY one person.

Right. Dismissed.

Re:Signed integer overflow (5, Funny)

plover (150551) | about 9 months ago | (#44322737)

Ok, lets take your way.....

Someone updated the paypal software. And it affected EXACTLY one person.

Right. Dismissed.

Maybe the guy's name is Little Bobby Tables. That'll teach you to sanitize your PayPal names.

Re:Signed integer overflow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322735)

It seems to me some bit of improper typecasting. A signed small negative signed integer value got typecast up to an unsigned integer.

Remember: -1 = 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF, -2 = 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFE, -2 = 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFD, etc.

Re:Signed integer overflow (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322845)

Kids these days... When I was young we only had 2 billion on our hacked accounts.

Re:Signed integer overflow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44323517)

Mod parent ^^

Re:Signed integer overflow (1)

sabbede (2678435) | about 9 months ago | (#44323461)

Its also 147AE repeated. Makes me wonder if he had $83886 in his account. Or $838.86 Well, one of the numbers reported somewhere worked out that way. I wouldn't really know. I can't count past 20 with my pants on.

Pics or it never happened (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322023)

no text

there's not that much money in the world! (2)

chris200x9 (2591231) | about 9 months ago | (#44322027)

As I read this I can't help myself from picturing that Austin Powers scene with doctor evil asking for 100 BILLION dollars.

Re:there's not that much money in the world! (2)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 9 months ago | (#44322191)

They could have swung 100 billion in the '60s, or WWII for that matter. The US alone spent $249 billion on WWII -- in 1940s dollars.

Now colonial days, where the Louisiana Purchase was $79 million, forget it.

Re:there's not that much money in the world! (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 9 months ago | (#44322221)

Of course, convincing people to pay Dr. Evil $100 billion during World War II, well, they'd have to use some damned sexy Rosie the Riveters on the Buy Dr. Evil Bonds posters.

Re:there's not that much money in the world! (2)

buswolley (591500) | about 9 months ago | (#44322521)

Of course, congress has the power to mint money. Hell the treasury can right now. As mush as we want. One cannot run out of money...The limitation is inflation. Only inflation. Its not debt. Its not tax dollars. Its inflation. The question the becomes, are we at risk of inflation if we helicopter-drop billions of dollars on the people? Maybe. Maybe not. Depends on how much capacity there is to meet the increase in demand. http://neweconomicperspectives.org/p/modern-monetary-theory-primer.html [neweconomi...ctives.org]

Re:there's not that much money in the world! (2, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | about 9 months ago | (#44324069)

The question the becomes, are we at risk of inflation if we helicopter-drop billions of dollars on the people? Maybe. Maybe not.

Our president blows a billion$$$ every day on gas money; helicopter-dropping a few billion would probably have no appreciable effect.

Frankly, the $1.5 trillion stimulus would have probably been better if he had divided the $1 trillion by $230 million people, and given every American individuals an equal amount, excluding individuals earning more than $80,000, and excluding individuals part of a married couple where the couple's earnings exceed $120,000 ; in other words.... approximately $40,000 extra money to be received by every American; instead of throwing away the $1 trillion on crappy programs and tax breaks for corporations.

Completely bogus. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322039)

Fake story whipped up by their advertising department. And slashdot fell for it.

Some sort of 64-bit under/overflow? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322047)

2^63 = 9,223,372,036,854,775,808, which almost makes sense if they're using a signed 64-bit int to store this number (or it's just an incredible coincidence). But I wonder what accounts for the minor discrepancy.

Re:Some sort of 64-bit under/overflow? (1)

Qzukk (229616) | about 9 months ago | (#44323073)

But I wonder what accounts for the minor discrepancy

Probably whatever funds he had in the account before this happened.

Man, slashdot *is* behind the times (4, Informative)

neminem (561346) | about 9 months ago | (#44322051)

I'd never really followed other similar news aggregators before, but I've been following Consumerist for a few months, and indeed, that blog tends to post interesting news a couple days [consumerist.com] before it ends up here. In fact, it just posted a followup story, that apparently when paypal heard that upon seeing the windfall, even though he the guy knew it wasn't real, he felt compelled to donate 30 dollars to a local charity, paypal offered the guy the chance to donate an unspecified but supposedly substantial amount to the charity of his choice as compensation for the mistake.

Re:Man, slashdot *is* behind the times (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 9 months ago | (#44322089)

Yeah, I come and read it here when its already been on the local news like 2 nights ago...

Re:Man, slashdot *is* behind the times (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322783)

Why didn't you submit it to Slashdot then? You realize most of the stories are user submitted right?

Re:Man, slashdot *is* behind the times (1)

jasax (1728312) | about 9 months ago | (#44323761)

30 dollars? Awsome! Probably PP added another 100 bucks to that... :-)

Except that it's a fucking negative balance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322057)

What an idiot.
Is it so hard to notice "-" sign in front of those numbers?

Unlike Monopoly (5, Funny)

Freddybear (1805256) | about 9 months ago | (#44322123)

Bank Error In Your Favor means you Go Directly To Jail if you try to spend the money.

Re:Unlike Monopoly (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322291)

but in the US, paypal is NOT a bank... and in some places in the US, if a company screws up and sends/gives you something in error (such as an erroneous double shipment on a mail order) -- it's yours. you're not obligated to return it or pay for it.

Re:Unlike Monopoly (3, Interesting)

AK Marc (707885) | about 9 months ago | (#44322309)

Most countries in the world yes, but not the US, what he should have done was put it in his bank, and get interest off whatever his bank would accept. A few million dollars an hour for PayPal's error, then give back the money when asked. Likely, he'd not have any charges, and get to keep a few million dollars for his trouble. Instead, he'll get nothing but some news articles.

Re:Unlike Monopoly (2)

Melkman (82959) | about 9 months ago | (#44322485)

A few hours ? If he had put it in an account with only 0,1% interest he would have earned almost 3 million dollar per second...

Re:Unlike Monopoly (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 9 months ago | (#44323167)

I was presuming that a bank would refuse deposits that exceded some threshold. After the first few billion, he might have had some problems. So I wasn't guestimating interest on the entire amount.

Though, from TFA, it looks like he never had it, and it wasn't an account issue, but a bill-printing issue, regarding his monthly statement.

Re:Unlike Monopoly (2)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 9 months ago | (#44323465)

I'd imagine paypal wouldn't have been able to cover the transfer and that would have triggered some rather unwelcome repercussions rather quickly. I wonder if he could have flash-crashed their stock sending them out of business?

Re:Unlike Monopoly (2)

mysidia (191772) | about 9 months ago | (#44324113)

Most banks will have an inbound ACH limit of around $10,000. I'm sure Paypal has an outgoing limit as well, that is well less than $100,000; let alone millions.

Re:Unlike Monopoly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44323931)

Don't banks normally index interest on a daily basis? So you'd need to keep the money in your bank account for a whole day instead of a few hours.

Re:Unlike Monopoly (4, Funny)

PPH (736903) | about 9 months ago | (#44323953)

then give back the money when asked.

Dear PayPal,

Realizing your mistake, I deposited the funds in a bank account for safekeeping and notified your accounting department immediately. I have authorized the funds release to you immediately. Please contact my bank, the First National bank of Nigeria at.....

Re:Unlike Monopoly (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 9 months ago | (#44324099)

A few million dollars an hour for PayPal's error, then give back the money when asked. Likely, he'd not have any charges, and get to keep a few million dollars for his trouble. Instead, he'll get nothing but some news articles.

They would most certainly discover the error pretty quickly, when reviewing the unusual transaction; which would no doubt result in his account being frozen, and maybe get his name on the ACH blacklists / Chexsystems.

Re:Unlike Monopoly (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 9 months ago | (#44324295)

Can PayPal do that? They've worked so hard to not be a bank, would they be able to blacklist you in bank systems?

Re:Unlike Monopoly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322353)

Since when was Paypal a bank?

Let me fix that for you. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322537)

Bank Error In Your Favor means you Go Directly To Jail if you try to spend the money.

Large Corporation Error in Citizen's Favor means you get anally raped.

Seriously, even if you don't try to spend it, all they have to do is suspect you made it happen and you Go Directly To Jail.

Remember, children, Corporations are not just people, they are important people. And you aren't.

Re:Let me fix that for you. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44323245)

Not just normal corporation, but any with a Jew on the board of directors.

You can easily incorporate, but you won't be able to bite them. The sayanim network is too tight. They control all the money.

Re:Unlike Monopoly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44323893)

That is partially false, but is a possibility, depending on the country the question can be funny but in the most sane countries you have 12 month to return all the money that you incorrectly has expended. And here the funny think, put the money in a 6 moth deposit and voila you have more than 1 trillion of interests for you.

Re:Unlike Monopoly (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 9 months ago | (#44324091)

Bank Error In Your Favor means you Go Directly To Jail if you try to spend the money.

Unless you use the money to buy out all your bank's stock, before they notice. And your first act as new CEO and director of the board is to take the company private, and make the "error" go away quietly

I can't math (4, Funny)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 9 months ago | (#44322171)

"it said he had a $92,233,720,368,547,800 balance in his account. 'I'm just feeling like a million bucks"
Someone's not so good at math, lol.

PayPal sucks ... (1)

pmikell (578334) | about 9 months ago | (#44322225)

... but on this occasion the suck was in a customer's favour. He could spend all of it and still be morally superior to PayPal.

In other news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322251)

PayPal changed its name today to PayLoverForWhoYouWouldPerformAnySexualActImaginable in order to more accurately reflect the nature of its customer relationships.

92 Billiard Dollars (3, Interesting)

acid_andy (534219) | about 9 months ago | (#44322539)

I prefer the term $92 billiard [wikipedia.org] .

I know, the Long Scale [wikipedia.org] is seen as very archaic these days but the short scale just seems to run out of puff too quick. Quadrillion, indeed!

Re:92 Billiard Dollars (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44323957)

Pff. You aren't going to snooker me with your crazy made up word. I know a bazillion when I see one!

No need to offer to pay off the national debt (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 9 months ago | (#44322685)

No need to pay off the national debt, he would owe the IRS over 36 quadrillion dollars. Even if he only pays Google's tax rate of 2.4%, that's still 2.2 quadrillion dollars.

92 quad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44322863)

if I had 92 Quad dollars Id buy the united states, then kick everybody out and give it back to the indians. Then Id PARRRRRRRTTTYYYYYYYY!

Re:92 quad (1)

DigitalReverend (901909) | about 9 months ago | (#44323573)

I am pretty sure that if you gave it back to the Native Americans (which is what I assume you mean by Indians) that they'd probably wouldn't let you stay either.

What would happen with a national debt of $0? (1)

darth_borehd (644166) | about 9 months ago | (#44323013)

Let's say he actually paid the national debt. I know it's just a mistake, but wouldn't there be seemed lag time between the debt being paid and them correcting it?

If so, what affect would having our debt be at 0 for a day be? For a few hours? Minutes? Seconds?

Re:What would happen with a national debt of $0? (1, Informative)

BrokenHalo (565198) | about 9 months ago | (#44323541)

If so, what affect would having our debt be at 0 for a day be?

I can tell you exactly what it would be like. We would see a massive spike in the US military budget, and half a dozen new wars started.

Re:What would happen with a national debt of $0? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44323731)

More accurately welfare programs to would be expanded to unprecedented levels. Oh wait, we've been there and done that already.

Re:What would happen with a national debt of $0? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44323909)

The national debt wouldn't just reduce to zero, even if there were suddenly enough money to pay it off completely. Much of the debt is held in the form of debentures. These are essentially contracts detailing a schedule for paying back a loan, including interest and the principal on the maturity date. These would still be outstanding, unless the government somehow recalls them (which they probably could with enough money).

If the government did manage to completely pay off the national debt in a very short period of time the result would likely be almost immediately catastrophic as the economy suddenly has trillions of dollars injected into it.

That's WAY more cash than there is in the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44323173)

This is a great example of how when numbers get too large our intuition fails us. The first estimate I could find of worldwide cash supply is about 4 trillion in USD (http://money.howstuffworks.com/how-much-money-is-in-the-world1.htm ).

That means Chris would have had about 23,000 times the total amount available. Cool.

uh oh (4, Insightful)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 9 months ago | (#44323773)

That's awfully suspicious. They better freeze Paypal's account, ignore all e-mails, refuse to admit they did it on support phone calls, and take 3 months to resolve it.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...