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Interactive Nukemap Now In 3D

samzenpus posted about 9 months ago | from the want-to-play-a-game? dept.

Earth 192

Lasrick writes "The brilliant Alex Wellerstein has an interactive map that shows the effects of a variety of atomic bombs on whatever city in the world you choose (you can designate the yield or choose from a wide variety of pre-programmed yields, like Fatman, Little Boy, or what the Soviets had at time of the Cuban Missile Crisis). Compelling in a scary sort of way. A 3D version is available."

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192 comments

IRAN ?? NUKE EM NOW !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346317)

And save the rest of us the problem !!

Re:IRAN ?? NUKE EM NOW !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347223)

I agree.. enough of this wasteful 'consensus' bullshit that solves nothing while costing trillions. Either leave them be, or declare war and send them back to the stone age they want us all to go back to. It's time to bring some unilateral action into the mix.

Funny game. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346325)

The only way to win is not to play.

Re:Funny game. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346351)

Or you could build mines with nuclear reactors and 150 years of food.

what side do you want? (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 9 months ago | (#44346363)

1. USA
2. USRR
3. China
4. North Korea
5. UK
6. France
7. India
8. Pakistan
9. Israel
10. NATO nuclear weapons sharing group

Re:what side do you want? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346421)

The US alone has enough to obliterate every major city in the world. Scary how we have a president who is reckless and irresponsible and has control over the US nuclear arsenal.

Re:what side do you want? (2)

the_bard17 (626642) | about 9 months ago | (#44346497)

Meh. He knows someone will retaliate, and it'll end up wiping out enough citizens to significantly hurt the corporate base of power in the U.S. If a significant portion of the population is dead, we can't exactly go out and buy stuff, can we?

Re:what side do you want? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347201)

Water, food, shelter, and women will be the only thing men will be fighting for post apocalyptic era. In that future, I'll be sure to keep a round in the chamber; for myself.

Re:what side do you want? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346507)

When have you not had a reckless and irresponsible president?

Re:what side do you want? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 9 months ago | (#44346637)

Not in the lifetimes of most of slashdot posters.

Re:what side do you want? (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 9 months ago | (#44346775)

I'll agree, looking at the behaviour of Kennedy before election (huge missile gap lie) right up to the Cuban missile crisis definitely drags it back that far. You don't even have to look that hard at Ford, Nixon and Johnson to find problems there. Anyone want to give an example before Kennedy?

Re:what side do you want? (1, Insightful)

epyT-R (613989) | about 9 months ago | (#44347277)

compared with the mangina leadership of most of western europe that led to the rise of the nazis and soviets?.. I'll take american style over that any time..

Re:what side do you want? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346679)

what makes you think people want nations? Seems like a bunch of dead weight to me.

Re:what side do you want? (1)

styrotech (136124) | about 9 months ago | (#44346699)

Slightly different game, but I used to like playing as Col. Khadaffy or Kookamamie. Ronnie Raygun was fun too.

Re:Funny game. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347263)

The only way to win is not to play.

The only way to win is to play first. You play your way and I'll play my way!

Fallout (4, Insightful)

Roger W Moore (538166) | about 9 months ago | (#44347395)

The only way to win is not to play.

Actually the only way to win is for nobody to play. Even if you don't play yourself the fallout from the idiot playing next door may still get you.

Re:Funny game. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347593)

you talking about Nukemap 4ever?

They had these during the Cold War, slow news day? (3, Interesting)

couchslug (175151) | about 9 months ago | (#44346371)

Of course the maps weren't as pretty, but this has been done to death.

The danger of nuclear war in minuscule compared to the days when Soviets and Maoists were a threat. Now Russians and Chinese are our business partners.

Detente worked, thanks be to Richard Nixon!

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (5, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 9 months ago | (#44346681)

Now Russians and Chinese are our business partners.

So were Germans and Japanese in 1939.

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 9 months ago | (#44346873)

So were Germans and Japanese in 1939.

And some multinationals continued those business relationships between 1939 and 1945, or nominally severed the relationship with their subsidiaries in those countries and then collected the profits after the war.

Big business is only loyal to profits. Flags, ideals, countries, and people are secondary concerns at best.

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346887)

Considering what a mess governments made of the 20th century, I'm all for letting the evil multinationals have a crack at it.

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346973)

It was the multinationals that made a mess in the 19th century. The 20th century was supposed to be a step up from corporate anarchy. It was corporations charted by both Britain and the Netherlands which subjugated almost the entirety of South and Southeast Asia.

The answer isn't to simply shift power around. It's to devolve and extinguish power completely.

Legislative democracy is not a democracy, anymore than a King surrounded, manipulated, and imprisoned by his Court is a monarchy.

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (2)

khallow (566160) | about 9 months ago | (#44347157)

It was the multinationals that made a mess in the 19th century.

Like England, France, Russia, Germany, Belgium, etc.

The answer isn't to simply shift power around. It's to devolve and extinguish power completely.

Can't be done. Someone will always be stronger, smarter, or have a hold on someone else.

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#44347377)

Now Russians and Chinese are our business partners.

So were Germans and Japanese in 1939.

I guess that means that relationships with ideological opponents based on trade don't always work out. Well, Russia that has been reverting back to Soviet style nuclear sub and bomber patrols of NATO countries and the US, with the occasional threat of nuclear attack. China has been rapidly increasing its defense budget, is planning to build multiple aircraft carriers along with a blue water navy, is threatening its neighbors and trying to take land from them. Maybe the US shouldn't draw down its military too much after all. Maybe it should also set aside some extra cash to replace the systems that Snowden has compromised. Where is he now, Russia, isn't it?

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (2)

confused one (671304) | about 9 months ago | (#44346723)

My expectations are simpler than all out war. At some point a terrorist group will manage to get their hands on a nuke. The easiest delivery method is cargo container. One day, one of our ports is going to disappear. I hope I'm wrong...

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (4, Interesting)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 9 months ago | (#44346813)

My expectations are simpler than all out war. At some point a terrorist group will manage to get their hands on a nuke. The easiest delivery method is cargo container. One day, one of our ports is going to disappear. I hope I'm wrong...

You are wrong. The worst a terrorist is ever going to be able to do is a dirty bomb - basically a bunch of C4 next to the radioactive material. The bomb will spread radiation across one or two city blocks and that's about it.

The reason that they will never actually detonate a real nuke is that they are complicated and extremely delicate. The shape of the bomb must be absolutely perfect and the timing of the charge detonations must be accurate to within microseconds, else nothing happens. Getting the shape right is so important that people working on at least one major nuclear programat Los Alamos had to classify all spheres, including oranges. [nuclearsecrecy.com]

It will take the resources of a nation-state to blow up a nuke on US soil and no matter what any war-mongering politicians have said, no actual nation-state is stupid enough to do that because it means the end of that country. Not Iran, not North Korea. Not going to happen.

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346949)

Good point,
however, the outrageous audacity of biligerent nuclear-powers willing to conduct false-flag ops in the usa is an issue.

It is exactly the same audacity which shocked me when i first saw the vid where benjamina netanyahu said *dont worry, we run the americans*
youtube.com/watch?v=rRBb6L2eY40

Someone please call 911, tell them the chief negotiator is a wanted war-criminal warrant evader!

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (2)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 9 months ago | (#44347229)

Pakistan. Should an islamic revolution take over the military, I fully expect a bomb to go "missing" only years later to be found exploded on US or European soil. Of course, not by Pakistan, but by some Islamic fuck looking to jihad himself to paradise.

Half right (2)

aepervius (535155) | about 9 months ago | (#44347429)

The main fear for nuclear terrorism is not that they build their own bomb, but rather that they get one thru stealing/corruption/or jsut plain buying from the soviet or other state with nuclear weapon. Can you be sure that nuke from ,say , France are as secure as the US one against stealing ? Now repeat the same question with say, Pakistan or India ? That's the real deal. If nuclear terrorism ever happen, it will be that way.

But far more likely before nuclear terrorism will be bio-chemical terrorism which do not need as much facility. VX gas, for example. Or even some changed virus, because some apocalyptic cult want us all dead.

Re:Half right (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 9 months ago | (#44347605)

The main fear for nuclear terrorism is not that they build their own bomb, but rather that they get one thru stealing/corruption/or jsut plain buying from the soviet or other state with nuclear weapon.

That is what I was talking about. Those nukes are not designed for shipping-container delivery. So buying one on the black market isn't going to do them any good. They might get all the pieces but they won't be able to make it go boom. This isn't the kind of thing they can just MacGyver up, especially without test runs.

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347471)

My understanding is you can make a "gun-type" weapon with plutonium. The perfection of the sphere helps to stabilize the explosive lense, but getting a critical mass to go critical is a matter of several variables such as pressure, mass, & temperature, with geometry being only one of them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_mass
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demon_core
(I like how the core used in a nuclear weapon is described by both weight and diameter)

The cat is out of the bag and someone is gonna go "nuclear boy-scout" and breed their own plutonium using a neutron generator. It's only a question of "when?", not "if?"...

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (1)

epyT-R (613989) | about 9 months ago | (#44347287)

yes.. soon citizens from all three nations can have the oppressive, paranoid, and freedom leeching state of the soviet union, the thankless slave lifestyle of the average chinese, and the corporate greed of america, I can't wait!

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 9 months ago | (#44347543)

Yeah, it worked for Germany with Russia and Britain in the early 30's.

Re:They had these during the Cold War, slow news d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347587)

The bombs are still there, though, and as far as I can tell the only thing between us and another cold war is our collective, international decision to ignore that particular elephant in the room.

The logic of MAD wasn't attached to any ideological disagreement, it was just the consequence of that type of weapon; there's nothing stopping us from returning to it if/when mutual distrust passes some invisible line.

Heck, look up 'chinese secret nuclear tunnels' to see proof that Dr. Strangelove is still alive and well. He's just not getting as much press these days.

I chose the largest we ever tested (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346391)

On Phoenix it was not as bad as I thought it would be.

Re:I chose the largest we ever tested (5, Informative)

amiga3D (567632) | about 9 months ago | (#44346423)

Actually one reason they went to smaller bombs is because they're more effective. Two 500 Kiloton bombs actually do more damage than one 1 Megaton bomb.

Re:I chose the largest we ever tested (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346463)

And with separate delivery mechanics, one is likely to come through.

Re:I chose the largest we ever tested (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346761)

I think is more of the matter that it is a payload of about 50 at a time.

Re:I chose the largest we ever tested (2)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#44346777)

Explosive power dissipates as a function of the cube root of the equivalent mass of explosive.

Re:I chose the largest we ever tested (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347489)

Explosive power dissipates as a function of the cube root of the equivalent mass of explosive.

No it doesn't. Over distance, yes. Size, no. This is basic physics.

Re:I chose the largest we ever tested (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347571)

You need further review.

Re:I chose the largest we ever tested (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346489)

The Chinese Dong Feng 5 is just the right size to wipe out the entire San Francisco bay area with fallout being carried out to Stockton and Sacramento.

It's a shame it's only a simulation. That would be awesome.

Getting better at what we do. (4, Interesting)

Riddler Sensei (979333) | about 9 months ago | (#44346405)

Christ, it really puts into perspective the rate at which these things have gained destructive power since their inception. The difference between the effects of "Little Boy" and the Tsar Bomba on Hiroshima are...jarring.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about 9 months ago | (#44346431)

The ones they dropped on the Japanese are about the same yield as tactical warheads now. It's so much easier to destroy than it is to build.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346549)

True, and that's a compelling argument against those who decry the ethics of dropping the bombs on Japan in WWII. It was better that we learned how awful these things are at the 20 kt level, rather than the 20 Mt level.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346613)

We learnt how awful these things are before they were dropped on cities. The Trinity test ( the very first ever ) was a paltry 15kt and even then everybody realised how powerful even that was.

One of the guys (Oppenheimer) who designed and built that bomb basically said "I have become the destroyer of worlds" or words to that effect.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346653)

We learnt how awful these things are before they were dropped on cities

No, only a few dozen people attending the Trinity test learned it.

One way or another, a bunch of people were going to have to die to drive the point home. Any denial of that fact is a denial of our nature as humans.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346825)

im *pretty* sure the govt and military high ups knew the results of the test as well as the scientists and engineers involved. Its the people who made the decision to go ahead with dropping the bombs who also knew fully well what effect it would have on the targets.

Everybody involved knew exactly what would happen to the target cities.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346975)

This is correct, although the rhetoric about *testing*, and *we had no choice* are based on fabricated circumstance.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (2)

demonlapin (527802) | about 9 months ago | (#44346815)

The quotation is from the Bhagavad Gita, which Oppenheimer had read in Sanskrit. "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds" is how he phrased it in English.

I asked actual Hindus about that (1)

Latent Heat (558884) | about 9 months ago | (#44346869)

I ran that Oppenheimer quote past some T.A.s from India, and they couldn't make sense of it either.

Seems Oppenheimer studied Sanskrit and that was his own translation into English.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346639)

Not all progress is good.

Still, its a pity we never got to see the Tsar Bomba at its fully designed 100 megaton yield instead of the 50 they went for. And they should have had more cameras and closer to the action, as the footage was too far away to really get to see the fireball and mushroom cloud, there was too much cloud in the sky.

The Soviets should have waited for better weather. Making it live on television would be a batter idea, it would have made absolutely fantastic television. The advertising profits alone would help pay for the bomb itself.

Even better would be a 100MT underwater detonation....boy would that be spectacular.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#44346953)

Even better would be a 100MT underwater detonation....boy would that be spectacular.

A spectacular fish kill and harm to the environment. That is a truly enormous explosion. It is a good thing it wasn't exploded on land or sea.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 9 months ago | (#44347259)

The EMP and radiation would wipe out the television transmission for several moments following the blast. I'm pretty sure all the archived footage was shot with film which is a chemical process because of that.

And yes, tube technology was far more resilient to an EMP compared to transistor (let alone micro chip). Again, it was a signal transmission issue upon detonation. A blackout period.

Re:Getting better at what we do. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347401)

The "Tsar Bomba" was 27 metric tons and had to be flown/dropped by a modified bomber with bomb bay doors removed and only partly fueled. It was never a real weapon, just something to show off for the Americans.

So outdated (4, Insightful)

manu0601 (2221348) | about 9 months ago | (#44346415)

This is so outdated; Today's significant threat to US is a 30 years old person hidden in a Moscow airport.

Re:So outdated (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346501)

Indeed. He was supposed to be terminated at age 30. Somehow he's on the run...

Re:So outdated (2)

dbIII (701233) | about 9 months ago | (#44346787)

He's just the messenger that's telling the people of the US what their most significant threat is.

Re:So outdated (2)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#44346985)

You mean by following his travels? That might be OK so far, but I doubt he'll make it to Iran or North Korea.

But since in recent years both Chinese and Russian officials have threatened nuclear attacks against the US and its armed forces, or against NATO forces as well in the case of Russia, there is some validity to that.

Re:So outdated (2, Funny)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#44346937)

No, he's just another threat. But he could make the other threats more dangerous. The US relies upon the NSA to avoid another Pearl Harbor. The information Snowden stole can show governments and organization that are adversaries of the US how to avoid or minimize the chances of detection by the NSA, and perhaps more. His four laptops of secrets are said to be extremely damaging. The revelations Snowden has made have already resulted in reports of terrorist groups changing their communications methods away from those more susceptible to US interception. Oddly enough he fled to two countries that count themselves as adversaries of the US to varying degrees, up to and including the threat of attack by nuclear weapons. Former career KGB officer and current Russian President Vladimir Putin will gladly suffer Snowden's presence. I'll be somewhat surprised if we hear of any similar leaks from China, Russia, or other countries that are either currently or trending authoritarian or worse - after all, you don't want to upset your hosts. It's also interesting that Snowden's lawyer spokesman in Russia reportedly does PR work for the FSB. Sweet.

Re:So outdated (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#44347545)

I expect most Europeans don't want to be left out of the fun.

Putin in nuclear threat against Europe [telegraph.co.uk]

No Longer Unthinkable: Should US Ready For ‘Limited’ Nuclear War? [breakingdefense.com]

Outside the US, both established and emerging nuclear powers increasingly see nuclear weapons as weapons that can be used in a controlled, limited, and strategically useful fashion, said Barry Watts, an analyst with the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, arguably the Pentagon’s favorite thinktank. The Cold War “firebreaks” between conventional and nuclear conflict are breaking down, he wrote in a recent report. Russia has not only developed new, relatively low-yield tactical nukes but also routinely wargamed their use to stop both NATO and Chinese conventional forces should they overrun Moscow’s feeble post-Soviet military, Watts said this morning at the headquarters of the Air Force Association. Pakistan is likewise developing tactical nukes to stop India’s much larger military. Iran seeks nuclear weapons not only to offset Israel’s but to deter and, in the last resort, fend off an American attempt to perform “regime change” in Tehran the way we did in Baghdad. The US Air Force and Navy concept of “AirSea Battle” in the Western Pacific could entail strikes on the Chinese mainland that might provoke a nuclear response.

Re:So outdated (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347467)

The reason Snowden is in the airport is because the US engages in scary surveillance measures precisely because they're worried about a bomb going off in Manhattan that kills 1,000,000 people. This is not outdated, this is the opposite of outdated. This is the math that makes our leaders want to read emails.

Primitive maps (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346417)

I want to see the geology of the area taken into account as well -- it would affect both surface and airbursts. With amazon, google, and microsoft buying CPU's for everyone on earth in their datacenters, can't we just run the simulations in real time in the cloud every time I blow up seattle in my browser?

Re:Primitive maps (1)

akeeneye (1788292) | about 9 months ago | (#44346643)

Did you mean "geography"?
I agree, it would be very interesting to have the topologies of hilly areas like Seattle and SF taken into account in the sim. Let's say you set off your nuke over Elliot Bay. Or in a shipping container down on the south end. I wonder if the neighborhoods on the lee side of the central ridge separating the city from the lake would be spared in any big way. Places like Mt. Baker, Leschi, Madison Park. I wonder if N. Queen Anne would be partially spared? It would be ironic if the aquaduct and the 99 bridge survived. Similarly, I wonder if the blast effects would be channeled by the hills, perhaps down the Rainier valley for example.

It would be tragic, a lot of good pubs would be ruined even by a low-yield device.

wow this sure is current (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346429)

wasn't this link passed around to virtually everyone on the internet some 6 months ago..

HYDESim? (1)

BobNET (119675) | about 9 months ago | (#44346441)

Sounds like Eric Meyer's HYDESim [meyerweb.com] from 2005 [meyerweb.com] .

Re:HYDESim? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346611)

It wasn't even a new genre in the 1980s (people have been drawing nuclear maps since 1945), but 1. the "basic" Google Maps version of NUKEMAP does more than any other ones out there, no question (arbitrary pressure, radiation, thermal, fallout, crater, and casualty effects is quite a bit more than a few psi rings), and is easy to use at that; and 2. the 3D version doesn't really have any obvious antecedents, at least none I've heard of. It lets you visualize mushroom clouds and their formation in real time, along with things like putting the fireball at optimum burst height. The only prior equivalent are things like the artwork of Chesley Bonestell or Hollywood special effects, and those always blow up the same few cities...

Please take out Washington DC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346481)

At the Capital during a state of the union address. Hopefully it takes out K street too. This would cut out so much of the cancer that has infected this country since 9/11.

Re:Please take out Washington DC (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 9 months ago | (#44346715)

What's the largest bomb that could be loaded into the elevators at the Washington monument? Send one up to the top and detonate, and it should do good damage to the White House and Congress. Or a smaller one on the steps of Congress in a joint session with presidental address.

The '90s called. They wanted their nukemaps back.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346487)

Beavis: Fire! Yeah! Yeah! Heh-heh! Fire! Heh-heh! Heh-heh! Cool! Heh-heh! Yeah!

Re:The '90s called. They wanted their nukemaps bac (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346743)

You forgot the Intro [youtube.com]

Doesn't account for terrain effects (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346527)

Terrain effects are very important. Nagasaki is a practical example.

What he's basically done is take the calculations form the Nuclear Bomb Effects Computer and draw circles on Google Maps. A good first step, but really, not particularly useful.

A decent model would
a) take into account terrain (there are all the databases, and a simple approximation for shadowing isn't all that tough. You don't need to model the shockwave over ground, for instance, but the flash is important for large yield devices.
b) do fallout analysis based on climatological model for winds. Easily available databases (NCAR reanalysis project for instance)

So I "nuked" Detroit... (5, Funny)

DG (989) | about 9 months ago | (#44346711)

...and the simulation reported a 40% increase in property values inside the blast radius.

I had no idea the sim was that accurate.

(I kid. I kid because I love. 519 represent! )

DG

Is that all? (1)

Latent Heat (558884) | about 9 months ago | (#44346885)

Only 40%?

I had heard of nuclear mining and excavation in the Plowshare Program.

Nuclear construction demolition of old buildings?

If Obama had a city... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347033)

It would look like Detroit

Re:So I "nuked" Detroit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347427)

You'd also see a drop in the current murder rate.

Where's the technology? (2, Informative)

RR (64484) | about 9 months ago | (#44346749)

This is a relatively boring app. It's drawing circles on Google Maps based only on estimates of yield, height, and level of destruction. I wanted to see the effects of geography and prevailing weather patterns on the distribution of destruction.

Re:Where's the technology? (1)

Trogre (513942) | about 9 months ago | (#44346829)

You can click on "Fallout" to see prevailing weather patterns taken into account. Perhaps the 3D version considers land countours - I haven't tried it.

Re:Where's the technology? (1)

Smurf (7981) | about 9 months ago | (#44347503)

You can click on "Fallout" to see prevailing weather patterns taken into account.

I don't think so... In all the tests I tried, the "fallout" was always in the North-East direction.
You can change the direction manually, but of course that's completely arbitrary unless you already know which are the "prevailing weather patterns".

Perhaps the 3D version considers land countours - I haven't tried it.

Maybe. But I couldn't get it to work in Safari nor in Chrome, even though I have the Google Earth plugin working quite well with both browsers.

Re:Where's the technology? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346865)

Apparently, it has been plagerized from "Nuclear Holocaust Survival Handbook".

Rather than 50 year-old bombs, he could have considered modelling the Jericho III multi-stage Nuclear Missile built by the israelis with USAID money.

Regarding the older-than-use-by-date 30 year-old, he merely exposed tactics (anyone who has read Machiavelli would have already known), and he has not even scratched the surface in comparison to the damage done by the Fletcher program understudies of the evil Dr. Uri Ra`anan; Jonathan Jay Pollard (traitor/spy), and Mira Boland Lansky (insert description here).

By the way, since the START treaty and its predecessor have been in force, both the nuclear arsenals of the former CCCP as well as the usa have been significantly reduced. In combination with the NPT (Nuclear non-Proliferation Treaty), very good disarmament progress has been made.

It saddens me greatly to know that there is a certain country which has not signed the NPT, is not a party to START, has been continueing the expansion and mass-production of weapons of mass-destruction, unimpeded, since 1959. That country is commonly known as israel.

When will the UPSTANDING scholars, experts, and proponents of transparency in the West, East, and everywhere between, put these NUCLEAR BULLIES on the map, and DISCLOSE ALL DATA CONCERNING THEIR NUCLEAR ARSENAL, perhaps the greatest threat to humankind?

Awesome (1, Interesting)

Fieryphoenix (1161565) | about 9 months ago | (#44346853)

I always wanted to know just how dead I was if the local military facilities were nuked during the cold war. Now I know that I would have died in agony.

Re:Awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44347499)

Now I know that I would have died in agony.

If it is any consolation, you probably still will.

Re:Awesome (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about 9 months ago | (#44347519)

Not that local then? My 6th grade teacher told the class if the emergency sirens every went off for real he'd go outside and face the air base because he didn't want to survive that blast. He probably wouldn't have either way, we were pretty much right on ground zero of any potential nuking. No one was going to fucking duck and cover in that classroom.

If you're into that sort of thing you can find some nifty footage of the old atomic blasts back in the day on youtube. They're pretty impressive. People used to spectate for that shit. They'd have reporters out for a test detonation. I wonder how many of those people died of cancer. Though everyone smoked back then so maybe it wasn't even the worst environmental risk factor they were being exposed to...

Of course, being afraid of nukes is so thirty-years-ago. Not really in vogue anymore. Too bad really, being afraid of some guy in a cave in Derkaderkastan really doesn't have the same... Zazz.

Hami Opto Technology Co., Ltd is the manufacturer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44346957)

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Does this mean (1)

drfreak (303147) | about 9 months ago | (#44347533)

a more accurate version of the original Nuclear War game can be done? The original version always seemed to side with Ronny Raygun.

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