Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Camping Helps Set Circadian Clocks Straight

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the nature-time dept.

Science 173

cold fjord writes "Counsel & Heal reports, 'Many people are stuck in the vicious cycle of late nights and late mornings. However, a new study reveals that a week of camping in the great outdoors may help people set their clocks straight. A new study, published in the journal Current Biology, reveals that if given a chance, our body's internal biological clocks will tightly synchronize to a natural, midsummer light-dark cycle. The study found that a week of exposure to true dawn and dusk with no artificial lights had a significant effect on people who might otherwise describe themselves as night owls. Researchers found that under those conditions, night owls quickly become early birds. "By increasing our exposure to sunlight and reducing our exposure to electrical lighting at night, we can turn our internal clock and sleep times back and likely make it easier to awaken and be alert in the morning," Kenneth Wright of the University of Colorado Boulder said in a news release.'"

cancel ×

173 comments

Why fix what ain't broken (4, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#44454221)

You call naturally awakening early "straight", I call it pagan witchcraft. I'm fine with staying up late thanks.

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (3, Funny)

Cryacin (657549) | about a year ago | (#44454309)

So, become unemployed, miss mortgage payments and steal a tent. Sleeping issue solved!

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454659)

Why? I work at night.

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454349)

When I'm in early I just end up working longer. Screw it. They get enough out of me. More than they put in anyhow.

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454737)

My sentiments exactly.

Re: Why fix what ain't broken (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454415)

Your circadian clock is "gay".

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (4, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#44454427)

also.. try doing this in Finland. in the summer or in the winter. natural clock..

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454901)

Easy. You just stay awake from mid may until late july ;)

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (3, Interesting)

Yaotzin (827566) | about a year ago | (#44455105)

I usually hike through Swedish Lapland once a year in summer. Even though night is like 2-3 hours, it does feel like it's easier to rise earlier in the morning when I get back. Although it only lasts for like a week or maybe two.

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (3, Informative)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about a year ago | (#44454439)

Oh, but it is [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (3, Funny)

marcello_dl (667940) | about a year ago | (#44454539)

Ok, cool, so camping helps circadian rhythms and the human health and all. What about teamkilling?

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (1)

calexontheroad66 (975611) | about a year ago | (#44454607)

That means that electric lights, TV screens and tablets set your circadian clock "gay"....

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (1)

VAElynx (2001046) | about a year ago | (#44455025)

Agreed. And ... it's nothing to do with actual schedule, morning or evening. The point is that I can easier do more stuff during the late (near going to bed) part of my daily cycle than the early (after waking) one - for half an hour after waking, I probably wouldn't pass Turing test x3.
Which is the actual reason for being a night owl (schedule is constrained by waking time to go to lectures/work)

Re:Why fix what ain't broken (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44455059)

Have fun with your depression and crankiness and general brain-numbness (which I'm sure you think is normal by now) then, you idiotic moron!

Works! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454233)

A week in a tent had exactly that effect on me. I woke at the crack of dawn and got sleepy when dusk set in. Hiking some 20 km a day helped, too. Recommended to all other night owls.

Try having a child (5, Insightful)

ControlFreal (661231) | about a year ago | (#44454249)

It does the same thing, for years on end, without having to take vacation days. The funny thing is that you do actually get used to it; I was a night owl, but not anymore. Now, if I do sleep in, I actually wake up with a headache.

Re:Try having a child (2)

_merlin (160982) | about a year ago | (#44454321)

Didn't work for me - he inherited my non-sleeping ways!

Re:Try having a child (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454335)

and you no longer need alarm clocks to wake up!

Re:Try having a child (1)

ridley4 (1535661) | about a year ago | (#44454469)

You'd've been S.O.L. if I was your kid - even when I was real little, I'd find myself staying up late into the night and consistently waking up past 10AM.

Re:Try having a child (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454477)

It does the same thing, for years on end, without having to take vacation days. The funny thing is that you do actually get used to it; I was a night owl, but not anymore. Now, if I do sleep in, I actually wake up with a headache.

Get yourself checked out at a sleep clinic for sleep apnea. I'm not kidding, nor trolling. I have the condition myself. You're MUCH better off to get treated early than end up nearly losing your job or killing yourself driving because you can't stay awake anymore. Perhaps you don't have it. But the kind of headache you describe should have been an early warning sign for me, had I known what to look for.

Hope you're healthy.

Re:Try having a child (3, Interesting)

c (8461) | about a year ago | (#44454809)

Get several cats. Vocal ones, like Siamese, work best.

Feed them once a day, in the morning.

In about six months, you'll be getting up at 5am to feed them.

Dogs can be effective as well, depending on the breed and age. A young lab or border collie is good. An older hound, not so much.

Re:Try having a child (2)

camperdave (969942) | about a year ago | (#44455259)

In about six months, you'll be getting up at 5am to feed them.

In about six months I'd be letting them outside and shutting the door. Or if I had actually gotten attached to the beasts, I'd be looking for a robo-feeder.

Re:Try having a child (3, Funny)

plover (150551) | about a year ago | (#44455499)

Here's what my dogs have to say about being on the wrong side of the door at breakfast-time: Bark-bark-bark-bark-bark-bark-bark-bark-bark bark-bark-bark-bark-bark-bark arf-bark, scritch-scratch, bark-bark-bark- ...

Of course, that's pretty much the same thing they say when they're on the right side of the door, too. Can't blame them. It's breakfast time, after all.

Re:Try having a child (3, Interesting)

zmooc (33175) | about a year ago | (#44454867)

Your sleep in headache may very well be related to mild dehydration. You'd probably do better if you drank a tad more before going to sleep.

Re:Try having a child (3, Insightful)

jaseuk (217780) | about a year ago | (#44454961)

Or caffeine withdrawal.

Re:Try having a child (1)

zmooc (33175) | about a year ago | (#44455021)

True, could be. Or nicotine.

Re:Try having a child (1)

camperdave (969942) | about a year ago | (#44455265)

Your sleep in headache may very well be related to mild dehydration. You'd probably do better if you drank a tad more before going to sleep.

...or drank a tad less.

Re:Try having a child (4, Funny)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44455113)

Try having a child ... The funny thing is that you do actually get used to it; I was a night owl, but not anymore.

I got used to it (and it amuses my old friends that I get up early) but I never really stopped being a night owl. Give me a chance, and I switch to my night owl schedule in a day.

Being awake when the sun is out is unnatural. I understand that sunlight is necessary for green plants, but I'm not a green plant.

Re:Try having a child (5, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | about a year ago | (#44455227)

It does the same thing, for years on end, without having to take vacation days. The funny thing is that you do actually get used to it; I was a night owl, but not anymore. Now, if I do sleep in, I actually wake up with a headache.

Of course, this doesn't work for everyone. Like any definition of "normal" it fails to notice that variation in the population may be an evolutionary strategy with benefits to the whole, while perhaps sub-optimal for the individual. Or that there's simply not sufficient selection pressure for homogenization. Or even that certain 'mutations' confer an evolutionary advantage (though most result in death or disability, true enough!).

In this case, having the occasional night owl might be useful to a tribe to keep watch for predators, who often hunt at night. Having them nodding off because they're not really night owls while everyone else sleeps wouldn't just affect the individual's reproductive success... but the entire tribe's.

In other news, being a night owl is a bona fide medical condition [wikipedia.org] with a genetic basis and high comorbidity with certain other disorders. And as we gain better understanding, we're finding a significant fraction of the population isn't just a "lifestyle change" away from a cure. The only reason it's classified as a disorder is because of society's narrow views on what is normal and useful; Not because it's unnatural or needs to be "fixed". For some things, it's society that needs to adapt, not the individual.

Surprise (4, Interesting)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | about a year ago | (#44454253)

Anyone who has been camping should have experienced this. It's really nice to be in sync with the day again, makes one happy. With computers (blue lights destroys Melatonin and thus makes you less sleepy), days last longer and longer.

Re:Surprise (5, Informative)

jones_supa (887896) | about a year ago | (#44454345)

With computers (blue lights destroys Melatonin and thus makes you less sleepy), days last longer and longer.

There's a neat program called f.lux [stereopsis.com] which smoothly cranks down your display's color temperature when the night comes. I'm not sure if it makes any big difference in terms of melatonin production, but it can create a bit more relaxing atmosphere to the evenings. Suits also yellowish indoor lighting.

Mod parent up! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454499)

This is a great tool for everybody who sits at a computer later in the evening. It definitely helps me to fall asleep much faster after using the computer for hours compared to the normal daylight setting with color temperatures of over 5000K.

Re:Surprise (5, Informative)

xaxa (988988) | about a year ago | (#44454617)

Debian/Ubuntu/etc users could easily install the 'redshift' package: http://jonls.dk/redshift/ [jonls.dk]

If it helps, my config file at ~/.config/redshift.conf is:

; Global settings
[redshift]
temp-day=6400
temp-night=3900
location-provider=manual

; The location provider and adjustment method settings
; are in their own sections.
[manual]
lat=51.5
lon=-0.1

(Also, I'm disappointed to see "f.lux is patent pending" at the bottom of their page.)

On Android, I have added a "Night Mode" button. I think this is only possible with Cyanogenmod, and it's an on-off change, rather than the gradual change done with f.lux or redshift.

Re:Surprise (1)

dotancohen (1015143) | about a year ago | (#44454921)

Debian/Ubuntu/etc users could easily install the 'redshift' package: http://jonls.dk/redshift/ [jonls.dk]

If it helps, my config file at ~/.config/redshift.conf is:

; Global settings
[redshift]
temp-day=6400
temp-night=3900
location-provider=manual

; The location provider and adjustment method settings
; are in their own sections.
[manual]
lat=51.5
lon=-0.1

(Also, I'm disappointed to see "f.lux is patent pending" at the bottom of their page.)

On Android, I have added a "Night Mode" button. I think this is only possible with Cyanogenmod, and it's an on-off change, rather than the gradual change done with f.lux or redshift.

Thank you, I did not know that one could create a config file for redshift. I've been starting with a shell script for my day/night parameters. Tell me, is a positive longitude east or west? I assume that positive latitude is north.

Re:Surprise (1)

monkeyhybrid (1677192) | about a year ago | (#44454995)

Tell me, is a positive longitude east or west? I assume that positive latitude is north.

Positive longitude is east. Positive latitude is north.

Re:Surprise (2)

xaxa (988988) | about a year ago | (#44455061)

Thank you, I did not know that one could create a config file for redshift. I've been starting with a shell script for my day/night parameters. Tell me, is a positive longitude east or west? I assume that positive latitude is north.

A positive longitude is east of Greenwich, a negative one West.

My -0.1 is roughly the centre of London. The astronomical observatory at Greenwich was built on a hill to the south-east of the City of London, away from the fog and smoke.

Re:Surprise (1)

Trogre (513942) | about a year ago | (#44454771)

I'm writing this right now with Redshift running. If I click the little icon in the system tray my eyes feel physical pain as the screen becomes a barrage of blue, then when I click it again suddenly feel calmer as the deep orange sunset hue sets in.

Video is automatically "beneath" the filter too, unless using xv which, for some reason appears "above" the filter (ie is not redshifted at all).

The only problem is I have to remember to switch it off when colour-correcting photos :)

Re:Surprise (3, Interesting)

CensorshipDonkey (1108755) | about a year ago | (#44455143)

I want to second f.lux. This program is AWESOME. During the day it reduces eye strain from 6-8 hrs of monitor use by just softening the display, and at night I find it a lot easier to fall asleep after exposure to the warm tint and suppressed blues.

Re:Surprise (2)

RoboJ1M (992925) | about a year ago | (#44454459)

Are you suggesting that the high temperature full spectrum lighting throughout my white walled house might not have been such a hot idea?!?! 8@

Actually they're there for S.A.D and I've just not bothered getting round to putting in some regular incandescent lighting for after bedtime.... .

However they're really isn't anything like a light you feel you can get a tan off in the bathroom to wake you up in the morning.

Re:Surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454513)

Maybe I should change my background, which is solid blue. Anyway, I'll try the f.lux program linked in one of the other answers.

Re:Surprise (2, Insightful)

greggman (102198) | about a year ago | (#44454759)

I'm calling BS. Which day are we talking about? A day at the equator? A day at the North Pole in summer? The length of sunlight varies all over the planet so it seems bs to claim that one specific daylight / night duration is special

Re:Surprise (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44455155)

Our ancestors came from East Africa, which is close enough to the equator that the days don't vary much in length. Rather different from living in Helsinki.

Re:Surprise (1)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | about a year ago | (#44454927)

That or had to deal with a two week power outage last October/November. No lights or electronics to disturb sleeping patterns.

Re:Surprise (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44455133)

With computers ... days last longer and longer.

That's a problem? You can sleep when you're dead.

SEEKING THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE WOODS !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454285)

Does a bear really shit in the woods !!

PeeEss, because the so/.called story is so very, very full of shit !!

I wonder if this works in Northern Lattitudes (2)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year ago | (#44454289)

I wonder if this works in Northern Latitudes, and if so at what time of year.

Re:I wonder if this works in Northern Lattitudes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454661)

I wonder if this works in Northern Latitudes, and if so at what time of year.

My guess would be: only during times of the year when one can actually sleep outside in a thin fabric tent.

The cold would be one problem, I suppose. The other problem is the heat. I used to camp annually with friends around the third week of December (mind this is in South Africa, so it's high summer and fairly warm). I used a thin nylon hiking tent, which fitted nicely on the back of the motorcycle. Sunrise tends to wake one up. If you're not quick to get up and out of the thing, the sun soon bakes it past any reasonable comfort levels. Of course all this newfangled tech with metalized fabric and whatnot tends to improve conditions....

Re:I wonder if this works in Northern Lattitudes (3, Informative)

tverbeek (457094) | about a year ago | (#44454897)

I don't know what you consider "northern", but the two times I've spent a week on Isle Royale (48N) in July, I switched pretty quickly and easily to sleeping on a natural day/night schedule.

Re:I wonder if this works in Northern Lattitudes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454971)

That's entirely south of Finland. Up north it never gets dark during summer. At midsummer, I was skydiving at midnight (the real midnight, not daylight savings time midnight). and that was about halfway between the north and south end of Sweden.

Re:I wonder if this works in Northern Lattitudes (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454991)

I don't know what you consider "northern", but the two times I've spent a week on Isle Royale (48N) in July, I switched pretty quickly and easily to sleeping on a natural day/night schedule.

Forty eight North. That's the latitude of Paris, isn't it? So, definitely not "northern" to me. I live at 60N. In mid-July the sun sets at 22:30 and rises at 4:20 in between there's about three hours of dusk and three hours of darkness. In mid-June those figures would be 22:50 and 3:55 with only dusk between and no darkness.

Some of my relatives live at 65N. In the mid summer sun sets at 0:22 and rises at 2:18. You get a really good sleep there, if you go with the natural cycle.

The figures are pretty much reversed for winter.

Re:I wonder if this works in Northern Lattitudes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44455421)

"northern"
Is 50-70+N ;)

Turn off the god damn sun so I can get some sleep. (0, Flamebait)

betterprimate (2679747) | about a year ago | (#44454297)

Obviously, sleeping closer to stars and waking up to chickens is going to set you straight. After all, there are no blinds to pull over the dawn. If all else fails, that badger in your sleeping bag will make sure you don't oversleep and miss brunch.

How much money was invested to realize what was innate for someone who grew up in a rural area? What's the point of this? "Scientific" studies are being made to discover why you shouldn't scratch, itch, or not blink. Maybe we'll hear about why bathing is good for us? Dumb monkeys. Can we stop this era of bullshit?

This makes want to stick my eye with a syringe full of mercury. Maybe I'll catch something like a cold or invent calculus.

This is so stupid I ruined my britches.

Re:Turn off the god damn sun so I can get some sle (5, Insightful)

hurwak-feg (2955853) | about a year ago | (#44454475)

Call it bullshit, but even things that you consider innate should still be held to the standard of peer review publishing. Remember, it was once innate that the earth is flat. People studying "scratch, itch, or not blink" and not too long ago smoking figure out things about health effects of all sorts of things that are innately harmless because there is no immediate affect. Asbestos, lead, and smoking come to mind.

Attacking science, no matter what popular opinion of it is, is dangerous. You didn't die of some terrible disease because scientists figured out vaccines. Engineers using what scientists figured out about electricity, magnetism, and mathematics built the computer you are using to read about this "bullshit". We already have enough anti-intellectualism in this world. There are morons in congress (and people who vote for them) that want to take a religious, "common sense", or tough guy approach to problems even in the face of overwhelming evidence.

Considering sleep quality and quantity is vital to a persons mental and physical health, sleep research is important. There might be some people reading this that have never lived in a rural area and have never been camping that might just have sleep problems that could benefit from this.

Re:Turn off the god damn sun so I can get some sle (2)

hankwang (413283) | about a year ago | (#44455223)

Although I agree with your general message, I think you picked bad examples:

... it was once innate that the earth is flat. People studying "scratch, itch, or not blink" and not too long ago smoking ...

The concept of a flat earth was never "innate", at least in Western cultures over the past 2200 years. [wikipedia.org]

According to the wiki, as early as 1604, smoking was considered unhealthy [wikipedia.org] , which is pretty soon given that tobacco became known after the discovery of America. Only the tobacco industry was actively trying to play down the risks of smoking.

Choose your campsite wisely (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454301)

There is certainly some merit to this research. However, be careful where you go camping. After my recent two-week camping trip to Iceland, my internal clocks are set to this insane there-is-no-night-and-your-are-never-gonna-sleep-again mode. It's been two weeks since I got back and still can't get enough sleep.

So I've got it backwards. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454311)

I must be quite sensitive to light. In winter, I used to have huge trouble waking up, and in summer I wouldn't get enough sleep.

Ultimately, I blacked out my windows and bought a wake up light. It's been fantastic. No more trouble waking up in winter, and my SAD is greatly reduced. In summer, I no longer suffer lack of sleep and I feel overall much better.

I probably should move to the tropics and have equally long days all year long.

Made the same experience (3, Interesting)

vikingpower (768921) | about a year ago | (#44454327)

When hiking through Europe ( I once walked from Amsterdam to Rome ), it was the same for me: as long as I slept outside, in a tent, I would wake up with sunrise and get sleepy shortly after sunset. As soon as I would begin sleeping in hotels, monasteries etc. etc., I would turn into a night-owl again...

but... (1, Funny)

stenvar (2789879) | about a year ago | (#44454329)

Camping to reset my circadian cycle sounds all nice and that, but where do I get power for my gadgets, and where do I get 4G Internet connectivity out in the boondocks?

Re:but... (2)

hurwak-feg (2955853) | about a year ago | (#44454485)

Solar panel/automotive power inverter and satellite internet.

Re:but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44455171)

Camp in your back yard and use an extension cord.

Re:but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44455215)

You don't need to camp in the "boondocks", my family camps in a place less than a mile from the nearest interstate. No electricity, no running water, but we have 4G there.

Not surprising but shitty interpretation as usual. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454343)

If you've ever been camping, you know there's a completely different reason for that. Most tents turn in greenhouses within about one hour after sunrise. It's really uncomfortable to stay in, let alone sleep. Sleep patterns will shift quickly under such conditions, unless you're quite resistant to sleep deprivation.
On the other hand, if you sleep outside or in an open, shaded structure, you can keep sleeping late.
The melatonin/sunlight interpretation the researchers gave is pretty close to unadulterated bullshit, taking consequence for causation, but that's usual with studies on that topic.

Re:Not surprising but shitty interpretation as usu (1)

hurwak-feg (2955853) | about a year ago | (#44454481)

So what research or expertise do you have to support the claim that "The melatonin/sunlight interpretation the researchers gave is pretty close to unadulterated bullshit"?

Re: Not surprising but shitty interpretation as us (2)

ozydingo (922211) | about a year ago | (#44454691)

You're really going to claim that your personal anecdotes trump the scientific method? Did you read the paper and find specific fault with their methods? Maybe your tent just sucks.

Re:Not surprising but shitty interpretation as usu (2)

HJED (1304957) | about a year ago | (#44454723)

That really depends where you are camping and the quality of your tents, I find that I wake up closer to sunrise and feel tried closer to sunset when camping irrelevant of the time of year (including winter in reasonably cold conditions where it is far more comfortable in the tent).
Also I am sure they actually measured the melatonin levels.

Re:Not surprising but shitty interpretation as usu (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about a year ago | (#44454911)

Most tents turn in greenhouses within about one hour after sunrise. It's really uncomfortable to stay in, let alone sleep.

Get a better tent, with proper ventilation.

What "night"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454353)

Feel free to attempt this in the summertime Finland, beneath the midnight sun.

No thanks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454363)

Being an 'early bird' has no positives... The whole world runs on that schedual.
Traffic is bad. Every place is packed. Kids are awake and being stupid during the day. It's around 90-100 here too.

Being awake overnight has only one problem. There's nothing on tv but infomercials. But i don't watch tv.

Re:No thanks... (1)

Scarletdown (886459) | about a year ago | (#44454559)

Being an 'early bird' has no positives...

The early bird may catch the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Re:No thanks... (1)

IdolizingStewie (878683) | about a year ago | (#44454843)

It depends on your definition of early. I find that the roads are quite nice heading to work at 6am.

Re:No thanks... (1)

T-Bone-T (1048702) | about a year ago | (#44454979)

One job I had was close to a highway that was heaven at 6am but turned in to hell at 6:05. If I left on time, I got to work 10 minutes early. If I left 5 minutes later, I wouldn't get to work 5 minutes early but 5 minutes late!

Exercise in futility (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454369)

First of all, it isn't clear if every participant in this study had a bona fide circadian rhythm disorder. The question has to be asked, "would this actually work for someone with a real honest to God circadian rhythm disorder such as delayed sleep phase syndrome or a non-24-hour disorder? "

All that withstanding, unfortunately, we don't live in an agrarian society. Like it or not, we do have electricity. We do have blue light. We have lights of many other wavelengths as well. So while "getting back to nature" sounds all warm and fuzzy, it does jack shit for anyone in the real world.

Anyone who believes that this research is valuable needs to pull their head out of their ass and refocus on providing research that helps people who live in the real world.

Is camping necessary? (4, Insightful)

rolfwind (528248) | about a year ago | (#44454405)

Why not just open the blinds before bedtime and turn off the lights progressively at night... or whatever the magic is... that does this?

I assume most whacked out rythms are just either from work schedules or start from bad self-discipline keeping on watching TV or hanging on the computer way past tired. In the latter situation, with smartphones, that means not even most accessible camping is going to help.

Re:Is camping necessary? (1)

HJED (1304957) | about a year ago | (#44454731)

Or for being inside all day with reduced (or different colour spectrum) light. The main thing is getting the light during the day, it is the same reason that if you spend a long day outside you feel a lot more sleepy.

Re:Is camping necessary? (2)

mjr167 (2477430) | about a year ago | (#44455141)

Why not just open the blinds before bedtime

But then you can't sleep naked...

Re:Is camping necessary? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44455297)

Opening the blinds before sleep works. There are some privacy annoyances (you think twice before walking to the bathroom half naked) and some artificial light can come in (headlights, for example). But with those caveats, it works.

Shame (2)

EzInKy (115248) | about a year ago | (#44454471)

I love camping, but having worked nightshift for the last 30 years and most likely will do the same for the rest of my carreer, this explains why I feel so out of sorts whenever I go.

What else is new? (1)

prefec2 (875483) | about a year ago | (#44454497)

If you are in the wilderness this works after some time. However, 'owls' get up later than 'early birds' because of different internal clock implementations. Some are faster than earth rotations and others are slower. The clock calibration with sunlight works perfect in the summer or in equatorial regions, but not in winter. In addition, I cannot work in an area where there is no artificial light and no modern civilization around. Therefore, setting the clock right once a year will not help for long. It will just be like another jet lag.

Normal sleep cycle???? (3, Insightful)

Jeepster77 (1106973) | about a year ago | (#44454507)

I worked 7am-3pm for 2 months, 3 years ago. Other than that, either 11pm-7am or 7pm-3am, or random hours on call, for the last 24 years. I get all messed up on vacation or out of work for some reason. Normal circadian rhythms do not exist in my world, since when I was working on call I lived a 20 hour day for most of the week... work 8, off 12, work 8 off 12. I'm still amazed that only a very few of my co-workers have died from falling asleep behind the wheel before, during, or after work. The days of working during the day and sleeping at night are long gone.

Re:Normal sleep cycle???? (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44455195)

But how does working those hours affect you?

My wife is a nurse and a worse night owl than me. On occasion she's worked 7AM-3PM, but she can never get used to it and always feels out of sorts. She's fine though working 11PM-7AM. She can do it forever and rather likes it. Most other people say it's a killer. Depends on the individual.

Anecdotal, but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454511)

I 'naturally' fall into night-owl patterns very easily. I don't wear it as some badge of honour - it's something I've always struggled with.

I've definitely noticed the effect of camping, and I think it has more to do with the mind relaxing. Little stressors and whirring thoughts start to fade away, due to the different environment. I'm more in the moment, happy with a full belly at the end of the day, and the satisfaction of being physically tired. I'm sure a good dose of natural lighting helps too, but the physical side is far and away the most important. It's why I go running at least every other day. The more intense I make it, the more relaxed I feel at night. The other thing is keeping electronics, laptops, TV, etc., away from the bed.

Unfortunately, the Ashes have fucked this up - but that's the price of admission when watching on the other side of the world:(

In related news (4, Funny)

korbulon (2792438) | about a year ago | (#44454517)

Studies show that me picking a fight with, oh, just about anyone, will get my clock cleaned, a hunderd percent guarantee.

And who doesn't love a clean clock?

Then three days later, it's back to normal (1)

iliketrash (624051) | about a year ago | (#44454523)

Right. Then the person gets back from his/her happy little camping trip and back into his/her normal life and three days later he/she is back on the same stupid schedule. I've done this many times and camping is not necessary—any outside influence that causes one to rise earlier will do. I didn't read the article but it sounds really stupid to me, so I won't.

Re:Then three days later, it's back to normal (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | about a year ago | (#44454851)

I use a dawn simulator for a morning "alarm" instead of a regular alarm clock. It doesn't keep me from staying up late, but it does make keeping an good morning rhythm easy in the winter when the sun comes up much later.

Well duh. (1)

RussR42 (779993) | about a year ago | (#44454525)

If you've ever worked a job that involves wacky schedules, you would know that any method of adhering to a sleep/wake schedule makes it feel somewhat natural pretty fast. In this case it's just naturally enforced light and dark cycles.

You know who doesn't have his clock straight? (1)

korbulon (2792438) | about a year ago | (#44454527)

Bill Clinton.

Sometimes I just can't help myself. Most times. All the time.

"real owl"; never worked for me (2)

dltaylor (7510) | about a year ago | (#44454541)

I've been tested to have a natural 3AM - 11AM (standard time) sleep cycle. I've done quite a bit of camping, for week+ periods, and it never changed that cycle. I'd still be up 'til well past midnight and totally ass-dragging 'til lunch. Saw a LOT of stars in the woods, desert, shore, though.

I doubt that they had real biological (genetic alleles) in that test, or true larks, for that matter.

Re:"real owl"; never worked for me (1)

MozeeToby (1163751) | about a year ago | (#44455425)

There's a difference between "golly I'm such a night owl" and having a circadian rhythm disorder [wikipedia.org] . It's like the difference of "I'm so anti-social I have autism" and actually being diagnosed.

Well, either that or... (2)

Narcocide (102829) | about a year ago | (#44454565)

... sleeping on the ground outdoors isn't really comfortable.

Re:Well, either that or... (1)

Nyder (754090) | about a year ago | (#44455379)

... sleeping on the ground outdoors isn't really comfortable.

Hammock. Sleeping bag and some sort of trap over you. Maybe a mosquito net depending on where you are. Most comfortable, lightest, best way to sleep unless you go where there are no trees.

Once we got behind on traveling to where we were camping, so it was like midnight, moonless night when we got to the spot (2 mile hike). While everyone else was cursing in the dark trying to get their tents set up, I had my hammock, and tarp taken care of in 10 mins.

Doesn't work for me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44454567)

When I camp, I stay up all night. Camping requires patience and time, you have to wait until the n00bs come to you.

Oh, you mean IRL camping? Why would I want to do that?

More benefits of camping (1)

WinstonWolfIT (1550079) | about a year ago | (#44454799)

Typically you also are biking/hiking/fishing/swimming. By the end of the day a tin of beans or instant pasta is delicious, and when you've had a tin of coffee and it's pitch black, you're well exhausted. Pretty much anything that breaks up your sedentary cycle every couple/few months is guaranteed to nudge you into a better lifestyle.

Disclaimer: I broke the sedentary cycle some years ago, and do 'difficult' grade hikes with full packs 3-4 times per year. And lost 14 kilos in the process.

Travel (3, Funny)

jabberw0k (62554) | about a year ago | (#44454913)

Visit Montreal or Toronto if you need to reset your Canadian rhythms. Vancouver, even.

Nonsense (2, Funny)

b4upoo (166390) | about a year ago | (#44454917)

Unless you camp like a sissy with lots of fancy equipment nature won't help you a bit in South Florida. First the heat will kill you. The insects will drive you mad as a March hatter. You will be miserable. Snakes, alligators and human psychopaths are more than a tiny issue and to make it worse we have wild boar that will kill you in the blink of an eye. One long weekend in our natural environment and you'll drop on the first air conditioned concrete slab you come to and sleep like a rock. You will feel like a victim of torture and may never be the same again for your entire life. You will most likely gain religion as much of your camping experience will be spent begging Jesus for the misery to let up.

Re:Nonsense (2, Funny)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year ago | (#44454997)

Florida is not fit for human occupation. For one, it is full of Republicans.

Yes. And no (1)

zmooc (33175) | about a year ago | (#44454975)

I used to experience something similar, but basically this boils down to either your tent getting way too hot way too early, simply having nothing to do at night and therefore going to bed early or actually using your body during the day (as opposed to sitting in a chair all day), causing it to actually be tired for a change.

I have recently acquired a new obsession - night photography. Now camping fucks up my circadian clock even more:)

Controls for exhaustion and boredom? (2)

PPalmgren (1009823) | about a year ago | (#44455125)

While I think there's likely some truth in the studies' conclusion, I don't think it controls for the environmental changes and attributes it all to avoiding unnatural light, and I don't think this is necessarily an accurate assessment.

One of the things that happens when you camp and hike is that you eat less and burn more calories. One of the things that keeps us up is our high calorie diets coupled with our sedentary lifestyles, causing our bodies to burn off excess calories through stupid things like nervous twitches. You can see the same circadian fix as the one the study proposes by working out for an hour and a half a day or doing heavy physical labor.

Couple that with how much easier it is to sleep when you're bored, and the fact that there's not much you can do in the woods at night compared to day, and you get a natural gravitation towards sleeping during the dark hours of the day. Hiking may regulate our sleep, but I think there's more factors here at play.

Bored (1)

Bensam123 (1340765) | about a year ago | (#44455327)

This has more to do with people being bored and not having the normal technical gadgets distracting them or keeping them up rather then 'nature doing it's work'. If people are bored or have nothing to do, they'll go to bed at 10 or whatever once all the social interaction dies out. That's really the only thing that happens while camping. You walk around and do stuff during the day, and talk to people at night or simply go to sleep. It's pretty binary.

You could do the same thing simply by going to bed early or turning off your phone or other electronics that keep you up or occupied.

Someone had to pay for this study? (1)

Squidlips (1206004) | about a year ago | (#44455377)

Duh? Isn't this pretty obvious?

So what (3, Funny)

rossdee (243626) | about a year ago | (#44455429)

I work night shift You insensitive clods!

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...