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FBI Pressures Internet Providers To Install Surveillance Software

Soulskill posted about 9 months ago | from the a-piece-of-the-action dept.

Government 225

An anonymous reader sends this quote from an article at CNet: "The U.S. government is quietly pressuring telecommunications providers to install eavesdropping technology deep inside companies' internal networks to facilitate surveillance efforts. FBI officials have been sparring with carriers, a process that has on occasion included threats of contempt of court, in a bid to deploy government-provided software capable of intercepting and analyzing entire communications streams. The FBI's legal position during these discussions is that the software's real-time interception of metadata is authorized under the Patriot Act. Attempts by the FBI to install what it internally refers to as 'port reader' software, which have not been previously disclosed, were described to CNET in interviews over the last few weeks. One former government official said the software used to be known internally as the 'harvesting program.'"

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225 comments

ENOUGH ALREADY! (5, Insightful)

xystren (522982) | about 9 months ago | (#44464809)

Since I have nothing to hide, YOU have no reason to look!

How about we pull a reversal and be permitted to monitor the FBI, NSA and CIA own internal network? All in the name of the constitution to ensure they are not overstepping their mandates and/or boundaries.

I wonder how well that would go over with them?

Incompetence (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44464841)

All this capability and warnings from Russia, and they still could not stop the Boston bombings. They also could not stop the Detroit shoe bomber.

Re:Incompetence (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465079)

They needed the Boston bombing to justify the surveillance. They probably let it happen just like they let happen the 9/11 attacks. The peasant need to be reminded time to time that they should be afraid of the terrorist and that the government is there to protect them.

The only way to win is to not play by their rules. Mock them, laugh at the attack, refuse to condemn violence. Be seditionist, corrupt morals, piss on their gods and tell them to fuck off.

Being compassionate, supportive and patriotic only strengthen them.

Re:Incompetence (1)

anagama (611277) | about 9 months ago | (#44465489)

They needed the Boston bombing to justify the surveillance. They probably let it happen

Never ascribe to malice that which can be ascribed to incompetence ... the quote goes something like that. If it isn't obvious, it should be, that searching all the text messages 3 hops out from the guy who's message read "Dude, this IPA is the BOMB" means that resources are wasted and nobody really has time to focus on the guys the Russians explicitely pointed out.

Re:Incompetence (4, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | about 9 months ago | (#44465289)

Those are not the target of this surveillance. Their target is the people that could throw out them from power: the citizens.

Re:Incompetence (5, Insightful)

amiga3D (567632) | about 9 months ago | (#44465383)

If you look at history the biggest threat to the citizens of a country is always their own government. No one is more likely to enslave or kill you. The founding father's realized this hence the protections built into the Constitution. Unfortunately the population is too easily manipulated into breaking the chains that keep the monster under control.

Re:Incompetence (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465685)

I disagree. I see why it looks likes that, but I think Eddie Izzard had it right instead... madmen who are leaders can kill as many as they want within their borders and no one will really interfere. As soon as they step over the border, other nations intervene.

Re:Incompetence (4, Insightful)

amiga3D (567632) | about 9 months ago | (#44465367)

It's because they look at everything. When you have too broad a search you can't find what you are looking for. The real threats get lost in all the noise.

Re:Incompetence (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465695)

All this capability and warnings from Russia, and they still could not stop the Boston bombings. They also could not stop the Detroit shoe bomber.

That's because their goal is not the protection of the Amercan way of life, but the destruction of the American way of life. The US federal government under Obama is mimicking Soviet Russia because that's what Obama wants. He wants America to grovel before him, begging for bread.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44464865)

Wow! That's the best response I've heard so far in this whole debate. Let us monitor those that monitor us. Great idea! Seriously...this is not sarcasm. And if they try and use encryption to hide what they are doing we pay them a SWAT team visit. ;-)

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (4, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about 9 months ago | (#44464867)

Probably not at all. People by definition assume others are like they are, and when they themselves are crooks and lying bastards who wouldn't allow them to exist if they had a choice, they assume that others are just like that. Combine that with the psychological need to overcompensate and you're set.

That works for governments as well as it does for superiors in the work place. The more he assumes that you're a slacker, the more likely he is one himself. The more he wants to "measure" your progress, the more likely he himself has nothing to show.

And the more a politician goes on about the importance of "family values" and "morals", the more likely he's cheating on his wife with some 12 year old boy.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44464889)

People by definition assume others are like they are

I wasn't aware of that definition of people.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465183)

People = beings that assume others are like they are.

Great, you're now informed.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465109)

Young people assume others are like them. When they become more mature, what people assume depends on their experience, not on what they are.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465257)

Most adults seem just as irrational and petty as children supposedly are, so I doubt that somewhat.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465223)

Guilty until proven innocent. It's the new American way!

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (1)

sphazell (745128) | about 9 months ago | (#44464877)

Since I have nothing to hide, YOU have no reason to look!

How about we pull a reversal and be permitted to monitor the FBI, NSA and CIA own internal network? All in the name of the constitution to ensure they are not overstepping their mandates and/or boundaries.

I wonder how well that would go over with them?

Well said mate wish I had mod points +1 to you.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44464953)

The next waste of tax money is when the gov creates another monitoring group to watch the ones who watches the ones that watches the watchers and discovers that they were watching the watchers so they have to create another group to watch what those watchers are watching.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (5, Interesting)

kheldan (1460303) | about 9 months ago | (#44464965)

The word we're looking for here, I think, is "oversight"
This is still supposed to be government "by the people, for the people" so there should be direct citizen oversight of the NSA, CIA, FBI, military intelligence, and any other alphabet-soup agencies within the government, preferably standing there with a big, heavy hardwood yardstick, ready to smack down hard on the knuckles of anyone of these goddamned spooks getting too nosy into what other honest, hardworking, tax-paying citizens are up to in their normal, everyday, absolutely non-terrorist lives. Of course the problem with that, is that the people involved in the oversight are going to be human beings, full of the same flaws that all other human beings are full of, and that's quite a powerful position to be in. No, I think maybe the best solution here is to have citizen oversight into the complete and total dismantlement of these surveillance networks, and make them go back to the good old days of actually doing "police work" to track down so-called "terrorists" and other wrong-doers, instead of using "protecting America" as an excuse for their blatant spying on everyone. The United States of America is not supposed to be a goddamned prison for it's citizens, where we're under armed guard 24 hours a day/365 days a year by those that are supposed to be serving us, and if these intelligence community jackasses don't like it, then they can all go to hell.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (3, Insightful)

jbolden (176878) | about 9 months ago | (#44465479)

Up until recently the civilian population strongly supported aggressive anti-terrorism efforts. Were their civilian oversight it would have looked like what congressional oversight has. Now the civilian population is more evenly divided, but they still aren't strongly pro-freedom.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465681)

Is the government paying for the extra traffic generated? Or are these cases yet more unfunded mandates? If they pay the line tap fees per connection monitored at the current rates charged by Telcos for phonetaps plus a charge for the additional traffic used, no wait, we have to pay up/down so then they need to as well. Of course we end up with the bill in the end but the dollar figures would make better attention grabbing headlines when the people know a portion of how much their providers are then profiting from the government playing peeking Tom on them while in the end, they get the bill for it.

Remember the rooms with the mirrored traffic going to servers in them from AT&Ts backbone cables that broke into the news a few years back then got cloaked under security mandates? Imagine the bill for that at some providers' data rates.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (1)

interval1066 (668936) | about 9 months ago | (#44465217)

We have a mechanism in place that's supposed to be monitoring these organizations, its called CONGRESS. Of course, its easily distracted.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465297)

The American Experiment In Liberty Has Failed! you KILLED it you lazy bastards , too much America no1. Im okay jack , football and tv rah rah .

Not an American

Re: ENOUGH ALREADY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465311)

Who watches... Downloaded versions of the watchmen? Isn't that really what it's all about

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (3, Funny)

Seumas (6865) | about 9 months ago | (#44465327)

Oh, for fuck's sake. It's not like the entire government is out to get people. It's only the FBI, CIA, NSA, Pentagon, Police/SWAT, and the Executive office.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (1)

b4dc0d3r (1268512) | about 9 months ago | (#44465421)

I wonder how well that would go over with them?

You know the answer to that, and that answer is why you post meaningless rhetoric from the safety of your basement. Set up an ISP, get backbone access through a peering agreement, figure out how to isolate TLA activity, and go do it. Have your door kicked in, your pets killed, and be thrown in jail for massive breaches of wire tapping and whatever other laws they can find to overwhelm your legal team. And rot in jail for forever.

You would be a martyr for the cause, if you believe in it, but you might just affect public sentiment enough to make a small dent. Everything Snowden released so far? Much more sympathy for that guy than you using the tricks of your enemy to defeat them.

Now that you have thought about it some, I'm sure you will agree that you either posted meaningless rhetoric, or a poorly considered action plan. You will go to jail and effect no change whatsoever. If that is your plan, do continue. Otherwise actually think about what you are typing, and fix it before you hit submit.

Re:ENOUGH ALREADY! (0)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 9 months ago | (#44465609)

How about we pull a reversal and be permitted to monitor the FBI, NSA and CIA own internal network?

Considering that Kennedy wanted to do pretty much the same thing (and look where that got him), I have a feeling it's going to be kind of tough to pull off...

I wonder when.. (5, Insightful)

epyT-R (613989) | about 9 months ago | (#44464819)

I wonder when this whole top heavy mess in washington will come crashing down.. They don't need to worry about 'terrorists', foreign or 'home grown'. Their own self destructive behavior will do them all in first...and drag the rest of us citizens down with them.

Re:I wonder when.. (4, Insightful)

geekymachoman (1261484) | about 9 months ago | (#44464875)

What self destruction ? It seems to me 'they' have a plan for a long time now and it's working out quite well, even with negative publicity.

What's gonna change ? The president. .. ? So what ... the president is a spokesman for somebody, and this ain't tin foil shit, it's obvious to everybody but naive.
Especially if you're looking at America from outside.

Re:I wonder when.. (1)

peragrin (659227) | about 9 months ago | (#44465107)

There is no "plan" only greed. once you have the power to do something letting go of that power is the hardest thing to do ever.

That is why George Washington is truly the only great president. After 8 years in office he stepped aside so someone else could take over. No term limit, no force other than his own will to do so.

Now a days we have to force such good behavior on politicians. Look at Spitzer and Wiener. They are the lowest scum of people to their wives, kids, friends. yet they are trying again to run for office. They are only the ones who got caught. There isn't a good politician working for the citizens of their districts to be found in the USA.

Re:I wonder when.. (1)

jbolden (176878) | about 9 months ago | (#44465483)

the president is a spokesman for somebody, and this ain't tin foil shit, it's obvious to everybody but naive.

If it is so obviously maybe you'll name this somebody and give examples of this somebody's policies that contradicted those of the American people and the presidents on the way in.

Re:I wonder when.. (1)

slick7 (1703596) | about 9 months ago | (#44464891)

I wonder when this whole top heavy mess in washington will come crashing down.. They don't need to worry about 'terrorists', foreign or 'home grown'. Their own self destructive behavior will do them all in first...and drag the rest of us citizens down with them.

We have met the enemy and they are us.

Re:I wonder when.. (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about 9 months ago | (#44464905)

Hmm... considering that Bin Laden's goal was (allegedly) the destabilization of the USA along with its bankruptcy... Damn that guy was a strategy genius. And one in psychological warfare, too.

That bastard really accomplished all his goals for this war. He read his enemies like an open book and played them like a violin.

That, ladies and gentlemen, is genius. I don't like him or the development any more than any other sane person, but you have to admire that, whether you like it or not. He knew the weak spot of the US is the combination of greedy leaders and fearful followers, mixed with an industry ready, willing and able to exploit both, and he knew how to use that to his own goals.

Brilliant. But why does brilliance in leaders always come packaged with being a complete asshole?

Re:I wonder when.. (2)

Coditor (2849497) | about 9 months ago | (#44464983)

Plus we still have no actual proof that he was killed. He might have already been dead long ago, or maybe he showed up at his funeral in a wig.

Re:I wonder when.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465057)

Named Phil Shiffley ... lol

Re:I wonder when.. (2)

craigminah (1885846) | about 9 months ago | (#44465211)

Yeah...kind of funny how the "killing of Bin Laden" went down...no proof whatsoever he's actually dead.

Re:I wonder when.. (4, Insightful)

b4dc0d3r (1268512) | about 9 months ago | (#44465559)

God dammit, you retarded sack of monkey shit. If there was any possibility of bin Laden being other than dead, it would destabilize the entire US of A to the point of people actually revolting.

The amount of outrage people felt for him was enough to give up civil liberties continuously for a decade, and feel good about it. If, 20 years from now, bin Laden poked his head out from under a rock and gave an interview, or said a word, or farted, the American people would riot in the streets. The coverage of his killing (alleged, for your sake) was so complete and his death was so final that any variation from the truth would be more outrageous than failure to capture him.

There is only one thing at this time that would unite the American people to overthrow the government, and that is bin Laden being alive. Nothing threatens the life of a soccer mom - financial crises, food chain shortages, coastal real estate being lost - nothing that she would give up the SUV and life of relative luxury, other than bin Laden being alive.

Take every violation of the constitution, put it in one place, and soccer mom says "if it helps keep the terrorists away, I'm all for it." Do you know what the opposite of that is? Literally the one thing that is the complete antithesis to every justification anyone anywhere has put forth for anything done since 2001?

Keeping the terrorists not only the opposite of "away", but alive. Lying about having killed him, and having him turn up somewhere on a video with a newspaper dated today. The SINGLE thing that could turn America into a rioting cesspool of VERY angry people, and you think that somehow the government thought it would be a good idea to lie about THAT?

If he turned up somewhere, it would defeat every justification, every court decision, every individual's belief that the government is doing things for the people. Not just that they lied - that happens all the time and no one bats an eye. But they lied about the number one terrorist in the world - the one person who can scare every average person just by appearing on TV - being killed. Not by some random ass clown in a desert, but by America's most elite using America's latest technology. A fucking stealth-coptor dropped out of the sky and put an end to America's long national nightmare.

And you think not just a few people but every person on record so far would be stupid enough to lie about it? I am all for caution, and have repeatedly posted such. But this is completely, unforgivably ignorant to even mention.

I can go with you on the long thought train to thermite and faked moon landings and the grassy knoll and whatever other lunacy you want to repeat. But this is simply knee-jerk contrarianism.

"What if it were true"? What if 9/11 was an inside job? Patriot act. What if there was more than a lone gunman? Plenty. What if the moon was faked? We beat Russia. What if everything Snowden leaked was true? Assumptions confirmed.

What if bin Laden were alive? What purpose would that serve? A political boost for Obama, to give him an easy ride to a second term? We can eliminate every Republican ever, and every closeted racist as beneficiaries. Who has anything at all to gain? No one has ever justified anything by saying "It helped us get bin Laden". No secret court, spy program, political organization has ever seen benefit. There is nothing to gain, and everything to lose. Americans had forgotten about him nearly completely, and if he disappeared into the sunset few would have noticed other than Bush haters who liked to point out the shift from "number one priority" to "not a priority".

Do you still think it is even a possibility that this did not happen?

Re:I wonder when.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465281)

There is credible evidence he was dying from kidney failure, and was on dialysis in Dubai for most of 2001.

Re:I wonder when.. (1)

jbolden (176878) | about 9 months ago | (#44465499)

The US government, Al Qaeda and the government of Pakistan all confirmed the kill. I'd say that's rather good evidence.

Re:I wonder when.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465065)

HAHAHAHA! I get your sarcasm, right? America is in the state it's in today because:

10% planning, explosions, death during 9/11
20% patriot act
70% American public allowing their government to overstep it's boundries

Osama Bin Laden had nothing to do with the problems that we have today. The American government was behind 9/11, and that's the reason things have kicked off the way they have, and why the words that you said should have truth behind them, but they don't. I know, I know, there's going to be people out there that disagree with the "9/11 was an inside job" idea. At least I'm assuming that there are still folks that think that 9/11 wasn't an inside job, maybe they're starting to wake up and see the light, as the American government keeps overstepping it's boundries. It's just like any other liar, the lies just keep getting thicker and thicker, as the truth tries harder and harder to come out...

Re:I wonder when.. (3, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about 9 months ago | (#44465171)

As much as I'd like to support your conspiracy theory, I think you overstate the ability of the US government.

Re:I wonder when.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465341)

How long was Prism kept secret? You don't think that took thousands of people minimally to accomplish?

Clearly their secret keeping discipline *works*.

Re:I wonder when.. (1)

jbolden (176878) | about 9 months ago | (#44465495)

But why does brilliance in leaders always come packaged with being a complete asshole?

Because talented nice guys often can't get past institutional barriers. Being an asshole is another word for being willing to do what it takes.

Re:I wonder when.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465507)

Question:
Why does brilliance in leaders always come packaged with being a complete asshole?

Answer:
Brilliant people grow up being feared by those who are not as smart as them.

Re:I wonder when.. (1)

istartedi (132515) | about 9 months ago | (#44465517)

I used to say Bin Laden was the mouse that made the Elephants panic and stumble. Damned if he didn't stampede the Donkeys too.

Re:I wonder when.. (1)

craigminah (1885846) | about 9 months ago | (#44465179)

Not when the media ignores the scandals and chicanery that goes on and continues to whistle as they pass the graveyard.

Don't you think it's a little late now? (5, Insightful)

allaunjsilverfox2 (882195) | about 9 months ago | (#44464831)

This has been A LONG time coming. Decades of mission creep, no one complains. But now that it's come back to bite us in the Gluteus maximus, we're all surprised? Personally, I love the idea that it's happening. Sure, I'll probably be one of the ones tortured and jailed for no other reason than "suspicious activity". And I'm not looking forward to that bit at all. But people have been screaming at us that this was going to happen. And no one listened. You reap what you sew, etc. As it was stated in the past, When they start coming for you, it's too late to change things.

Re:Don't you think it's a little late now? (4, Informative)

homey of my owney (975234) | about 9 months ago | (#44464913)

I can't imagine why anyone is so indignant about this now. It has been on-going since 1997 [wikipedia.org]. THAT was the time to be indignant, not 15 years in.

Re:Don't you think it's a little late now? (2)

DrLang21 (900992) | about 9 months ago | (#44464931)

Thank you. I remember wigging out about Carnivore back when it first made it to the press and no one else even cared. Not even the most paranoid of my friends.

Re:Don't you think it's a little late now? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465005)

Earthlink was one of the ISPs that resisted Carnivore. Except for a few of us nerds, most people and the media didn't care about it then. Today, people are shocked and acting like this surveillance thing just started happening. Even the AT&T whistleblower in 2006 has been forgotten.

Re:Don't you think it's a little late now? (5, Insightful)

Rougement (975188) | about 9 months ago | (#44465197)

No, I completely disagree. Snowden provided proof of domestic spying and now the story is blowing up big time and going into all sorts of places. The world is waking up to this, now is the time to be indignant. Just because a few people "knew" 15 years ago, it doesn't mean it's old news for the vast majority of people.

"URLs that can reveal search terms" (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 9 months ago | (#44464833)

Interesting if it is after https goes back to plain text at the server or search engine or search engine proxy service on any .com (US) provider?

The harvest (3, Funny)

puddingebola (2036796) | about 9 months ago | (#44464837)

The "harvesting program" brought in a bumper crop of civil liberties this year.

Re:The harvest (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465461)

What they saw, they will reap.. wait..

Attempts by the FBI to install what it internally refers to as 'port reader' software

My tired eyes read that as 'porn reader.' There must be a reason for that.

List of Those Who Decline - Marketing (5, Informative)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 9 months ago | (#44464845)

Let me know who's declining to install warantless taps and I'll put them on my list of businesses to engage for projects.

For those wondering, Democracy Now carried the Senate hearing a day or two ago with Senator Lahey grilling the Deputy Director of the NSA, who revealed that of all the S.215 intercepts that have happened since 9/11, he could point to only one terrorist plot that maybe (just maybe) would have happened 'but for' the NSA spying. This is the purported benefit of sacrificing the privacy of three hundred million people.

I haven't seen this make the mainstream news yet, at least from the links on the aggregators I read. Oh, but since the spying justification is falling apart, there's going to be a terrorist attack on Sunday. :P

Re:List of Those Who Decline - Marketing (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 9 months ago | (#44464919)

In other words, come Sunday we get the proof that the whole security theater is pointless and we can go back to having a private life?

Re:List of Those Who Decline - Marketing (1)

instagib (879544) | about 9 months ago | (#44464995)

I haven't seen this make the mainstream news yet

Well, the mainstream media won't help with spreading the news on this one. Currently, as you can see, they are busy drumming up the new batch of Al Qaeda warnings, and take care to repeatedly state that it is the NSA saving the world here.

As expected, the two countries deepest into the US' digestive body parts - UK and Ger - already help with the security theatre effort by closing embassies. It all plays out like in a bad spy movie.

UK and Germany (1)

jbolden (176878) | about 9 months ago | (#44465567)

As far as I understand it the European position has always been pro-policing anti-warfare. They aren't being hypocrites they wanted the USA to have a deeper surveillance system and said so openly for many years.

The third what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44464849)

Well... since it's not explicitly a soldier, a federal representation of military enforcement, I GUESS it's okay.

Corporate regime locking in. (2)

boorack (1345877) | about 9 months ago | (#44464851)

With latest revelations going mainstream, we're transitioning from stealth surveillance and oppresive state to overtly oppresive corporate fascist state. How long will it take for government opressions to become mainstream ? US police and security apparatus is already quite oppresive and corrupt (propably the worst in the developed world with the biggest prisoner population in the whole world), yet people tend to ignore this. Opressions from corporate fascist state will become part of everyday life sooner than people expect.

Re:Corporate regime locking in. (2)

vettemph (540399) | about 9 months ago | (#44465153)

Quick, Create a false flag by putting our middle east embassies on high alert. This will quiet most of the resistance!

Time for politicians (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44464859)

to either blow up the patriot act to bits or loose their jobs. Are they for or against the people ? That should be the only matter on the next election agenda.
looks to me like they're against the people they are " supposed " to serve. If that's not true , how is this a democracy ? Or is it just tyranny under the disguise of democracy ? I mean .. i don't know what's less frustrating. Is it knowing you're screwed like in Russia or living with one's pants down pretending we're not getting screwed ?

Re:Time for politicians (2)

PPH (736903) | about 9 months ago | (#44465467)

Time for politicians to either blow up the patriot act to bits or loose their jobs.

A nice thought in theory. But how do you propose organizing support for this initiative. You don't think the NSA is watching for attempts to undermine their operating charter just as earnestly (if not more so) than backpacks and pressure cookers?

Terrorist hate America (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44464925)

Because they hate our freedooms.

Re:Terrorist hate America (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465025)

I see what you did there. Mod up +5, Sarcastic.

This is what we need (1)

Sla$hPot (1189603) | about 9 months ago | (#44464957)

Everybody NOT in the administration ( or familly, friends inkl. freemason lodge bongholes ) must wear a prison tag around the angle (GPS enabled).
All public areas must have surveillance cameras. ( Allready checked )
Cafes, bars and restaurants must be equipped with microphones as well.
The comrades from the administration must be entitled to rape one random citizen every month by choice.

Inevitability (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44464971)

http://wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net/80450F/screencrush.com/files/2012/10/Agent-Smith1.jpg

white collar investigations? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465009)

White collar criminals perpetrate their crimes that's evidenced by their phone calls, emails, spreadsheets, financial transactions, etc. IOW, data. With access to so much data, why isn't law enforcement doing more to investigate white collar crime?

Re:white collar investigations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465131)

[..] why isn't law enforcement doing more to investigate white collar crime?

Please, peasant, go back to your manure and swine. Let the nobles men deal with the investigations and law enforcement.

So tired of hearing Patroit Act (4, Insightful)

Guru80 (1579277) | about 9 months ago | (#44465015)

It's a bogus name given to bogus laws that flies right in the face of everything patriotic. Whenever that damn name is invoked (Patriot Act) it means we are having something taken from us be it rights or privacy.

Re:So tired of hearing Patroit Act (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465095)

Maybe it's an imperative.

"Patriot: Act!"

President McCain strikes again (2)

Kohath (38547) | about 9 months ago | (#44465021)

They told me if I voted for John McCain we would see this kind of escalating government abuse. And they were right! [pjmedia.com]

Re: President McCain strikes again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465395)

you are trying to be funny, but in this entire list of posts I didn't see one person calling for an executive order that could stop this tomorrow, or impeachment of that person. It appears we have to wait for the GOP to have the White House in order to call for holding specific people accountable. Currently its obviously not Obama's fault because the GOP holds the house and is forcing him todo this.

Unfourtanetly until people running this are thrown in jail, it will continue. If you suggest Obama be one to get tossed in jail you are a bigot. Hopefully a white GOP guy will be the next president so people will demand accountability,

I thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465041)

That works for governments as
well as it does for superiors in the work place. i [blogspot.com]

I wish (3, Insightful)

fullback (968784) | about 9 months ago | (#44465067)

I could move to another planet. I don't like this one anymore. It's too polluted with asshole politicians.

If the illusion is real, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465071)

let the good times roll...

Thanks for ruining our lives, Jews... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465111)

Who do you think is behind all of this constant spying on their 'cattle'? Why, it's the Eternal Jew...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asGvjbfIASA

All Your Bases (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465129)

Bow down before me you twerps!
Love,
Lester

We Never Learn (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465139)

People often look back at datelines where fascists thrived (Germany, Cambodia, Spain, etc.) and think, "Wow! How couldthey just sit back and let that happen!"

Well, ladies and gentlemen, this is how.

Re:We Never Learn (1)

instagib (879544) | about 9 months ago | (#44465319)

The populations of your examples were poor, naive, badly educated, living in restricted militarized societies, with very few news sources which were easily manipulated for propaganda purposes.

Compare them to the people of today living in relative luxury, with free speech and history education, thousands of news sources and a dozen media alternatives.

It can't happen again. Or can it?

Re:We Never Learn (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465371)

The history education doesn't probably doesn't do them much good; many things are simply forgotten, or they just spew it all on a test and forget it.

It can happen again if people continue being complacent pieces of trash.

Undernet (4, Interesting)

GrBear (63712) | about 9 months ago | (#44465191)

I wonder how long hacks and other enthusiasts get tired of being monitored up the ass before an alternative Internet gets created. Piggy backed on the Internet, but offering true end to end encryption and complete anonymity. I'm not talking TOR with it's limited exit nodes, I'm talking where every person on the 'network' is an exit node. Visiting a website with say a page of 10 images results in a server log of 11 different IP addresses.

Re:Undernet (1)

jbolden (176878) | about 9 months ago | (#44465649)

Why go to that much trouble? Point to point encryption would already do quite a number on surveillance. Throw in even one layer of anonymizer and the system becomes overwhelmingly complex to monitor. You are already going to see people start walking away from US providers over this.

Only one possibility (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465273)

We all are the enablers, either by us creating cool programs because we saw a use, but could also be miss-used. Or by our votes or by the cash we paid gladly to build the internet.

We paid for the internet they are riding on the backs of, our intentions were good until the complete commercialization of the internet happened which probably started around the AOL time.

I see the only possibility of the implosion of the internet infrastructure by a mass exodus to be the only way that will happen, but don't count on that.
Get rid of your cell, get rid of your computers. Does not mean that they cant monitor you. Start meeting people in public places and enjoy life untethered. If you feel you must code software instead of creating tools that can be misused create educational software that does not need a connection to a server. The internet of thing is bull**** it was envisioned to be a military tool for the government, and it has truly became that.

who the f cares (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465299)

no need to comment on these win-win situation for the bad guys trying to
induce a feeling of fear. only people susceptible are reading this "news" anyways.
the obvious fact is that there exists a "dumb" elite that is interested more in
creating physical buttons they can press to liberate more "feel good" neurotransmitter for themselves,
FRAME people who stand in their way or might even get some money for their publicly
approved work. furthermore mobiles are traceable (how else does one phone know where
to send the signal too) and you cannot spy on the whole internet, else it would require a
second slightly bigger spy internet (that manages the first internet).
if you do any money business on the internet, then all your anonymity is gone anyway.
this is all an escalation. the digital crimes are just gonna get a whole lot more REAL, unless
you're on the right side, whence you will be classified as a "digital soldier" not a "murderer" or killer".
it took a government to come up with the idea to use computers to do actual damage in the physical (unstable atom) world,
not some "criminal" programmer who just sent love letters or re-programmed a few SQL servers.
i hope they will give away some computers to crystal meth addicts, because THAT is prolly the biggest problem in
country with strips and stars as a flag right NOW and the three letter agency that starts with F could do alot
of good spying in the right place then? then again meth addicts don't give a F about computers : )

First they came... (2)

gmuslera (3436) | about 9 months ago | (#44465331)

When the target of snooping were foreing citizens all was OK, no reason to complain. Then they started watching "suspicious people", but it was for national security, just a few, is justified. Now is on everyone, specially US citizens, your time to complain has passed already.

Now wait for the same sequence with drones. Just try to avoid the wrong neighbourhoods [policymic.com]

Been "re-evaluating" SOME of this stuff... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465631)

I have to 'backpeddle' on the NSA @ least in 1 respect I got wind of:

http://it.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=4046997&cid=44465451 [slashdot.org]

(The republicans BLOCKING the cybersecurity bill - stupid, Stupid, STUPID! Even from a businessman's "pov" especially for reasons I noted there for reason of BUSINESS OWN BOTTOM-LINE 'raison d'etre': Profitability: Cyber insurance be damned, especially if the insurer finds out YOU as the business making the claim did NOT fully cover yourself vs. threats completely, opening the doors to liability suits, rightfully so, from customers affected potentially...).

Still against PRISM though - that much I feel is wrong & that its actual efficacy + "ROI" is questionable vs. potential for abuse/misuse.

I.E.-> Yes, I don't like the idea of "Big Brother" anymore than the next guy is why, & the fact some of what they said is "not 100% straight up" (from Clapper/Alexander, but then again, they have their hands tied too on things probably on WHAT can be said). Still - the "roi" on PRISM? Not good enough to 'spy' on US citizens (didn't stop boston bomber for example), & yes, the fact there exists a potential for misuse/abuse by "mortal men" via "absolute power corrupting absolutely",

* So YES - I still am, however, HIGHLY AGAINST the potential for misuse of both PRISM (not so much xKeyScorew anymore though - that's pretty much just a query tool & parser of data IF we've been told the straight up on that much though, per this -> http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/08/01/xkeyscore_leak_challenged/ [theregister.co.uk] )

The cybersecurity bill being blocked though? HEY, not only does it leave the windows open, even when the front doors are triple locked, but it also cuts out jobs for geeks/nerds like us here too (yes, that's right, looking @ ALL sides).

APK

P.S.=> You really, Really, REALLY have to "sift thru" this material, from any/all possible sources in the news (especially since, let's face it, "biased journalism sells more magazines" & those that own said organizations skew/twist things for their OWN agendas @ times too, sometimes QUITE bogusly) to make better determinations of "what's-what" & on what specific grounds/accounts (What I posted above made me do a 180 on that much @ least, & yes, in FAVOR of the NSA/General Alexander, for once, in fact, on the CyberSecurity bill going through @ least)... apk

pressuring telecos providers to install malware. (2)

MobSwatter (2884921) | about 9 months ago | (#44465645)

How long before we end up with someone at the front door in a cheap suit that forces end users to install their malware?

Fuck the FBI (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44465657)

They are NOT in existence to serve the people.

They exist to make sure the corrupt and dishonest
government stays in power.

If you think the FBI is your friend, do some research on
COINTELPRO.

Like I said : FUCK the FBI.

And if you read this, mister feeb, fuck YOU.

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