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Apple Isn't the Next Microsoft (and That's a Good Thing)

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the microsoft-also-not-the-next-apple dept.

Iphone 269

Nerval's Lobster writes "In a new Gizmodo column, Andreas Goeldi calls it the 'frosted glass' effect: when a prominent tech company's latest upgrade to its flagship operating system features frosted-glass highlights as its primary innovation, you know that company is facing a period of severe stagnation. That's what happened to Microsoft around the time of Windows Vista, Goeldi wrote, and Apple's going down the same road with iOS 7. In light of what he views as Apple's sclerosis, it wasn't difficult for him to abandon his iPhone in favor of a Google Android ecosystem. But is Apple really becoming the next Microsoft? In short: no. Apple seems to recognize everything that seemed to elude Microsoft's corporate thinking six years ago: namely, that even the most successful companies need to keep breaking into new categories, and keep innovating, if they want to stay ahead of hungry rivals. Rumors have persisted for quite some time that Apple is prepping big pushes into wearable electronics and televisions, both of which could prove lucrative strategies if executed correctly. Goeldi faults iOS 7 for its frosted-glass effects, which he compares to those of Vista; but similar graphical elements aside, it's unlikely that iOS 7 will run into the same complaints over hardware requirements, compatibility, security, and so much more that greeted Vista upon its release. In fact, iOS 7 isn't even finished."

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269 comments

Gizmodo (2)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490733)

I take it this is all a suck-up smoke and mirrors after that iphone theft debacle?

Re:Gizmodo (5, Insightful)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about a year ago | (#44490853)

Considering the source (Gizmodo) it's not surprising that they think Vista's "frosted glass" effect was its main innovation. Vista had its problems, but many of them were the fault of third party developers who dragged their feet when it came to making their software run properly on Vista. Having used Vista every day for 18 months, it was better than XP. Not as good as Windows 7, but not as bad as most people tried to claim.

Re:Gizmodo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490975)

I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss Gizmodo. Any site which writes so much is bound to write one or two stupid things.

But, on average, their output has been solid for years on end. It's what I use for the stuff Slashdot doesn't cover.

Disclaimer: I own two shares of Gizmodo stock. Other than that, I have no relation to them except as a satisfied customer. I was fucked in the ass by a goat yesterday.

Re:Gizmodo (4, Insightful)

dan828 (753380) | about a year ago | (#44491111)

Oh come one, Gizmodo used to be a nice gadget site, now it's just a hipster blog with tech as one of the themes.

Re:Gizmodo (0)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about a year ago | (#44491069)

3rd Party developers were all to blame? MS created many of the problems themselves; they didn't need help. Many 3rd party developers weren't ready for Vista but they like everyone else didn't think MS would actually release Vista in that level of incompleteness. They thought they had more time. Those developers didn't create the Vista Compatible/Ready fiasco. They didn't make UAC so damn annoying. They didn't cause MS to throw out everything after years of development and start from scratch using a different kernel.

Re:Gizmodo (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491263)

3rd Party developers were all to blame? MS created many of the problems themselves; they didn't need help. Many 3rd party developers weren't ready for Vista but they like everyone else didn't think MS would actually release Vista in that level of incompleteness. They thought they had more time. Those developers didn't create the Vista Compatible/Ready fiasco. They didn't make UAC so damn annoying. They didn't cause MS to throw out everything after years of development and start from scratch using a different kernel.

Actually, Vista was the move where Microsoft stopped trying to support the babies. Many 3rd party apps improperly used API calls, long marked deprecated, long warning against misuse in the documentation, were finally culled and the edge cases nailed down. Throwing tentacles into the registry and tweaking hidden and unsupported things were no longer allowed. Dangerous things like writing directly into system directories now needed UAC. Annoying? Sure, but if the apps weren't trying to (ab)use the system, they wouldn't have needed those escalation prompts in the first place.

Apps and drivers that failed to respect the proper models paid the price. The stuff worked in XP despite itself because no one ever thought Microsoft would break compatibility. Well, when you were getting 0-day exploits popping up every few days, it's time to lock that crap down.

It's just like the move from Windows Me. The environment was so polluted and haphazard it was time to clean house. And, if you recall, there were plenty of whining developers back then, too, as none of their stuff worked in Windows 2000 / XP unless they stopped relying on unsafe, crash-happy tricks.

Re:Gizmodo (5, Insightful)

TemporalBeing (803363) | about a year ago | (#44491775)

3rd Party developers were all to blame?

Primarily yes, though Microsoft didn't help things by changing the driver API between the last RC (RC2) and manufacturer (RTM) releases, thereby breaking most all the drivers that manufacturers had tested.

MS created many of the problems themselves; they didn't need help.

MS propogated a culture of developers using Administrative Rights for nearly every application. It didn't help that many of their own APIs were broken so badly that you had to have those rights to do many things. However, they also warned developer for years that the change was coming, and developers had the opportunity to test on Vista before its release to make sure that wouldn't be an issue - yet most chose to ignore it. Thus the whole UAC debacle which is primarily a 3rd party issue.

Many 3rd party developers weren't ready for Vista but they like everyone else didn't think MS would actually release Vista in that level of incompleteness.

Vista was quite complete when it was released. That was not the issue. Win8 was less polished than Vista upon release (considerably so); but fairing better because it builds off of Vista (as Win7 did).

They thought they had more time.

No. Anyone that tracked the releases - and you didn't have to be in some secret group - knew the release was coming. The betas for Vista were very public and didn't require an MSDN license to obtain either. The only thing that really caught people off guard was the change in the driver APIs that MS did at the last second which only affected those writing device drivers. Those developers didn't create the Vista Compatible/Ready fiasco. They didn't make UAC so damn annoying.

Their failure to modify their applications to not require APIs that needed Admin Rights was what caused the UAC fiasco and made it so damn annoying.

They didn't cause MS to throw out everything after years of development and start from scratch using a different kernel.

You obviously know very little about the Vista codebase and its evolution and history.

Vista is based on the same kernel series as WinXP - the NT Kernel. It was just the next major version (6.0).
Yes, Microsoft had developed a version of Windows that it had scrapped - 3 years before Vista was released - and restarted the development cycle to produce Vista. But that restart was not a wholesale rewrite. It restarted from the WinXP codebase, refactored the APIs for better modularity, and added new features.

The kernel that got scrapped was never released outside of a couple limited distribution alphas and betas. It never really entered the release cycle - other than demos that Microsoft did of WinFS and other stuff. It was too damn slow to be usable.

The main areas of incompatibility between the NT5 (WinXP) and NT6 (Vista/7/8) kernels were that the sound and video drivers were moved from kernel space to user space to help improve stability. Most all other drivers were still compatible or only had minor changes required.

Re: Gizmodo (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491121)

My vanilla install crashed at least daily for about a year. I re-installed the OS several times to no avail. XP, win7, win8 and Linux variants have run and continue to run on the same hardware.
Your post is BS and Vista IS still shit!!
My wife said I never swore as much as when I used Vista.

Re:Gizmodo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491501)

The article is pure puffery. In fact, Apple and Microsoft ARE converging.

Android has 80% of the smartphone market and Apple has 14%, down from 18% last quarter.

Global smartphone shipments grew 47 percent to hit 230 million devices in the second quarter of 2013, according to a new report from research firm Strategy Analytics. And Android captured record market share of 80 percent. Apple iOS reached 14 percent global smartphone share in the quarter.

Microsoft has 4%.

In China, Apple overtaken by Xiaomi in smartphone rankings

And it's only going to get worse for Apple, as the company just announced the Red Rice smartphone, a pretty decently spec'd model priced at a mere 799 yuan ($130). For that pittance, Chinese buyers will get quite a bit: a quad-core MediaTek CPU, 4.7-inch 720p screen (312 ppi) with Gorilla Glass 2, 1GB RAM, 4GB storage, China Mobile's TD-SCDMA 3G, dual-sim / dual standby capability, an 8-megapixel rear camera and Xiaomi's MIUI-flavored Android.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/07/31/xiaomi-unveils-the-red-rice-smartphone/ [engadget.com] [engadget.com] http://www.pcworld.com/article/2046019/in-china-apple-overtaken-by-xiaomi-in-smartphone-rankings.html [pcworld.com] [pcworld.com]

Oddly enough, Slashdot does not consider this to be news.

Re:Gizmodo (3, Interesting)

tverbeek (457094) | about a year ago | (#44491569)

He's mistaking the superficial smoke and mirrors for what is/isn't going on under the hood.

Vista had fresh eye candy, but nuts-and-bolts problems. It sucked.
OS X had fresh eye candy, and a somewhat revolutionary software framework behind it. It rocked.
WinXP had fresh eye candy, and a more solid NT kernel underneath. It rocked gently.

The bottom line is that everything new is going to be loaded with new eye candy, because it can be. If you want to determine whether that eye candy is trying to disguise problems with the underlying system software and company behind it ... you need to look at that underlying system software and the company behind it.

Re:Gizmodo (1)

drsmithy (35869) | about a year ago | (#44490855)

In the grandest /. tradition, I have of course not properly RTFA.

However, if the author thinks the most interesting "innovation" in Vista was "frosted glass", then he has no credibility on the topic whatsoever. Vista was a massive overhaul of Windows, with most of the effort (and changes) spent under the hood.

The irony here is that the author seems to be both criticising eye-candy UI effects, while simultaneously peddling the notion that the "innovation" that matters happens in the UI, rather than in the guts of the OS.

yes, and it's wrong for another reason. (3, Insightful)

mbkennel (97636) | about a year ago | (#44491319)

"Apple seems to recognize everything that seemed to elude Microsoft's corporate thinking six years ago: namely, that even the most successful companies need to keep breaking into new categories, and keep innovating, if they want to stay ahead of hungry rivals."

Microsoft was not unaware of that at all. They tried very hard for a long time, after all Windows Phone was worked on for many years before iPhone.

Microsoft's problem was that they weren't good at it. Vista was another example. The common problem is internal corporate politics, and the key to that problem is at the top.

Re:Gizmodo (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#44491347)

well that's what the users see.. who the fuck cares if win8 has better internals than 7, if the face of win8 is metro.

however the author is stupid. there's obvious reason for apple to move to flat design and the obvious reason is that jonyyyyyyyyy got tired of approving 10 life imitating pictures for different screen sizes of a calendar background image. yes folks, that's the real reason for apple to go flat: they got so many different ios device resolutions that they got tired of the shit of photoshopping buttons and backgrounds for all of them.

(I use 8 because I have to, alternative would be to run 8 in a vm and since 8 can be made to run mostly like 7 I don't really care, and no I don't want to run occasional visual studio and games in a vm)

Re:Gizmodo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490903)

Suck up to who?
Not to apple.

Re:Gizmodo (1, Troll)

dan828 (753380) | about a year ago | (#44491137)

Please. Giz has been sucking up to Apple since the whole iPhone thing, hoping to make it back into their good graces. They come off as blatant fanboys any more.

Re:Gizmodo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491607)

Maybe if you RTFA you'd see that the stupid Gizmodo article is trashing Apple, not sucking up to them.

Re:Gizmodo (1)

dan828 (753380) | about a year ago | (#44491673)

RTFA? Are you new here?

Re:Gizmodo (2)

orthancstone (665890) | about a year ago | (#44490911)

I take it this is all a suck-up smoke and mirrors after that iphone theft debacle?

You give them way too much credit. No way that much forethought was put into this article.

Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (4, Insightful)

schlachter (862210) | about a year ago | (#44490735)

It was easy for Apple to innovate a few years ago because they had no momentum in the space. They were agile and free to create. It's much harder to do that when you have a huge codebase that's a decade old, with hundreds of millions of users who have expectations of your product.

Nonetheless, I can't help but think if Jobs was still around, there would be more exciting stuff in the pipeline.

Re:Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (2)

MLRScaevola (1984056) | about a year ago | (#44490831)

Jobs died almost two years ago (wow, that long already). Most likely, he at least gave some pipeline ideas to Cook and co. which are being worked on now. I figure that Apple still has maybe three more years of Jobs' 'ideas from the grave' left before we really get to see if they can keep doing interesting things. They've probably had to wrangle with this for a while now, and I can't help but think that the solution to their problems is just to find someone capable of projecting a new Reality Distortion Field.

Re:Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490845)

Well, yes and no.

People were pretty hung up about their physical keyboards. Apple had some convincing to do in the on-screen keyboard space. they overcame that.

At first there was no app-store and no 3rd party apps breaking form the norm of every other device. the web app model was a joke. Eventually the prevailing attitude broke them and now they have made billions by succumbing to the existing inertia.

Re:Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (4, Interesting)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#44490909)

Yes, but this is a corporate management problem, not a technical one. Go read the sad history of Xerox where, at one point, they needed the signatures of 47 managers to make a change to a copier, as hungrier companies cranked out modern innovations.

Re:Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490941)

You mean Jobs is the one that spends all of his time looking at what other companies are making, stealing blue-prints, and pretending everything Apple copy didn't exist elsewhere long before and was invented in 1 Infinite Loop?

Apple's new products are going to be a TV and a watch. iPhones are already looked very dated, and Macs are following PCs down the slippery slope of what people have is good enough, even though Apple kill a generation with each OS upgrade. Tablets aren't in vogue any more, people rarely upgrade whatever platform they choose. The masses have grown past the novelty, at least the middle classes have. The poor will still enjoy them for a few months at some point, but they can't afford $500 toys.

We already have smart watches, and TVs have long has SoC that allow app stores and comprehensive media support. Of course, Apple's will have a premium price and the fans will lap them up, but that won't scale. TVs are already at the bottom of the mass market, and few people bother with watches that aren't bald or with grey hair. Apple's screens are also made by others, mostly Samsung, so why not just by a Sammy?

Apple's stock is falling month upon month. They have a huge cash pile, but unless they buy something substantial, they'll slip away, again.

Re:Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (2)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about a year ago | (#44490963)

Please. Vista bumbled badly based on what MS did. Let's take compatibility: at the last minute, they reversed course on hardware requirement so that Vista Basic could be released and, of course, didn't take the effort clearly explain to consumers that Vista Basic was barely Vista. UAC needed many more refinements. But like all things MS they released it anyway and worried about SP1 later. They've done that with all their releases before but time the incompleteness was obvious to consumers. They didn't learn that lesson with Win 8. Some here question the whole strategy of shoehorning a tablet UI onto a desktop but 8 is almost bipolar in its approach. Some things are tablet; some things are still desktop. And there isn't a reason why. 8.1 is supposedly the savior but I don't see it.

Re:Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (5, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44491035)

Nonetheless, I can't help but think if Jobs was still around, there would be more exciting stuff in the pipeline.

Perhaps... but equally likely, there would be some regular stuff in the pipeline that seemed exciting, because Jobs was hands-down one of the best marketers to ever walk the face of the Earth.

I'll leave it to the reader to decide whether that's a compliment or insult.

Re:Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (1, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | about a year ago | (#44491417)

There is NO WAY Apple doesn't have something much more innovative than the iPhone 5s in the pipeline. I say this not as a fan of Apple, but simply because Tim Cook has $145,000,000,000 (yes, billions) burning a hole in his pocket, with nothing more to do than prove to the world that he's just as wonderful as Steve was. Worst case, Apple bleeds cash throwing one desparate hail mary after another, but there is no way they will just fall on the ball.

Re:Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (2)

Maury Markowitz (452832) | about a year ago | (#44491045)

> It's much harder to do that when you have a huge codebase that's a decade old

Very much agreed. But it's not just Apple, it's the entire category.

The iPhone was the big bang of smartphones. Everything after that was, to a great degree, an iPhone.

There has certainly been some innovation in this space since. Apple's introduced retina, siri, passbook. Google's got Now, which is really under-utilized so far I think, and will likely become dramatically more important in the future IMHO. We have always-on from Moto, Nokia's cameras, Sony's waterproofing, etc. All of these are real advances.

But the problem is that each of these is "here or there". As such, they represent only minor incremental improvements (with the exception of Now and Siri perhaps) that are being applied to only one or another platform. These are, sadly, features, not paradigms.

Re:Shifting paradigms is easy with no momentum (2)

timeOday (582209) | about a year ago | (#44491355)

You say that as if momentum were bad! Compare [businessinsider.com] . Microsoft has been raking in at least a billion in profit per year, year, for 15 years. Apple, meanwhile, for about last 5. Do you see any of Apple's current products that wedged so deep into every business process out there that they will almost surely still be profiting $1BN / year a decade from now, as Microsoft has ALREADY done? I don't. Apple is never more than about 2 bum product releases away from losing money. Microsoft has already done that many times over :)

Apple is overrated (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490739)

Apple is totally overrated. I bought an MBP 2010 for the reason to leave the Desktop Linux (and the crap called GNOME). Sadly OSX sucked even more. After 4 months I placed the MBP back into its box and never touched it again since then. Now running a Lenovo notebook with the even worser crap called GNOME 3 and it's bloatsucking Shell. The only thing I like about Apple is the iPhone. Sadly the start to cripple that place off as well with iOS 7.

Re:Apple is overrated (1)

Chompjil (2746865) | about a year ago | (#44490763)

Try MATE or Xfce

Re:Apple is overrated (1)

Bradmont (513167) | about a year ago | (#44490777)

Try KDE? Or LXDE? Or E17? Or OpenBox? Or xmonad? Or the command line? Or any of the myriad other UI options you have available to you in any Linux distribution?

Re:Apple is overrated (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490873)

My reply wasn't about Linux or switching to another DE. It was about Apple being totally overrated. My intention was to say this "Apple sucks with OSX as much as any other Desktop System" AND "iOS 6.x used to be good and now the new upcoming iOS7 sucks because the same idiocracy that cripple GNOME starts to cripple iOS7 as well". Sure not all about iOS7 sucks but re-designing it sucks,

Re:Apple is overrated (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490823)

So why has my comment been modded down ? Just because someone can't stand the fact that someone else has his own opinion ? About iOS7 have you followed the recent conversations about how badly iOS7 sucks on one of germanies bigges IOS news pages ? You should go there and read about all the issues covered about iOS7. So saying, that iOS7 start to suck isn't all about my very own opition. It's being shared by many others as well.

http://www.iphone-ticker.de/

Re:Apple is overrated (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490877)

It's because you complained about Gnome 3 without apparently having tried any of the bazillion other choices.

Re:Apple is overrated (2)

tsa (15680) | about a year ago | (#44491055)

And because you call iOS7 crippleware even before it's out.

Re:Apple is overrated (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491455)

Yeah, if you're going to review a restaurant, your opinion will have no value unless you try out every other restaurant on Earth before writing your review.
Wait...

Of course they aren't... (5, Funny)

Zalbik (308903) | about a year ago | (#44490745)

Of course Apple isn't the next Microsoft

Microsoft used shady business practices to destroy competitors and thereby screw the customer.

Apple cuts out the middle-man, and just screws the customer directly.

Re:Of course they aren't... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490843)

So you're saying Google is the next Microsoft?

Re:Of course they aren't... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491063)

No google is the next NSA or maybe the previous NSA. I'm a little confused on the timing.

Re:Of course they aren't... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491211)

Of course apple isn't the next Microsoft that job is reserved for google.

Agree. Apple isn't the Next Microsoft... (5, Insightful)

faragon (789704) | about a year ago | (#44490749)

... Apple is the Next Apple without Steve Jobs, again.

Re:Agree. Apple isn't the Next Microsoft... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490879)

Agree. Apple isn't the Next Microsoft... (Score:1)
by faragon (789704) Alter Relationship on 2013-08-06 15:41 (#44490749) Homepage
... Apple is the Next Apple without Steve Jobs, again.

I'm pretty sure NeXT [wikipedia.org] was Steve Jobs without Apple.

apple profits from every product, MS doesn't (4, Informative)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#44490751)

MS has lost billions of $$$ on bing, x-box and other experiments funded by Windows and Office license sales which are now slowing and decreasing. microsoft has been innovating for years but not profitably. they had commercial tablets before apple, mobile devices and cloud services long before cloud became a buzz word.

apple on the other hand has a rule that every product must be profitable. even the apple tv turns a small profit.

Re:apple profits from every product, MS doesn't (5, Insightful)

asmkm22 (1902712) | about a year ago | (#44490907)

This is a good point. People are quick to confuse Apple with a company that actually innovates and pushes boundaries and stuff, when in fact, they just release highly-polished (and sometimes very well-timed) products that are often 5 or 10 years old.

Re:apple profits from every product, MS doesn't (2)

StripedCow (776465) | about a year ago | (#44491015)

Spot on. Much of the research is open too. Have a look at http://research.microsoft.com/ [microsoft.com]
Then point me the equivalent of Apple.

Apple research much more public; usable (1, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#44491295)

Webkit
BSD Unix
Grand Central Dispatch
Darwin
Clang/LLVM
And many more.

You can SEE what Microsoft is researching.

You can USE what Apple is researching.

How much of Microsoft's research makes it to the real world? Where is WinFS? Microsoft research is a golden tower into which Microsoft locks smart people so other companies cannot use them, and produces almost nothing of tangible benefit to the world.

Re:apple profits from every product, MS doesn't (2)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about a year ago | (#44491231)

Well, most people associate innovation==something brand new when innovation can be improving on something existing. Apple's strength has been to bring hard to use technology to consumers. Case in point: OS X is a Unix core with a consumer GUI on top.

MP3 players existed before the iPod and they simply were hard to use for most consumers. I think the four things that Apple did right was:

  1. Treat media as media and not merely files. Media that has metadata like Title, date, album, genre, etc.
  2. Reduce syncing to one step
  3. Scroll wheel
  4. Bundle player with software that can make and manage MP3s. With my other player, I had to find and use 4 different programs to accomplish the same thing.

Re:apple profits from every product, MS doesn't (5, Insightful)

tlhIngan (30335) | about a year ago | (#44491293)

This is a good point. People are quick to confuse Apple with a company that actually innovates and pushes boundaries and stuff, when in fact, they just release highly-polished (and sometimes very well-timed) products that are often 5 or 10 years old.

Correct. But that discounts the importance of polish and timing.

Polish is very important - a technical feature is completely pointless if people don't use it, can't use it, or are unable to figure it out.

Timing is important in business because, as Apple will see this year, people get bored. Releasing product all at once in the fall seems like a great idea but damn the other 3 quarters where everyone bitches about "not innovating".

The iPod is an example of both - polish in that it was a player with tons of storage, in a formfactor that was convenient for a lot of people. At a time when MP3 players were JUST taking off, Apple produces something that has a slick UI (the wheel makes navigating through huge lists quickly), slick syncing (firewire, when most computers sported USB1.1) and iTunes (making it stupidly easy to manipulate your music library and convert your CDs to MP3s). A couple of years later they tossed in the iTunes store, bringing the music industry into the 21st century, kicking and screaming.

The iPhone brought polish to smartphones. In the name of Mobile Safari. Because until then, most mobile browsers were crap (I had one with Opera Mobile - the better ones, but it was slow and was showing its age).

The iPad brought polish to tablets - because instead of crappy lets-run-Windows, it ran iOS which was more adapted to touchscreens than even OS X is. Sure you could run OS X on a tablet, but the experience was mediocre at best - GUI concepts and designs for mouse and keyboard just don't translate well to pen and touches.

Hell, the iPhone wasn't considered revolutionary - Apple hoped it would maybe get 1% of the market, or 1 million phones. (It took 77 days to hit 1 million). Of course, the 3G sold 1 million opening weekend, despite well know problems.

The iPad was universally panned - it was so bad, Jobs even said they'd cut the price if it didn't sell well.

And the iPod, well. The millionth iPod sold in 2003, and by then it was the 3rd gen iPod with dock connector.

Don't discount polish. When people say things look "inconsistent" or "work poorly", it doesn't matter how big the numbers are on the spec sheet - the user ends up forgoing those features. Open source is primarily bad at this (often because non-programmers are discounted - this includes technical writers, designers, and testers - yes, it's your itch, but when users complain something works badly and could be better, perhaps it could go from "your itch" to "everyone's itch" and not "try this alternative").

Re:apple profits from every product, MS doesn't (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491387)

More innovative than anyone else in their class. I know it would burn your ass to admit it but Apple is the best game in town when it comes down to accessible technology that just works from a reputable vendor. I was an Apple hater until about a year ago and my frustrations with getting things to work right have gone by the wayside since I gave them an honest go.

The Apple TV turns a big profit (2)

mveloso (325617) | about a year ago | (#44491003)

Actually, the Apple TV turns a huge profit.

On 5/28/13 there were 13 million Apple TVs sold, at about $100 each. That's $1.3 billion of revenue. I'm being conservative and assuming those numbers don't include the Apple TV 1.

Given an ultra-low margin of 25%, that means Apple conservatively has made $325 million off of the ATV. And Apple's margins have historically been more than 25%.

Re:The Apple TV turns a big profit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491273)

And that doesn't count the video sales/rentals from the ATV.

Re:apple profits from every product, MS doesn't (4, Insightful)

CAIMLAS (41445) | about a year ago | (#44491057)

The problem Microsoft has is that they stopped being a company that has innovative products a long time ago - arguably they never started, because their 'traditional' linear products (OS, Office) had too much momentum.

Look at Microsoft Research, for instance. The one notable product to come out of that is the Kinect and related technologies. We've seen MS ads now for years for something similar to SketchInsight, which looks incredible - but no working POC for anyone to ogle or demo. This would be a Killer App in a heartbeat for pretty much everyone I know - and the missing link that MS has so much needed for Windows 'tablets' for the past decade.

Then you've got things like their AI and machine learning research, as well as OS research projects. Those show promise, but don't see much light in marketable products. Imagine what MS could've done with "Windows Mobile/Phone" had they not focused on changing UI paradigms against peoples' will?

The biggest thing MS has going for them at this point is their vendor lock-in, and it's much worse than we feared it could be back in the 1990s. "Cloud services" were so far in the future they weren't really conceived. Today, we've got everything in the MS stack integrating tightly with Office 365 - and Exchange is most certainly the worst offender in this regard, with much of the traditional functionality available in 2003 and 2008, and fixed greatly in 2008, gone again for O365 integration. If you're a MS shop, you're more or less stuck, and options for migrating that data off their platforms diminishes as time goes on simply by the motion of the machine - regardless of any actual, needed features present in the upgraded products. (When was the last time you've heard of someone upgrading MS products for anything other than 'compatibility with everyone else, and bug/security fixes'?

Re:apple profits from every product, MS doesn't (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | about a year ago | (#44491173)

MS has lost billions of $$$ on bing, x-box and other experiments funded by Windows and Office license sales which are now slowing and decreasing. microsoft has been innovating for years but not profitably.

Yet another search engine and yet another game console don't really count as major innovations. Also, consider this. [knowyourmeme.com]

they had commercial tablets before apple

Apple launched the Newton MessagePad in 1993.

Re:apple profits from every product, MS doesn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491307)

MS has lost billions of $$$ on bing, x-box and other experiments funded by Windows and Office license sales which are now slowing and decreasing. microsoft has been innovating for years but not profitably. they had commercial tablets before apple, mobile devices and cloud services long before cloud became a buzz word.

apple on the other hand has a rule that every product must be profitable. even the apple tv turns a small profit.

If Microsoft really focused on their core instead of trying to wedge itself into every other market tangentially related to technology, they could really do some great things.

Nope, it is the other way around though. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490755)

Microsoft are becoming the next Apple. Terrible sales on expensive devices and services.

To the fuuutu-ah!
Nice knowing you Microsoft.

as far as beverage containers go... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490757)

I prefer a frosty mug

these are symptoms, also frost pist (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year ago | (#44490765)

The cause is beret-wearing UX asshats. They never knew that the GUI was invented as a functional tool because it was discovered that command lines are a fucking mystery to most people.

Because they don't know what a GUI is actually for, and because they grew up with ones that did the job competently even if they weren't works of art, they focus on making it pretty or kewl or whatever and forget to make it usable.

Re:these are symptoms, also frost pist (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about a year ago | (#44490957)

As a 3D Graphics, UI, and UX expert I 100% agree!

The majority of UX (sic.) people don't understand BOTH the pros & cons to GUI compared to the Command Line. They both have DIFFERENT strengths and weaknesses that _complement_ one another.

Voice is a crappy UI because it has the same problem as the command line: It is an *invisible* interface. You don't know what your choices are until AFTER you are familiar with the system. On the command line we have tools like tab-completion and 'man' to help the beginner. The garbage OSes don't provide examples; the better ones like BSD *do* provide examples. Command line interfaces trade "easy-learning-curve" for "efficiency". We don't kvitch about their design because they were designed for *different* purposes.

The GUI is very good for beginners because they can literally see (all) of their choices but for the power user it is slow. Things like hot keys / shortcuts (which seem to be almost extinct these days in the _help_ file) empower the power user so they can actually focus on functionality.

iOS 7 is a HORRIBLE design because it fails THE fundamental goal of *good* UI.

Good UIs maximize the Signal-Noise ratio.
Poor UIs minimize the signal and maximize the noise.

Desaturating the icons it makes it harder for someone to focus on the signal -- everything is one big noise. FAIL. Good UI designers use silhouette, color, contrast to ALL AUGMENT one another.

Microsoft has *never* understand good UI -- especially with the idiotic "one Tablet size fits all" -- uh, NO. When the finally (re)move the stupid Close button away from the Minimize / Maximize buttons then _maybe_ they will start to understand. One of the few things Microsoft hasn't fucked up is Office on OS X. I get *both* the Menu bar AND the ribbon bar. As a user it empowers me as I can chose which form of interaction works efficiently for me.

A *great* UI focuses on BOTH beginners AND power users. Sadly UX don't have a clue. They focus on Form over Function instead when it should be Form Augments Function.

Don't get me started on how the majority of UX completely fail to understand the importance of 60 Hz vs 30 Hz.

Re:these are symptoms, also frost pist (2)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year ago | (#44491531)

The majority of UX (sic.) people don't understand BOTH the pros & cons to GUI compared to the Command Line. They both have DIFFERENT strengths and weaknesses that _complement_ one another.

Why is that comment in a thread about mobile phone interfaces? CLI is not a reasonable interface on a phone with no hardware qwerty keyboard. Not even as a complement. As a niche legacy app for people that want to telnet onto some nix machine, UI. But it doesn't and shouldn't have any relevance to the UI of the phone itself.

It does though tip me off that the nature of your UI taste is classic unix. And makes your opinion on phone UIs not particularly worthwhile.

Desaturating the icons it makes it harder for someone to focus on the signal -- everything is one big noise. FAIL.

Is about as useful as someone saying "3x3 pixel font? FAIL". As you showed yourself recently, it all depends on context. And "FAIL" is the mark of an ill-thought out comment.

Comes to show to trust NO ONE (5, Interesting)

Billly Gates (198444) | about a year ago | (#44490781)

There was a time back in 1999 in the good old days of slashdot and IT where I had a debate with someone over how evil MS and Bill Gates were.

Back then MS was unstoppable! If investors found out MS was going to compete agaisnt you then your stock would be shorted as no one could stop the all powerful Microsoft!

I mentioned if Steve Jobs won the world would be heaven. No more expensive crap. Free standards galore. No more DRM with .WMV and IE 5.5 dictating the future of computing. Apple was cheered as the good guys trying to stop the DRM madness of RealPlayer and Windows Media Player. Remember?Fastforward today and I think Steve Jobs is fucking a more greedy monster than Bill Gates ever was. True their products are better quality and more UI and consumer data is put into products before being released, but man they charge and lock you in.

What Changed?
Itunes gave Apple a financial incentive for DRM and lock in. Apple monopolized the mp3 market and almost the phone before Android did a quick rescue. Their Macs are falling behind as more effort is on consumer gadgets these days.

Would I want a Google only world? Fuck no equally

Chrome's webkit is not W3C compliant compared to IE and Firefox with its extensions and some sites that only work with Chrome when you turn on HTML 5. If they owned 93% of the market ala IE 6 from 2003, you can bet javascript would go bye bye for whateverthefuck script that they invented, sites would not render properly if you used advanced features, and Google would ignore W3C and put Google Store as the master of the e-commerce universe!

I would not want just Android phones either streaming ads from Google servers 100% of the time, nor would shop owners want to pay 300% more for ad revenue as they would ahve a monopoly on this.

Business and greed is evil. We are all greedy and evil ourselves with a shade of gray. It is our human nature sadly. Competition frees us, though I do have to say I am disappointed in all web browsers recently and kind of miss Firefox when is owned just 15% of the market but maybe that is because IE sucked so bad then it seemed like heaven?

Re:Comes to show to trust NO ONE (5, Informative)

rolfwind (528248) | about a year ago | (#44490887)

Itunes gave Apple a financial incentive for DRM and lock in.

Um what, they pushed to get music publisher's to sell tracks without DRM. As for video, where can you get video without DRM? Netflix? Amazon? Huh?

Re:Comes to show to trust NO ONE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491077)

What Changed?
Apple monopolized the mp3 market and almost the phone before Android did a quick rescue.

Apple was late to both of those games and did some serious trouncing in both, to their credit. Where they have gone with that is another story.

Re:Comes to show to trust NO ONE (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | about a year ago | (#44491227)

To be fair, they sell non-DRM'ed music now.

Re:Comes to show to trust NO ONE (5, Informative)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year ago | (#44491469)

I mentioned if Steve Jobs won the world would be heaven. No more expensive crap. Free standards galore. No more DRM with .WMV and IE 5.5 dictating the future of computing

I have no idea why you thought that. Remember Steve Jobs was the same one who ripped off Woz back in the day. He sued for UI lookalike rights. He got in a fight with the FSF over gcc. If you thought Jobs would be all roses and heaven it's because you weren't paying attention.

Re:Comes to show to trust NO ONE (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | about a year ago | (#44491579)

Compared to old Microsoft he surely was a godsend at least in user quality and we were excited about having a unix that worked on the desktop that was fucking gorgeous for its time.

My point is you can't trust them once they are in absolute power. My views of MS warmed up after Windows 7, Office 2010, and IE 9 a few years ago as I saw them as their best products in a long time. ... then came Windows 8 :-(

But because they are no longer a gorilla in the room it is not as threatening as consumers have choice now. Apple is not cool anymore here on slashdot like they were 10 years ago.

Re:Comes to show to trust NO ONE (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491533)

Itunes gave Apple a financial incentive for DRM and lock in. Apple monopolized the mp3 market ...

http://www.apple.com/ca/hotnews/thoughtsonmusic/ [apple.com]

Re:Comes to show to trust NO ONE (1)

tooslickvan (1061814) | about a year ago | (#44491653)

I think the reality distortion field must have hit you pretty hard. Apple has been accused of producing expensive crap ever since the Lisa and Macintosh were sold. Apple has never been a big proponent of free or open standards; they have been using propriety standards for Macs, iPods, and iPhones since their creations. While Steve Jobs did write the open letter for the music industry to stop requiring DRM, he was also criticized for doing nothing for movies (especially since he owned Pixar at the time).

Let's innovate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490785)

Apple is the next Microsoft. It's successfully fooled the tech media into watching the pretty colors and repeating buzz words. Microsoft enslaved a bunch of Mexicans for their products, Apple enslaved some Chinese. Microsoft figures UI design is the only thing people care about anymore, so that's the only thing that changes between OS releases -- ditto for Apple. Vendor lock-in? Check. Inability to come up with an original idea after chasing their key talent away with bureaucracy and pointless office infighting? Check. Desperate attempts to expand into new sectors because people got tired of their lack of improvement in key areas? Check.

Soon Apple will buy a tech company and then you'll see the truth: there hasn't been a distinction all along. The only difference between Bill Gates and Steve Jobs is that one of them is dead.

Apple's new CEO still needs to prove himself (-1, Flamebait)

rolfwind (528248) | about a year ago | (#44490789)

And after 2 years, he still hasn't. We keep hearing hype, but where's the proof? Apple should be in front of the next revolution (dismembering STBs and their fees) but no, that looks to be Roku because Apple's longstanding effort (Apple TV) is and continues to be half-hearted. This guy seems to be by the numbers type of guy, an accountant, and no Jobs. Jobs was an asshole, but he was an asshole that got things done. We already seen Apple without a ruthless asshole in the past and it's not pretty.

So don't tell me what Apple knows better, what is it doing better? Microsoft has the entrenchment of apps to rely on, Apple not so much.

Re:Apple's new CEO still needs to prove himself (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | about a year ago | (#44490861)

And after 2 years, he still hasn't. We keep hearing hype, but where's the proof? Apple should be in front of the next revolution (dismembering STBs and their fees) but no, that looks to be Roku because Apple's longstanding effort (Apple TV) is and continues to be half-hearted. This guy seems to be by the numbers type of guy, an accountant, and no Jobs. Jobs was an asshole, but he was an asshole that got things done. We already seen Apple without a ruthless asshole in the past and it's not pretty.

So don't tell me what Apple knows better, what is it doing better? Microsoft has the entrenchment of apps to rely on, Apple not so much.

He hasn't. It has been 2 years now and the only thing he has done was get rid of graphics to aplease the anti-skuemorphism crowd with a METRO clone of flat, colorless, no shininess, tile like icons for IOS 7 with cheap plastic phones knockoffs of their original. [neowin.net]

Re:Apple's new CEO still needs to prove himself (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year ago | (#44491593)

It has been 2 years now and the only thing he has done was get rid of graphics to aplease the anti-skuemorphism crowd with a METRO clone of flat, colorless, no shininess, tile like icons for IOS 7

iOS 7 isn't flat. It's just got rid of 3D effects hardcoded into bitmaps. (Shadows and highlights). It's 3D is truer now, making greater and more logical use of layered OpenGL textures.

cheap plastic phones knockoffs of their original.

Presumably you are just as convinced that the sweater in that photo is made by Nike.

You have got to be kidding (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#44491363)

And after 2 years, he still hasn't.

Apple has not released an unsuccessful product yet, and Cook oversaw much of the last few. The last quarter saw a large growth in iPhone sales despite no new models at all, totally eating the lunch of every Android based competitor.

Coming up is the release of iOS7 which has drained away design talent from working on other platforms, and a fantastic reboot of the Mac Pro which looks like a really great system that lots of people will buy.

Cook has done far better than I ever thought anyone could after Jobs, Apple is not slowing down at all.

Apple has to much lock down / lock in and that bad (-1, Flamebait)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#44490805)

IOS app store has to much censorship and it's not easy like android to side load.

Also the apple laptops and desktops have gone to far on the thin side.

Also the new mac pro with no BUILD IN HDD's for an pro media workstation? apple flash price is like $700.00 for an upgrade to 768GB.

One Thing (1)

Chompjil (2746865) | about a year ago | (#44490813)

Apple is lacking jobs

question (-1, Flamebait)

asmkm22 (1902712) | about a year ago | (#44490815)

What exactly is Apple doing for any industry right now, aside form suing other companies? I remember when Jobs died, or maybe it was right before, Apple basically said he had left them with 3 to 5 years of new products in the pipeline. So far we've seen pretty much nothing, so what exactly are they doing?

Apple seems to be acting quite a bit like Microsoft, in that respect.

Re:question (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year ago | (#44491651)

I remember when Jobs died, or maybe it was right before, Apple basically said he had left them with 3 to 5 years of new products in the pipeline.

I think that was just the opinion of bloggers. Might be right or wrong, but I don't think it's anything Apple said.

The common expectation of new product categories from Apple every year or two is ridiculous and doesn't reflect the historical record. Significantly different devices within categories, sure. And we've had those - the iPad Mini and the new Mac Pro.

New Categories? (1)

VGPowerlord (621254) | about a year ago | (#44490837)

It's not that Microsoft didn't break into new categories, it's just that they were bad at it or the categories they chose sucked.

See Also: Microsoft Tablet PCs [wikipedia.org] AKA "Pen-based computing" circa 2001.

They've had a bit more luck with their Xbox division, although one could argue that video game consoles wasn't exactly a new field when they joined it. They still managed to steal Sega's spot in the market and push their way to number two for a few years... and number one in the North America and European markets for some of that time as I recall.

Of course, we all know that they already messed up the launch of their next console. It's pathetic when you can make a defective company like Sony look good.

Re:New Categories? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about a year ago | (#44491377)

I think one of MS problems was everything had to be "Windows". For tablets, all they did was put a touchscreen on a laptop and called it done. They never really thought that touch technology might need a different approach. Same thing with WinMobile which they made the UI just like Windows even though it didn't need to be. Now everything has to Windows but everything has to be touch oriented instead of desktop UI for desktops etc.

Too successful (1)

hxnwix (652290) | about a year ago | (#44490839)

iOS has become too mainstream. The masses like it. This can't be tolerated! So, how can this be rectified?

Make it look more like windows phone metro crud. Then, only the fanboys will like it.

TFA is wrong because: rumors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44490865)

Essentially Apple won't be the next MS because of rumored innovations in "new" categories that Google is already releasing products for? Lets wait and see how that works out for them.

Furthermore, arguing that they aren't stagnating because their next iteration of iOS won't "run into the same complaints over hardware requirements, compatibility, security" is missing the point. iOS7 being more well accepted than Vista != innovation. New features with more breadth and depth than UI overhauls = innovation.

Too (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#44490875)

> "Apple is prepping big pushes into wearable electronics and televisions, both of
> which could prove lucrative strategies if executed correctly."

AKA a Microsoft-like "Mee Toooo!", but of Google.

Re:Too (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44491185)

> "Apple is prepping big pushes into wearable electronics and televisions, both of
> which could prove lucrative strategies if executed correctly."

AKA a Microsoft-like "Mee Toooo!", but of Google.

Google did not invent wearable electronics. [wikipedia.org]

They're a "Me Too-er" as well.

Cable card / Tru2way failing likey killed the TV (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#44490881)

Cable card does work for some others it's an big mess to get the cable to make it work and it's people who know what they are doing run into the people at the cable co who have little to no clue at times on cable card that need to do there part to make it work. The cable card mess is very un apple.

As well the new Xbox idea use there box likely with IR blasters and you still have deal with cable CO UI.

Breaking into new categories (0)

mvar (1386987) | about a year ago | (#44490893)

Apple seems to recognize everything that seemed to elude Microsoft's corporate thinking six years ago: namely, that even the most successful companies need to keep breaking into new categories, and keep innovating

So how is MS not doing this? Surface, win8, win RT, XBone..sure they "failed" (I doubt if this will be the case for the xbone though) but one can't say they didn't try to "break into new categories" or "innovate". The big difference is that apple has countless fanbois so they're less likely to go down so early :P

They're not, Google is (0)

ZephyrXero (750822) | about a year ago | (#44490895)

Well that was a silly question...I thought we all already knew Google's the one on track to be the next Microsoft. Just as Microsoft was the next IBM before it.

Almost as easy to use? (1)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about a year ago | (#44490915)

When someone puts a phrase like that into their article without substantiating it or addressing it other than to simply state it then they're just trolling. A pencil is easy to use, but it doesn't mean it's better than iOS or Android. The whole 'so easy a three-year-old' can do it thing has passed. I'm not three. I can handle something that takes some thought, that I may not know all the ins and outs of perfectly on my first day, because the only way to do that is to simplify stuff to the point of not being usable. As a longtime Android user (if that's a thing) I can say that I'm immensely frustrated by having to help people with their iPhones. The lack of options in almost all applications, especially the OS ones, amazes me. No wonder they can't figure it out. There's no two pages of options like you get in Android where you can easily set things up. That would be 'hard to use' because you'd have to read something!

A brand is not cool if your parents use it (1)

StripedCow (776465) | about a year ago | (#44490921)

Apple became the next Microsoft the moment my mom bought an iPhone.

No regrets on iOS devices (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491053)

My years old iphone4 is getting iOS7. More new features and continued support on old hardware. This thing has been so good to me I can't justify upgrading. I simply have no reason to buy a new phone yet, but when I do it will be an iphone.

I've been an iphone user since the original and it's been the same cycle every time. Buy device. New software comes out, adding functionality. Eventually new tech produces a new device worth the upgrade. All of my stuff migrates over without a hitch.

All of the itunes music I had for my ipod worked with my original iphone. Software upgrades brought the app store. Then later exchange connectivity. All of that migrated seamlessly to my 3g. Same experience with the 4. If I feel like getting the 5s when it launches I won't even have to plug it in to the computer, because during the 4's release a software upgrade enabled cloud backup. All I have to do is log in to my new phone and let it cloud restore.

Android, however, is starting to get there. I picked up the new nexus 7. (Amazing device by the way. Literally the best andriod tab on the market as far as I'm conserned). Logged in with google services and those migrated over seamlessly. Most of of my google play apps came over too, but some bugged out.

My previous device was a galaxy tab 2 7.0. While good, I had to root it and install a hacked up rom to strip out most of the Samsung garbage. (Note to samsung, fuck off with your crapware. We want google's apps and app store, not your abortions)

MS vs Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491089)

Microsoft has better technology. They're more innovative and creative.

Apple is better at taking tech other people made, and then turning it into a product that people actually want to buy and can use and enjoy using.

There's a place for both.

Apple is far worse (0)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about a year ago | (#44491091)

Apple isn't just trying to lock you in to their proprietary formats, they control a large percentage of how the US communicates and are all too willing to work at the edge of censorship without question *

"Apple has patented a piece of technology which would allow government and police to block transmission of information, including video and photographs, from any public gathering"

[*] - http://rt.com/news/apple-patent-transmission-block-408/ [rt.com]

Trying to control - or prevent control? (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#44491315)

Apple has patented a piece of technology which would allow government and police to block transmission of information

Note that there are two reasons to procure a patent. The first is to make a product based on that patent. Apple has not done that...

The second is to prevent anyone ELSE from making a product based on that patent.

Given Apple's actions to date, it's equally likely they wish to prevent said technology from coming to market.

Source (1)

randizzle3000 (1276900) | about a year ago | (#44491117)

Gizmodo reposted (they even say it at the bottom [I know, /., who rtfa anyway?])

Give the guy his clicks: http://blog.agoeldi.com/ [agoeldi.com]

You post a ling with "in short, no" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491187)

You post a ling with "in short, no" as the text to the link, but the link does not show that the answer IS "no".

Please do not do this.

Answer or do not, don't try and fail.

Reiterating what many others have already said... (2)

TsuruchiBrian (2731979) | about a year ago | (#44491201)

If you think that the main innovation in Windows Vista was the frosted glass, or any other UI feature, you are retarded.

While I think Windows Vista was far from perfect (so far that I didn't buy it), Windows XP was 5 years old and showing it. It was not designed for 64 bit architecture, and could not address more than 4GB of memory. Yes I know there was 64-bit windows XP, but that opens up a whole new can of worms. All windows OSes up through windows XP had horrible security models that lead to rampant infections by viruses.

Windows XP was based on 1990's NT technology. Windows vista was a near complete rewrite of the OS to bring windows into the 21st century. It had lots of problems, but I'd sure as hell use it over XP if given a choice.

I am not a M$ fanboy either. I use both windows and linux both at work and at home. I'd probably own a mac too if I had more disposable income.

Apple died with Jobs (0)

Overzeetop (214511) | about a year ago | (#44491213)

As much as Jobs was an utter asshole, he was an asshole with a vision and a mission. He had very specific ideas about technology and they were mostly aligned with non-technologically oriented people (aka: most humans). Apple has banked its success on non-technical people - if you are the computer equivalent of not being able to find your ass with both hands, Apple is for you. It's why Apple was king of graphics - those people aren't IT geeks. Apple locked everything down so it looked like paper and pencil, or dodge masks, or picas or points. Jobs understood that the feel, look, and minimal learning curve of a device was THE most critical factor to selling them. He hated buttons because they complicate the interface.

Apple has not only lost it's way, it has done so as their primary markets that made them the juggernaut they are are saturating (tablets and phones). They hold such a dominant position that it can only really erode in a normal marketplace. MS has the advantage of decades of software development by third parties protecting it's operating system. Apple has the disadvantange that everyone *expects* to trade in their device every 2 years, and the software investment users have is minimal thanks to the lowest-price-wins marketplace they've created (and profited off handsomely, I might add).

Apple IS at a crossroads. They really need to find another Jobs or they will, though it seems amazing, probably fritter away their $100B warchest on redesigning icons. They're going to need another "holy shit that's awesome" moment here soon, imho.

No.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491261)

... they're worse. If MS had just pulled half the shit that Apple has in the last ten years, Bill & Steve personally would have been rosted on a small flame by the government.

Oh look (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491369)

another paid advertisement from Apple

More like Google is... (1)

cjjjer (530715) | about a year ago | (#44491523)

Yes I know this is not popular but seems lately Google is pulling some of MS's old tricks...

http://blog.elliottkember.com/chromes-insane-password-security-strategy [elliottkember.com]

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/08/06/android_oneclick_authentication_open_to_hacking [theregister.co.uk]

Sad no-one realizes how different iOS7 really is (4, Informative)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#44491677)

What's really bad about all these iOS7 articles is how off they are about what has changing.

If the person writing claims iOS7 is "flat", they have totally missed the point.

iOS7 has gone DEEP, not flat. It's many layers where before there was just a flat tree. It's added a literal new dimension to UI and UIX design.

When you actually have it in hand you may understand better, but just know until then anyone who says iOS7 is "flat" has no idea what the heck they are talking about.

Apple vs Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44491777)

Apple wants all my money and Google wants all my personal information.

I rather give my money away... Don't be evil my a**.

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