Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

China Has a Massive Windows XP Problem

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the don't-we-all dept.

China 520

An anonymous reader writes "The Chinese are going to have a very, very hard time kicking the Windows XP habit. The deadline for the retirement of Microsoft's most successful operating system ever is eight months from tomorrow: April 8, 2014. That's the day when the Redmond, Wash. company is to deliver the last XP security update. According to analytics company Net Applications, 37.2% of the globe's personal computers ran Windows XP last month. If Microsoft's estimate of 1.4 billion Windows PCs worldwide is accurate, XP's share translates into nearly 570 million machines. In the U.S., 16.4% of all personal computers ran Windows XP in July, or about one in six, Net Applications' data showed. But in China, 72.1% of the country's computers relied on the soon-to-retire operating system last month, or nearly three out of every four systems."

cancel ×

520 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

xp still works (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505673)

ive got at least 4 workstations that are still running xp, we have legacy software and drivers that wont work on win7, and win8 blows. but we dont worry about updates, since these dont connect to the web. m$ is going to be a dinosaur very soon, the signs are there....

Re:xp still works (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505733)

I still use Windows XP and Windows 2000. They were good operating systems and, from my perspective, Vista, 7, and 8 haven't brought anything to the table. Quite the opposite, in fact: I went full penguin after Vista came out. It was patently clear that Microsoft was going in a direction I didn't want to go.

Re:xp still works (5, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#44505789)

I still use Windows XP and Windows 2000. They were good operating systems and, from my perspective, Vista, 7, and 8 haven't brought anything to the table. Quite the opposite, in fact: I went full penguin after Vista came out. It was patently clear that Microsoft was going in a direction I didn't want to go.

Yes, but what of the botnets? Who will take care of them? Without care and feeding of ineffective security updates to make users believe they are safe from such things, the botnets will wither and die.

Re:xp still works (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44506123)

Don't worry, Linux boxes are far from immune from them. As soon as they take an interest, the botnet creators will be happy to make sure that their software is safe and sound on your Linux and MacOS boxes.

Warms the heart, really.

Re:xp still works (1)

norite (552330) | about a year ago | (#44505811)

Actually, 7 isn't too bad an OS; you just have to install classicshell to get rid of the severely kneecapped start menu they tried to force on folks.

Re:xp still works (5, Informative)

Billly Gates (198444) | about a year ago | (#44506039)

You mean the all so horrible instant search where I can start word and view files by subject in 1\9 of a second without a mouse?

You couldn't pay me to go back to XP style start menu! Yuck.

Some people are so stuburn and hate change so much they refuse to learn anything new including Windows 7 features as I am not referingto 8 at all.

Re:xp still works (2)

tnk1 (899206) | about a year ago | (#44506133)

Yeah, running both "Classic" and Windows 7 style start menus, I prefer the Windows 7 start menus. It's a lot easier to get at what you use all the time by pinning to to the start menu or the task bar.

I wasn't so sure about those changes, but they work pretty well when you get used to them.

Re:xp still works (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505895)

Windows XP and 2000 were good OSes, as long as you don't care about limited user accounts, escalating privileges, file permissions, or anything like that.

Re:xp still works (4, Insightful)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44505885)

I have three xp units left. We will migrate to Linux.

Re:xp still works (4, Funny)

UltraZelda64 (2309504) | about a year ago | (#44505929)

DOS still works too, if you find the right hardware to run it on or use it in a virtual machine. Does that mean we should all be using DOS?

Re:xp still works (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505997)

WOOOOOSSSSHHHHHHHH!!!!

LPT bit banging (4, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#44506009)

Does that mean we should all be using DOS?

No, but it means that people with a need for DOS should still be using DOS. In a lot of cases, only DOS supports legacy or hobbyist hardware that bit-bangs the parallel port. Likewise, the AC that you replied to has a need for Windows XP for much the same reason: to use hardware that lacks an NT 6 driver.

That will be a lot of spambots (4, Funny)

NixieBunny (859050) | about a year ago | (#44505683)

Once the patches stop and they all get infected, they'll be so busy sending junk to each other that they won't have time to compute anything.

Re:That will be a lot of spambots (4, Insightful)

MurukeshM (1901690) | about a year ago | (#44505727)

What makes you think that isn't happening already?

Re: That will be a lot of spambots (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505745)

Someone at the NSA is having an orgasm over this.

Re: That will be a lot of spambots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505821)

Two if you count TOR on Winbugs

No worse than right now. (2)

khasim (1285) | about a year ago | (#44505765)

If they are not already running a firewall then they're probably already infected.

If they are running a firewall then they might be infected through a 3rd party app (I'm looking at you, Java). Or maybe not infected at all (that is possible).

Which will be the exact same situation when XP support expires.

Re:No worse than right now. (2)

Billly Gates (198444) | about a year ago | (#44506065)

IE 6 also is one the most popular browsers. Infact until this time last year it was the most popular browser as Chinese websites are still made to only work with IE 6.

Re:That will be a lot of spambots (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#44505795)

Once the patches stop and they all get infected, they'll be so busy sending junk to each other that they won't have time to compute anything.

once ... they all get infected?!? Um. Odds are they have been for years.

Re:That will be a lot of spambots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505965)

Once the patches stop and they all get infected, they'll be so busy sending junk to each other that they won't have time to compute anything.

once ... they all get infected?!? Um. Odds are they have been for years.

The US Government has been proudly running XP for years... And they still are... And... well... ;) File that shit under "stupid fucking morons".

Re:That will be a lot of spambots (1)

SeaFox (739806) | about a year ago | (#44505921)

Once the patches stop and they all get infected, they'll be so busy sending junk to each other that they won't have time to compute anything.

So lots of spam will be coming from computers in China?
That will be a big change. /sarcasm

Interesting (4, Interesting)

pipatron (966506) | about a year ago | (#44505699)

It will be interesting to see how they will handle this. When I visited China, computer security didn't seem to be one of the top priorities among the computer users, so the majority of the population might just not care much about updates. If it starts breaking down completely, and Windows 7 or 8 isn't as easy to pirate, perhaps we'll see a Chinese mass migration to Linux.

I wonder how difficult it would be for the Chinese government to make their own Windows patches. They could probably perform a MITM on the windows update servers and feed their own patches if a lot of unpatched Windows machines leads to an increased influx of CIA-sponsored viruses to China.

Re:Interesting (4, Funny)

armanox (826486) | about a year ago | (#44505755)

They'll probably just push Red Flag Linux to everyone.

Re:Interesting (5, Funny)

tnk1 (899206) | about a year ago | (#44506143)

I prefer Black Flag Linux. It only costs 35 dollars and a six pack to license.

Re:Interesting (5, Interesting)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#44505777)

perhaps we'll see a Chinese mass migration to Linux.

Don't hold your breath. I went to a Linux User Group meeting in Shanghai a couple years ago, and more than half the people there were expat white guys. Linux has an astoundingly low adoption rate in China. You'd think that people that are at least nominally commies would more open to FOSS.

Re:Interesting (0, Flamebait)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year ago | (#44505909)

its cause it wont do what they want it to without a massive headache, just like anyplace in the whole universe when talking about linux on the desktop

dorks like it, everyone else doesn't

surprised?

Re:Interesting (4, Interesting)

slackware 3.6 (2524328) | about a year ago | (#44506139)

I found the opposite everyone from relatives to babysitters liked using Linux (Debian/Gnome3 or Bodhi or Magia) and asked about me installing it on their computer. So no not just dorks like Linux, the kids with the fancy $600 phones and the grandparents like is. Although my brother-in-law phoned me last week and asked if I could help him install and configure Slackware over the phone I told him no, then told him to try Mint.

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505967)

I don't know... It's not an issue governmentally. Desktop wise I'm sure they use their pirated copies with abandon as the govmnt there don't really care that much about that either.

http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2013/03/ubuntu-to-become-the-official-os-of-china

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505799)

The same for windows 3.1 and 98

and NT...

Pirated/hacked copies and Linux. There will probably be a few community updates. But I don't see this as a huge problem because China isn't a #1 country for hosting and or datacenters. Its mostly going to be peoples PC's and random studio machines running outdated software. That may or may not ever see the internet.

Low priority and when the time comes, Ubuntu and Debian are there. China has shown its not averse to using *nix.

This also may be a political ploy more than anything to get Micro$oft to release windows 7-8 cheaply 8$ or less on the Chinese marketplace. Just like they did for XP, and 2000

I guarantee any Chinese version of NSA quality computers are good to go. It only affects schoolchildren and the working class. Same as here. Here we just are willing to pay more, faster and are less resistant to the forced upgrade cycle.

*** P.S. Still using 7zip from sourceforge here... runs on everything... from 1999-2005... computer ~4 years old and not upgrading any time soon. U.S. Citizen.

Re:Interesting (1)

EzInKy (115248) | about a year ago | (#44505913)

Pirated/hacked copies and Linux...

The ability to hack Linux is by design. Releasing the current version of Windows at a price the market can afford would only benefit Microsoft.

Re:Interesting (3, Funny)

interval1066 (668936) | about a year ago | (#44505943)

Pirated/hacked copies and Linux...

The ability to hack Linux is by design.

He/she meant Pirated/hacked copies of WINDOWS AND linux, genius. Learn to 'merican.

Re:Interesting (1)

EzInKy (115248) | about a year ago | (#44505879)

When I visited China, computer security didn't seem to be one of the top priorities among the computer users, so the majority of the population might just not care much about updates.

Given all the NSA spying stories in the news recently, I'm sure there is a possibility this will change in the future. Just another example of the cure being worse than the disease, actually. Of all the routes the US could have chosen to follow, becomming facist was the worst it could have chosen.

Re:Interesting (1)

interval1066 (668936) | about a year ago | (#44505937)

...Windows 7 or 8 isn't as easy to pirate...

*lolz*... ok.

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505985)

How is Windows 7 less easy to pirate? It's freely available by torrent, along with any number of licensing cracks. Is it just because we don't have 20-odd dozen volume license activation codes floating around?

Re:Interesting (2)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about a year ago | (#44506001)

. When I visited China, computer security didn't seem to be one of the top priorities among the computer users

Remember that China has it's own state filtering and spyware software they install and run. And woe to you who are not happy to be spied on by the government. Unlike the US, who basically get to talk a lot, the PRC government feels no legal limits to doing whatever it wants to whomever it doesn't like.

There's no point in trying to have a secure system if the government itself is mandating an insecurity and is primarily the one spying on you, and is free to throw you in jail arbitrarily for complaining about it.

Re: Too addicted to IE 6 (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | about a year ago | (#44506135)

Thanks to the US export restrictions on encryption the Asians use ActiveX obtracities for banking and web shopping written in VB 6 with many designed for IE 6.

Many slashdotters ignorantly think the 10% of IE 6 users are all corps. They are almost all Chinese and Korean users. The good news is Xihnu and ebay are now updating their sites to work with IE 8.

What does that mean? Like the corps Linux and anything later than 2001 is a no go.

I swear that browser is more of a nightmare than Windows ever was for lockin.

Wonder what it looks like closer to home... (0)

dyingtolive (1393037) | about a year ago | (#44505701)

like the US or the UK, just as a point of comparison.

Ummm... RTFS (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about a year ago | (#44505719)

"In the U.S., 16.4% of all personal computers ran Windows XP in July."

I mean seriously, it isn't like you even had to click on the article.

Math much? (5, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | about a year ago | (#44505705)

But in China, 72.1% of the country's computers relied on the soon-to-retire operating system last month, or nearly three out of every four systems."

This is Slashdot. I think we can do the math on that one.

Re:Math much? (5, Funny)

Lendrick (314723) | about a year ago | (#44505737)

Relevant [bash.org] .

Re:Math much? (4, Insightful)

dotancohen (1015143) | about a year ago | (#44505751)

But in China, 72.1% of the country's computers relied on the soon-to-retire operating system last month, or nearly three out of every four systems."

This is Slashdot. I think we can do the math on that one.

I came for this. I do wonder, though, for how much of the general population does "72.1%" go in one ear and out the other, but "three out of every four" sticks.

Re:Math much? (1)

someone1234 (830754) | about a year ago | (#44506071)

Probably only 4 out of every five users can do that math.

Embedded XP machines (5, Interesting)

innocent_white_lamb (151825) | about a year ago | (#44505707)

I own and operate a movie theatre, and my digital projector runs on Windows XP, believe it or not. (The server that talks to it runs on Linux.)

In my case, this setup is not on the Internet; all of the gadgets in my projection room talk only between themselves, so there is no particular security concern in that regard. But I wonder how many other folks have very expensive hardware like this that will probably never be upgraded to run on anything other than XP.

Re:Embedded XP machines (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505805)

I see a similar situation in medical and dental offices. The equipment is able to upgrade the OS, but the Windows 7 licenses for their specialty software are exorbitant.

Re:Embedded XP machines (1)

pipatron (966506) | about a year ago | (#44505835)

Sounds like a great target for an epic rick-roll trojan.. say.. where is this movie theatre located? ;)

Re:Embedded XP machines (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505903)

Plenty of places do, but there's always a workaround. For instance, the newspaper I used to work at had a bunch of machines running XP in their office - because most of their hardware (cameras, scanners, etc) ran on drivers that didn't work properly on Windows 7. Their workaround was to have a secured company intranet with access out only through a proxy server, which they'd put into place when the XP licenses were purchased.

Generally, I don't think there are too many non-upgradeable pieces of hardware that are hooked up directly to the Internet.

Re:Embedded XP machines (1)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | about a year ago | (#44505951)

So do a lot of oscilloscopes and logic analyzers.

Re:Embedded XP machines (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year ago | (#44506035)

But I wonder how many other folks have very expensive hardware like this that will probably never be upgraded to run on anything other than XP.

Expensive like ... what?!? Are [tomshardware.com] you [voanews.com] kidding [msdn.com] ?

Of course if you can pay... (1)

ls671 (1122017) | about a year ago | (#44505711)

Of course if you are a big corporation and you can pay, Microsoft should still be able to provide you with security updates. At least that's how it was done with windows 2000 if I remember right...

Re: Of course if you can pay... (2)

Patch86 (1465427) | about a year ago | (#44506081)

My company (which is a big UK national) enquired after this sort of arrangement (not for XP, but for another programme going out of support in 2014- an old Microsoft CMS). Basically, they wanted multi-millions for it. Our pockets are deep, but nowhere near deep enough for those shenanigans.

There won't be many companies who can justify that sort of cost on a long term basis.

At long last... (1)

cervesaebraciator (2352888) | about a year ago | (#44505713)

next year will be the year of the [Red Flag] Linux Desktop [redflag-linux.com] . In all seriousness though, updating China has to be eagerly anticipated in Redmond. It might even be in the Chinese government's interests to encourage users to adopt Linux rather than sending all that money to the States.

Re:At long last... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505793)

They need Windows to play League of Legends and all the crap in internet cafes.

Re:At long last...Snowdwn action? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505801)

Perhaps some Snowden type in Redmond will post up the source code.
(or take it to China and auction it off)

Re:At long last...Snowdwn action? (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | about a year ago | (#44505989)

"Perhaps some Snowden type in Redmond will post up the source code.
(or take it to China and auction it off)"

There will be no auction, they already have the code

Microsoft will extend the deadline (4, Insightful)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a year ago | (#44505829)

Microsoft simply has no choice especially if it wants to protect its compatibility insurance with Windows Office. In reality its monopoly in Desktop Applications...Relies on on it being a Monopoly, and it has real competition. I have bought tablets, smartphones, rasberry pi, an Ouya replicating everything I do on a PC. At a fraction of the cost of a less desirable bottom end PC. Intel and Microsoft have been overcharging its hostages on massive gross profits of 70%(Its not working for Apple Macs either), and are finding it very difficult to adjust when its competitors with can produce devices like a Chromebook for $200 a Tablet for $100 a Smartphone for $100 a chromecast for $35. buying an *unpgrade* to the crippled version of Windows 8 at £99($150) is stupid.

The bottom line is any money they earn from cutting off their hostages from essential packages is a potential export to another platform.

Re:Microsoft will extend the deadline (1)

Hadlock (143607) | about a year ago | (#44505919)

Eventually these machines will have drive, powersupply or cpu fan failures and they'll be forced to upgrade...probably to an android tablet for about half the price of a new PC (or less). I don't think providing extended-extended support for a customer base who is migrating away from microsoft products is going to make microsoft very much money in the long term.

Nothing New (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a year ago | (#44506069)

I don't think providing extended-extended support for a customer base who is migrating away from microsoft products is going to make microsoft very much money in the long term.

http://articles.latimes.com/2006/apr/09/business/fi-micropiracy9 [latimes.com] "Piracy also prevents free, open-source alternatives such as Linux from chipping away at Microsoft's monopolies, especially in developing nations."

Nothing has changed simply because Microsoft is heading towards a self generated deadline.

Re:At long last... (2)

pegacat (89763) | about a year ago | (#44505863)

rather than [sending all that money to Ireland, then Holland, then Ireland, then a Swiss bank account]

(was: rather than sending all that money to the States)

There, fixed that for you...!

Most useless comment (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505729)

"72.1% ... nearly three out of every four systems"
I refer you to http://bash.org/?2999

Re:Most useless comment (0)

dotancohen (1015143) | about a year ago | (#44505763)

"72.1% ... nearly three out of every four systems"
I refer you to http://bash.org/?2999 [bash.org]

<kyourek> There was a 23% drop in temperature.

<nappyjallapy> That's almost 25%!

<kyourek> ... That was one of the most worthless comments I've ever heard.

Time to invest in popcorn (1)

lennier1 (264730) | about a year ago | (#44505747)

A shitload of people is probably hoarding exploits to use when MS stops patching the product. Once that happens,it's gonna be fun to watch.

Keeping XP For Legacy Games? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505757)

Anyone keeping XP around for legacy games? Also, games that came out for Windows 98, but can run in XP, but not anything newer? I also have a few that only work with specific graphics cards, for 98, and won't work properly even in XP. Has something to do with game being programed to the card clock/timing... Found an in depth article on this game a while back, and the 'fix' was to either de-prioritize the process to slow it down when using 'other' hardware (cpu/gpu), or rewrite the game.

Now I realize the 'security' problem with doing this, especially with keeping them Internet connected, but the assumption that apps and software of the past are cleanly carried forward is an absolute joke today. Is WINE really the only recourse for this particular problem? I'd prefer it not be, but that's what it presently looks like from where I'm sitting.

Re:Keeping XP For Legacy Games? (2)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year ago | (#44505897)

nope

if it was made for XP it runs in 7

if it was made before XP get virtualbox, not like its going to consume that much power in a VM

What's the problem? (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | about a year ago | (#44505759)

These are old machines that aren't capable of upgrading to a more recent version of Windows. The hardware requirements from XP to Vista were to great that no one bothered. XP will still be used well past its expiration point and many will be using linux after.

Further, what percentage of these machines are running pirated copies of WinXP? I know in Latin and South America, they're almost all pirated. How is it in China?

And whats up with referencing Net Applications? I haven't stumbled upon a site using their analytics since the 1990s.

Sources for TFA are elusive at best.

Re:What's the problem? (1)

pipatron (966506) | about a year ago | (#44505855)

Further, what percentage of these machines are running pirated copies of WinXP? I know in Latin and South America, they're almost all pirated. How is it in China?

Well.. I don't think you need to be a rocket surgeon to guess that number correctly. :P

Re:What's the problem? (1)

Delarth799 (1839672) | about a year ago | (#44505871)

Well China is known as the land of copycat it seems and I would wager a good 75% or more of those machines are running pirated copies.

Re:What's the problem? (1)

EzInKy (115248) | about a year ago | (#44505947)

Further, what percentage of these machines are running pirated copies of WinXP?

Why should how WinXP was acquired matter in the least? Microsoft, by hook or by crook, wanted a monopoly and they got it. It is their responsibility to maintain it.

I don't see a problem. They probably pirated most (1)

SensitiveMale (155605) | about a year ago | (#44505767)

of those copies of XP and they'll do the same for 7 or 8.

Let us think a little (2)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a year ago | (#44505861)

I don't see a problem. They probably pirated most of those copies of XP and they'll do the same for 7 or 8.

If all copies of Windows are the same price you have to expect they have *chosen* windows xp over Windows 7 for a reason.

Its not difficult to imagine that many of these machines simply will not work with anything other an XP.

The beginning of dystopia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505783)

I predict riots, and everything every dystopian sci-fi book and movie has predicted.

XP Forever. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505815)

It's terrible. Buggy. Insecure. Clown-shoes funny looking. But it's still the best Windows ever. I'm sure some company will swoop in to fill all of it's cracks with some kind of quick-drying cement, and keep the old boat floating, as it were. XP Forever.

Re:XP Forever. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505893)

2000 pro was the best windows ever, but you morons in the home consumer world bought into the windows 2000 fisher price edition cause you were too fucking stupid to burn your blank CD without a pop up telling you to

FIRST@ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505817)

Stay frosty out there, fokls.

What's the legit percentage? (1)

wallsg (58203) | about a year ago | (#44505819)

Probably something like 7.21% of the PCs would pass the Windows Genuine Advantage check...

How is this a problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505825)

I bet at least 3/4 of those xp machines in china are running illegal/bootleg copies anyway.

Re:How is this a problem? (1)

EzInKy (115248) | about a year ago | (#44505973)


I bet at least 3/4 of those xp machines in china are running illegal/bootleg copies anyway.

What does it matter if the copies are bootleg are legit? The software is Microsoft's and Microsoft's credibility is on the line here.

To eat or to upgrade? (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | about a year ago | (#44505923)

Correct me if I am wrong, but I thought people were starving in China and a very few (1%) can actually afford an iPhone or a new computer.

There's a joke in their somewhere if you're brazen enough to make it.

Re:To eat or to upgrade? (3, Informative)

shadowofwind (1209890) | about a year ago | (#44506085)

Correct me if I am wrong, but I thought people were starving in China and a very few (1%) can actually afford an iPhone or a new computer.

You're wrong.

http://www.zdnet.com/chinas-internet-population-surges-to-564-million-75-percent-on-mobile-7000009813/ [zdnet.com]
http://www.minyanville.com/sectors/global-markets/articles/Apple-Inc-Doubles-iPhone-4-Sales/6/21/2013/id/50472 [minyanville.com]
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-26/apple-iphone-share-shrinks-as-china-s-huawei-to-zte-lure-users.html [bloomberg.com]

The market is huge, closer to 50% than 1%, and Apple's sales, while growing rapidly, aren't as large as Samsung's or growing as fast as those of Huawei or ZTE.

It should be obvious that there are a lot of reasons besides poverty to prefer other smart phones over Apple phones.

Linux (1)

faldore (221970) | about a year ago | (#44505931)

Time to install Linux.

Asianux? Red Flag Linux? (1)

ikhider (2837593) | about a year ago | (#44505941)

I thought the Chinese embraced the penguin! What about Asianux and Red Flag Linux?!? I thought the Chinese took a stand and made GNU/Linux their national distro. Come on China, harness that considerable population power to boost the kernel! Download http://www.asianux.com/ [asianux.com] pour a cup of ginseng tea and install. I can't believe the Chinese are still stuck on Windows.

Not my problem. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505955)

This is what you get for using Windows, XP or otherwise, pirated or otherwise. Pretty sure all those old machines can run Linux.

The world has a Massive Windows problem. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505977)

But Ballmer, dog bless him, is slowly but surely solving it for us all!

EOL a product to force new sales? (1, Insightful)

Sir Holo (531007) | about a year ago | (#44505983)

Does MS not realize how vividly anti-consumer this is? Even to non-tech types?

What if your auto dealership end-of-life'd your Honda Civic? And thereafter refused to service the vehicle? Would you buy another Honda, or start looking elsewhere for your next car?

And to keep our analogies clear, let's consider that an XP patch (of a security hole) is equivalent to a recall for a manufacturing defect that is fixed for free.

/no hate on Honda; just an example.

Re:EOL a product to force new sales? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44506053)

That might be an apt metaphor if Honda was a criminal organization, operating an illegal monopoly of cars that were notorious for exploding or simply falling apart for no reason.

Re:EOL a product to force new sales? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44506057)

When XP's EOL comes, Microsoft will have supported it for nearly 13 years. How long do you want them to support it for? Should they still be supporting Windows 3.1 and DOS 6.22?

In the tech world, 13 years is an epic amount of time. Microsoft is not EOLing XP to force people to buy a new version of Windows. It's time to put XP to rest. It had an amazing run, but no one can expect any OS to be supported forever.

Strange way of measuring Support (2, Interesting)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a year ago | (#44506131)

When XP's EOL comes, Microsoft will have supported it for nearly 13 years. How long do you want them to support it for?

Yet was only replaced 6 years ago by Vista, and did not have a real alternative till Windows 7. In fact Microsoft sold XP well beyond its Vista Operating Systems to starve off the mobile threat...then in the less threatening Netbook form, XP was used to stave of Linux. A strategy that gained them a few years Windows revenue at the cost of letting the iPad...and now Android into the Personal Computer Space.

In answer to your question...long enough not to let your competitors through the door. Especially if your strategy is to license your OS to *Manufacturers* not customers.

Re:EOL a product to force new sales? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44506079)

Are you even old enough to own a car? The first Civics came out in 1973 and no dealership is going to service one of those beyond basic maintenance simply because OEM parts are no longer available.

Re:EOL a product to force new sales? (4, Insightful)

Pinhedd (1661735) | about a year ago | (#44506091)

That's a horrible example. Car manufacturers do stop making parts for old vehicles after a while. Fixing up old junkers can be expensive because the parts can be quite rare. Owners certainly have the option of buying aftermarket parts just as PC users have the option of third party software.

Whenever emissions or road standards change the car manufacturers don't retroactively update every previous production model to meet them. The owners either pay for a custom fix up, are SOL, or get grandfathered in.

Re:EOL a product to force new sales? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44506145)

my vw dealer refuses to work on my 2006. not that it matters, the last
time i went in they wanted $104.99 to attach the obd-ii computer. but
at least they forgot to pick me up, and stranded me at work.

Re:EOL a product to force new sales? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44506097)

Does MS not realize how vividly anti-consumer this is? Even to non-tech types? What if your auto dealership end-of-life'd your Honda Civic? And thereafter refused to service the vehicle? Would you buy another Honda, or start looking elsewhere for your next car? And to keep our analogies clear, let's consider that an XP patch (of a security hole) is equivalent to a recall for a manufacturing defect that is fixed for free. /no hate on Honda; just an example.

According to the NHTSA and the SaferCar.gov (http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/recalls/recallprocess.cfm), there is a 10-year time limit for free repairs due to recalls. The exact quote:

In order to be eligible for a free remedy, the vehicle cannot be more than 10 years old on the date the defect or noncompliance is determined. Under the law, the age of the vehicle is calculated from the date of sale to the first purchaser. [...] However, consumers should realize that even though manufacturers are not obligated to remedy safety defects in older cars, a safety problem might still exist. If you receive notification of a defect on a vehicle older than 10 years, take the responsibility to have your car repaired at your own expense – and eliminate unnecessary safety risks.

Re:EOL a product to force new sales? (1)

aphelion_rock (575206) | about a year ago | (#44506113)

Do we perhaps have an opening here for Android for PC?

Re:EOL a product to force new sales? (1)

Selur (2745445) | about a year ago | (#44506121)

hmm,... Apple doesn't provide updates for their older OSs. Apples business plan seem to sell machines which are normally only supported for a few OS versions. Apple users don't seem to complain. Not sure if they to not care (may be because they think their OS is secure) or if they 'simply' buy new hardware whenever they can't update to the latest OS (a few might switch to running Linux on their machines, but probably not many). Virus&Trojan developers don't seem to target those machines much (I wonder why, they should be easier targets and their number increases). May be Microsoft plans to adapt to Apples example.

They have bigger concerns than XP (0)

ruir (2709173) | about a year ago | (#44505987)

It is very myopic to be using a product from a competing and hostile nation. Industrial and state secrets espionage for dummies. And unlike most nations, they have already their own operating system, their own processors, their own chips, their own boards and capacity to manufacture in large scale. Plus, enough people to create a market to be viable on its own.

So? They'll just pirate a newer version of Windows (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44505991)

.... like they do everything else.

Time to ditch XP for Linux (1)

jcasey (264935) | about a year ago | (#44505995)

In light of the semi-recent revelations about MS/NSA collusion, I would think it would be an opportune time to mandate a switch to Linux. What money is saved in doing so could go towards funding the development of any other software they might need.

I think M$ will extend XP support (1, Informative)

bobthesungeek76036 (2697689) | about a year ago | (#44506033)

My wife works for a hospital system and they are still on XP and have no migration plans as of yet. I think there are enough companies like that out there that will force M$ to continue patch support past the 4/8/14 deadline...

Well, would you choose a GM Saturn over a Toyota o (1)

coutysd (3011631) | about a year ago | (#44506055)

Well, would you choose a GM Saturn over a Toyota or Honda?

Linux with XP virtual machine (1)

oregonjohn (1902706) | about a year ago | (#44506077)

Surf and email with Linux, use MS Office or whatever other applications on XP in a virtual machine. Same XP, just inside a safe place.

I've stuck with XP because (1)

kilodelta (843627) | about a year ago | (#44506087)

Vista was a flaming piece of shit, Windows 7 addressed some of the issues with Vista but it still grated because features that have been in a common place on Windows since NT4 got shifted just to be cute. Same as what happened to Office in version 2007 and up. That fucking ribbon shit.

And then there's Windows 8. First of all I don't want a mobile operating system running on my desktop or laptop. And I've even seen Win8 on the Nokia phone - it's disgusting. That tiled interface is for the dogs. And the issue with Microsoft's Surface tablet - it can't run the same apps because of the processor difference. That's why Microsoft is dropping prices like the proverbial rock on that platform. Plus Windows 8 on a laptop - lest one has a touch screen on it, it blows big time.

I'm considering just going Unix full time. Probably Ubuntu when I do. But I need the MS Office Apps. I do a lot of development for Access and Excel in VBA and that just isn't available for Unix/Linux. I support I could see if it'll run under WINE but honestly, that's a hoop I really don't want to have to jump through.

We need to understand what "retire" means (4, Informative)

roc97007 (608802) | about a year ago | (#44506111)

I'll let you in on a little secret -- a lot of embedded control systems are still running Windows 98. Test by: Stick around when a bottle return machine is rebooted.

In other words. What is China going to do when XP is "retired"? You're kidding, right?

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>