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Elon Musk Admits He Is Too Busy To Build Hyperloop

timothy posted about a year ago | from the if-you-can-bear-through-the-intrusive-ads dept.

Transportation 253

DavidGilbert99 writes "It sounded like the future — a 600mph train taking people from San Francisco to Los Angeles in just 30mins. In fact it sounded like a future too good to be true. And so it seems to have proven. As Alistair Charlton at IBTimes reports, Elon Musk, the man behind PayPal, Tesla and Space X has admitted that Hyperloop is a step too far and he should never have mentioned it in the first place — 'I think I shot myself in the foot by ever mentioning the Hyperloop. I'm too strung out.' Oh well, let's hope SpaceX works out a bit better ... " Considering that SpaceX has already sent materials to the ISS and retrieved the capsule, it seems to have worked out pretty well so far.

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If its good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509127)

If its a good and solid idea/plan, someone else could/should do it. Eccentric billionaires groves on trees, right?

Re:If its good (1)

gr8_phk (621180) | about a year ago | (#44509369)

If its a good and solid idea/plan, someone else could/should do it. Eccentric billionaires groves on trees, right?

Not ones with any ambition to innovate.

I had to add those last 2 words because many have tons of ambition to grow their empire or fortune.

Re: If its good (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509503)

It's dumb. It's a highway of driverless cars, with a private company paying for both the highway and cars.

His only good observation was "banks are ripping people off - why can't I rip them off too, but with the internets."

Re: If its good (1)

somersault (912633) | about a year ago | (#44509593)

It's dumb. It's a highway of driverless cars, with a private company paying for both the highway and cars.

What's dumb about that? If they provide a useful service, people will pay for it.

His only good observation was "banks are ripping people off - why can't I rip them off too, but with the internets."

Why do you feel so ripped off by PayPal? You could also take this time to reread the first part of my post.

Why are you so negative about everything? :p

Re: If its good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509621)

It's bad for another reason too. Earth Quakes.

Re: If its good (4, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#44509945)

It's bad for another reason too. Earth Quakes.

Earthquakes take time to propagate, so unless it is built right on the faultline, there will be time to react.

Protip: If you immediately see a serious problem with something you know almost about, it is likely that the responsible professionals are already aware of the problem and have considered it in their design.

Re: If its good (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44509795)

It's a highway of driverless cars

I believe it's called a "railroad". I wonder if it's ever been tried as a business model?

Re: If its good (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#44509963)

I believe it's called a "railroad". I wonder if it's ever been tried as a business model?

Not successfully. No where in the world do passenger trains operate profitably without subsidies.

Re: If its good (4, Insightful)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | about a year ago | (#44510113)

What you meant to say is, "Nowhere in the world do roads compete successfully with railroads except thanks to road and motor vehicle subsidies."

Re:If its good (2)

Megane (129182) | about a year ago | (#44509765)

"Groves" on trees? [/facepalm]

I think you've invented a new eggcorn. [wikipedia.org]

Page Not Found (4, Insightful)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | about a year ago | (#44509135)

Great article!

Re:Page Not Found (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509181)

He was too busy to write it.

Re:Page Not Found (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44510055)

Oh silly, no one is expected to actually read the article; you're just supposed to gloss over the summary and then write a funny/insightful comment about the NSA. You must be new here.

ERROR! PAGE NOT FOUND (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509139)

ERROR! PAGE NOT FOUND

This page works (5, Informative)

Dave Whiteside (2055370) | about a year ago | (#44509145)

RTFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509793)

The page was not found.

Elon Musk... (5, Interesting)

Ecuador (740021) | about a year ago | (#44509147)

I get the feeling that if we had about a dozen Elon Musks we would be living in the 2010's version we see in 40 year old sci-fi films...
Ok, the Hyperloop is a bit too much (for now), but the work he's done with Tesla and SpaceX is amazing. And don't forget he had PayPal back when it was a good thing!

Re:Elon Musk... (5, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509221)

I am 100% sure of it.
You can say a lot things about Mr.Musk, but he is taking risks with his own money that everyone might one day profit from. As opposed to the usual route of billionaires which seems to be taking risks with everyone elses money so that they can profit from it.

Re:Elon Musk... (-1)

hedwards (940851) | about a year ago | (#44509395)

Not really, being a douche is a full time job. Hence why he's so busy.

Re:Elon Musk... (5, Insightful)

supertrooper (2073218) | about a year ago | (#44509949)

Not really, being a douche is a full time job. Hence why he's so busy.

Why is he a douche? Because he's successful and he actually got there by not screwing over millions of people? You can say anything about PayPal but it's a service you can choose not to use. I wish he found a time to do this thing. Safe and fast travel, and I think cheaper too. It would be a great competition for aviation industry. In any case, nothing but respect for this guy.

Re:Elon Musk... (1)

JWW (79176) | about a year ago | (#44509943)

Why can't Elon delegate some of this work? He doesn't need to be involved in every aspect of everything. I'd be willing to help with Hyperloop ;-) if he asked.

Now if the issue isn't really the time needed, because there are plenty of talented people that could work on this, but the cost then I can be convinced that perhaps the technology to make this really work is just a bit out of the reach of feasibility at this time.

But damn, the hyperloop concept is really cool. I'd have liked to see work progress on it.

Re:Elon Musk... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509965)

Didn't most of those have wall sized computers with 100s of flashing lights that served no purpose with a tiny tv screen stuck in them.

He's too busy? (2)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about a year ago | (#44509149)

Maybe he could . . . you know . . . hire somebody to build it for him rather than doing it himself.

and nice 404 link.

Re:He's too busy? (4, Insightful)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about a year ago | (#44509313)

Delegation often doesn't work for endeavours like that. He'll delegate it to someone else (or more likely: a team of executives), and they will certainly push work and decisions even further down the chain until you end up with a typical corporate managerial quicksand geared to kill any innovative idea. Compare that with a driven, visionary, smart and in-control CEO, who knows when to step in and has the authority to do so (and knows how to make his middle managers sit up straight when ordered, too). Elon Musk, Steve Jobs, people like that who are not afraid to take charge of the nitty-gritty, even if they do not always get it right. It's a rare combination of talent and influence, which cannot be delegated... unless he finds the next Jobs and gives him carte blanche.

Re:He's too busy? (4, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | about a year ago | (#44509415)

Why wouldn't it work? Is he personally qualified to design and build this thing on his own? Somehow I doubt that.

Re:He's too busy? (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509517)

No, but he is motivated to get people to do it.

Instead of endless meetings where "None of Us is as Dumb as All of Us" is the order of the day he can step in and push the project forward. Once you start delegating you will have layers and layers of delegation and nothing gets done. Welcome to Corporate America.

Re:He's too busy? (1)

hedwards (940851) | about a year ago | (#44509561)

If you hire competent executives and managers rather than a friend of a friend, you can get that.

I'm guessing this is either a case of NIH or an admission that the idea won't work in any sort of reasonable time frame. What's more, this is an idea that is likely to compete with SpaceX in the long run.

Re:He's too busy? (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509845)

No matter how great these folks are once an organization gets to some size this stuff starts happening. At some point instead of working for Exciting Company A you get people thinking they work for Tribe B of Exciting Company A.

Re:He's too busy? (1)

hedwards (940851) | about a year ago | (#44510013)

And there's something wrong with that? That's the natural result of enthusiasm. What's more, when you have divisions as diverse as this, they are more like Tribe B of Exciting Company A. You're not going to get a lot of coordination.

Re:He's too busy? (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44509983)

If you hire competent executives and managers rather than a friend of a friend, you can get that.

It's a shame Musk doesn't know how to hire competent people.

I'm guessing this is either a case of NIH or an admission that the idea won't work in any sort of reasonable time frame.

That's Musk. No vision, not willing to take risks, and the sort of NIH guy who would never dream of building on something like the AC Propulsion tzero [wikipedia.org] .

What's more, this is an idea that is likely to compete with SpaceX in the long run.

I know that some people have described San Francisco as inhabited by people who are not from this world, but I still think different modes of transportation are appropriate, depending on whether you want to go to SF or outer space.

Re:He's too busy? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#44509615)

The same corporate America you think is competent enough to ruin the world?

I agree with this version. In my experience big corporations are clueless and their customer lists are very valuable as they are under served. Don't get me started on how much money I've made off former EDS clients. If I could get the SAP chump list I'd be set for life.

Re:He's too busy? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509773)

They don't want to ruin the world, they are just incompetent.

Re:He's too busy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509901)

Once you start delegating

Yeah, he's never once delegated major decisions about SpaceX, PayPal, or Tesla Motors, I bet.

What world do you live in where a single man has the technical expertise, time, and focus to manage the complex details of all of those projects without delegating major decisions? What world do you live in where Elon Musk is the only superhero capable of being motivated to work on a project like this?

With billions to spend, it's not that hard to find and hire a few talented, motivated managers to push a project forward.

Mr. Musk's real problemm? Delegating control of the project would turn it into "someone else's" success, and if it doesn't burnish his own personal brand he's not interested. What he should have said, to be more accurate, is "I don't have time to work on it, and I'm too much of an egocentric narcissist to delegate responsibility for a project and let someone else's name be attached to it." If people don't say "Oh wow, Elon Musk is pretty cool guy who saves the world and doesn't afraid of anything," he's not interested in being involved.

Re:He's too busy? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509953)

Way to ignore what I am saying. Good job, most people can't even try to be that dense.

Re:He's too busy? (1)

OakDragon (885217) | about a year ago | (#44510139)

You're thinking of government.

Re:He's too busy? (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#44509583)

No more than Steve Jobs personally designed and built the iPhone. However, Steve Jobs was still the driving force behind Apple's domination of the mp3 player and, later, the smartphone markets up until Android began to take over.

Re:He's too busy? (1)

randallman (605329) | about a year ago | (#44509817)

He has 5 kids. Hopefully he'll pass on his positive traits and his kids will multiply Musk's achievements.

Re:He's too busy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509455)

Maybe he could . . . you know . . . hire somebody to build it for him rather than doing it himself.

and nice 404 link.

Tony Stark does not simply

hire some trabajos to dig his ditches...

he spends a few billion on a robosuit so he can do it himself!

Re:He's too busy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509815)

http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/163452-elon-musk-ill-release-the-hyperloop-plans-but-im-too-busy-to-build-it-myself

"Musk did say, however, that if no progress has been made by other people/companies in the next few years, he might try to “make it happen.”"

Link not working (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509165)

Also, I think it was wise of him to back out. I don't see how he could build something like this any cheaper than high speed rails.

Re:Link not working (1)

hedwards (940851) | about a year ago | (#44509441)

In the long run his competition is with space. Space flight between two cities is quite fast, and doesn't require the huge tracts of land that this would.

Re:Link not working (2)

pe1rxq (141710) | about a year ago | (#44509515)

Space flight is incredibly inefficient.
You lift a tin can above the atmosphere only to drop it back in a little later. All the energy you used to lift it will be lost.
It also doesn't scale very well.

Re:Link not working (3, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#44509603)

Maybe we just need to figure out how to apply regenerative braking to rocket engines...

Re:Link not working (1)

hedwards (940851) | about a year ago | (#44510029)

It scales better than the Hyperloop would and the energy efficiency is probably better than the Hyperloop as well. Unless of course there's a way of keeping the entire tube in a state of vacuum.

Re:Link not working (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44510031)

Space flight between two cities is quite fast, and doesn't require the huge tracts of land that this would.

Here's a suggestion for a proof of concept: buy a surplus ICBM and squeeze yourself into the re-entry vehicle. If it works for you, I'll try it. If it doesn't work, the re-entry will save your survivors the cost of burying you, as you'll already be a lot deeper than 6 feet.

It appears this article was a bit too premature (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509167)

Link is broke. First!

First (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509171)

First

Elon Musk and Transportation (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509189)

Mating with an ape, Mate with an ape.

Is great just because they can't cry rape,

Rich thick fur, leathery tits,

Can't cry rape 'cause they don't have wits.

Burma Shave.

Re:Elon Musk and Transportation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509915)

> whatthefuckamireading.jpg

High speed rail (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509199)

All he has to do is announce an investment in high speed rail service. Nothing would benefit Americans (or the national infrastructure) more than a rail network that isn't over a hundred years old.

Re:High speed rail (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509251)

Hell, a single high speed rail link through the middle of the country linking the existing decent rail on the coasts would be great.

Re:High speed rail (0)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#44509527)

what exactly is this love affair with HSR?

in the 21st century we have air travel for long distance travel. in the north east we also have amtrak for trips in the 1-3 hour range to bypass the TSA nonsense at airports these days

Re:High speed rail (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509637)

You can't transport several hundred thousand tons of cargo an hour across the country efficiently with a plane. It'd take a lot of trucks off the road, sparing our already badly degraded highway system. If you made it passenger rail, the same would happen with cars.

Re:High speed rail (2)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#44509771)

a lot of freight is already transported by rail. HSR is for people, and in most cases people prefer to fly because its faster

Re:High speed rail (3, Interesting)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509897)

No, it is not. For flights you have to get there an hour or more in advance, they are chronically late or canceled and you can't get up and walk around during it.

Go someplace they have HSR and check it out.

People travel by air because they don't have HSR available to them.

Re:High speed rail (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#44509985)

europe is tiny

i'll take flying NYC to Denver in 4 1/2 hours over a much longer HSR trip any day. i can fly out of NYC at 7am and be at my mom's house for lunch. same with a weekend at vegas. fly out friday afternoon from NYC and be back sunday night

Re:High speed rail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509775)

it's called gravity

Re:High speed rail (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509871)

Have you ever tried them both yourself?

If you had you would not likely be asking.

Re:High speed rail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509735)

Bullshit.

Highspeed rail has one problem it cant overcome - it has to go through towns and cities. Towns and cities have a say as to how fast speeding metal objects may go through their area. One town or city with laws dictating a low rate of speed affect the speed of the train for miles coming to it and going from it. A few of those towns or cities each roughly 20 miles or so apart and you have a very expensive train moving at pretty much the same speed as trains do now.

Unless you bypass all the small towns and only go to major cities, in which case you arent going to get enough ridership to pay for it.

Re:High speed rail (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44510165)

Towns and cities have a say as to how fast speeding metal objects may go through their area.

If you have grade level crossings, which high speed rail can't. That's largely regulated by the Federal Railroad Administration, and to a lesser extent, the states. [wikipedia.org]

Unless you bypass all the small towns and only go to major cities, in which case you arent going to get enough ridership to pay for it.

If you do stop at every small town, it won't be high speed. It's called an express train. Nothing new about that strategy.

Not Iron Man after all (5, Funny)

Pedestrianwolf (1591767) | about a year ago | (#44509207)

This just completely shattered my illusions of Elon Musk as a real life Tony Stark.

Re:Not Iron Man after all (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509291)

Since Tony Stark shattered his Iron Man suits at the end of the last movie, I'd say they're on equal footing.

Re:Not Iron Man after all (4, Funny)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509299)

I think the problem is not enough cocaine. Look at how Tony Stark acts, that requires Scarface sized piles of cocaine.

Not that I want to kill Elon Musk, but that might just be the price of progress.
 

Re:Not Iron Man after all (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509631)

I think the problem is not enough cocaine. Look at how Tony Stark acts, that requires Scarface sized piles of cocaine.

Not that I want to kill Elon Musk, but that might just be the price of progress.

According to Musk, he's taking too much already - he said he's too "strung out" after all.

Re:Not Iron Man after all (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509539)

But Iron Man got burnt out all the time.

Too Strung Out? (1)

Notabadguy (961343) | about a year ago | (#44509265)

If the man is too strung out he obviously needs to refocus his efforts into personal cloning. Imagine what an army of Elon Musks could do.

How didn't you get so cynical? (3, Insightful)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#44509267)

I wonder if he realized all the people "on his side" pushing trains would turn around once it got started and put tens to hundreds of millions in lawsuits in the way about environmental studies, hiring union people, and anything else they can think up, not coincidentally buying time for people to throw up apartments in the way, or cram warehouses in the way full of old machinery, all of which must be bought at vastly overinflated government condemnation appraisals.

More stories from Washington, and bankrupting Detroit in this month's issue of Actual Tales From Actual Freakin' Reality.

Re:How didn't you get so cynical? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509281)

Go pound sand you idiot.

Not everyone pushing trains is like that nor are most people like that.

Re:How didn't you get so cynical? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509439)

That said... it only takes one or two assholes...

Re:How didn't you get so cynical? (1)

Bucc5062 (856482) | about a year ago | (#44509597)

Eminent Domain comes to mind to solve property issues. Seems to be working for the Keystone pipeline companies. There is a value in upgrading rail travel to the 21st Century, but it will take a better partnership between Government's ability to build infrastructure and private sector's ability to exploit a structure.

The core issue I see with trains is that the "road" and transportation mode are created by the companies, causing inefficiencies in the system. Imagine if air travel was run the same, or ground transportation. Airlines do not need to worry about flow control (other then pushing it for profit), Truck Freight companies don't worry about road maintenance, instead focusing on scheduling and delivery. Only in Railroad do you have infrastructure and operation under one roof.

What I'd see is having the Government be the focus of managing the Infrastructure of rail (tracks, paths, standards, regulations, flow) and open up competition to companies for the ability to use the system for freight or passenger. In short, rail should not be the exclusive use of one or two transportation companies, but be available to anyone who thinks they can run a train service.

There are no NIMBYs in space... (4, Insightful)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | about a year ago | (#44509285)

Launching through cleared airspace is probably much easier than trying to secure right-of-ways for a slightly-subsonic transport through thousands of municipalities, state and federal lands, and individual property owners, not to mention likely tangles with the EPA and whatever unions might be involved. Plus, a high-profile transportation project like that might pick up TSA attention too.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (3, Interesting)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509315)

If they can build a oil pipeline I fail to see how this is any different.

Besides the entire middle of the country is nearly empty, go check it out on google earth.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (1)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | about a year ago | (#44509399)

>> differences with oil pipelines

Oil pipelines are quiet. A 600-mph train wouldn't be. Ergo, the zone of disruption, lowered property values, health issues, etc.would be much wider for the train.

Oil pipelines don't carry people. Trains do. With people and mass transportation come security concerns you don't see with pipelines.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509449)

A 600mph train could be fairly quiet. Design is a big part. Yes there would be some disruption.

What security concerns? Terrorism? You mean that thing that in the USA kills less people than farm animals?

Pipelines can also be attacked, and would actually be a better target. Look at what bursting a pipeline did just recently in the news.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (4, Funny)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | about a year ago | (#44509717)

BTW its not a train but a capsule suspended in air by magnets in a tube. The sound it would make is probably the muffled woosh as often heard by readers of Slashdot.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509873)

And where are those killer farm animals located? In the very same rural fields that the trains would be passing through! You'd be bringing the people right to them!

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (1)

slash.jit (2893213) | about a year ago | (#44509457)

Not to mention Oil pipelines are backed by some very rich people who would love to try everything possible to stop a 600-mph train running without Oil.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (0)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#44509541)

how do you make the electricity to run the HSR train?

hamsters?

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#44509669)

Coal, nuclear, natural gas, hydro, wind, solar... oil isn't exactly the only way we make electricity. Nuclear alone accounts for ~20% of US energy supply.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#44509875)

The only place in America that generates a significant amount of electricity from oil is Hawaii. Great place for HSR.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44510119)

But what about a 600-mph inside an oil pipeline, huh?

No imagination, that's what's wrong with this country.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | about a year ago | (#44509405)

Yes, the middle of the country is empty, but you want to build rail where there will be people to use it.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44509483)

That is where the endpoints go. The part of the trip that needs to be at hundreds of miles per hour is the giant empty part in the middle. Done correctly with a few stops on the way that land would be greatly increased in value. People would move out to the country.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#44509689)

You want the endpoints to be where people use it. You want the noisier, space-hogging midpoints to be that big gap between Where People Are and Where People Want To Be. If it weren't for that gap, people would walk.

Re:There are no NIMBYs in space... (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | about a year ago | (#44509971)

I'm not an American, but I suppose for most people that "big" gap is between suburbs and the city center. Those gaps, also referred to as "cities", tend to not be empty.

The usual solution... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509331)

Is to hire some competent management team to execute on his vision. Or is it that he is unable to devolve responsibility? How do you think IK Brunel managed so many achievements in what was a relatively short lifetime? Or for those yankee doodle dandy's who cant relate to anything outside their own culture and sphere of experience, look up Vannevar Bush and what he was able to achieve through the management of good people.

Re:The usual solution... (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | about a year ago | (#44509417)

Is to hire some competent management team to execute on his vision. Or is it that he is unable to devolve responsibility? How do you think IK Brunel managed so many achievements in what was a relatively short lifetime? Or for those yankee doodle dandy's who cant relate to anything outside their own culture and sphere of experience, look up Vannevar Bush and what he was able to achieve through the management of good people.

You had me at "competent management".

He's invented a most ingenious transport (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509485)

Unfortunately, the capacity of the web server was too small for him to be able to release any details.

Monorail... Simpsons Did It (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509487)

MONORAIL! Sing along everyone!

Pointless hype (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509565)

Musk has been talking about Hyperloop at least a year now. He promised to release more details in the summer of last year. Nothing happened. Only a year full of fantastic claims and now this. He is probably right though - either release something or stfu.

15 minutes (-1)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#44509627)

Can this guy go away now please? Or can we at least stop fellating him every time he says something?

So his vision... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44509653)

So Musk's vision for a train in a long tube is just...a pipe dream?

Too busy for a pipe dream! (1, Interesting)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | about a year ago | (#44509703)

NEVER!

I think the reality is few people would like to strap themselves into a coffin and fly down a tube at 4000 mph considering that we can't even prevent trains from crashing in the 21st century. I mean think of how ridiculous that trains actually crash? The one in Spain crashed because it was going to fast around the corner because the driver was texting on his phone. Why would there not be simply some mechanical/electrical switch that triggers the train to slow down automatically approaching sharp corners?

I mean mankind wants to build cars that drives themselves, but we haven't figured out how to make stuff that can only drive on a set of rails safe and autonomous. Why the hell do we even have Train engineers when the source of most train crashes is human failure? Hell we even have planes that can land themselves on auto pilot and I think the physics and technology involve in landing a flying object is significantly more complicated than trying to control something stuck on a set of rails.

So I can only imaging how much humans could screw up something as simple as a capsule being fired down a tube.

I am sure that technically this is a very feasible transportation solution, but lets figure out how to stop trains from crashing into each other or running off the rails because they are going to fast FIRST before we string the planet together with tubes.

Re:Too busy for a pipe dream! (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about a year ago | (#44509881)

t was going to fast around the corner because the driver was texting on his phone. Why would there not be simply some mechanical/electrical switch that triggers the train to slow down automatically

Because there'd be an equal chance of the switch failing because the guy who installed it and/or the guy who programmed the subroutine which monitored it was texting on his phone... :p

Re:Too busy for a pipe dream! (1)

mjr167 (2477430) | about a year ago | (#44510063)

People strap themselves in to small metal boxes and hurl themselves down freeways at 60+ MPH several times a day... And automobile accidents are the leading cause of death in the US. But we still do it.

Re:Too busy for a pipe dream! (1)

rasmusbr (2186518) | about a year ago | (#44510065)

Why would there not be simply some mechanical/electrical switch that triggers the train to slow down automatically approaching sharp corners?

No reason, other than money saving and/or trying to complete the project on time by cutting corners. It's usually a bit more advanced that a simple switch, but that's besides the point. Any decent railroad has a signalling system that detects overspeed and automatically slows the train down to something like 20 mph before letting the driver speed up to the allowed speed again.

Time to get pedantic (5, Funny)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year ago | (#44509745)

It sounded like the future — a 600mph train taking people from San Francisco to Los Angeles in just 30mins. In fact it sounded like a future too good to be true.

A future where SF and LA are only 300 miles apart does sound a little unlikely.

new quest! (1)

SebNukem (188921) | about a year ago | (#44509805)

He obviously needs to start working on cloning sooner than later.

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