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Cory Doctorow On Privacy and Oversharing

timothy posted 1 year,23 days | from the open-book dept.

Privacy 53

slash-sa writes with a link to an opinion piece from Cory Doctorow that begins: "The European Parliament is currently involved in a wrangle over the new General Data Protection Regulation. At stake are the future rules for online privacy, data mining, big data, governmental spying (by proxy), to name a few. Hundreds of amendments and proposals are on the table, including some that speak of relaxing the rules on sharing data that has been "anonymised" (had identifying information removed) or "pseudonymised" (had identifiers replaced with pseudonyms). This is, however, a very difficult business, with researchers showing how relatively simple techniques can be used to re-identify the data in large anonymised data sets, by picking out the elements of each record that make them unique."

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EU=nanny ste communist faggot's (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,23 days | (#44532995)

First roman_mir not fordidden by the constatutian post.

Enough already. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,23 days | (#44533005)

Does every damn story on here have to be about Doctor Who? It's getting a bit much.

Re:Enough already. (0)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533353)

Exterminate! Exterminate!

Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,23 days | (#44533013)

Hundreds of amendments and proposals are on the table, including some that speak of relaxing the rules on sharing data that has been "anonymised"

If it is not broken, don't fix it.
What is the upside for relaxing the rules, again?

Re:Why? (4, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533023)

A massive dataset for use in research, for one. Be that purely academic research, or statistical analysis for marketing usage.

They can still get their research data. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44534585)

They need to ask for it and it needs to be "forgotten" by them when the use of it ends.

So there's no need to relax the rules.

If I allow myself to be included in data for a study or whatever, then that's fine. If I no longer want to be included, then that should be my right. It's still my information. You have been allowed to use it temporarily for your own purposes and you never paid me for each use of that data, so therefore you cannot claim to own it. Therefore when I say "You may not use my information again", then you must stop.

And the only way for that to occur is for you to delete that information.

Or don't you know how to keep track of information given to you? If so, then please close shop and don't do the work you're not competent to do.

NOTE: if you want to take information about me from someone else I gave my information to, then ASK ME. It will be under the same conditions as the other person: consideration for the use and/or the data remains mine, not yours.

Re:They can still get their research data. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44534871)

NOTE: if you want to take information about me from someone else I gave my information to, then ASK ME. It will be under the same conditions as the other person: consideration for the use and/or the data remains mine, not yours.

Microsoft Disagrees.

In an open letter to Microsoft sent January 15, 2013, the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner questioned whether Microsoft was really committed to privacy, based on a series of privacy summits the company organized last November. Specifically, the OAIC expressed "reservations" about one of the "discussion topics" Microsoft encouraged attendees to discuss.

The meetings proposed rewriting the so-called "Collection Limitation Principle," which states: "There should be limits to the collection of personal data and any such data should be obtained by lawful and fair means and, where appropriate, with the knowledge or consent of the data subject."

The report published by Microsoft states this "discussion version" was used:

"Data should be obtained by lawful and fair means and in a transparent manner. Data should not be collected in a manner likely to cause unjustified harm to the individual unless required by law. 'Harm' may include more than physical injury."

The OAIC worried that the revised discussion version placed no limitations on the collection of personal data. And the report said as much:

"[T]he requirement in the original OECD principle that data be collected, 'when appropriate,' with the 'knowledge or consent of the data subject,' seems to ignore the reality of the extraordinary volume of data that is generated today through routine activities and transactions and near-ubiquitous sensors (such as surveillance cameras, location monitoring by smart phones, and embedded computers in cars and other devices). Often, knowledge or consent of data collection in these situations is either nonexistent or likely to be so vague as to be meaningless. No one suggested that knowledge is not important, or that consent may not be appropriate in some settings, but there seems a real risk that the 'where appropriate' exception could swallow the entire principle, given today’s technology landscape."

http://readwrite.com/2013/01/23/microsoft-crows-about-its-privacy-program-but-australia-has-deep-concerns#awesm=~oed5BqlgbBHZTp [readwrite.com]

Re:Why? (1)

davester666 (731373) | 1 year,22 days | (#44534101)

The people with the data can make more money.

Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (5, Insightful)

Hadlock (143607) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533017)

Cory's site has 7 tracking services that track you every time you logon to his site, and correlate with a multitude of sites that also track everywhere you go online. I would think if you're going to promote digital privacy, the first thing you would do is remove the four google tracking systems installed on your website.

Re: Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookie (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,23 days | (#44533029)

What? You mean a writer on boing boing is a hypocrite when it comes to privacy and censorship issues? Shocking.......

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,23 days | (#44533115)

Just like other "globally-renowned" pontificaters, Doctorow is of course a publicity whore who has grown addicted to the lime-light.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44535463)

ding ding ding!

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (4, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533213)

I'm not sure if I would classify that as "his site". He's one of many bloggers. His site [craphound.com] , only seems to block 2 cookies (using ghostery), and they are twitter and wordpress stats. I would classify those as at least not completely terrible. That being said, My browser reported blocking 9 things from Boing Boing. That's just a little bit crazy. It's probably one of the highest number of blocks that I've seen a "legitimate" site.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (4, Informative)

Hadlock (143607) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533383)

He's listed on the Masthead as a founding member. I don't know what better credentials are needed to call it "his site". Should I have said "his commercial site" and then in subtext mentioned "his personal blog"?

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44536049)

Being a founding Member does not mean One agrees with everything the organization does. For example, I doubt Jesus and/or the Apostles approve of pedophile Priests.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (1)

lxs (131946) | 1 year,22 days | (#44536721)

When you have been dead for two millenia it's kind of difficult to have an opinion one way or the other.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (1)

The Cat (19816) | 1 year,22 days | (#44536809)

Only an atheist could say something so bold and brave. You must also be a scientist, because all atheists are also scientists.

Do you shut people down at the dinner table by defining fallacies and start conversations with girls with the word "Actually?"

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (1)

lxs (131946) | 1 year,21 days | (#44539945)

I usually try to make girls giggle by secretly making fun of bloviating fools. It's surprisingly effective.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#44544219)

No, you just have to disbelieve that Jesus is God. As Richard Dawkins said, most people are atheistic about Odin, etc. The supreme hubris of Christianity is that it arrogantly assumes that other religions do not even exist. You couldn't possibly be that blind could you? To say nothing of the "no true scotsman" fallacies that appear TWICE in as many lines.

Trolls gonna troll, I guess.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (4, Insightful)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | 1 year,22 days | (#44534035)

"I'm not sure if I would classify that as "his site". He's one of many bloggers. His site, only seems to block 2 cookies (using ghostery), and they are twitter and wordpress stats."

He blogs there, it's his site. There is no reason to split hairs. He is famous enough, he can blog wherever he damned well pleases, and he pleases to do it on Boing Boing. So it's "his site". Or where he chooses to blog.

Having said that, there are at least 7 javascript libraries on the site, 2 that appear on Ghostery, that are potential trackers, and some of them are definitely trackers.

And yes, hypocrisy applies here.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (1)

In hydraulis (1318473) | 1 year,22 days | (#44536269)

Tom's Hardware.

Ghostery blocks 16 trackers off the bat.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (1)

Agent ME (1411269) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533489)

There's stuff to privacy besides lack of cookies.

Cookies aren't the problem, scripting is. (1)

evanh (627108) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533517)

Cookies are managed by the user. Scripts that are written to replace rather than sit along side HTML are the problem. Scripts are managed, primarily, by tool-set developers. That makes the script monkeys the evil guys.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (4, Informative)

hairyfeet (841228) | 1 year,22 days | (#44533849)

Yeah I had to say the irony is moist and delicious when the guy banging the drum for Internet privacy has the largest number of red flags from PrivDog I have ever seen at 10, hell the porn sites don't have that much damned tracking!

Ya know as much as I hate RMS that is one thing I'll give him credit for, i went to his website and there is ZERO tracking going on, it was 100% tracker free. I found that refreshing and it was nice to see there are still some that walk the walk and not just talk the talk.

Re:Cory's site (boingboing) has 7 tracking cookies (1)

PrimeNumber (136578) | 1 year,22 days | (#44538011)

If you think that is dodgy ask his holiness about Federated Media [edrants.com] . He is near the tops in my list of arrogant self-righteous media whores that say one thing and do another.

Civil and criminal penalties against cyberbullying (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,23 days | (#44533037)

I think a good first step would be to make life tougher for cyberbullies who post images and documents with the clear intention of destroying someone's reputation or making them the subject of ridicule. Whether such incidents would be sanctioned would depend on how public the documents were, whether the victim was a celebrity or public person (e.g. high-ranking government or corporate official), whether the victim knowingly participated in either the photographing or the posting of the images/documents, etc. The laws would have to be clearly defined.

Facebook (3, Informative)

hoboroadie (1726896) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533125)

If you overshare, then every script-kiddie on the planet will be able to hack your life.
No law available to our Fearless Leaders can prevent abuse of the system by our National Security Industry. Forget about any sort of reigning in of the God-given Rights of our Owners.
Vote as if it mattered. Ha-Haa!

Rules? Please (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533155)

...anyone who can bribe or impersonate a cop can access them...

What 'rules' are going to stop that?

just happened (-1)

slashmydots (2189826) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533177)

A much younger friend of mine just got mega busted for random Facebook stupidity. Well, random stupidity that was posted about on Facebook but it totally makes me realize what's going on. I'm in my twenties (lol not oversharing) and I'm stuck right between people older than me not using it anyway and people younger than me sharing way the hell too much and not being remotely cautious about privacy. I do still remember in middle school when my first friend got dialup and after 25 minutes, MTV streamed half of a music video WITHOUT PUTTING IN A CD OR DVD! OMG! So I was pretty much there at the beginning but now I can't live without computers or the internet so I think I'm right there in that sweet spot of seeing every internet scam and problem and privacy issue and data leak that there has ever been but I'm not too old to just avoid it all.

Re:just happened (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533359)

What?

Re:just happened (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44533841)

What?

"A much younger friend of mine just got mega busted for random Facebook stupidity. Well, random stupidity that was posted about on Facebook but it totally makes me realize what's going on. I'm in my twenties (lol not oversharing) and I'm stuck right between people older than me not using it anyway and people younger than me sharing way the hell too much and not being remotely cautious about privacy. I do still remember in middle school when my first friend got dialup and after 25 minutes, MTV streamed half of a music video WITHOUT PUTTING IN A CD OR DVD! OMG! So I was pretty much there at the beginning but now I can't live without computers or the internet so I think I'm right there in that sweet spot of seeing every internet scam and problem and privacy issue and data leak that there has ever been but I'm not too old to just avoid it all."

Re:just happened (2, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533373)

Cool story bro!

Seriously, the only thing at all interesting in your post was the reference to your friend who got "mega busted" but you didn't even tell us what happened.

On oversharing (2)

yuhong (1378501) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533193)

I think the problems with oversharing should be fixed if possible. Of course, some of the problems are more difficult or impossible to fix, but we should try to fix as many as we can.

Re:On oversharing (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44534077)

I think the problems with oversharing should be fixed if possible. Of course, some of the problems are more difficult or impossible to fix, but we should try to fix as many as we can.

Done, and done. Emphasis mine. Some of us folks have had this over-sharing online BS wrapped up since the BBS days.

I over-share to the extreme, but it's all just unsubstantiated lies and grandiose claims. "Guerrilla Marketing for my Fictional works", is my story and I'm sticking to it. Sure I said all life on the planet should be eradicated.... The alternative is to move the Earth out of the Sun's orbit before it goes red-giant. I also said I wouldn't save the planet unless the world leaders paid me One Million Dollars!

Honestly though, since you want to keep the iceball Earth through the Andromeda Merger, just to have as a frozen origin-of-life museum, half price is fair for a charity case, innit? I mean, it's not like convincing folks global warming is a myth was hard... Slashdot posters get an additional 100b% off, Act now for this one time limited offer!

See? You'd be a fool to bring any of this crap against me in court. Who do you think fixes as many iCraps as we can for Judge Troglodyte? Magical Geniuses? Ha haha, oh you are silly. [gizmodo.com] Why, we do such a good job for our friends in high places, I bet they wouldn't even worry about clearing their browser history before ringing us up to fix their iTunes remotely via TightVNC...

Doctorb (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,23 days | (#44533259)

Doctorb. The b is for bargin.

European Parliament (5, Interesting)

manu0601 (2221348) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533283)

It is worth noting that this topic is among the "codecision" matters for which the EU parliament has a word to say. But even in that case it is still long away from being a real parliament. The European Commission proposed the initial draft, and it can strip the amendment voted by the parliament (it already happened). Moreover the parliament will have to agree with the European council, which is made of member states' government representative, and acts as a upper house in the EU framework.

Re:European Parliament (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,23 days | (#44533385)

It's time we got rid of that no good un-elected commission.

Re:European Parliament (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | 1 year,22 days | (#44538899)

Do not forget the policies carved into treaties, which are therefore moved outside the field of democracy.

Lobies lobies... (1)

BrillenOtarie (3015535) | 1 year,22 days | (#44534931)

The interesting point here, is that the wholedebate is just : The owners of some structures, some creepy sponsors or control freaks, and those on their paychecks (less than 1% of the population reweighted by the strength of their lobbies) vs. The Users (99% of the population; be serious, noboby likes to be followed, spyed on, to receive more junk publicity at least). Now lest's see what democracy is about... For me, the simple fact that it did manage to create a wrangle, points to a problem.

Re:Lobies lobies... (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | 1 year,22 days | (#44536767)

But the EU is not a democracy. The elected parliament has little power: it cannot start a directive draft. it cannot have the last word on amendments. It can reject a directive, that is its only real power, but that only apply to a limited range of matters for which the parliament is involved. For many matters, it happens at the European Commission, the European Council, or between both of them.

The horror show continues: the executive powers of member states act as a legislative power at the EU level, since the European Council is some kind of upper house... except that the debates there are not public. You never know if your government betrayed its promises or not. On the justice side, European Court of Justice's judges are appointed by the executive power for a renewable term, which means they are not likely to upset the executive power.

Many policies are carved in the marble of treaties, and cannot be changed even if a majority of European citizen want so. When France and Netherland's people said they had enough in 2005, their votes were just ignored.

I came to the conclusion that there is nothing to save in the EU. The sooner it collapse, the better. That will allow us European people to start over some continental cooperation with the respect of people sovereignty in mind.

building a public personna (4, Insightful)

anomalous cohort (704239) | 1 year,23 days | (#44533463)

I remember when facebook got big enough that I finally decided to create an account there. Not because I wanted to share private details of my life with my friends. Because the FB audience was big enough that I felt compelled to have some representation there. What my timeline displays is what I call a public profile. Think of it as the linked in for hobbies and vacation travel. Don't publish anything that wouldn't hold up in a criminal investigation. I'm not saying lie. Remember Andy Warhol's now famous "15 minutes of fame" quote? Well, famous people need a PR manager. In today's "15 minutes of fame" world, everyone needs their own DIY PR manager. Think like a PR manager before you post.

Re:building a public personna (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44533991)

exactly, i resisted social media for so long but by not having any of my own to represent me searchers get all kinds of other people with my name or maybe some posts about linux i made to some mailing list back in college in the 00s...not horrible stuff but i realize i need to put more effort into controlling my image online, kind of lame because all it does is make social media companies rich with little advantage for me but .. "welcome to the future" or whatever.

Re:building a public personna (1)

FuzzNugget (2840687) | 1 year,22 days | (#44534081)

Don't publish anything that wouldn't hold up in a criminal investigation

Sir, we have photographic evidence that you were at this location around the time of a nearby murder, we'd like you to come down to the station for "questioning."

Re:building a public personna (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44534167)

i hate to say this as i hate the surveillance state as much as the next guy but there's this one security camera right on my walk to work and the only way to not walk by it would cost an extra five minutes but i always think anti-government thoughts when i go past it until one day i saw they actually caught a murderer with it, some dude blasted a cabbies head off during a robbery attempt and luckily they had a clear picture of the guy from that camera which i could tell because i go by it every day, i was like "holy shit". now don't get me wrong i know the nsa could use some facial recognition shit to match me to some protest and then find my route i walk to work every day from a database and do something to me or whatever but...on the other hand some of these cameras really do reduce crime on a local level, key part being "local level", the nsa doesn't need a feed from that camera, but i have no problem with the local pd watching it.

Re:building a public personna (1)

am 2k (217885) | 1 year,22 days | (#44534961)

How has it reduced crime? This cabbie's head is still somewhere it doesn't belong.

Re:building a public personna (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44536665)

Well the shooter is now in jail instead of on the streets shooting other people.

Re:building a public personna (1)

godel_56 (1287256) | 1 year,22 days | (#44538343)

i hate to say this as i hate the surveillance state as much as the next guy but there's this one security camera right on my walk to work and the only way to not walk by it would cost an extra five minutes but i always think anti-government thoughts when i go past it until one day i saw they actually caught a murderer with it, some dude blasted a cabbies head off during a robbery attempt and luckily they had a clear picture of the guy from that camera which i could tell because i go by it every day, i was like "holy shit". now don't get me wrong i know the nsa could use some facial recognition shit to match me to some protest and then find my route i walk to work every day from a database and do something to me or whatever but...on the other hand some of these cameras really do reduce crime on a local level, key part being "local level", the nsa doesn't need a feed from that camera, but i have no problem with the local pd watching it.

I would have no problem with security cameras having local storage that the cops could come and access when necessary, but I'm not crazy about the idea of every security camera being linked back to some central location where you could be tracked 24.7 every time you leave the house.

That small extra degree of difficulty would be enough to provide a lot of extra privacy protection

Re:building a public personna (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44536163)

Remember, if You are asked to talk to the Police, the answer is, "Not before My Attorney arrives," even if You are completely innocent. I was going to post this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wXkI4t7nuc but I think, given the circumstances, it is better to get there thru Cory Doctorow's blog: http://boingboing.net/2008/07/28/law-prof-and-cop-agr.html.

Cory Doctrow? Seriously? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44533953)

Why is anyone listening to this guy about anything? He's not an authority in any circle - he just curates odd content around the internet and he himself isn't all that bright.

Re:Cory Doctrow? Seriously? (1)

godrik (1287354) | 1 year,22 days | (#44538145)

He is a public figure. He does speak about these issues frequently and held various position in various organization about privacy and copyright issues. I'd say he is the closest thing we have to an expert on privacy from the societal perspective (instead of the technological one).

Personnaly, I like his writing style in novels. But I tend not to like his blog.

Re:Cory Doctrow? Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#44539277)

Exactly. Why a serial college dropout and hypocrite is being taken seriously is beyond pathetic. Cory needs to go the fuck away. His writing alone is reason for him to be silenced with duct tape and pepper spray.

There is a path beyond anonymizs and pseudonyms (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,22 days | (#44534527)

Disclaimer: I am affiliated with one of the initiatives about to be mentioned.

While anonymization and pseudonymization can be broken with access to related datasets, secure computation is harder to break. There are various ongoing efforts like IBM's HElib (https://github.com/shaih/HElib) and Cybernetica's Sharemind (https://sharemind.cyber.ee) among many others. These tools allow you to build data analysis systems that will not see the data and will work nicely in an environment of distrust.

Some academic papers for the interested ones:
A paper on secure genomic studies - http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/29/7/886
A paper on secure financial reporting - http://eprint.iacr.org/2011/662.pdf (published at Financial Cryptography)
A thesis on the fundamentals of the approach - http://dspace.utlib.ee/dspace/bitstream/handle/10062/29041/bogdanov_dan_2.pdf?sequence=5

The technology is becoming more efficient and developer tools are being created (e.g., https://sharemind.cyber.ee). While they are still maturing, new and better versions will be popping up soon.

Hopefully, they will be here in time to still help us fix some of the privacy leaks.

Dan

Well (1)

The Cat (19816) | 1 year,22 days | (#44536779)

Cory Doctorow is a hypocritical self-congratulatory bigot.

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