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Dyslexia Seen In Brain Scans of Pre-School Children

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the a-picture-is-worth-a-thousand-diagnoses dept.

Medicine 105

dryriver writes "Brain scans may allow detection of dyslexia in pre-school children even before they start to read, say researchers. A U.S. team found tell-tale signs on scans that have already been seen in adults with the condition. And these brain differences could be a cause rather than a consequence of dyslexia — something unknown until now — the Journal of Neuroscience reports. Scans could allow early diagnosis and intervention, experts hope. The part of the brain affected is called the Arcuate Fasciculus. Among the 40 school-entry children they studied they found some had shrinkage of this brain region, which processes word sounds and language. They asked the same children to do several different types of pre-reading tests, such as trying out different sounds in words. Those children with a smaller Arcuate Fasciculus had lower scores."

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Baby Monitor FOSCAM ABC NEWS (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44569759)

http://foscam.us/forum/hacked-t6626.html [foscam.us]

Is the one who is in all the news.

Re:Baby Monitor FOSCAM ABC NEWS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44569863)

A cop with a lot of free time and nothing to do; getting careless while searching to satiate his desire for voyeurism and pedophilia.

sadly (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44569811)

it's just another one of natures ways of telling you your not meant for college

Re:sadly (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44569873)

That's a bunch of horseshit. My sister was dyslexic but also ambidextrous, and went on to graduate from the best public school in the U.S. and now works for the Ivy League. A woman I dated in L.A. who was dyslexic was also a biotech savant and polymath who painted and did a little acting on the side.

Dyslexia is one of those ailments that, unfortunately, cause young but talented kids to be shoehorned into retard classes and given complexes -- an early diagnosis is essentially a self-fulfilling prophecy of setback. Meanwhile, bullshit overprescribed "disorders" like ADD, which are indicators of true jackassery and bad parenting masquerading as a disorder, give the overstimulated too-much-TV-and-X-box socially-stunted, truely borderline-retarded kids a leg-up against those who deserve the edge.

So suck my dick, motherfucker. In fact, anybody with an ADD diagnosis can suck my dick -- you poorly-parented latchkey socially retarded sad fucks. You and the aspies both can eat my dick.

-- Ethanol-fueled

Re:sadly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44569913)

from the best public school in the U.S.

That isn't saying much.

and now works for the Ivy League.

If she didn't do anything innovative, that's not impressive either.

Re:sadly (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44570085)

2/10, made me respond. You must have been diagnosed with ADD, It's how bad parents absolve themselves of guilt raising their kids by monitors indoors 24/7 like privileged pets.

What Linus and RMS did wasn't impressive or revolutionary, they just stole other ideas, changed a semantic aspect here or there and called it their own(which, thanks to StackOverflow, is what happens during the workday of the average programmer). What Newton and Leibniz discovered wasn't impressive, Newton himself even admitted he was "standing on the shoulders of giants." What Elon Musk did wasn't a big deal, humans have been making cars for centuries! Shit, that applies to just about everything else as well. Just what is "impressive?"

I'll tell you what's "impressive" -- a Slashdot troll who says the word "nigger!" ( Oh no! He did NOT just say that! Oh my god, that is so wrong. What an ignorant asshole, he must be -- like -- so unhappy to be saying such an ugly word! How can we expect women/genderqueers/minorities/other freaks of nature feel welcome here if those...those TROLLS keep saying such things! Oh my GOD! That is so wrong! He's so...so...insentitive! Doesn't he know just how much those people have BEEN through, how his kind have been stepping on their backs like brutal oppressive patriarchs? As a single mother of a minority baby, he has NO IDEA how hard is it to see past those stares, that ridicule! BAN HIM! BAN HIM PERMANENTLY! There is no place here for HATE SPEECH. HATE SPEECH! ) *

* The passage enclosed in parenthesis and typeset in italics is the personal opinion of -- Ethanol-fueled, who does not condone illegal use of the word "nigger".

Re:sadly (0)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44570341)

My sister was dyslexic but also ambidextrous, and went on to graduate from the best public school in the U.S.

Oh, so you are from FL? http://www.businessinsider.com.au/the-10-best-public-high-schools-in-america-2013-5?op=1#10-stanton-college-preparatory-school-1 [businessinsider.com.au]

Aspies and dyslexia correlate well with each other and with dyslexia.

Re:sadly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44572069)

Dyslexia correlates with dyslexia? Who knew!?

Re:sadly (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44576127)

Replace the last dyslexia with ADD, and blame my dyslexia.

Re:sadly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44570359)

Never had ADD , grew up in a proper generation with none of this emo stuff, if you didnt make the grade for whatever reason they didnt spare your feelings.

'graduate from the best public school in the U.S.' with all the resources thrown at those priviliged few I should think an 8 year should graduate.

Re:sadly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44572119)

Never had ADD , grew up in a proper generation with none of this emo stuff, if you didnt make the grade for whatever reason they didnt spare your feelings.

YEAH! How dare those lazy cunts, the ones who can't learn the way we teach, try and do better for themselves! IF IT'S GOOD ENOUGH FOR 65% OF THE POPULATION, THE REST MUST BE LAZY!

If this doesn't sound like sarcasm to you, you might be an idiot. The best way for you to find out is to play Russian roulette with a hand grenade.

Re:sadly (0)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#44569887)

it's just another one of natures ways of telling you your not meant for college

I think you're reading too much into the presence of the word "shrinkage" in the summary.

Re:sadly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44574047)

it's just another one of natures ways of telling you your not meant for college

I think you're reading too much into the presence of the word "shrinkage" in the summary.

I wonder what told the guy you responded to that he wasn't meant for college? It's pretty obvious he's never been inside one.

Re:sadly (2)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44569911)

Einstein had dyslexia. For most people and business, college (and school in general) is about meeeting deadlines and following a schedule. For the minority that enjoy learning and have done so their whole lives, college is quite tedious.

Re:sadly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44572221)

Projecting your own failings and insecurities onto others doesn't make them a strength, and it does not make you intelligent. Best you shut up before people realise that you're not as smart as you feel you are.

Awww. Too late.

Re: sadly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44570083)

like being blind and deaf means you're not meant for college? (except for that chick that went to harvard, Hellen something?)

Re:sadly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44570389)

Wyh shuodl thta mtatre?

Dyslexic agnostic insomniacs toss and turn (2)

Bob_Who (926234) | about a year ago | (#44569865)

They lie awake all night wondering if there really is a DOG!

Re:Dyslexic agnostic insomniacs toss and turn (2)

hutsell (1228828) | about a year ago | (#44570039)

They lie awake all night wondering if there really is a DOG!

Unfortunately, this means dyslexics — not realizing it was a joke — will read your comment and mistakenly think you're talking about God .

Re:Dyslexic agnostic insomniacs toss and turn (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44574903)

Why would any one ever give a moniker to a condition whose primary symptom is the ability to spell said name?

Re:Dyslexic agnostic insomniacs toss and turn (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44576293)

Why would any one ever give a moniker to a condition whose primary symptom is the ability to spell said name?

I will see your dyslexcia and raise you a lisp..

Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia! (4, Insightful)

gnoshi (314933) | about a year ago | (#44569875)

What I got out of the article was not that 'scans could allow early detection and diagnosis', because deploying brain-scans on children to 'detect' a disorder like this is ludicrous (due to the low base rate and high cost of imaging). What I got was that there are 'pre-reading tests' which are apparently useful to detect dyslexia - otherwise you couldn't correlate the brain imaging results with the results of those pre-reading tests, and then call the imaging a 'dyslexia test' right?

Hell, maybe the researchers could develop a battery of pre-reading tests and then look at the correlation of the tests to the smaller arcuate fasciculus to choose good diagnostic tests. Assuming that the smaller arcuate fasciculus is actually causal in dyslexia, of course.

(Note: I am broadly cynical about correlational brain imaging research such as this. It can be good. It is almost invariably overstated.)

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (0)

cb88 (1410145) | about a year ago | (#44570413)

Sigh... the scans are probably quite cheap just gotta pay for a person to run a machine that was paid for since 20 years. They just charge you an arm and a leg for them. My parents being missionsaries they live in Brazil. A few years ago due to thyroidism, unknown to us at the time. My mom had an electrocardiogram which had cost around $500 where we live in the states and there it was $50 for the same exact test and same machine in a commercially supported hospital. They bought the machines and I am sure they were sold at a profit.

That machine does nothing all day but sit there and make $50  bucks a pop ($150+ is the going rate I understand in the USA)... now how many weeks would it take to pay off that same machine here in the US I could probably count them on my hands.

I know machines need upgrades and repairs and the nurses running them have mouths to feed... but the current medical system has no mercy let alone desire to benefit mankind beyond making a quick buck.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (2)

gnoshi (314933) | about a year ago | (#44570563)

As you're probably aware, MRI != ECG

An MRI requires a huge amount of power to run, because it needs to power an electromagnet capable of magnetically aligning atoms in the body. For one mobile scanner, this requirement is 200 amps at 480V on three-phase power. That doesn't specify actual consumption, true, but the magnet needs to be repeatedly used throughout a scan, which can be 20+ minutes.

According to a friend of mine (who a imaging researcher at an Australian hospital) a decent scanner will have a purchase cost of >$1m.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

gnoshi (314933) | about a year ago | (#44570567)

I should also point out that the people operating MRIs are not nurses.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (0)

cb88 (1410145) | about a year ago | (#44570707)

All valid points...I do also know that MRIs are quite alot cheaper as well.

Electricity is cheaper here in the US so while it is a valid point that it has a cost.. its lower here though. Electricity is so expensive in Brazil (mostly hydro power and some nuclear) that hardly anyone runs Air Conditioners and lights get run sparingly by many people even stores don't have AC them for the most part unless you are in a big box store in a large city. Another factor is most can't buy and AC so there isn't demand to sell them. I mention AC because its probably the biggest power user here in the US.

Here in the USA on average it would cost ( 200 * 480 /1000) * (12/100)  = $11.52 to run it for an hour at the max power draw you suggest assuming that is the electrical service requirements for the unit... it can me assumed it would actually cost much less since it is probably overrated at least by 20% and probably doesn't pull that constantly though I wouldn't be surprised if it did. Even if you left it on for a year... thats only about 100k in power bills.

I just looked it up and 1Kwh runs you about 0.33 Reais which is roughly 14 cents so thier costs are comparable but slightly higher and much higher relative to average wage 95% of the population.

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080513200318AASqIzq .... from that it seems like it takes 2 years of school and 2 years of apprenticeship to become a MRI technician as a minumum. I think its safe to assume at least 45-50k as a base salary possibly a good bit more (I'd want someone pointing a giant magnet at my head to make decent money heh...) Thanks for the cool reply :)

Re: Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexi (1)

loufoque (1400831) | about a year ago | (#44572031)

You don't power off an MRI after use. It's always on except for maintenance. The reason medical bills are expensive in the US is become the medical system is crap. In good countries, the national health care system pays for your medical needs, and ensures that if you have to pay it's affordable.

Re: Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexi (1)

diamondmagic (877411) | about a year ago | (#44591419)

The reason medical bills appear so expensive in the US are because we're still actually billed, and we get to see the results of a giant socialization of healthcare. The majority of people receive some sort of government assistance in part or in full, and the majority of everyone else still receives some form of third-party-payer care.

Parts of the industry where insurance programs aren't regulated or provided, like cosmetic surgery, LASIK eye surgery, and veterinary care, have been declining in price and cost for quite some time.

Other countries don't have lower costs. They're just hidden away. They do, however, have longer lines. (I can't name very many other countries where I can get an MRI next day.)

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (2)

fritsd (924429) | about a year ago | (#44572135)

The electromagnet of an MRI (or NMR machine as they were politically-incorrectly called) has a truly humongous field strength (order of 1 Tesla) and it's wound from Niobium-Tin alloy which is superconducting if you put it in a liquid Helium cooled NMR machine. So, you charge it up to the field strength it can bear without quenching, and then you just make sure to regularly top up the liquid Nitrogen (77 Kelvin = -195C) in the large Dewar barrel that surrounds the small Dewar barrel with liquid Helium (4 K).

It's a cool machine to work with ;-)
In order for it to scan and flip the Hydrogen spins in the patient or sample tube you need variations in the electromagnetic field surrounding the probe, but they just do that with radio waves coming in from the sides. You can also do more complicated stuff with magnetic field gradients but I think the gradients are really really small perturbations of the main field strength (in the order of ppm).

tl;dr: the electromagnet of an MRI / NMR is never turned off; that's a minor industrial accident called a "quench" when the Helium and then the Nitrogen boils off and the personnel rapidly leaves the room. I've heard firsthand that it gives a very unpleasant feeling that is difficult to describe.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (2)

brantondaveperson (1023687) | about a year ago | (#44571049)

Yes. There are pre-reading tests that can detect dyslexia, and they are quite accurate. The tests that I know of are trivial to pass for non-dyslexic children, and surprisingly challenging for children who will exhibit dyslexia once they start to learn to read.

They're all about testing how well children can take words apart and put them back together in their head. I attended a presentation on this at the University of Canterbury - which if you're interested you can see here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzyZquJ4260 [youtube.com]

I have two children with dyslexia, and one without. Of the two with dyslexia, one is quite a bit more severe than the other. I would judge that they are each of more or less equal intelligence, but the one with the severe dyslexia can barely write. He can talk intelligently, use his fairly extensive vocabulary, follow complex lego instructions, understand complex language when it's spoken. But he finds it very difficult to read and write.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about a year ago | (#44572463)

Try introducing him to Japanese or Chinese. Many dyslexic people find they may have trouble with English but not with non-alphabet based languages. Japanese is probably the easier to start with because of the three character sets used two are phonetic and there are only 48 per set (actually it's even less than that, half are just variations of the other half).

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

brantondaveperson (1023687) | about a year ago | (#44577747)

Well, we live in New Zealand, so of all the languages in the world to learn, one or both of those is probably a good idea. I'll give it a shot.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about a year ago | (#44582759)

Good luck. Japanese is the easier of the two, and if you go for it I suggest beginning with the katakana characters because they have a lot of loan words and they are all written with it. It can be kind of fun trying to figure out what a loan word is because they don't always fit into Japanese pronunciation that well, and of course some are not English (Japanese for bread is "pan", from Portuguese).

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about a year ago | (#44573057)

My younger brother is dyslexic and is most definitely the smartest person I have ever met. {and I know a lot of very smart people} Aside from a couple bachelors degrees he can fix your car or any item in your house electronic or not. When he was in school they gave him this colored film to place over books he read now he has it tinted into his reading glasses. {I have no idea if they still do it but it works for him and you might ask about it}

He is also left handed, extremely eccentric, and a little weird.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about a year ago | (#44573193)

I had to look it up.

http://irlen.com/index.php [irlen.com]

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

brantondaveperson (1023687) | about a year ago | (#44577727)

On the subject of Irlen Syndrome:

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/128/4/e932 [aappublications.org]

Which isn't to belittle your brother's achievements, but my understanding of Irlen Syndrome is that it's quackery. They diagnosed both of my kids with Irlen, but the colored overlays made no difference to their reading abilities that I could detect. It's always a warning sign when a 'syndrome' is a registered trademark.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about a year ago | (#44577979)

If you ask him he will say it makes all the difference... Maybe it's a placebo effect...

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

brantondaveperson (1023687) | about a year ago | (#44578691)

Quite, and I don't want to suggest that someone who's found something that works should stop using it. But dyslexia is a tough thing to deal with, and the evidence doesn't support what the Irlen outfit want to sell, so people's money and energies should probably be channelled into support strategies that the evidence does support.

If either of my boys decide to wear coloured lenses, and claim that they help, placebo or otherwise, I'm certainly not going to stand in their way. But kids are extremely suggestible, and one should take great care with any self-reported results from them. For instance, both my boys claimed that the coloured overlays helped their reading. But they both struggled the same amount with or without the overlays, and I didn't observe any difference in either their reading speed or their accuracy.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about a year ago | (#44582751)

I actually had never looked them up online before my brother is in his 30s now, and it's something he has done since grade school. He is very hard to gauge with his many eccentricities but I've not seen him struggle with reading since junior high.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

matria (157464) | about a year ago | (#44571327)

As a parent of two "normal" children and one badly dyslexic child, and having spent the same amount of time playing, singing, reading, drawing, coloring with all three, this was obvious. By the time my dyslexic child was 2, I knew he had something going on. Before that, actually, but nothing definite until then.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44571855)

Please read the book 'Why children can't read' by Dianne McGuinness, which will help your child learn to read just as well as your other ones. There is no such thing as 'dyslexia'.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44612505)

Understand that the fact that researchers have seen for themselves a physical difference in the brains of dyslexics versus non-dyslexics has invalidated McGuiness' theories on the subject of dyslexia.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (4, Informative)

mandginguero (1435161) | about a year ago | (#44571447)

If you check out the actual reporting from the authors (here for abstract http://www.jneurosci.org/content/33/33/13251.abstract?sid=bb49e635-09a9-4719-8462-cf027b122652 [jneurosci.org] ) you can see that they tested three predictors for dyslexia on children who had not yet received reading lessons. Without making any claims of observing dyslexia, they noted that the size of the arcurate fasciculus is positively correlated with scores of 'phonological awareness' and no correlation with 'rapid naming' or 'letter knowledge.' Perhaps a linguist or clinician could help elucidate what those tests are actually measuring.

It could be that dyslexia is a grouping of somewhat different brain/processing abnormalities that have similar behaviors. If that is the case, then brain imaging of the size of arcurate fasciculus could predict whether treatment aimed at increasing phonological awareness would have any effect. If you haven't had an intro neuropsych course you may not have heard that the arcurate fasciculus is a primary connection between auditory cortex and motor representations - thought to translate hearing into replying. Folk who have damage to this fiber tract are typically unable to repeat back to you what they just heard. The auditory and visual conduits run in parallel in this part of the brain, so it may have bearing on sequencing of writing, not just spoken words.

Re:Excellent! There pre-reading tests for dyslexia (1)

radtea (464814) | about a year ago | (#44575473)

Assuming that the smaller arcuate fasciculus is actually causal in dyslexia, of course.

This is where the utility of brain imaging comes in: it may help localize the causes of dyslexia in particular regions of the brain, guiding further research and perhaps leading to better remedial approaches to the condition.

who could of thunk it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44569965)

when ever natural left handers are forced to be right handers all sorts of funny things happen.
just saying
mike

And a dollar short (5, Interesting)

djupedal (584558) | about a year ago | (#44570011)

My dyslexia forced me to work harder in school at things others found easy. I was confused for a few years until I realized not everyone had my issues. Once I adapted, I started jumping grades and moving ahead. There are things about it that can be leveraged in terms of learning, after all.

Finding issues like this out early can be a blessing or a curse depending on how the parents and the school system react. If it's used to hang a 'problem learner' sign on a kid and just stick them in a corner, I say it's a curse. If it's used to support a tailored teaching environment, it would be a blessing.

Re:And a dollar short (2)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44570637)

My dyslexia left me learning learning differently than my peers. Some things I was faster at, others slower. But the school system is set up to push everyone through at some arbitrary average. Someone that's a few years ahead in one area and behind in another is not a possibility for the present system (until the higher grades). If the entire system was scrapped and moved to something Montessori-like, that would take care of many of the problems. But political reasons prevent any improvements in the school system.

Re:And a dollar short (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44573077)

My dyslexia left me learning learning differently than my peers. Some things I was faster at, others slower. But the school system is set up to push everyone through at some arbitrary average. Someone that's a few years ahead in one area and behind in another is not a possibility for the present system (until the higher grades). If the entire system was scrapped and moved to something Montessori-like, that would take care of many of the problems. But political reasons prevent any improvements in the school system.

My oldest niece (she is 21 now) had extreme difficulties in school due to dyslexia. Luckily (yeah, you can attack me for saying it that way - but she is lucky) she lives in Denmark that has special schools for kids with dyslexia and it has helped her a lot. I don't know why this isn't looked at a lot more in a country like USA (I'm born and raised in Denmark myself but now living in a Southern US state ... don't ask... life happens.) Overall it would benefit everyone. "No kids left behind" seems to not happening much here. It is more like "Everyone for their own because it is all about survival of the fittest". And that is a huge shame.

Re:And a dollar short (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44576285)

NCLB was deliberate sabotage of the public school system. Yes, I believe that Bush deliberately sacrificed the educations of millions of children to try to make the schools bad enough that charter schools and voucher programs would do better. My nephew is 12, and because of NCLB, he was declared "retarded" near test dates, then declared "normal" after. They didn't want his scores pulling down the school, and didn't want to give him any special treatment because he was a poor reader (presumably because of dyslexia). So he'd be sentenced to special education classes/schools, but not actually provided with any special treatment because it costs money, then have the special treatment revoked when it was no longer needed for excluding him from tests, and wiping it from his record so that he couldn't get any additional services.

Technically illegal, but nobody cares. The worse the schools do, the better, because when they collapse, we'll get more welfare for the rich (vouchers), which is the goal of the rich.

Re:And a dollar short (1)

nbritton (823086) | about a year ago | (#44572323)

For what it's worth, I've always learned best through hands-on and video instruction. The ability to pause a lecture, rewind it, play it back at a slower or faster rate, and play it back at any time is priceless. Non verbal queues are lost in audio only recordings, and attention has always been a problem for me due to lack of engagement. I'm a proficient reader, testing at a post grad level, but it has always been a laborious process for me. Additionally I have a strong aversion to serif fonts, as it's much harder for me to process words in these typefaces.

The one thing I wish professors would do is video record their lectures, dyslexic individuals can't take notes and process a lecture at the same time; this has been the largest impeder to my education. Every student benefits from this, really it's just stupid to not capture this information. I don't understand why it's ok in the teaching profession to needlessly dedicate hundreds of hours to repeating oneself to a new batch of students every year.

What could possibly go wrong? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44570047)

Monsters inventing excuses for all of us to have "brain scans" at the earliest age possible. What could possibly go wrong with this scenario? It is phrenology, lobotomy, and 'hysteria' based illnesses all over again.

Take phrenology. For the usual cretins, this pseudo-science was justified by the fact that certain rare diseases do cause predictable cranial deformities. So, the leap could be made from "the tiniest kernel of scientific justification" to a general roll-out of such nonsense. The elites in control would love to persuade the sheeple that such examination of their children was in the best interest of the family.

Of course, the USA has always welcomed such 'Brave New World' pseudo science in its widespread medical community. Eugenics (the Nazis based their horrifying regime on false but well establish theories of 'racial purity' first developed American universities during the 19th century to justify slavery), genital mutilation of males AND females (US doctors were destroying the sexual pleasure centre of female children into the 1960s), lobotomy (came within a whisker of being universally applied to whole classes of children within the USA just like vaccines), electro-shock, chemical destruction of key brain areas- the US medical establishment has embraced them all in its time.

Up until the late 60s, young women at the best US universities were forced to strip and pose naked for photos, simply because the racist nutters that headed the academic establishments believed in the racial superiority of the "white race", and allowed vile frauds like Sheldon to run riot.

In the post war period, the US government (via a military project) paid Israel to irradiate the heads of thousands of Jewish immigrant children the Jewish authorities in Israel deemed as 'lesser' Humans because their skin was darker. The families were told the massive doses of X-rays were a 'treatment' for ringworm (a fungal infection). The depraved pseudo-scientists behind the scheme thought the radiation would 'evolve' the brains of some of the children, producing 'super' Humans (the same pseudo-science later became the basis for the origin story of The Incredible Hulk).

Had Slashdot been around during this time, the owners of Slashdot would have been promoting 'science' stories about how great the X-ray to the head project was. Today, they try to groom you to thinking government inspection of your children's brains is a good thing.

Those that want to test and label you and your children, via generic tests applied to everyone, are the same evil today as at every other time such proposals were made. There is no mystery as to the common psychology that lies behind such proposals, and the propaganda used to sell it as a good idea to the sheeple in general. You are either cattle or you are Human. If you do not comprehend the difference, go away and spend some time researching Human History. The pattern of abuse never changes, even when the excuses do.

Re:What could possibly go wrong? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44570679)

Up until the late 60s, young women at the best US universities were forced to strip and pose naked for photos, simply because the racist nutters that headed the academic establishments believed in the racial superiority of the "white race", and allowed vile frauds like Sheldon to run riot.

I must not have known anyone that went to any of the "best" universities, as I'd never heard of that practice. I can't think of any link between that practice and racial superiority.

Today, they try to groom you to thinking government inspection of your children's brains is a good thing.

This isn't the government doing the inspection, and they are doing so to look for signs of a disease. I suppose you refuse blood tests if you are sick, wouldn't want the government to find out your blood type.

Re:What could possibly go wrong? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44572367)

I'd suggest you should get medicated, but that's probably some ebil gubbermint plot to suppress the truth or your natural instincts or something. Your paranoid delusions are impacting your lifestyle. Also, the NSA is reading your messages, and if they really wanted to, they could fuck you up. They'd make you do whatever the fuck they liked. If you didn't comply, they could just kill you. The fact you're still alive, and not being forced to take medication shows that you're just a paranoid delusional.

Another cause of dyslexia (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44570069)

A large percentage of dyslexia cases can be corrected through the use of colored lenses. Evidently in these cases dyslexia is caused by certain colors being transmitted to the wrong areas of the brain. Filter out these colors and a person can suddenly start reading. See irlen.com for more information. I am in no way affiliated with the site but know from personal experience that this works.

Re:Another cause of dyslexia (3, Insightful)

brantondaveperson (1023687) | about a year ago | (#44571067)

Irlen Syndrome is a scam. Suspiciously overpriced colored overlays, and lo-and-behold everyone who they test ends up having it. If you have children who are dyslexic, save your money and spend it on tuition instead.

Evidently in these cases dyslexia is caused by certain colors being transmitted to the wrong areas of the brain.

Evidently implies evidence. Of which there is none.

See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21930551 [nih.gov]

Re: Another cause of dyslexia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44571601)

Just HAD to comment (first time ever). Nonsense! Orange tinted glasses changed my daughter's life. She had never read a book for pleasure, struggled with homework. Tested various filters, got orange lenses, now studying medicine at Cambridge university and enjoys reading novels.

YMMV, and I believe that 'dyslexia' covers many internal malfunctions so this won't fix all, but DON'T discourage people from trying this - for her it was a miracle fix.

Re:Another cause of dyslexia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44572203)

Just because a cause may not be able to be proven definitively it does not logically follow that a certain procedure might not work in helping with the symptoms of that problem. I believe there have been MRI's done that led them to this understanding of what was happening. And before you buy overlays or glasses you are tested to see if it will work in your case. They are not going to force you to buy something that you haven't already seen the results for. And as another poster replied, this can indeed be life-changing. The overlays are not that expensive and they don't even recommend getting glasses for at least a year because just using the overlays might get the brain to start filtering these colors itself. And as I said, I KNOW from personal experience that it works. Maybe this isn't the source of all problems with dyslexia but it is in some and maybe a large percentage of cases.

Dyslexia NOT seen in brain scans (1)

umafuckit (2980809) | about a year ago | (#44570257)

According to TFA: "It is too early to say if the structural brain differences found in the study are a marker of dyslexia." Why? Because the children in this study are still of pre-school age so they haven't been followed up. What they have shown, it seems, is that a smaller arcuate fasciculus makes you worse at tasks such as producing word sounds.

Wouldn't help (3, Interesting)

roc97007 (608802) | about a year ago | (#44570317)

When we discovered my daughter had a reading problem, I paid for comprehensive tests, delivered the results to the school, (she had severe dyslexia -- the doctors said she probably wouldn't ever read past third grade level) and was told flatly by school officials that they didn't recognize Dyslexia as a condition. That their diagnosis (a school giving a medical diagnosis? never mind...) was that she was hyperactive and had a problem with authority. They suggested Ritalin. I pointed out that an independent psychologist hadn't found any signs of hyperactivity. They stuck to their guns.

So, maybe I'm being overly cynical, but I suspect this new test will just give them another datum to ignore.

But who knows, maybe it depends on the school system.

Re:Wouldn't help (2)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about a year ago | (#44570381)

and was told flatly by school officials that they didn't recognize Dyslexia as a condition. That their diagnosis (a school giving a medical diagnosis? never mind...) was that she was hyperactive and had a problem with authority. They suggested Ritalin. I pointed out that an independent psychologist hadn't found any signs of hyperactivity. They stuck to their guns.

Wow, that's...fucked up. I hope you got her transferred to some other school or worked out the whole thing. Luckily here in Finland dyslexia is actually recognized as a medical condition and kids who get diagnosed as dyslexic get help with that -- no Ritalin, not treated like retards, no claims of hyperactivity.

Re:Wouldn't help (3, Informative)

roc97007 (608802) | about a year ago | (#44570681)

I fought the system for a couple years, got her transferred to IEP ("special needs" program) but they were so hostile to her and to me that I finally pulled her out of school. She was homeschooled for three years, (which, fortunately, is legal here) then she applied for and was accepted into a magnet school for 9th grade. It was still not great (I had to read all of her homework to her, and she had to dictate her assignments to me ... every night ... it was like having a second job) but the magnet school never questioned her inability to read and at no time suggested she needed to be medicated. It was precisely where she needed to be and I have nightmares sometimes thinking what she would have gone through had she not been accepted.

Re:Wouldn't help (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44571361)

In the UK at least you could take them to court for that sort of attitude, it is a recognised disability, and as such like all recognised disabilities requires your school or your employer for that mater to make "reasonable adjustments". That behaviour would probably count as discrimination.
see
http://www.csie.org.uk/inclusion/education-disability.shtml
if you are in the UK and have problems like this with your kids you might want to talk to a lawyer, a polite letter from such a person on your behalf will probably bring them back into line.....

Re:Wouldn't help (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44572199)

I am a bit frightened in that if Dyslexia is caused by a neurological issue and we also see so much autism and other unusual problems in children that some mechanism or pathology is not attacking infants. Also the very testing that you surely paid a huge sum to have done should be done by all school systems for any kid struggling to keep up.. Also the frequent claim of hyperactivity really rests upon social policy as we no longer are allowed to really keep control of a class room. I am not advocating severe whippings or hanging students by their thumbs overnight. But three hundred years ago it is interesting that hyperactivity did not exist in a classroom. Simply answering a question incorrectly was enough to have a cane used on a kids back. So kids were more than eager to study in great depth.

Re:Wouldn't help (1)

lxs (131946) | about a year ago | (#44572381)

Dyslexia isn't easily recognized in a population when literacy is low.

Re:Wouldn't help (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44575903)

I am a bit frightened in that if Dyslexia is caused by a neurological issue and we also see so much autism and other unusual problems in children that some mechanism or pathology is not attacking infants.

It's simply that these handicaps are better understood today. My 28 year old daughter is so obviously autistic that even my 84 year old mother sees what the problem is. Yet no professional ever diagnosed her as such. When she was two and having trouble talking, one doctor diagnosed her as deaf and suggested that we all learn sign language... and her hearing is better than anyone's I've met. Later doctors diagnosed her as having ADHD (after which he did a double blind ritalin test, ritalin had no effect, not even a placebo effect) and mental retardation, despite the fact that she's shown her true intelligence many times.

Today a kid like her would be diagnosed as autistic before they were out of diapers.

Re:Wouldn't help (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44577517)

I had a similar experience, though they did not suggest Ritalin. We caught it early, pulled him out of school, and did an online "virtual public school" long enough to get him to read and have him assigned an IEP (individual educational program). With the IEP in place, we were able to put him back in school and they had to provide assistance to him. He seems to be doing much better now.

Re:Wouldn't help (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about a year ago | (#44579831)

We tried that -- Part time private tutoring on reading plus IEP program in the school. I'm not sure why the school was so hostile to me and my child -- maybe because I refused to consider their diagnosis of ADD? But we weren't getting anywhere and eventually I pulled her out and tutoring (essentially, homeschooling) became full time.

I have saved all the correspondence between me and the school administration during that time. *I* think it makes entertaining reading, and maybe my daughter will think so too, some day. It's in the pile of stuff labeled "for daughter".

Labels (1, Insightful)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about a year ago | (#44570337)

We are hell bent to label everyone....

See Johnny over there? He's high functioning autustic.

Little Suzy to his right? Textbook Dyslexic!

Little Ralph? Oh, very ADHD.

.....and on, and on, and on, until we find out that only 10 percent of the population is "normal" - whatever that is. Then we'll be able to drug the little bastards up, and turn them into model citizens.

Re:Labels (2)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about a year ago | (#44570401)

What's wrong with labels, then? You're acting like they're something bad, but you're not actually explaining why. Certain labels just happen to help with knowing how to treat a person in some situations, like e.g. my ex is highly dyslexic and therefore has trouble with written content; if you're communicating with her but don't know about her "label" -- as you so eloquently put -- you'd think she's either retarded or doesn't bother to follow the communication because she keeps misinterpreting what's being said or reading it completely wrong. On the other hand, if you know about her "label" you'll know to write your sentences slightly different so they may be easier to interpret and if she still misreads what's being said you can just ask her to re-read the thing.

Personally I feel there's nothing wrong with most labels, it just seems fashionable to complain about them.

Re:Labels (2)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about a year ago | (#44570959)

What's wrong with labels, then? You're acting like they're something bad, but you're not actually explaining why.

Labels, what could be wrong?

1. You are categorized that is what you are, and when labeled, you tend to stay there.

A co-worker's wife was a teacher. One day at a wedding reception she told me that she had excellent skills at labeiling chilren after a few seconds, and was very proud of how well she did it. She said she was always right. After speaking with some other parents, it turns out when she lableed some child a loser, she made damn well sure the child became a loser

I might have dismissed it, except that I had a teache like that. She picked one male child every year to be "the bad boy". And boy howdy did she let me have it when she decided I was the bad boy. My most amazing experience with her was when she told the parents about "bad stuff" that I was doing in school. And my parents believed her. Took till well out of high school to heal those jabs.

So yeah, I don't like labels. Labels, especially lables of presumed deficiancy are the stock in trade of people who lack the intellectual ability to understand that people are people. I have no toleramce for them. They are mentally lazy.

Certain labels just happen to help with knowing how to treat a person in some situations.

Oh, yes, how to treat people. I've worked with people with "ADHD", and "Aspergers". I put those in quotes, because I'm not all that sure that they sohould be conditions, and of the odd things that happen once you are diagnosed. You are treated as if you are stupid. Every personal problem is attributed to your deficiency. How do I know? Because of my life experiences, I don't treat them as anything . They all kind of like it. Aspergers dude says something outrageous, I laugh, or tell him to knock it off. Most folks just don't understand. When you're labeled, people tend to talk to you as if you are mentally challenged, or suffering from dementia. Neither is a condition of those two labels

This is going to be a really big secret I'm telling you, don't tell anyone:

These people that you need to know how to treat? Treat them like a normal person.

With all due respecrt to the normal people in the world, Normals really have the market covered on being unctious condescending assholes. Perhaps that should be their label, and we should treat normal people like assholes?

Personally I feel there's nothing wrong with most labels, it just seems fashionable to complain about them.

No doubt you haven't experienced the joy of being labeled. It's a lot of fun. Makes you feel like you are on top of the world. Now go take your Ritalin.

Re:Labels (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about a year ago | (#44572039)

This is going to be a really big secret I'm telling you, don't tell anyone:

These people that you need to know how to treat? Treat them like a normal person.

Reading through your whole rant you just seem terribly bitter and assume immediately that everyone is like the teacher you mentioned. Well, I'm gonna tell you a secret here in return: not everyone is like that. I don't see dyslexia, for example, as a deficiency as that would imply a negative attitude towards it; it's just one aspect of the person, it carries no positive or negative connotation in my mind at all. If I hear someone having Asperger's or something I don't immediately jump to the conclusion that they're mentally retarded and I don't go out of my way to treat them as such, so don't go harping on me for the failures of other people.

No doubt you haven't experienced the joy of being labeled.

You know, through your whole post you, yourself, are trying to label me as "normal," yet you continue to whine about labels. That right there is hypocrisy. Also, you immediately jump to conclusions based on this label you assigned to me; I've had PLENTY of labels attached to me over the years, both good and bad labels, and by no means am I considered "normal."

Re:Labels (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about a year ago | (#44579523)

This is going to be a really big secret I'm telling you, don't tell anyone:

These people that you need to know how to treat? Treat them like a normal person.

Reading through your whole rant you just seem terribly bitter and assume immediately that everyone is like the teacher you mentioned.

No doubt you haven't experienced the joy of being labeled.

Perhaps you read well, but you are not comprehending. You even quote my main point, yet miss it. Allow me to explain, although I fear it will not do much good.

1. I believe that labeling people is misused as often as it is used for good. I have personal experience in that exact thing happening, bith with myself and others

2. I do not treat people who have been labeled as (insert the label here) in the same manner as people who think they have to know the label do,

2. The people who I have associated who have been labeled as ( in my instance as ADHD, and Asperger's, as well as some intellectually challenged but not labeled autistic) have related to me that people tend to talk to them as if they are children. Dumb children.

3. The people who I have associated with who have been labeld have commented that they prefer my approach. Which is actually no approach at all.

Seriously, if you don't like my approach, too bad.

You know, through your whole post you, yourself, are trying to label me as "normal," yet you continue to whine about labels. That right there is hypocrisy.

I do not label you as anything - at least in my world. I believe that you are one of those people who feel the need to label everything, In your world, my writing that means I am labeling you as that. But that is not understanding. Being "labeled" as "A person who labels everything" is nothing like being labeled as ADHD, or Antisocial, or Bad person, or whatever negative connotation others might want to bestow. As a show of our differences, you have called me a bitter whining hypocrite. Hey, thanks. I have not called you personally anything. The closest thing is that i declared that you missed my point, or not comprehended my point.

There is an old joke: There are two types of people in the world. Those who separate everything into two tpyes, and those who don't. Seems like we have reached that impass.

Re:Labels (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44612671)

I do not label you as anything - at least in my world.

So, when you see a car parked on the side of the road with a light-bar on top with red and blue lights, and markings that look like your local police, you assume no difference between that can and any other? Most people would label it "police car" and either check their speed, or give more space, as it's more likely to pull out suddenly if it sees something that the "usual" car labeled "broken down car".

Or do you pull over behind it and check for government plates, in case it's an ex-police car sold at auction? Or continue further and call the station to see where car 421 is at the moment so you can identify it, rather than label it?

Re:Labels (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about a year ago | (#44613663)

Or do you pull over behind it and check for government plates, in case it's an ex-police car sold at auction? Or continue further and call the station to see where car 421 is at the moment so you can identify it, rather than label it?

You re arguing past me. What I am saying is that many people are labeled, and some others use that to discriminate against them. I don't like that. I think it is wrong. Do you think it is a good thing?

This is what I am talking about:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labeling_theory [wikipedia.org]

And much of the response to this labeling is very similar to styereotyping, especially the self fulfilling prophecy aspects:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereotype#Discrimination [wikipedia.org]

There is also a bit of Observer-Expectency effect going on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer-expectancy_effect [wikipedia.org]

And lest we be only negative, there is an effect, known as the Pygmalion Effect http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_effect [wikipedia.org] in which children will do better with higher expectations, while the Golem Effect http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golem_effecthas [wikipedia.org] children decreasing their performance because of their low expectations.

These things are not fiction, I have experienced both the Golem effect, and Pygmalion effect when I have had teachers who didn't subscribe to the idea that because one teacher had decided that I was bad, that I was inevitably bad. Those teachers were a great help to me in High School.

This is not absolute. There are some children with some real issues. A lead poisoned child will have behavioral issues that will be more difficult to cope with. A non-verbal autistic child will need special attention to their needs. But a child labeld as ADHD, only because they tend to fidget is wrong, Yet I have seen just that sort of thing..

But most very respectfully, I am talking about known and real effects. If you think that what I am talking about is the same thing as a person deciding that a police car is a police car by looking at a police car, it isn't even

the same thing. That isn't labeling. That is life experience. I have a very good expectency - although not 100 percent - that it is a Police car by virtue of it's resemblance to the other Police cars that I have seen in the past.

If you want to have an intelligent discussion about the harm that teachers and others in authority can do to children, fine, we can have that, and I would enjoy it. But can we? I'd like to think so. But at the moment, we aren't even sharing the same definitions.

Re:Labels (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44577235)

There's no such thing as "normal". Einstein didn't have a normal brain, and we're all the better for it. That teacher I'll label as "stupid" made the mistake not of labeling, but of applying the wrong labels. Judging someone as a "loser" is just brain-dead stupid; it's not a damned game, it's LIFE. That teacher is in the wrong profession.

My daughter is autistic. Your daughter is dyslexic. Those labels are descriptive and truthful, "loser" was not.

Re:Labels (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44612627)

And I was locked in a closet every day over lunch (at John J. Pershing Elementary School, Dallas) in second grade (around 1980). Just because you had a teacher that did it wrong doesn't mean that labels are bad. I did finally get pulled when I was beat for failing to follow directions for a Halloween assignment (the order was to "draw a man with two orange heads" - everyone else drew a man with two orange heads symmetrically in place of the regular one. I drew a regular human, carrying two jack-o-lanterns, one in each hand). Being required by law to notify on beatings (*before* not after, but only notified after in my case, and illegally as permission must be given, and they request blanket permission from all parents, and didn't notice my mother didn't give them beating permission).

And she recommended holding me back (I have a 180+ IQ, and had I gone through school 10 years later would have been diagnosed with everything they have a checklist for). Private school until the choice was eat or school, then back to public schools, though my mother was so worried about my previous experiences that she joined the PTA and was a little over-protective.

But labeling is a good thing. People do it naturally, and it would be unnatural to not do it. We start with the basics. Male vs female. Important for anyone wanting to procreate. We've discovered there are a number of states between, but they are mainly ignored except to figure out how to put them in one of the first. We also label based on age. "Age discrimination" is illegal, but legal when you discriminate against children and elderly, more labels. We label based on tribe (define that however you like), which was a strong safety requirement.

Labels are required for functioning. Drive to work. There are 1,000,000 cars on the road. If you treat every car as "unique" then you'll not be able to process enough to drive safely. Instead, we label them into at least two categories. "Uninteresting" and "interesting". You label uninteresting cars as such, and ignore them. They will change labels if they do something, but you'll ignore them if they are highly unlikely to interact with you. The interesting ones are the one directly in front of you and directly behind you, and those immediately around you.

Labels are required for human functioning. They aren't bad. But they can be misused. That is a poor way to label labels.

Re:Labels (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44571825)

my ex is highly dyslexic [...] she keeps misinterpreting what's being said or reading it completely wrong.

Are you sure you've got the label right?

Re:Labels (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44570599)

Nice rant, but it ignores that dyslexia is not treated with drugs. Is there a label for the condition that causes someone to lump everything into the same category?

Re:Labels (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about a year ago | (#44570975)

Nice rant, but it ignores that dyslexia is not treated with drugs. Is there a label for the condition that causes someone to lump everything into the same category?

Ummmm, that's what labels are Did you see in a dictionary somewhere that defines the word "label" is some sort of condition treatable by drugs? I'm complaining about societies seeming desire to label normal people as something somehow deficient. Not only drug treatable "deficiencies".

Re:Labels (2)

brantondaveperson (1023687) | about a year ago | (#44571081)

Dyslexia exists. Get over it.

ADHD - don't know. High-functioning autistic? Sounds like a contradiction in terms to me. But Dyslexia? Trust me mate, it exists, and if you have it then you will have severe difficulty in learning to read and write. End. Of. Story. I presume from your dismissive attitude that you don't have it, in which case more power to you.

There's no drug for it ether. Sure, I'm very suspicious of problems that have quick fixes you can go out and buy - Dyslexia doesn't have any of that. There's no cure, it's just how you are. You will always struggle with reading and writing, but other aspects of language will be unaffected.

Re:Labels (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44572281)

Stimultant medication is effective as a smart drug across a wide proportion of the population. In people with developmental / learning difficulties stimulant medication can close the gap between them and the normals, particularly around focus and organisation. ADHD meds are controlled, so the only way to get ADHD medications is to be given an ADHD diagnosis, physicians can't go off label where you can with a lot of other treatments. What this means is to receive "ADHD" medications you need to have an ADHD diagnosis.

Hopefully you can see the circular problem there, if you have dyslexia, but ADHD meds help you, you are considered to have ADHD+Dyslexia. This makes what you say completely true and false at the same time. ADHD medications help a lot of people with Dyslexia. They may not help with the core problems, but then they don't really help with the residual problems of ADHD either, particularly in adults.

If you follow this properly you'll see that most adults with ADHD tend to have difficulties like HFA/Aspergers anyway. This is true to a degree with most of these learning difficulties. The extent may vary a little. Same underling causes different expression. Same stories, different labels.

Re:Labels (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44612787)

You will always struggle with reading and writing, but other aspects of language will be unaffected.

I don't believe you. Have you seen the studies where people properly read words with the correct start and end letter, but the middle ones jumbled? That's more how dyslexics read. When you don't know as many words, it makes it very hard to learn new words, sounding them out doesn't work well. Writing isn't hard, it just isn't as accurate, and can be frustrating when perfection is demanded. When the dyslexic gets to enough words, reading is no harder than a regular person, just possibly less accurate (though in practice, I think confusing combinations should be limited). My vocabulary is likely more than double average, and when I, as a teen, got to about "average" adult vocabulary, reading became much easier. The problem with the "fix" for dyslexia is doing what you don't like until you do like it.

Re:Labels (1)

brantondaveperson (1023687) | about a year ago | (#44612883)

Have you seen the studies where people properly read words with the correct start and end letter, but the middle ones jumbled? That's more how dyslexics read.

Yes, I have seen those studies. That's not how dyslexic's read - that's how 'regular' people read. I am not dyslexic, so I don't know how they read, but I do know that they find it very difficult.

When the dyslexic gets to enough words, reading is no harder than a regular person.

Citation needed

Writing isn't hard ... When I, as a teen, got to about "average" adult vocabulary, reading became much easier.

You are not dyslexic. Good for you.

I think you might want to do a bit more research before you proclaim on matters about which you appear to know very little.

My vocabulary is likely more than double average

Unlikely. Lots of people think this, in the same way that lots of people think they are above average drivers. Your vocabulary may very well be very large, although your writing doesn't betray such versatility, but double average? In your own words, I don't believe you.

Re:Labels (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44613721)

You are not dyslexic. Good for you.

Then you know more about me in a single sentence than a PhD who tutored me for multiple years and formally diagnosed me.

Unlikely. Lots of people think this, in the same way that lots of people think they are above average drivers. Your vocabulary may very well be very large, although your writing doesn't betray such versatility, but double average? In your own words, I don't believe you.

I don't use big words for little minds. There's not an easy way to gauge vocabulary size, but I've had mine estimated at about 40k, and "average" is about 20k. You likely didn't know what average was until I just told you, but are somehow enough of an expert to know I'm wrong without even knowing what "wrong" would be.

Yes, I have seen those studies. That's not how dyslexic's read

In your own words, I don't believe you.

Yawn, more bad research (2)

gr8_phk (621180) | about a year ago | (#44570367)

They asked the same children to do several different types of pre-reading tests, such as trying out different sounds in words. Those children with a smaller Arcuate Fasciculus had lower scores.

Sure, but did the kids later get diagnosed with dyslexia? Oh, didn't follow them that long? So we have an interesting observation pretending to be a diagnostic tool.

could be a cause rather than a consequence (1)

SpaceLifeForm (228190) | about a year ago | (#44570395)

NFS. Who ever thought otherwise? Oh, maybe some researchers scamming your tax money.

dyslexia is for parents... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44570659)

who can't admit they have stupid kids who suck at reading.

Re:dyslexia is for parents... (1)

matria (157464) | about a year ago | (#44571343)

Nonsense. Worksheets with pictures, the kid is supposed to put the pictures in the proper sequence - the dyslexic kid couldn't figure it out. It's not a problem with reading per se, it's a problem sequencing. I get numbers backwards all the time, as well a left and right, sometimes even up and down. But I was reading at 9th grade level in the 1st grade. My dyslexic kid would say "stairsdown" for downstairs, and "antarz" for Tarzan. We persevered, and he later went on to college, for accounting, and got on the Dean's List.

Re:dyslexia is for parents... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44575107)

So how is someone who can't tell left from right or up from down less retarded than say a kid who can't read but can hit a fastball over the fence? I don't know why you think your brand of retardation somehow makes you better than all the other dumbasses.

I seem to be affected (1)

mandark1967 (630856) | about a year ago | (#44570867)

since I read that as Pre-School Children Seen In Brain Scans of Dyslexia

Seen scrawled on bathroom wall: (1)

wbr1 (2538558) | about a year ago | (#44571335)

Dixlecys Untie!

Catch 22 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44571371)

My daughter has reading troubles that I believe were consistent with dyslexia. We voiced our concerns to the school and they told us it was a medical issue not a school issue. So we talked with her doctor who informed us that dyslexia was a school problem and not a medical problem. To have her diagnosed officially we would have to had paid a large amount out of pocket and even then the school would not do anything beyond what help she already received in her reading group. If dyslexia is so common I can't understand why it is swept under the rug like it doesn't exist.

Re:Catch 22 (2)

FireFury03 (653718) | about a year ago | (#44571693)

My daughter has reading troubles that I believe were consistent with dyslexia. We voiced our concerns to the school and they told us it was a medical issue not a school issue. So we talked with her doctor who informed us that dyslexia was a school problem and not a medical problem. To have her diagnosed officially we would have to had paid a large amount out of pocket and even then the school would not do anything beyond what help she already received in her reading group. If dyslexia is so common I can't understand why it is swept under the rug like it doesn't exist.

As far as I can tell, here in the UK it isn't swept under the rug - schools seem to take it very seriously and provide extra help, and dyslexic people can qualify for government grants for equipment to help them, etc. From the comments I'm seeing here it sounds like the US is pretty backwards when it comes to dyslexia. (And you're right - its extremely common, I know a lot of dyslexics).

I don't know but: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44571461)

As someone who could not read until 4th grade (US). Then when suddenly the glyphs stopped dancing. My tested reading level went to pre college.

I can say in my case dyslexia is in the decoding. Not the encoding of information.

I think that the statically most humans process information in a linear fassion. So if some of us have a more multidimensional thought process it may seem our thoughts are random and even at times out of place but...

Lysdexica (1)

Roachie (2180772) | about a year ago | (#44571541)

Held me back never did.

Re:Lysdexica (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44572719)

Yoda, is that you?

No such thing as 'dyslexia' (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44571735)

Read 'Why children can't read' by Dianne McGuinness, if you're interested.

Arcuate Fasciculus (1)

AikonMGB (1013995) | about a year ago | (#44572219)

There's a typo in the summary, the correct spelling is "Accurate Fasciculus".

We're all a lil lysdexic .... (1)

tkjtkj (577219) | about a year ago | (#44574267)

On ??

Another eugenics case (1)

lunacyq (2893005) | about a year ago | (#44592913)

This genetic disease can be abolished with application of eugenics. To bad humans cannot understand an accept eugenics. It's to help advance their own kind.
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