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Bradley Manning Says He's Sorry

timothy posted about 8 months ago | from the may-I-have-another dept.

Crime 496

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "The Washington Post reports that Pfc. Bradley Manning told a military judge during his sentencing hearing that he is sorry he hurt the United States by leaking hundreds of thousands of sensitive military and diplomatic documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks and he asked for leniency as he spoke for less than five minutes, often in a quavering voice "I'm sorry I hurt people. I'm sorry that I hurt the United States," said Manning, who was convicted last month of multiple crimes, including violations of the Espionage Act, for turning over the classified material. "I'm apologizing for the unintended consequences of my actions. I believed I was going to help people, not hurt people." Speaking publicly for only the third time since he was arrested in Iraq in June 2010, Manning said he had been naive. "I look back at my decisions and wonder, 'How on earth could I, a junior analyst, possibly believe I could change the world for the better over the decisions of those with the proper authority?'""

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496 comments

I'd be sorry (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573253)

I'd be sorry if you locked me in a box for years.

Re:I'd be sorry (5, Insightful)

dmbasso (1052166) | about 8 months ago | (#44573373)

[Spoiler alert] Last page of 1984.

Re:I'd be sorry (5, Interesting)

no-body (127863) | about 8 months ago | (#44573501)

[Spoiler alert] Last page of 1984.

That ?

You believe that reality is something objective, external, existing in its own right. ... Do you remember, [O'Brien] went on, writing in your diary, 'Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two makes four'?
Yes, said Winston.
O'Brien held up his left hand, its back toward Winston, with the thumb hidden and the four fingers extended. How many fingers am I holding up, Winston?
Four.
And if the Party says that it is not four but five--then how many?
Four.
....
Five

He's been broken on the wheel. (5, Insightful)

FreonTrip (694097) | about 8 months ago | (#44573259)

What would YOU say if you'd been through what he has? Who can say if he's sincere? This is just another part of the dog and pony show. Keep fighting.

Re:He's been broken on the wheel. (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about 8 months ago | (#44573297)

This apology carries no more weight than confessions extracted by torture. It's only purpose is to legtimize barbaric injustice. .

Re:He's been broken on the wheel. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573355)

It literally is an apology extracted by torture, as has been extensively documented.

Re:He's been broken on the wheel. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573573)

No, he's a fucking pussy. To think I participated in a protest calling for his freedom from prosecution. He knows he's going to be locked up and eaten alive, he could have roused the rabble with an extended speech about how freedom must not succumb to tyranny and that the population must rise up, etc. He did not "hurt" the United States, he "hurt" the corrupt power and kill-hungry military leadership and their empire-building. Disappointing. Very, very disappointing. It's the kind of Indian-give a typical bootlicking Slashdot reader would do.

-- Ethanol-fueled

You did change the world for the better! (5, Insightful)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 8 months ago | (#44573269)

He is clearly just trying to show remorse and get a lighter sentence now. In any measurable way his actions have made the world a better place, no not resulted in any demonstrable harm (except what the US deserves for its actions).

Can't blame him when he could be facing the rest of his life in jail, but I don't believe him for a second.

Re:You did change the world for the better! (4, Insightful)

davydagger (2566757) | about 8 months ago | (#44573303)

the worst part is this is a horrible idea.

1. None of his detractors are ever really going to forgive him. They'd just take this as a sign they broke him and pat themselves on the back at a job well done. It vindicates their position, and makes them look better.

2. Its a slap in the face to his supporters. It makes them look like idiots, and traitors for supporting him, which is what its going to be used for in propaganda.

3. He's not going to get a lighter sentance.

Re:You did change the world for the better! (5, Informative)

MrLint (519792) | about 8 months ago | (#44573447)

I'm not a detractor and I think hes been broken. Ceding to the 'chain of command' to disavow bad action by the organization is one of the ways fascism grows unchecked.

Re:You did change the world for the better! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573521)

Easy to say from the outside looking in huh?

Re:You did change the world for the better! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573369)

I agree. The quote: 'How on earth could I, a junior analyst, possibly believe I could change the world for the better over the decisions of those with the proper authority?' sounds like Manning took the prosecution's argument and rephrased it in the first person. It sounds improbable with respect to sincerity.

How much more natural does it seem to imagine the prosecution (or the authorities in question) saying: 'How on earth could you, a junior analyst, possibly believe that you could change the world for the better over the decisions of those with the proper authority?'

It almost seems tongue in cheek to me.

Re:You did change the world for the better! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573537)

It almost seems tongue in cheek to me.

It seems honest. He's sorry to have leaked so much to be identifiable so early in his career. Now he knows he should have probably leaked less, risen in ranks, be able to take more influence at a higher level, or if nothing else helps, leak more important information at a later time.

Re:You did change the world for the better! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573591)

We don't really know what's going on in his mind. He has been tortured and isolated for so much time. It saddens me but I think he might be sincere. This doesn't change how I feel about what he has done for making the world a better place.

Re:You did change the world for the better! (2, Interesting)

poetmatt (793785) | about 8 months ago | (#44573543)

I wouldn't fault him for that as much as fault the US government for our gross miscarriage of justice.

the impact of this is causing ripples around the globe - more and more companies involving technology do not have any desire to work with the US. This wouldn't matter if we weren't a country that's living basically depends on our technology involvement.

MIT has told the world "fuck you" and was seen as a leader in technology. The NSA has done the same. That's pretty significant.

You break the law you go to jail (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573271)

Good intentions or not, what he did was wrong and he will have to take the consequences.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (5, Insightful)

kevkingofthesea (2668309) | about 8 months ago | (#44573291)

Wrong and illegal are not always one and the same.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573307)

That's a matter of personal opinion. In general wrong and illegal are the same thing, because no one will be able to decide what is wrong unless it's defined that way.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (-1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about 8 months ago | (#44573347)

So it's not wrong for your wife to lie to and cheat on you, since it's not illegal?

Re:You break the law you go to jail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573359)

In general no, personally yes.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (5, Insightful)

Notabadguy (961343) | about 8 months ago | (#44573437)

So it's not wrong for your wife to lie to and cheat on you, since it's not illegal?

Bad analogy.

Better analogy: You're cheating on your wife. I tell your wife that you're cheating on her. Am I wrong?
Analogy +1: In this case, you're the government and the wife is the American people. As it happens, you've made a law that no one is allowed to disclose if you cheat on your wife.
Analogy +2: Our marriage contract says that you don't have the power to make that law.

So: You've broken our marriage contract by making a law stating that no one can tell anyone if you cheated on your wife. Then you cheated on your wife, breaking the covenant of marriage. Then you locked up the guy who tattled that you cheated on your wife.

Who's in the wrong here?

Re:You break the law you go to jail (2)

hypergreatthing (254983) | about 8 months ago | (#44573349)

That's a matter of personal opinion. In general wrong and illegal are the same thing, because no one will be able to decide what is wrong unless it's defined that way.

Except, you know, a jury.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573389)

So you'll suddenly think raping your mother is okay if there were no law forbidding it? If there's intelligent life in the universe, it's no wonder we haven't found them. They're not letting us.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573393)

Yes, because of course laws are our sole source of morality...

Re:You break the law you go to jail (5, Insightful)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 8 months ago | (#44573395)

No, wrong and illegal are different sets. Hopefully, they have considerable overlap, but all things that are wrong certainly shouldn't be illegal, and there are things that are reasonably illegal that are not wrong. Now, whether or not what Manning did was wrong is a matter of opinion, but whether wrong and illegal are the same thing or not is not up for reasonable debate.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (3, Insightful)

neonKow (1239288) | about 8 months ago | (#44573479)

In that case I'd really like to hear your views on slavery, segragation, and voting rights. I'd also like to know how you define things as right and wrong that are illegal in one state or nation but not another.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (5, Informative)

SecurityTheatre (2427858) | about 8 months ago | (#44573525)

Have you ever heard of the crime "structuring"? If you haven't let me give you a little summary.

See, a long time ago, for a variety of reasons, some probably legitimate, many probably not, the government made the sale and possession of drugs illegal (including alcohol, at first). In order to maintain illegal businesses, a number of various types of organized crime arose. In response to this, the IRS was given sweeping powers to strike at individuals regarding their assets and income. A set of laws was put in place to give them this power and now, lying to the government about the source and value of your personal income was illegal.

As a result, organized crime businesses needed to find means of distributing cash without records, hence "money laundering". Often using a business, such as a laundromat to direct money elsewhere, criminals could distribute their cash. As a result, a series of new laws were created to prevent the distribution of cash to businesses, including sweeping NEW laws enabling the government to snoop in private company's records.

Moving on, the crime bosses began to launder money internationally. This usually involved briefcases full of cash. As a result, some western countries enacted regulations on the amount of cash one could carry over the border. Today, anything over $10,000 in cash must be declared and will usually be subject to investigation as to the source.

But deciding this wasn't sufficient, in the 1980s, a new law was created, called "structuring". This law essentially prevents you from carrying the sum of $10,000 over the border over the course of multiple trips. This law simply states that you may not circumvent arbitrary controls, such as currency limits, by conducting your activities in such a way as to avoid them.

As the result of a law to prohibit the structuring of activities to avoid the law to prevent the carrying of cash, which itself is to avoid the law of domestic money laundering, which itself is to avoid the law of revenue auditability, which itself is set up to prevent those who started a business based on that which is of questionable ethics (selling prohibited substances).

Illegal does not always equal wrong.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (4, Insightful)

mcvos (645701) | about 8 months ago | (#44573601)

That's a matter of personal opinion. In general wrong and illegal are the same thing, because no one will be able to decide what is wrong unless it's defined that way.

No, it's a matter of fundamental morals. If you'd lived in nazi Germany, would you have ratted on a neighbour hiding Jews? Not doing so was illegal, but also the only right thing to do.

Equating illegal with wrong means you're uncritically accepting your government as the ultimate judge in ethical matters.

Re: You break the law you go to jail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573317)

Maybe the only thing he did wrong was give it to Wikileaks instead of the Guardian or Der Speigel and running. It's amazing how uninterested domestic media was in the info.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573405)

Stop trying to confuse Javert. You'll only cause him to kill himself, you know.

Re:You break the law you go to jail (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573583)

Good intentions or not, what he did was wrong and he will have to take the consequences.

Eat shit, you bootlicking fascist pawn.

I choose to believe (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573273)

that he fell victim to the 5 dollar wrench.

Not Quite (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573277)

He apologized for the result of his action, not his action.

Re:Not Quite (1)

barlevg (2111272) | about 8 months ago | (#44573287)

"I look back at my decisions and wonder, 'How on earth could I, a junior analyst, possibly believe I could change the world for the better over the decisions of those with the proper authority?'"

That struck me as an apology for the action itself.

Re:Not Quite (5, Insightful)

camperdave (969942) | about 8 months ago | (#44573367)

"I look back at my decisions and wonder, 'How on earth could I, a junior analyst, possibly believe I could change the world for the better over the decisions of those with the proper authority?'"

That struck me as an apology for the action itself.

That struck me as a "they broke me", rather than an "I'm sorry".

Re:Not Quite (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573371)

No, that's not an apology, that's a statement of self deprecation; meaning that he should have known that the powers he is up against are so overwhelming that he should have just kept his mouth shut than try to do the right thing. David vs. Goliath, without god's grace to see him through.

Re:Not Quite (3, Insightful)

freezin fat guy (713417) | about 8 months ago | (#44573465)

People forget that America was built by people who refused to question authority, people who knew their place, people who quietly did their part for their superiors and didn't waste time with foolish, liberal ideologies like, well liberty and equality.

Re:Not Quite (3, Informative)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 months ago | (#44573561)

It was built by people who would have lost their shirts if the British stayed in control and turned over the vast majority of the central US to the french, as was their plan.
They then used fear of Catholics, who where growing in Canada, and lied about taxes by making a big show even tough Taxed tea was cheaper and higher quality then black market tea.
And it was liberty and equality for educate white men.

Re:Not Quite (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 months ago | (#44573527)

Where in the sentence does he say he is sorry?
It's not even close to an apology. I've heard politicians come closer to apologizing.

Not quite that either (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573321)

He apologised if the accusations made against him without evidence (that he damaged the USA or innocent people) were true for doing it.

However, since the people he's hurt are criminals and the USA has not been damaged (the criminals who think they ARE the USA [see Noah in Bourne Legacy] have been damaged, but I count them not the USA), there's nothing to apologise for.

They probably said that he'd be dangling on the edge of a trapdoor if he didn't at least let it be hinted he was at fault.

Belief (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573281)

"I look back at my decisions and wonder, 'How on earth could I, a junior analyst, possibly believe I could change the world for the better over the decisions of those with the proper authority?'"

Because those with the authority weren't going to do anything for the betterment of the world.

Re:Belief (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573305)

You have been flagged. Random beat downs may occur in the future.

NSA bot #4339

Re:Belief (4, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about 8 months ago | (#44573329)

Exactly. Those in authority care nothing for the betterment of the world. Only their own betterment, which is tied to the betterment of the rich and powerful.

Resistance to those with authority is the only way we are actually going to better the world.

By the end (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573285)

He loved Big Brother.

Ministry of truth (5, Insightful)

MadTinfoilHatter (940931) | about 8 months ago | (#44573293)

After a few months in the basement of the ministry of truth he had finally learned to love Big Brother...

Re:Ministry of truth (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573315)

Sends chills down the spine, doesn't it?

Re:Ministry of truth (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573471)

and another 5 decades behind bars at the ministry of leavenworth he will learn to love dick

Re:Ministry of truth (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573581)

He already does, next time read the full article.
And yes, the USA bravest soldier is a faggy.

"America, Fuck Yeah", or should I say: "America, fuck me you handsome man yeah!!"

Re:Ministry of truth (1)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | about 8 months ago | (#44573477)

No.

It's the Ministry of Love that's in charge of torture. The Ministry of Truth is in charge of revising the history books to match current political convenience.

Re:Ministry of truth (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 months ago | (#44573507)

Another person referring to 1984 and not getting it right. Have ANY of you people actually read the book?

And he didn't apologize for his actions.

Re:Ministry of truth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573555)

"Underneath the spreading chestnut tree,
I sold you and you sold me"

The truth is a boot stomping on a human face... forever.

Oh yeah, totally believable. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573313)

So they "enhanced interrogation" and/or solitary'd him until he broke and said anything they want to make the pain stop, and we're totally supposed to think that his epiphany was due to suddenly remembering just how free we are and people-loving is our government?

Riiiiiiight.

*Fun fact my captcha there was "kneecap". How appropriate.

Re:Oh yeah, totally believable. (1, Insightful)

Sepodati (746220) | about 8 months ago | (#44573403)

Or... he's just saying what his lawyers told him to say. I know, it's more fun to blame torture, though.

No one will believe it. (0, Flamebait)

Kid Zero (4866) | about 8 months ago | (#44573337)

I think we've already summed this one up.

1. His backers will just assume he's either lying to get a lighter sentence, or he's been to the reeducation camp and loves Big Brother now.

2. His detractors? They will believe he's trying to get a lighter sentence and still isn't sorry.

Either way, he deserves the jail-time and not martyrdom.

Re:No one will believe it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573469)

Yes, because when we give up on the mythical man in the sky as our supreme leader whom we follow blindly, it is important we replace it with a supreme leader who you didn't vote for and whom you typically can't leave without kissing a new leader's ass (and giving the old leader your respects in the form of taxes). Makes sense, I guess.

Re:No one will believe it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573607)

Either way, he deserves the jail-time and not martyrdom.

I don't think that word means what you think it means

Having been tortured and mistreated before trial, he is now going to jail for what he has done. That is pretty much a definition of martyrdom.

The accusers have failed to show any actual harm, although they tried to introduce "his leaks killed people", that didn't fly in court.

Re:No one will believe it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573611)

Either way, he deserves the jail-time and not martyrdom.

And you deserve cancer.

Where have I read this before? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573339)

Did he also say he loved Big Brother?

Unintended Consequences (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573357)

At least he is acknowledging how reckless he was in mass dumping data like that. He only had a gut feeling that he was doing more good than bad and that isn't enough to do what he did when lives are on the line.

Re:Unintended Consequences (3, Insightful)

geirlk (171706) | about 8 months ago | (#44573617)

Thing is, in international conflicts, lives are on the line every day. It's just whose lives are endangered that one side takes issue with.

Lives are also daily at stake in the more or less secret drone wars the US are waging around the world today. Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Jemen are some examples. Civilians get killed by US drone pilots fromthe other side of the planet.

I for one am happy the world is starting to get a look into US dealings in foreign affairs. Like hiw Norwegian wx-coos have been recruited by the US embassy in Oslo to spy on Norwegian citizens for the US.

No, the world clearly needs more Mannings' and Snowden's.

A little postscript: This time around it was the US that got busted, I'm hoping for similar leaks in the whole world. We need more transparancy.

Even the smallest person can change the world (5, Insightful)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 8 months ago | (#44573363)

It sucks that you're locked up buddy, but you did the right thing.

Re:Even the smallest person can change the world (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573481)

Yes, jeopardizing peoples lives, undercut long term diplomatic missions. That sure is the right thing.

wa wa wa (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573377)

He was entrusted with a clearance. He broke his word, he broke whatever trust and faith and responsibilities that his chain of command entrusted in him. He violated Operational Security. I cannot bring myself to care about how "sorry" he is or isn't. He messed up in the biggest way possible for someone of his job.

Stockholm Syndrome (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573385)

Stockholm Syndrome - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stockholm_syndrome

We now return you to Jersey Shore...

Re:Stockholm Syndrome (1)

macbeth66 (204889) | about 8 months ago | (#44573497)

He's suffering from no such thing. He just wants the lightest sentence he can get. Can you blame him?

Amazing! (4, Insightful)

Notabadguy (961343) | about 8 months ago | (#44573399)

Torture has come so far in the last 200 years that when the defendant gets dragged into the court room, there isn't even visible evidence of Iron Maiden puncture marks, the flopping limbs that come from the rack, the rapid flinching from water boarding, or the glossy eyed stare from being subjected to countless hours of network TV.

 

Re:Amazing! (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 8 months ago | (#44573515)

the glossy eyed stare from being subjected to countless hours of network TV

Bringing "cruel and unusual punishment" to a new extreme.

Re:Amazing! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573567)

We are told to believe a clueless junior analyst left alone with hundreds of thousands of sensitive military and diplomatic documents who became bad when he tried to do something good, (in his opinion). But.. if that material was so sensitive then what fucken idiot boss gave him access to so much and didn't think it could become a problem if any of it got out ? Why isn't his fuckn idiot boss also being held on charges for being an ass-hole ?

Greatest Hero (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573409)

Manning is a hero. The disclosures of the illegal activities of the illegal U.S.A. Government will reverberate for decades. It had to be done.

Mr. Manning ... (4, Insightful)

MacTO (1161105) | about 8 months ago | (#44573425)

Any action is going to have positive and negative consequences. The question is: does the good outweigh the bad?

It's probably too early to tell if your actions served the greater good.

On the other hand, what you did was important for your country: the United States is a representative democracy. In order for your government to work as intended, both the representatives and electorat must have information regarding both policies and how those policies are implemented. Without that information, decisions are ill informed (at best) and possibly even manipulated to serve the interests of the government, a particular branch of the government, or a small group of individuals (at worse).

I still want to know why (3, Insightful)

apcullen (2504324) | about 8 months ago | (#44573429)

If there was something that the US was doing that bothered him, why didn't he just leak what was relevant to that instead of just dumping everything? There were a lot of embarrassing revelations that came out of his wikileaks dump, and whatever he was trying to accomplish, those stupid but insignificant tid-bits overshadowed it.

Re:I still want to know why (1)

scarboni888 (1122993) | about 8 months ago | (#44573499)

Somebody had to do it wrong so that others who follow know exactly what not to do.

Remember: "If you can't be a guiding light to others you'll just have to serve as a bad example"

Either way you can be useful, right?

Re:I still want to know why (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573519)

Didn't he initially leak just the video of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/July_12,_2007_Baghdad_airstrike ?

Damn. (5, Informative)

stewsters (1406737) | about 8 months ago | (#44573441)

He gazed up at the enormous face. Forty years it had taken him to learn what kind of smile was hidden beneath the dark moustache. O cruel, needless misunderstanding! O stubborn, self-willed exile from the loving breast! Two gin-scented tears trickled down the sides of his nose. But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother.

Totally understandable (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573449)

I can totally relate to this. When it's you against the whole system what else can you expect someone to do .

"In over 200 years this country has never even admitted a single mistake, let alone apologized for one. We don't have government by the people for the people but by TV for the rich . I gave this documents to wikileaks to try and force my country to change for the better and encourage other people to do the same. We're not the heroes, we're the bad guys."

I would have loved him to say that. Can't put a single finger of blame on him for not saying it though.

Whistle Blower != Spy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573457)

The crimes that were brought to light from these leaks were necessary, and it is distinguishing that the true criminals are still allowed to be free. Mr. Manning isn't a criminal, he is a whistle blower, and yet that is not how he is being treated. It is funny how quickly people forget the past.

This brave new world of ours, is a big disappointment.

1984 (1)

Delgul (515042) | about 8 months ago | (#44573463)

Yep... showing respect towards the 'proper' authorities and recanting is the way to go if you end up on the wrong side of a society that is starting to show many parallels with George Orwell's 1984 (or the Spanish Inquisition or similar). I know I would. Sad but true...

No matter what law you break (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573529)

Or what reason you break it you may well have to pay the price. That is precisely why we have laws.

AND YET CHENEY WALKS FREE !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44573541)

Something not right about this !!

Oh, wait !! Money !! Changes everything !! - Dame Cyndi Lauper

Don't be sorry (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | about 8 months ago | (#44573559)

"Sorry I revealed your dirty laundry and forced you to admit the truth."

In light of his solitary confinement abuse and who knows what else I'll take his statement with a grain of salt. The government's track record for torture and abuse isn't that good.

LOL. (0)

WindBourne (631190) | about 8 months ago | (#44573587)

I look back at my decisions and wonder, 'How on earth could I, a junior analyst, possibly believe I could change the world for the better over the decisions of those with the proper authority?

Now he is being facetious. To be honest, I like him for saying this. You know that he is digging at them with this.
However, the man still deserves the death penalty for his treason.

Re:LOL. (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 8 months ago | (#44573609)

However, the man still deserves the death penalty for his treason.

However, it's still not treason. He may have broken his oath, but he upheld his responsibility to the American people. And you and all the other people calling him a traitor are doing the work of those who would oppress you, and me too.

It's true that he's just digging at them in that sentence, which is a truly brilliant piece of work. We all know that "proper authority" is code for "all the power". And you are kissing their assholes bigtime.

Not that difficult (1)

NikeHerc (694644) | about 8 months ago | (#44573615)

Manning: 'How on earth could I, a junior analyst, possibly believe I could change the world for the better over the decisions of those with the proper authority?'

If the people above you are corrupt or inept, it isn't impossible to change the world for the better.
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