Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

How One Programmer Is Coding Faster By Voice Than Keyboard

samzenpus posted 1 year,12 days | from the greased-lightning dept.

Programming 214

mikejuk writes "Is it possible that we have been wasting our time typing programs. Could voice recognition, with a little help from an invented spoken language, be the solution we didn't know we needed? About two years ago Tavis Rudd, developed a bad case of RSI caused by typing lots of code using Emacs. It was so severe that he couldn't code. As he puts it: 'Desperate, I tried voice recognition'. The Dragon Naturally Speaking system used by Rudd supported standard language quite well, but it wasn't adapted to program editing commands. The solution was to use a Python speech extension, DragonFly, to program custom commands. OK, so far so good, but ... the commands weren't quite what you might have expected. Instead of English words for commands he used short vocalizations — you have to hear it to believe it. Now programming sounds like a conversation with R2D2. The advantage is that it is faster and the recognition is easier — it also sounds very cool and very techie. it is claimed that the system is faster than typing. So much so that it is still in use after the RSI cleared up."

cancel ×

214 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Try that with LISP (0, Troll)

sourcerror (1718066) | 1 year,12 days | (#44602917)

I'd like to watch him try that with LISP. Though it might work perfectly with COBOL.

Re:Try that with LISP (4, Funny)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603051)

"Open parenthetheeth liphth wun too theven clothe parenthetheeth wetun"

Huh, it actually works.

Re:Try that with LISP (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603129)

The first demo in the talk is editing lisp.

Re:Try that with LISP (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603223)

He in the video, around 14 minutes, says he uses this for Elisp - a minute or so later there is LISP among his list of language definition classes.

Re:Try that with LISP (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603281)

At 23 minutes: "this works best with very structured languages, such as Lisp."

Probably not faster than auto complete (3, Insightful)

ModernGeek (601932) | 1 year,12 days | (#44602921)

The first thing that came to mind was how much useless and repetitive things that a programmer has to churn out to make things work, however I'd have a hard time believing that this could be faster than someone using something like autocomplete as done in .NET.

Re: Probably not faster than auto complete (3, Funny)

alen (225700) | 1 year,12 days | (#44602945)

Yeah, but Microsoft is evil and everyone knows you are dumb as door nails if you cheat with autocomplete and code suggestions in a modern IDE rather than type everything yourself

Re: Probably not faster than auto complete (1)

murdocj (543661) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603121)

True... much better to just type something that looks plausible and then run it and find out that you left out the 's' from the end and now you get to fix it. Not to mention spending all of your time googling because god forbid there would actually be real documentation.

I really miss auto-complete :(

Re: Probably not faster than auto complete (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44604239)

What does Microsoft or .NET have to do with autocomplete? More astroturf from a flailing dinosaur, I guess.

autocomplete as done in Borland C++ .. (4, Informative)

dgharmon (2564621) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603203)

> I'd have a hard time believing that this could be faster than someone using something like autocomplete as done in .NET ..

autocomplete was around long before .NET as was context-sensitive-help before Microsoft renamed it Intellisense ..

Re:Probably not faster than auto complete (2)

complete loony (663508) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603569)

I haven't RTFA, but I'd guess his biggest gains came from scripting things that were annoying to say. If you invested the same amount of effort in automating things that you would normally type, you can get very big productivity gains.

My father is a (retired) software developer. When he was a kid he lost both of his hands in an accident. So how does he type? By holding a pen between his arms. How does he code efficiently? Lots and lots of domain specific vi macros. For example, with less than 10 key presses he can insert a well formatted SQL Insert statement, with all columns from the requested table pre-filled.

there are faster languages, but not all can progrm (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603689)

There are more complex programming languages that allow one to produce terse code, such as Perl. However, being able fully read and use Perl requires lots of prior study, and requires lots of mental focus when programming. Programming Java is slower, but is much easier to read and write with only a part time commitment. I suspect that most people that write code are not dedicated, hard core, full time, years of study coders, but people that also do something else, and happen to do some programming. I think that is why the complex, and terse programming languages do not take off, like Java did.

#cough# (2)

MickLinux (579158) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604005)

#snort# #ugh-phptt# gah gak #thwip# #snrgle# #cmhmm#...

Save

Compile

There. Your routine is done.

Re:Probably not faster than auto complete (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | 1 year,11 days | (#44604313)

To be honest, I find it moronic that parsers don't provide an API for code editors, as well as a transform from syntax trees back into source code. It's quite retarding, the obsession humans have with textual glyphs, and the limitations they accept as programmers.

Imagine if your .o object files were more malleable than text, now realize that they are, but you haven't developed the tools to do so.

Emacs (4, Funny)

captain_dope_pants (842414) | 1 year,12 days | (#44602927)

Really ? He'd have been better off with VI - everyone knows it stands for Voice Input :p

Re:Emacs (2)

Immerman (2627577) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603167)

> while (true != false) process_more_stupid_code();

Ah, I see you've selected "a lawyer enters the room" as your stopping condition. Should I be suspicious of the code in that harmlessly named function?

Re:Emacs (2)

newcastlejon (1483695) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603353)

Should I be suspicious of the code in that harmlessly named function?

Not really. The whole scope ceases to be a problem when vanish(puff_of_logic) gets called at the end.

Re:Emacs (1)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603227)

It works with both vi and emacs.

Re:Emacs (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603991)

No shit, Emacs? No wonder his health is declining. He may as well lost his hands in a mower accident.

Re:Emacs (1, Flamebait)

Arker (91948) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604087)

It actually stands for Venom Incarnate, of course.

Anyway it's about time someone figure out the key to voice recognition. (I have known it for some time of course but obviously no one listens to me.) Computers have a very difficult time understanding natural human language, but humans dont have any problem at all making up verbal codes which are much more structured and regular, and a computer should have a much easier time understanding those.

Re:Emacs (4, Funny)

doti (966971) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604207)

VI VI VI

the editor of the beast

The secret is hot sauce (1, Offtopic)

alen (225700) | 1 year,12 days | (#44602933)

I get some RSI as well sometimes and then I run out to buy some habanero sauce
It has some chemical that you find in prescription drugs that treat the condition

Re:The secret is hot sauce (1)

EdZ (755139) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603387)

So... what? Do you just chug it? Massage it into the affected areas? Inject it? Process it to extract the relevant chemical? Place it in a small shrine to Yog-Sothoth?

Re:The secret is hot sauce (4, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603655)

So... what? Do you just chug it?

I believe it's intended to be administered as an enema . . .

You might be able to convince some frat boys into trying it . . . they're already doing it with alcohol.

Re:The secret is hot sauce (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44604301)

Capsaicin is used for pain relief in various cases, applied topically. Typically it involves putting some other short term, local anestetic on the area, then putting really high strength capsaicin paste on the area. It overloads the nerves, so after it is removed, perception of pain is reduced for quite a while later. Although I would be careful about using it for RSI. While capsaicin can reduce very specific kinds of inflammation that are caused due to response of nerves, if that isn't relevant to your situation, you might just be treating the symptom. You could end up continuing to damage things, just not feel it while it happens.

You can't win.. (5, Funny)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | 1 year,12 days | (#44602953)

So how long until he gets laryngitis and has to start typing again?

Re:You can't win.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603119)

So how long until he gets laryngitis and has to start typing again?

No, then its gesture based input.

Re:You can't win.. (5, Informative)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603141)

If you watch the video, he discusses that. He does about 40-60% of his coding with this system and he does keep voice-strain in mind (in fact, he was sucking on a hard candy during the demonstration to keep his voice from drying out). You may not do 100% of your work in it, but just imagine if you could cut the amount of typing you do down to about half of normal? Suddenly, you're spreading some of the load to your voice, keeping either from being excessively stressed.

Re:You still can't win.. (1)

stms (1132653) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603263)

How long after that will he get carpal tunnel and have to start speaking again?

Re:You can't win.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603533)

Well then he can go back to his hands and wait for his voice to improve.

GENIUS.

Coding != Typing (3, Insightful)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | 1 year,12 days | (#44602973)

It's an impressive demonstration of voice recognition, and rather useful for people suffering from RSI, but to suggest that we may all benefit from this? Besides the fact that speech-to-text is a decidedly crappy input method in open plan offices (especially with the extra noises added on), it is also questionable if this will make us code faster. In my experience, typing speed is not really a major limiting factor in coding speed, when taking problem solving and debugging into account. When coding, I do not spend that much time ting, actually.

Re:Coding != Typing (5, Funny)

oodaloop (1229816) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603063)

I do not spend that much time ting, actually.

You don't say?

Re:Coding != Typing (0)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603093)

Never post from an iPad without proof-reading your contribution...

Re:Coding != Typing (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603237)

Besides the fact that speech-to-text is a decidedly crappy input method in open plan offices

Know what else is crappy?

Re:Coding != Typing (2)

Krishnoid (984597) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603473)

It's an impressive demonstration of voice recognition

Is it really? Since English is a non-phonetic language, I wonder if there's a parallel between coming up with consistently pronounced individual phonemes for special characters, and PalmOS Graffiti. In both cases:

  • the computer gets help in keeping input tokens distinct by restricting the breadth of expressivity of the input space,
  • the human has to alter their input to improve recognition for cases the computer has difficulty with.

It is definitely impressive from a practical perspective in that tweaking the voice recognition like this can produce much improved results.

Re:Coding != Typing (3, Interesting)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603595)

In the talk he says open source voice recognition software, e.g. Sphinx, don't work at all, and you have to go for Dragon.
But then creates writes his own command language.

So I don't understand why do we need voice recognition software that recognizes English? All we need is a open source package that translates sounds into some phonetic dictionary (e.g. IPA), and from there the second problem is to translate that into a native language.

Or even simpler, give it a dictionary of commands, and get it to find the closest match, or if all are unlikely, do nothing.

Why try to go for something so hard, but there is no software for the simpler problem that would make people very productive by just commanding the computer?

Codijng faster by voice because... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44602987)

His coding by hand has been crippled by RSI. That's like saying someone can get around faster in a wheelchair because they've broken their legs.

Re:Codijng faster by voice because... (2)

CastrTroy (595695) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603361)

I think it means he's actually coding faster now than before he got the RSI. Although I think this works for the same reason that Palm Graffiti [wikipedia.org] worked a lot better than regular handwriting recognition. Change the alphabet so there are no longer any ambiguous letters, and it's a lot easier to recognize them. In this case, he's only using a very limited vocabulary, with a very well defined grammar. This makes it a lot easier for the program to figure out what the correct interpretation is.

Re:Codijng faster by voice because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603603)

You could go faster in a wheelchair, too, if you were going downhill and never ran into stairs.

Re:Codijng faster by voice because... (1)

Friend of Nature (1245372) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604165)

Or running faster by losing their feet and running on prosthetic blades... Oh wait, that happened already.

Re:Codijng faster by voice because... (1)

Raenex (947668) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604305)

And then kill your model girlfriend and blame it on an imaginary intruder.

Re:Codijng faster by voice because... (5, Insightful)

jeffb (2.718) (1189693) | 1 year,11 days | (#44604389)

That's like saying someone can get around faster in a wheelchair because they've broken their legs.

You might want to look up the record time for completing the Boston Marathon in a wheelchair vs. on foot.

He was doing it wrong (0)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | 1 year,12 days | (#44602991)

I have been typing for more than 30 years and I don't have an issue. Why? Because I don't use the traditional typing method, which as it turns out is very bad for your metacarpal joints. I use what I call the "Modified two finger hunt and peck" method (for the space bar use the thumb.) Since I am almost always creating rather than trying to copy what someone else wrote, as was traditionally the case, I can actually type faster than many if not most "conventional" typists, and as I said, with no undue stress on the metacarpal joints.

Re:He was doing it wrong (1, Funny)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603155)

I dunno. I think typing is a lot like a handjob -- all fingers work a lot better than just two.

And you thought *your* cube mates were annoying (2, Insightful)

msobkow (48369) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603003)

It's bad enough to hear people yelling at their phones in the cubes around. Now one can expect to hear someone yelling at the computer...

Re: And you thought *your* cube mates were annoyin (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603275)

You don't already have that in your office?

Re: And you thought *your* cube mates were annoyin (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603519)

They probably use Macs. :ducks:

Re:And you thought *your* cube mates were annoying (1)

Kjella (173770) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603527)

It's bad enough to hear people yelling at their phones in the cubes around. Now one can expect to hear someone yelling at the computer...

You don't already? Granted it's about 80% cursing with sprinkles of frustration, rage, resignation and prayer so it's not exactly voice recognition I need. I've never felt the need to yell though, by then the urge is usually stronger to throw it out the window.

Re:And you thought *your* cube mates were annoying (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603933)

Hell, I'd rather yell at my computer then use Emacs.

Sounds Tedious (2)

Polarised Bear (2658431) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603007)

I really can't imagine it being more effective than typing and I really don't want to sit and make sounds at my screen. If it works for him that's great but count me out.

Writing is easy (3, Insightful)

rrohbeck (944847) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603021)

90% of my work is debugging and even figuring out the failure scenario and testing against it. Writing the fix and new code is easy and quick.

Re:Writing is easy (2)

Tablizer (95088) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603221)

90%? Maybe you suck :-)

Mouse (1)

WilyCoder (736280) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603039)

Does his RSI prevent him from using a mouse? How does he cut and paste?

Re:Mouse (2)

xlsior (524145) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603935)

Does his RSI prevent him from using a mouse? How does he cut and paste?

If you actually watched the video, you could have seen that he was using voice commands to select blocks of text and cutting/pasting them that way as well.

How about coding better (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603061)

Rather than coding more?

Re:How about coding better (1)

gweihir (88907) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603329)

Indeed. Unfortunately that idea is way beyond the understanding of many coders and the reason most code out there is pretty bad.

This is like the corded keyboard (5, Interesting)

Required Snark (1702878) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603107)

The mouse/keyboard combination was not the original combination envisioned by Douglas Englebart, the inventor of the mouse. He paired it with a chorded keyboard [wikipedia.org] that could be operated with one hand. Clearly text input with one hand and mouse input with the other is a better input paradigm, but it is still not in use much today.

This use of speech recognition seems like a similar situation. It works for a few people, but it will not ever have a large user community. QWERTY keyboards are so dominant that their network effect makes other input modes irrelevant. Even those who adopt it will still be using conventional keyboards away from their custom environment.

Re:This is like the corded keyboard (1)

n1ywb (555767) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603261)

This use of speech recognition seems like a similar situation. It works for a few people, but it will not ever have a large user community. QWERTY keyboards are so dominant that their network effect makes other input modes irrelevant. Even those who adopt it will still be using conventional keyboards away from their custom environment.

I think this point is a red herring. At every job I've ever had I've spent 90% of my time in front of the same workstation. If you can use your preferred input method 90% of the time, how is that purpose defeated by using QWERTY the other 10%?

Re:This is like the corded keyboard (2)

hibiki_r (649814) | 1 year,11 days | (#44604383)

The problem is not with the person learning the new input UI, but with those that end up having to use your computer with zero training. I remember trying to help out a coworker that decided to buy a kinesis keyboard, and then set it up to dvorak: Not only I had to remember to switch layouts every single time I had to type something, and managed to miss 15% of my keystrokes due to its strange button placement, but then space, enter and backspace are all wrong, and right next to each other: It was just a horrible experience. I can only imagine what would happen with a chorded keyboard.

Re: This is like the corded keyboard (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603295)

Gee I wonder why the corded keyboard never took off.

I cant wait for lisp (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603139)

Pararenthesis parenthesis parenthesis. ... Was that one too much?

Oompah Oompah Band (5, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603277)

Pararenthesis parenthesis parenthesis. ... Was that one too much?

No, open "parenthesis" will be abbreviated "pah". And close parenthesis will be "ump".

Thus, coding will sound like, "Umpah lumpa, dipity doo, I have another puzzle for you..."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qw0zZttfUaw [youtube.com]

Get the computer to think instead (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603231)

Better to get the computer to do the programming.

Re:Get the computer to think instead (1)

Tablizer (95088) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603395)

Better to get the computer to do the programming.

Use genetic algorithms: spawn mutated or cross-snipped copies via zombied Windows machines, and the best fit after 2k generations is sent to the boss.

Re:Get the computer to think instead (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603903)

Better to get the computer to do the programming.

Use genetic algorithms: spawn mutated or cross-snipped copies via zombied Windows machines, and the best fit after 2k generations is sent to the boss.

2k?! We don't have time to wait for that shit! Just give me the first one that compiles and we'll ship it!

Re:Get the computer to think instead (2)

Tablizer (95088) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604025)

Welcome to Slashdot, Mr. Ballmer.

Family guy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603239)

I know why you geeks love Family Guy so much... it's because the one guys chin looks like a nutsack and we know you geek faggots love nutsacks slapping against your faggot chins.
 
FAGGOTS EAT SHIT OUT OF THE ASSES OF OTHER FAGGOTS!!!

Form over function. Typical iSheep (1, Troll)

Taantric (2587965) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603289)

You can see why he got RSI in the first few minutes of the video. He is using a Macbook Pro attached to three large monitors. First of all Macbooks have the worst fucking keyboards. It is complete and utter victory of form over function. Steve Jobs wanted his machine to look beautiful, who gives a fuck if it is uncomfortable to type on. Secondly look that the absurd height he has placed his monitors. Of course your neck and shoulder muscles will be wrecked working like that day after day.

Re:Form over function. Typical iSheep (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603487)

Have you considered it might be a standing workstation...just a thought random internet guy.

Re:Form over function. Typical iSheep (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603787)

You can see why he got RSI in the first few minutes of the video. He is using a Macbook Pro attached to three large monitors.

No?

What if (1)

Hsien-Ko (1090623) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603297)

John Moschitta were a programmer....

Input is not the limiter when coding (4, Insightful)

gweihir (88907) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603313)

Unless you are programming utterly structure starved glue-code, input is not the limiting factor, thinking about what you want to input is.

Re:Input is not the limiter when coding (4, Insightful)

pla (258480) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603561)

Unless you are programming utterly structure starved glue-code, input is not the limiting factor, thinking about what you want to input is.

You beat me to it.

I can type in code pretty damned fast - Fast enough that people frequently ask me how often I go through keyboards - Fast enough that I've actually had people in the room with me ask if I had just typed something meaningful or merely mashed keys for the hell of it - And, while coding, I tend to spend far, far more time thinking than coding. Someone watching me program for an hour would see 3-5 minutes at a time of complete inactivity, followed by assaulting the keyboard for a 30 second burst, rinse wash repeat.

Re:Input is not the limiter when coding (4, Interesting)

Kjella (173770) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603711)

You beat me to it. I can type in code pretty damned fast - Fast enough that people frequently ask me how often I go through keyboards - Fast enough that I've actually had people in the room with me ask if I had just typed something meaningful or merely mashed keys for the hell of it - And, while coding, I tend to spend far, far more time thinking than coding. Someone watching me program for an hour would see 3-5 minutes at a time of complete inactivity, followed by assaulting the keyboard for a 30 second burst, rinse wash repeat.

I think I can have considerably longer buffer/burst cycles, the challenge is keeping the big picture in your head while doing the little parts, and there I feel the duration of the bursts matter. If I've figured that to solve a business problem I need to change code sections A2, B4, C3 and D1 I'll start working on A2 and if it's quick and easy I won't forget the rest while if I struggle and need to churn out a lot of boilerplate by the time I'm done I might not remember what those other changes were. Either you then have to take notes or pseudocode the whole solution first or recreate it from memory, in those cases faster input would help keep me "in the flow", even though the input itself is only a small fraction of the wall time.

Re:Input is not the limiter when coding (1)

rasmusbr (2186518) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603977)

He was/is a freelancer, so I think it's a pretty safe bet that the majority of his typing was not code. Emails, specifications, documentation, planning, accounting, correspondence with tax authorities and so on and so fourth. These things don't write themselves.

Re:Input is not the limiter when coding (1)

gutnor (872759) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604021)

It is on other devices like a tablet.

Now, I'm not saying it is a good idea to develop on a tablet nowadays. But then consumer grade stuff have a tendency to invade the professional world, so it may be forced upon us at some point.

Is anyone else thinking of Tron (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603359)

The scene with Yori talking in numbers comes to mind.

How soon until brain implants (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603367)

Think -> code

Re:How soon until brain implants (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603915)

Think -> code

int main(pr0n int argc,char pr0n **argv)
{
...

RSI prone (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603437)

He was writing in LISP, which has tons of awkward characters, and using Emacs which uses awkward meta-keys where you have to contort your hand. That's a double dose of RSI.

New rapping fad (3, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603441)

You: "Biff Niff Bobblewop, Mop Top, Flip Flop Dribble Nibble Bazzle Dazzle Ropple Popple Slip Dip..."

Boss: "Get to work, no more rapping!"

You: "I'm not rapping, I'm programming via voice commands. Actually, I'm doing both."

Boss: "Yeah, right. It's called Riff Raff."

Python? (1)

Dahamma (304068) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603453)

So, as long as he makes sure the VTT software understands "tab" he'll be golden...

You insensitive clod! (1)

PPH (736903) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603575)

I code in Malbolge!

e.e (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603613)

Someone make this work on Linux.

Imagine reviewing his code... (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603637)

/* This function takes in the accounts receivable data and.....hey Jon how's it going?...uh huh....uh huh...yeah well I'm glad you had a good time and...
Hang on ... phone is .... sec hey! yeah the project's going fine, should be done by tomorrow afternoon. uh huh, well i'll try to get it done in
the ... i know ... yeah .... yeah ok. ok bye. Jerk. */ ...

Not shocking (3, Interesting)

quantaman (517394) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603719)

Not a fan of evolutionary psychology, but I think there's a lot of reason to think we do have an aptitude for spoken language. I wouldn't be at all surprised if a well designed voice system left more mental focus available for the task of coding.

I'm not sure if the technology is there yet, and you still don't want to hear your officemates jabbering away, but I could see the theoretical usability of a spoken word interface surpassing that of typing.

Re:Not shocking (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603951)

and you still don't want to hear your officemates jabbering away

throat-implanted mic + subvocalization ftw?

Or just have everyone telecommute from home, and all professional communication is done via IRC so as not to interfere.

There's actually an argument that the customary "telephone for comms, keyboard for entry" is exactly backwards. Code entry becomes more efficient, and we duck the whole problem where it's impractical to carry on simultaneous phone conversations with different people/groups without both groups hearing your side of the other conversation. You just shout commands at your window manager (or use the mouse, but that's boring) to focus windows alternately...

(Yeah, I'm not entirely convinced. But it's cool to think of...)

Re:Not shocking (1)

doti (966971) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604277)

How about a programming language created with speech in mind? It should be even more efficient.

you FAIl 1t (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44603741)

Typing speed is never the bottleneck in coding (1)

brunes69 (86786) | 1 year,12 days | (#44603975)

The bottleneck in coding is solving the problem, and debugging issues in your code. Code rapidly written is more likely to have errors because you have not had as much time to think about what you are writing. Coding is not like writing a book.

Cublcles (1)

sunderland56 (621843) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604033)

As if cubicles weren't annoying enough already.....

His setup with the monitors above eye level is bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,12 days | (#44604093)

So - you tear your rotator cuff rock climbing and assume that since you can no longer rock climb that is why you got RSI - couldn't have anything to do with the torn rotator cuff?

Or the INSANE setup with the 3 monitors on that top shelf so he has to constantly crane his neck backwards so he can look up? What ergonomic expert in the world would give that setup a thumbs up? Pair a laptop (so the monitor is too low) with monitors on a shelf where the eye is at the base of each monitor - horrible.

Lisp programmers need foot pedals (5, Funny)

ebno-10db (1459097) | 1 year,12 days | (#44604213)

What Lisp programmers really need are two foot pedals - one for left parentheses and one for right parentheses. That should cover 90% of their input requirements.

Does typing speed really matter? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,11 days | (#44604321)

If you're a programmer and you spend more time typing than thinking, you are probably doing something wrong.

This is awesome and will change peoples' lives. (2)

students (763488) | 1 year,11 days | (#44604333)

I am seeing lots of negative and off topic comments, many of which show people only watched part of the video. I thought it was totally amazing. When I was a teenager I had to change the course of my career away from computational science towards experimental science because of RSI-like problems. If I had his tools when I was 14 and had known I needed to use them, my career would be totally different and possibly much better since my programming talents would actually have been used.

Today, I can't really afford to spend several months learning to replicate his work, but hopefully soon it will be easier to learn. This will never be for everyone - some people can't use modal programs - and maybe it will never work in every context (Can it talk to my 20 year old Tektronix oscilloscope over GPIB?) but the video showed it can work. I hope good documentation, native linux support, and support for latex will be forthcoming so it can help me do science.

Richard Stallman (1)

DMJC (682799) | 1 year,11 days | (#44604385)

Could this Help Richard Stallman? I know he is a very gifted programmer but he unfortunately isn't able to type due to injury. If he could use this to program directly again it could be a massive boost to Free Software Foundation project development.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>