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Bradley Manning Sentenced To 35 Years

Unknown Lamer posted 1 year,20 hours | from the welcome-to-america dept.

The Courts 491

An anonymous reader writes with bad, but not unexpected news: "The U.S. soldier convicted of handing a trove of secret government documents to anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks has been sentenced to 35 years in prison. Pte First Class Bradley Manning, 25, was convicted in July of 20 charges against him, including espionage. Last week, he apologized for hurting the U.S. and for 'the unexpected results' of his actions. He will receive credit for three and a half years, but be dishonorably discharged from the U.S. Army."

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When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631519)

It's not a legitimate secret. It's a coverup of war crime. They are not the same thing.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (2)

DFurno2003 (739807) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631539)

You didn't need to post that as AC.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631675)

You didn't need to post that as AC.

NSA

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (3, Insightful)

meta-monkey (321000) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631897)

He's right. If the NSA wants to know who posted that comment, they will know.

AC is fine to hide your identity from your fellow posters. If you think AC hides you from the Lidless Eye, you're fooling yourself.

On the bright side, I don't think we have a thing to fear from the NSA. It's the other TLAs you need to worry about.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (1)

Opportunist (166417) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632057)

I'm not even worried about the other TLAs. What can they do to me that I care about that they haven't done already?

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (5, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631765)

It's not a legitimate secret. It's a coverup of war crime. They are not the same thing.

Manning released over 10,000 documents. Are you sure he read them all and confirmed that every single of the 10,000 documents contained evidence of a war crime and made sure that the release would not help the enemy?

Don't get me wrong, if he read and verified every document he sent out, fine. That's not the case here.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631853)

And who gave him those documents? I find it extremely hard to believe that a mere private would be granted access to that many of those kinds of sensitive documents as a matter of course. Someone else provided him with them, a superior officer probably, and THAT is the person who should be in prison.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632075)

He wasn't a private. He is now after being demoted.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632095)

You overestimate our protection of State secrets. You would be shocked to find out how poorly-managed access to these kinds of resources is. That breaches of this magnitude are so rare, honestly, speaks more to how overblown some of these accusations are, rather than to the security tasked with protecting the data.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632003)

Whether Bradley Manning deserves to be punished is something reasonable people can disagree about. What reasonable people cannot disagree about is that those responsible for the crimes he did expose deserve to be punished.

No one has been tried for the crimes uncovered by Manning.
No one has been tried for the crimes uncovered by Snowden.
No one has been tried for the crimes uncovered by Kiriakou.
No one has been tried for the crimes uncovered by Binney.
No one has been tried for the crimes uncovered by Drake.

All these people reported on crimes committed by the government and government officials. Crimes ranging from fraud, to wiretapping, to murder. In none of these cases have any of the true criminals been tried, and in every one of these cases the whistleblowers have been the subject of harassment by the government, or worse.

If you're going to fall back on the "it's the law" excuse for prosecuting whistleblowers, you have to apply the law to everyone. Anything else is despotism.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (1, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632071)

"No one has been tried for the crimes uncovered by Manning."
what crimes?
"No one has been tried for the crimes uncovered by Snowden."
it's on going, and he uncovered very few crimes.
Asking a company for documents is not a crime.
Keeping warrant secret for an investigation is not a crime.
As a culture we haven't even decided if information sent though multiple servers around the globe IS private.

You can repeat what you here in your echo chamber, that doesn't make it true.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (-1, Troll)

MarkvW (1037596) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632049)

I could maybe get over the fact that Manning was a soldier and he betrayed his duty--but my problem is that Manning's disclosure was so very indiscriminate.

Manning is the living definition of a fool.

I believe Manning's apology. I think that there is a likelihood real human beings were harmed by Manning's disclosures.

Still think he got way too much time and was way overprosecuted.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631807)

If woManning exposed the apache footage, he would not be doing time. It's because of all the other classified information that did not have news value.

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631813)

Also important to remember that "Crazyhorse 1/8" and "Crazyhorse 1/9" have been cleared of all wrongdoing, and have been allowed to remain anonymous.

CAPTCHA = libelous. Wow, just wow, Slashdot

Re:When a secret is a criminal act, it's evidence. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632087)

If that was all he released, he likely wouldn't be serving 30 years.

Good (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631529)

He's a traitor, he deserves it. I know I'll get down-voted to oblivion for that, but that's how I feel. Why people have such a problem with the fact that he was in the army, supposedly serving his country, and did something that he was forbidden to do, and so should face the consequences? Personally, I wouldn't have any objection to execution as the standard punishment for acts of treason.

Re:Good (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631589)

Reporting on war crimes should be considered a service to his country.

Re:Good (3, Interesting)

couchslug (175151) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632029)

If he'd been smart enough to send the war crime data, and ONLY that, to the Hague etc then he'd likely have fared better than by doing a bulk data dump which included so much material he couldn't have checked it all.

Reactions to Manning seem to be dictated by the ideology of the beholder rather than what he actually did.

I don't find him either a hero or a villian, just a young troop with serious personal issues who went attention-whoring without thinking it through despite his training.

I'm also not sure that what he released wasn't salted with items which allowed those doing the salting to further their own agenda. Hammering Manning would confirm everything he dumped in the eyes of the world. He'd have been easy to exploit.

Re:Good (4, Funny)

oodaloop (1229816) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631627)

I agree. And I'm glad many Bothans died to get the plans for the Death Star into the hands of the rebels. Those traitors to the Empire deserve it!

Re:Good (1)

meta-monkey (321000) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631725)

Well, if you recall, the Emperor allowed the plans to be leaked so as to lure the pitiful rebellion into a trap.

Re:Good (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631815)

That's true. I think his weakness was his over confidence. In any case, the Bothans still died.

Re:Good (1)

meta-monkey (321000) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631931)

Remember, though, as Luke has taught us. The only way to win is not to fight.

Re:Good (1)

Opportunist (166417) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632079)

I just doubt that now Manning will become more powerful than we thought possible...

Re:Good (4, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632097)

The Empire was a legal entity created through a vote in the Senate.

So, yeah the rebels were terrorists.
Oh wait, they won..I mean freedom fighters.

Re:Good (2)

PIBM (588930) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631663)

I'd understand if you'd want those who commited the war crimes he revealed to be executed, but him? I don't understand how you can arrive at the conclusion that he deserves that, unless you were perhaps one of those who commited a crime he revealed ?

Re:Good (1)

MightyYar (622222) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631889)

While I'm glad that some of the information he revealed came to light, he was completely reckless in the way he went about it. He did, arguably and depending on your perspective, as much harm as the original "crimes" he revealed. You don't just share 10,000 secret documents without at least reading them first. Snowden, perhaps reflecting his age and experience, is doing exactly that. So while I feel strongly that any crimes revealed by Manning should be prosecuted, I also feel that he needs to go away for a while. He was young and foolish, but he should pay for his mistakes. Whether 35 years is too long? I think it sounds too long, but it's not life. Chances are he'll get out before he's 40.

Re:Good (5, Insightful)

MadKeithV (102058) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631753)

Why people have such a problem with the fact that he was in the army, supposedly serving his country, and did something that he was forbidden to do, and so should face the consequences? .

Because "I was just following orders" should never, ever, ever be a legitimate reason for committing crimes against humanity.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,19 hours | (#44631987)

"Because it seemed right at the time," should always, always be subjected to intense scrutiny. There are reasons why we have redundant and overbearing regulations on just about everything in government and the military: people, by and large, very rarely exercise good judgement in real life.

Take Manning, for instance: people justify his actions by saying that he uncovered crimes. This may be true, but can you honestly and realistically assert that all 10,000+ documents he released detail crimes worthy of violating their classification? I submit that it's unrealistic to presume that Manning even read all of those documents, never mind had the time and perseverance to sift through them, separating evidence from legitimate State secrets. He exercised very poor judgement, if not in what he did, then in how he did it... and now he has to pay the price for that.

Re:Good (5, Insightful)

0a100b (456593) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631775)

Serving your country and serving your government are not necessarily the same thing. I think Manning was serving his country but not his government.

Re:Good (2, Insightful)

hjf (703092) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632021)

Funny, isn't it? How rednecks are considered ignorants, but most of them have a clear definition of what is "government" and what is "america". Amazing how patriotic they usually are (flags, american pride, traditions), and yet they hate the "gub'mint". They're considered crazy paranoids because of that hate, and how the gub'mint tramples on their freedom.

And here we are, educated people, confusing government with country.

Re:Good (4, Insightful)

Ckwop (707653) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631783)

He's a traitor, he deserves it.

I don't think anyone can argue with the fact an offence was committed. But the punishment should fit the crime. It is on that basis I object to this sentence. The sentence is so long that I feel this punishment violates your constitution. It is cruel and unusual.

We're talking about locking this guy up longer many rapists or murderers. You're even talking about executing him. How is that a sensible level of punishment?

At the end of the day, nobody died from this leak. Nothing of any substance has changed in geo-politics either. The cable leaks had a tendency to show that US foreign policy behind closed doors was pretty much the same as it was on the public sphere. As a Brit, I thought they actually came out of it looking quite good. It was the other countries were made to look like asshats.

Manning is a bit of an idiot and should serve some time but taking his entire life in forfeit for his stupidity is totally disproportionate and in my view unconstitutional.

Re:Good (2)

gtall (79522) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632011)

He's up for parole in 11 years (at least as theRegister reports it).

Re:Good (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632065)

We kill mentally retarded people (in Texas)

Re:Good (1)

Salgak1 (20136) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632091)

First, the trial was only notionally under the Constitution. The court-martial was conducted under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). It is MUCH harsher than civilian courts, and Manning, as a soldier in the US Army, was under a restricted set of rights to begin with. The sentence is for 5 or 6 (depending how you count them) espionage counts, two computer fraud counts, five theft counts, and multiple military violations. Most Murder or Rape trials are for a single major count: there are at LEAST 12 major counts against Manning. . .

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631879)

mod up parent

that said he'll probably hang himself within 10 years

Re:Good (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631915)

You're not getting voted down, but you will have to sleep at night knowing that you are a fascist and will be partly responsible for contributing to the now inevitable decline of America into a dystopian technocracy. You should revisit your understanding of authoritarianism. When you give those in power the ability to make arbitrary laws and conduct fake star chamber trials to imprison or murder people that don't agree with their agenda, you're endangering yourself as well. You've been brainwashed and are a sick, sick collectivist. The sooner you understand what's been rotting your brain for your whole life, the sooner you can join the Rebellion, because right now you are basically sucking Darth Vader's robot phallus with aplomb.

One of the only good things that will come from the breakdown of society (as a direct result of compliance by idiots like this guy) is that we won't have to hear sycophants cheering for their own enslavement. Or maybe we will, Stockholm syndrome in the forced labor camps and all...

Re:Good (1)

jcr (53032) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631919)

I see that the propaganda corps have dropped by to share their views on exposure of war crimes with us.

Let me remind you of your oath, son. The constitution trumps your "don't talk about fight club" bullshit.

Re:Good (5, Interesting)

HeckRuler (1369601) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631947)

You feel that because of some twisted nationalistic pride and unquestioning faith that the overlords are benevolent, know what they're doing, and are above the vast swaths of historical abuse by similar authority figures. We feel he's been unfairly treated because of a lot of things.
1) He exposed [wikipedia.org] a whole hell of a lot [wikipedia.org] of people doing "forbidden" things [wikipedia.org] . Most of whom are never going to face prison time, courts, fines or even a slap on the wrist.
2) The people he's exposing have previously concealed their wrongdoing [wikipedia.org] . Gaming the system of justice is serious infraction. It's often worse than what they're hiding.
3) The people he's exposing have a vast amount of political power and very much have control over his punishment. I don't think it's a stretch to say that they're abusing their power and being vindictive.
4) He's been tortured. Not the sort of torture with massive blood loss, hideous scars, and severed limbs, but the sort of torture you get in a lab setting. And it looks like it was enough to break him.

Yes, he should face consequences for violating orders and exposing secrets. And he should face praise and leniency for making the USA a better place and upholding his oath. You know, to protect the nation from threats from within.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631949)

"the army, supposedly serving his country, and did something that he was forbidden to do, and so should face the consequences"

Apply to the Army itself, under even US law - or international law as we try to uphold it elsewhere. See hypocrisy yet? No?
Then you are blind.

Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631541)

So now we know how much it costs to reveal the truth: 35 years. I would say that it's worth it.

Re:Well... (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631633)

If they were 35 of your years I think you'd see it differently.

Re:Well... (1)

shop S Mart (755311) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631639)

Easy for you to say, you're not the one sitting in a cell for the next 11.5-35 years of your life.

title (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631551)

senteced

Re:title (1)

Dins (2538550) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631767)

Posting to undo a bad mod...

Justice (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631567)

I'm glad that traitor is behind bars now

Senteced? Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631571)

The bar needs to be raised again...

Re:Senteced? Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631631)

James Cameron does not raise the bar for James Cameron...

But be dishonorably discharged.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631579)

Uhmm yeah, who the fuck even thought that needed to be MENTIONED. If you get convicted by a *MILITARY TRIBUNAL* it's pretty damn well certain you're being dishonorably discharged.

The real question is: Why didn't they do the humane thing and put a bullet in his head rather than having him spend more of his life in prison than he's already lived?

If he's really gay though, I suppose it might be a field day for him...

Re:But be dishonorably discharged.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631957)

If you get convicted by a *MILITARY TRIBUNAL* it's pretty damn well certain you're being dishonorably discharged.

I figured you'd get some sort of party. And cake. Clearly there would be cake. Is that not so?

If he's really gay though, I suppose it might be a field day for him...

People like you are the reason I'm going to devote my life to developing the technology to deploy over the Internets a hundred undersexed Ron Jeremey penis-cloned automatons to violate the assholes of snarky little turds who think prison rape is funny.

This is A Distraction From the NSA Scandal (5, Interesting)

ilikenwf (1139495) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631581)

Considering today news is breaking about the NSA monitoring 75% of all domestic US internet traffic, and logging all domestic emails, as well as their plans for a national facial recognition system (as in live video feeds), it seems obvious to me that they sentenced him today and announced it in this way in an effort to distract us from what really matters.

Sources: http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/nsa-has-access-75-percent-us-internet-traffic-says-wsj-6C10967780 [nbcnews.com]
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/21/us/facial-scanning-is-making-gains-in-surveillance.html?_r=0 [nytimes.com]

Re:This is A Distraction From the NSA Scandal (0)

ilikenwf (1139495) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631667)

All that said, I personally believe the difference between Manning as a pawn of Wikileaks, and Snowden being a true whistleblower isn't intent, because they both had good intent. The difference lies in that Manning was not only working as a naive pawn for Julian Assange, who the US government hates, but in his effort to quickly become what he thought was a hero, he neglected to scrub the names of innocents from the cables and files he released, potentially threatening people in the US and abroad.

Aside from that, he has sociopathic tendencies and I hope he can get the help he needs, as well as parole - it's always sad to see a young man lose a large portion of his life for something that amounts to a crime on paper - that's not to discount the potential consequences of what he released.

Re:This is A Distraction From the NSA Scandal (4, Insightful)

NEW22 (137070) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632059)

What are these sociopathic tendencies? He wanted to expose wrongdoing and did not do it in the best way.

Sociopath: a person with a psychopathic personality whose behavior is antisocial, often criminal, and who lacks a sense of moral responsibility or social conscience.

I don't see how you could claim he lacks a sense of moral responsibility or social conscience. It seems he may have them in more abundance than the average person.

Re:This is A Distraction From the NSA Scandal (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631689)

Bingo. This is exactly right.

Re:This is A Distraction From the NSA Scandal (1)

sageres (561626) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631711)

Hm... I don't quite understand that... I think about 10-15 years ago they already had that system and deployed it with police and FBI at some sort of baseball game scanning for people on the "wanted" list.. They caught quite a few. Can anyone remember this?

Re:This is A Distraction From the NSA Scandal (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631723)

A man was sentenced to 35 years in prison for exposing war crimes, all to distract you from the fact that the NSA is looking at 75% of the funny cat pictures you download?

Glad to see our priorities are in order.

Re:This is A Distraction From the NSA Scandal (3, Interesting)

ilikenwf (1139495) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631873)

Don't be thick, and "war crimes" are defined quite differently from what he did here. Being in a permanent war with a nonexistent entity doesn't really count as a true war - "war on drugs," "war on terror," Vietnam - all farces or based on farces.

I'm saying they released the sentencing information and the news about the NSA on the same day in an effort to obscure what the NSA is up to, as they know most of the techie/twenty something/hacker types will quickly drop everything to do some sort of "Free Manning" chant and forget the other news.

/. editors should be "Senteced To 35 Years" (1)

roman_mir (125474) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631587)

This is a serious story, Manning, however a sad person, actually did the right thing by releasing this information. He cemented his status is a martyr for a just cause, I consider him to be some kind of a real American hero actually. This judgement is a travesty, an authoritarian oppressive regime, crashing everything on its way to power and anybody who challenges that power, however illegal and unconstitutional.

But /. editors, they actually deserve, if not 35 years... then 35 lashes.

FTFT (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631597)

Fix The Fine Title

Cat got your tongue? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631599)

How is this bad news? If you want to blow whistles, there are legal ways to do it. At least is was less cowardly than what Snowden did. Snowden just dumped it and ran.

Re:Cat got your tongue? (0)

ciderbrew (1860166) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631715)

Cowardly? You'd have the balls to do that then?

In other news... (1, Troll)

BringYourOwnBacon (2808547) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631605)

Slashdot editor senteced to 35 years of grammar school.

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631685)

Still wrong in tab title LOL

Justice Has Been Served? (5, Insightful)

Apharmd (2640859) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631625)

Meanwhile Bush, Cheney, and a whole line of people that authorized or performed torture remain free. People who murdered innocent civilians and laughed about it, free. It's all a big joke.

Re:Justice Has Been Served? (3, Insightful)

JackieBrown (987087) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632023)

I never understand why people leave the current Obama administration out of these lists. He has taken what Bush did further than Bush ever dreamed (which is normal. The next president usually adds to their power/abuse instead of reducing it.)

Re:Justice Has Been Served? (3, Interesting)

Apharmd (2640859) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632077)

I agree with you. I don't leave the current administration out of my condemnation. The Granai airstrike that Manning leaked happened under Obama and many innocent civilians were killed. But my understanding is that the bulk of what Bradley Manning leaked occurred under the Bush years. I'm not trying to claim that Obama and co. are innocent of war crimes. They are not.

"the unexpected results" (0)

themushroom (197365) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631645)

are that the truth about the government spying on its own people comes out, and for once the public listens rather than looking at Manning as though he's wearing a tinfoil hat.

Re:"the unexpected results" (1)

Russ1642 (1087959) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631799)

Are you perhaps confusing this case with that of Snowden?

Always look on the brightside of life.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631647)

.. by the time he gets out there will be no more licence plate records of his car stored in the CA traffic police database!

Re: Always look on the brightside of life.. (1)

gmuslera (3436) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631797)

Considering how everyones freedom is being gradually decimated, will not be long till he will have more freedom in prison than us outside it.

Re: Always look on the brightside of life.. (2)

RobertLTux (260313) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631929)

eHem i think you are reaching for Devestated not Decimated since they ate more than 10% of our freedoms about 3 years back

hint for you

Decimated: One out of Ten removed
Devastated: One out of Ten Remains
Redacted: Zero remain

What damage did he do? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631649)

How many lives were lost? How many billions of dollars was lost? How many shills lost their jobs because of this?

Twisted "Justice" (5, Insightful)

assemblerex (1275164) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631669)

William Calley, the officer in charge of the My Lai massacre (murder of 304 civilians) server 3 1/2 years house arrest.

Bradley Manning has been sentenced to 35 years, and must server 1/3 to get parole which they will of course deny him.

President Obama authorized the killing of Americans without trial, something illegal under the very rules of the U.S. (constitution)

One of those Americans killed was a 16 YEAR OLD BOY who was murdered by his own government, without trial. [nytimes.com]

The United States no longer pretends to be the land of the free, it now openly favors corporations (Apple given presidential override of import ban), rich individuals and political cronies.

Today is a very sad day. The truth is the enemy, justice inconvenient, and money/power the one true ruler of this country.

Re:Twisted "Justice" (1)

damicatz (711271) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631823)

Obama is nothing but Bush in blackface. It is amazing how many people give him a pass because he is black and has a D besides his name.

What is even more laughable is the Nobel Peace Prize that was given to him.

Re:Twisted "Justice" (1)

crashcy (2839507) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631941)

Why do so many people treat Bush like Original Sin? Bush is not the First, Greatest, or Final Evil. The world was not perfect pre-Bush, and the world post-Bush is not a mirror image. The Obama administration has some originality you know.

Re:Twisted "Justice" (2)

Rougement (975188) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632055)

Why? Because of all the terrible stuff he and Cheney did. Were you not paying attention during those 8 years?

Re:Twisted "Justice" (5, Informative)

arnott (789715) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631913)

Read this speech [salon.com] by Chomsky, it is very informative and depressing.

Re:Twisted "Justice" (1)

vivaoporto (1064484) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631961)

A good comparison will be seen when Sgt Robert Bales get his sentence for killing 16 civilians in Afghanistan [bbc.co.uk] . Then we will see how hard of a crime is leaking secrets when compared (in a contemporary justice system) to killing more than a dozen people.

Can't say I'm surprised. (4, Insightful)

korbulon (2792438) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631679)

Merely disgusted.

Re:Can't say I'm surprised. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,19 hours | (#44631995)

I agree, it should have been 90 years or a firing squad... fucking traiter

Hang him (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631691)

2 bad they didnt hang the traitor

...and the others? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631693)

I know he did something considered wrong, and the punishment has been dealt out (excessively but there had to be something).. but I'm wondering when the crimes of the people Manning exposed will be dealt with if at all?

USA USA USA (0)

ebubna (765457) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631707)

n/t

Re:USA USA USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632001)

America, fuck yea! Coming to save the mother fucking day yea!

Suck it up libtards!

I'd have less of a problem with this (5, Insightful)

intermodal (534361) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631721)

if the government's idea of "secret" weren't complete and total BS. Today, "secret" simply means "stuff that would embarrass us". The only context that getting most of today's government "secrets" into the public's scrutiny would qualify as "aiding an enemy" is if they consider the American people to be their enemy. Which is, sadly, closer to the truth than it ever should be.

Re:I'd have less of a problem with this (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631883)

My head just blew up reading that explanation of secret level for classified data.

Thank god for the delete key (5, Interesting)

fastgriz (1052034) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631735)

"Protect Whistleblowers: Often the best source of information about waste, fraud, and abuse in government is an existing government employee committed to public integrity and willing to speak out. Such acts of courage and patriotism, which can sometimes save lives and often save taxpayer dollars, should be encouraged rather than stifled. We need to empower federal employees as watchdogs of wrongdoing and partners in performance. Barack Obama will strengthen whistleblower laws to protect federal workers who expose waste, fraud, and abuse of authority in government. Obama will ensure that federal agencies expedite the process for reviewing whistleblower claims and whistleblowers have full access to courts and due process."

US (5, Interesting)

damicatz (711271) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631741)

The United States government is the largest criminal organization in the world. Bradley Manning exposed some of the war crimes routinely committed by the United States. That, in and of itself, makes him a hero. It takes no courage to invade another country that is drastically weaker than you are and to then shoot people (mostly civilians) who are simply defending their country from foreign invaders. It takes a lot of courage to stand up to the Imperial US Government.

The USA will fall (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631749)

suffocating in their own feces.

sharing info is worse than killing people... (5, Insightful)

at_slashdot (674436) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631751)

ACLU's Ben Wizner: "When a soldier who shared information with the press and public is punished far more harshly than others who tortured prisoners and killed civilians, something is seriously wrong with our justice system."

fine day to be american! (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631755)

so got enough oil now?
people distracted enough?
jump-started economy by borrowing/printing money and getting it
into peoples pocket by hiring soldiers to chop down poppy plants
in some mountain village?
what's next?

Maybe Someday (2)

Oysterville (2944937) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631759)

I'd like to believe that someday we will get to a more enlightened part of our evolution and realize that Bradley Manning's actions were the start of a more transparent government, and that the Internet took on the role of government overseer that the media long ago surrendered to the very same government. Maybe then he will be released, pardoned, and seen as the hero that he is.

This whole thing is sad (1)

crashcy (2839507) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631773)

And reading the comments, especially on the Reuters article [reuters.com] , is depressing. There is a lot of hate out there, and blind devotion to the overlords.

I'm sorry for this guy ... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631791)

I have respect for this man. He broke the law for the sake of what is right.

Blow my whistle baby (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631819)

Protect Whistleblowers: Often the best source of information about waste, fraud, and abuse in government is an existing government employee committed to public integrity and willing to speak out. Such acts of courage and patriotism, which can sometimes save lives and often save taxpayer dollars, should be encouraged rather than stifled. We need to empower federal employees as watchdogs of wrongdoing and partners in performance. Barack Obama will strengthen whistleblower laws to protect federal workers who expose waste, fraud, and abuse of authority in government. Obama will ensure that federal agencies expedite the process for reviewing whistleblower claims and whistleblowers have full access to courts and due process.

change.gov/agenda/ethics_agenda/

Change you can believe in.

Kickstarter for hitmen and kamikazes ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631875)

I would gladly spare a few bucks to get the criminals who got Manning condemned shot.

That Should Teach a Geek ... (1)

silvergeek (2768657) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631911)

That should teach a geek to not to stray from covering up government wrongs. Well, maybe at least, he will win the Nobel Prize.

Obligatory Baretta Quote (0)

SonnyDog09 (1500475) | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631937)

Don't do the crime if you can't do the time.

"He" (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631955)

Ummm...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradley_Manning#Deployment_to_Iraq.2C_discussion_with_counselor

Not so sure... this is the kindest way to refer to them.

I wonder if Adrian Lame-o feels safer now (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,20 hours | (#44631973)

n/t

Unfortunate, but Just (1)

SgtPepperKSU (905229) | 1 year,19 hours | (#44632009)

He is definitely guilty. He did the things with which they're accusing him. The punishment of that crime is straightforward.

However, I think he is a patriot and should be lauded for his efforts. When he did it, he knew that this was what he risked. He obviously felt that it was worth it to provide such a tremendous service to his country. I applaud him and consider him a national hero for making such a sacrifice for me and everyone else. I would like to think I would do the same, but without being placed in that situation, I obviously can't say for sure. He can. His moral character was tested and he passed with flying colors.

This is the way things should/need to work. If there weren't consequences, we'd have all sorts of deluded people releasing classified documents (that they - possibly errantly - felt needed to be released) because they thought they'd just be allowed to go on their way (the world needs to know that we use slightly too weak of bolts on our drones, so here are the plans to prove it!).

The best possible timeline for this type of situation in my opinion:
1. He releases documents and is exposed as doing so
2. He is arrested and tried for the crime
3. He is found guilty and sentenced
4. If the public good that came from the action is so dramatic as to warrant it, he should receive a pardon (but that doesn't mean he shouldn't have been found guilty to begin with).

Of course, I won't hold my breath for the pardon, though. Politicians are too concerned with appearances to risk being "soft" on "terrorism" (everything bad is "terrorism", don't you know).

I salute you Bradley Manning. Serve your sentence with pride.

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