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Motorola Uses NFC To Enable Touch-to-Unlock For Smartphones

timothy posted about 8 months ago | from the press-here-to-continue dept.

Cellphones 87

colinneagle writes "A lot of people don't password-protect their smartphones, and even those who do employ a simple four-digit passcode to at least keep it a little convenient. Their phones aren't really protected, as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recommends a 12-character random password. Those who check smartphones 50 times a day would probably get tired of that. So Motorola developed the Skip, an NFC-based unlocking tool smartphone users can clip to their clothes. Tapping an NFC-enabled phone to the Skip unlocks it. The Skip also comes in sticker form, so users can install one in their cars or at their desks." That's why the muggers want your jacket, too.

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87 comments

first apk host file (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44646825)

ban the things with host files

backdoors. (-1, Troll)

grub (11606) | about 8 months ago | (#44646863)


Of course there will be no government-mandated backdoors in this.

Re:backdoors. (1)

Firethorn (177587) | about 8 months ago | (#44646883)

Of course not! They don't want to use some tool specific to the user's security system. They'd much rather just slurp the contents of the phone remotely through the carrier.

Re:backdoors. (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 8 months ago | (#44647071)

Of course there will be no government-mandated backdoors in this.

Why would there need to be? It is a matter of controversy whether passwords/phrases are protected from disclosure under the 5th amendment; but physical unlock fobs that can be seized definitely don't enjoy anything more than 4th amendment warrant requirements (and, on a bad day, probably not even that...) A physical fob makes the system markedly more accesssible to authorities, even ones acting within the law.

Re:backdoors. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647213)

A physical fob makes the system markedly more accesssible to authorities, even ones acting within the law.

And also to criminals who are able to get within pick-pocketing distance of you.

Re:backdoors. (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 8 months ago | (#44647843)

It is a matter of controversy whether passwords/phrases are protected from disclosure under the 5th amendment

I don't think you can call it a "controversy" when the government thinks the Fifth and Fourth Amendments don't apply and the citizens think it does.

I haven't met many people who didn't work for the government who didn't believe their passwords are protected.

Maybe "controversy" isn't the right word.

Re:backdoors. (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 8 months ago | (#44648691)

The executive branch considers both to be either ornamental or objectively pro-terror; but RE: passwords and the 5th, my understanding is that judicial opinion has been rather muddled and decisions have gone both ways in various places, which counts as 'controversy' in my book.

I...hesitate... to appeal to public opinion because that seems to vacillate, among all but the most studiously consistent, between "The gummint is taking my rights!!!" and "I saw on TV that he did it, why can't we just lynch him?".

Re:backdoors. (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 8 months ago | (#44647861)

A physical fob makes the system markedly more accesssible to authorities, even ones acting within the law.

Simple: make the fobs edible and fully digestible.

Re:backdoors. (2)

icebike (68054) | about 8 months ago | (#44649561)

Why would there need to be? It is a matter of controversy whether passwords/phrases are protected from disclosure under the 5th amendment; but physical unlock fobs that can be seized definitely don't enjoy anything more than 4th amendment warrant requirements (and, on a bad day, probably not even that...) A physical fob makes the system markedly more accesssible to authorities, even ones acting within the law.

Right, if they got your phone, chances are that they took it off of you, and have your Skip-Chip as well.
(Its actually not really even a fob, its just something to slide over your pants pocket or belt. (Better Picture Here [talkandroid.com]).
Comes in a set of three, because you WILL soon lose it.)

But with an APP [google.com], and a cheap NFC stickers you can make your own with any android phone that has an NFC chip.

Some states are Not allowing mobile device searches [abajournal.com] without a warrant warrants, but that is a trifling impediment. When they confiscate your phone, they will certainly find your "Skip" or they will simply take your phone into their lab an crack it via other means.

This thing is aimed at the casual user that keeps their phone on their desk, and needs to keep it locked to keep busybodies away from it. Its not meant as protection from the police.

implant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44646869)

Excellent, now where can I get this implanted into my fingertip?

Re:implant (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647049)

Moron. Those are all fake. Mobile phone touch interfaces don't have nearly the sensitivity to really read a fingerprint. You probably meant to link to something more along the lines of this: http://www.techradar.com/us/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/apple-patents-fingerprint-sensor-for-biometric-iphone-unlock-1104176 [techradar.com]

Re:implant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647541)

yes they are, but how about this http://www.droid-life.com/2013/08/22/newest-google-patent-application-secures-your-phone-depending-on-where-you-are/

Location based security, at home, you only need a swipe, out in public (where your phone could get lost or stolen) need a password.

Clever (2)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 8 months ago | (#44646871)

That's a good idea. I think I'll do the same thing with an NFC tag and Tasker. You could also just use any old expired card with an NFC chip in it in your pocket. When I finally get my Pebble watch, I'm planning on having the lock disabled when they're connected to each other.

Re:Clever (4, Interesting)

PhrostyMcByte (589271) | about 8 months ago | (#44647189)

It'd be really clever if someone made it into a ring [nfcring.com].

Re:Clever (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 8 months ago | (#44647917)

It would be more clever if someone made it into an edible piece of candy.

Think of it: A jar full of individually-wrapped Lemonheads sitting on your dresser. They can be "charged" and will work to unlock your device for one day (or one hour), after which they are useless. Can be dissolved in water or swallowed and completely digested.

Personally, I like complex gestures better. It's not that hard to learn to draw a figure that is completely unique to your hand and is extremely hard to forge (especially since it's invisible until you use it and then disappears).

Re:Clever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44648229)

It would be more clever if someone made it into an edible piece of candy.

Think of it: A jar full of individually-wrapped Lemonheads sitting on your dresser. They can be "charged" and will work to unlock your device for one day (or one hour), after which they are useless. Can be dissolved in water or swallowed and completely digested.

Personally, I like complex gestures better. It's not that hard to learn to draw a figure that is completely unique to your hand and is extremely hard to forge (especially since it's invisible until you use it and then disappears).

Didn't you read the most recent Wired? Motorola is already working on a daily pass code pill powered by your stomach acid.

Re:Clever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44648475)

Just don't look too hard at that odd-shaped smudge on your screen.

Re:Clever (2)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 8 months ago | (#44648627)

Just don't look too hard at that odd-shaped smudge on your screen.

My screen gets covered with all sorts of oddly shaped smudges just from daily use. I would doubt that forensics have advanced to the point where the greasy smears on my screen protector can be deciphered.

Especially if you put the area for the entry of that complex gesture right over the part of the screen that has the virtual keyboard.

Or, how about unlocking by using very specific, complex movements of accelerometer-enabled smartphones, held in a hand. Shaken to a particular beat.

How is Big Brother going to figure out that my phone unlocks by being shaken to the rhythm of some obscure Public Enemy song?

Re:Clever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44656613)

Personally, I like complex gestures better. It's not that hard to learn to draw a figure that is completely unique to your hand and is extremely hard to forge (especially since it's invisible until you use it and then disappears).

Really? When I used to work in a supermarket it was a rare person whose signature actually matched what was on the card, if mine ever did it was more by chance than anything else. I tried using pattern unlock on my nexus 7 but it was too much effort to reproduce a complex pattern consistently and I didn't care enough about keeping my device locked so I gave up on it.

It may not be hard for you to do this, but I think that is an ability lots of people just don't have.

Re:Clever (4, Funny)

Areyoukiddingme (1289470) | about 8 months ago | (#44648147)

Damn damn damn. You had to paste that link 3 days after the Kickstarter ended, didn't you. If only I'd known. That's what I've been wanting ever since I heard about NFC.

Now I have to wait around until they're selling them, and fork over the extra 6 pounds.

Re:Clever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44651951)

the problem with a physical device is that the cops can compel you to turn it over, they can issue warrants to seize it, or they can just outright take it or clone it... unlike a password which is locked away in your brain, and as far as i know, drugs and torture are still illegal, at least when used against american citizens that don't reside in a cuban beach resort. and what's to stop rogue devices, like simple door handles, from capturing the data on the ring for criminals? a little face recognition, open access public records, or image/facebook search, and the crooks get your 'key' and know who you are and where you live.

do.not.want.

captcha: oppose

Re:Clever (1)

wile_e8 (958263) | about 8 months ago | (#44647397)

I've thought about the same thing, but doesn't the phone need to be unlocked for NFC to work? (at least on Android, which is what I'm assuming you're talking about since you mention Tasker). I've seen some mods to get around this, but they never worked on my GNex.

Re:Clever (1)

ElderKorean (49299) | about 8 months ago | (#44674493)

I've thought about the same thing, but doesn't the phone need to be unlocked for NFC to work? (at least on Android, which is what I'm assuming you're talking about since you mention Tasker). I've seen some mods to get around this, but they never worked on my GNex.

I would be happy if there were options of:
"If I see this WiFi network ....., then don't require a password to unlock the phone (also turn volume up)" for at home
"If I see this WiFi network ....., then don't require a password to unlock the phone (also turn volume off)" for at work

12 digit? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44646873)

Assuming unlimited password tries, 4 characters is enough. I use pattern lock on my phone and it times out indefinitely after 5 failed attempts, requiring a Google Account Username/Password verified online. 12 digits would only be required for real security if there were no timeout.

Re:12 digit? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44646927)

I wouldn't mind the Skip plus four characters. Multi-factor authentication, so if the phone is stolen, the really long code is required.

I do this already -- you can split up the screen locker password from the password that unlocks the /data partition, so when the phone first boots, it will ask for the long password, then from there on out, one uses the fairly short screen locker PIN, and too many guesses will cause it to time out.

It isn't bulletproof, but good enough. I wouldn't mind having a NFC key as an additional layer though. That way, if I have the key with me and lose the phone, I have good confidence that the data on the phone will be out of reach of all but the more well-heeled folks.

Re:12 digit? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44646993)

Should read "limited password tries" not unlimited. There's always time to proofread after I submit it, right?

Re:12 digit? (1)

a-zarkon! (1030790) | about 8 months ago | (#44647631)

To confirm - power-down reboot doesn't clear the lock on your phone? If that's accurate, that's cool. Can I ask which phone and OS you're running?

Re:12 digit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44653013)

Correct

This is standard on Google Android phones after I "think" 2.3.

Even more convenient. (4, Funny)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | about 8 months ago | (#44646879)

Tapping an NFC-enabled phone to the Skip unlocks it. The Skip also comes in sticker form, so users can install one in their cars or at their desks.

Or stick it to the back of the phone. :-)

Re:Even more convenient. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647053)

I'm sure somebody (or many somebodies) would do this. The 21st century equivalent of your password on a sticky note under the keyboard?

Re:Even more convenient. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44648827)

You gotta love an instance of Murphy's Law in action as originally phrased.

3 pillars... (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 8 months ago | (#44646901)

Something you have, something you are, something you know.

Seems like this involves 2 "something you have"s. Added alongside facial recognition, and it'd be fairly secure. But by itself....

Re:3 pillars... (1)

chuckinator (2409512) | about 8 months ago | (#44646939)

Facial recognition is painfully insecure and can be easily broken with a portrait photograph of the person you're trying to impersonate. It's security theater for the kool-aid drinkers.

Re:3 pillars... (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 months ago | (#44647203)

It's in its infancy, and not kool aid.
That said, the vast majority of unexpected phone access come from people leaving their phone someplace. What are the odds that the person who finds it ALSO has a picture of you?

Security isn't about absolutes, it's about layers, risk, percentages and time.

The issue you bring up have been solved in high end racial recognition tools.
Eventually the phone.

Re:3 pillars... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647293)

That said, the vast majority of unexpected phone access come from people leaving their phone someplace.

And if you live in a moderately civilized area, the majority of those accesses are attempts to figure out some way to tell that random stranger that they just left their phone at the bar.

If you're going to try to over-secure your phone data, make sure that the 'logic failed' screen has an alternate contact method and a polite phrase asking the finder to use that method.

Re:3 pillars... (1)

Beorytis (1014777) | about 8 months ago | (#44647613)

On the bright side though, the muggers won't beat your face up (at least not until they unlock the phone).

Re:3 pillars... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44648565)

Mine has an option to require a blink during recognition. Motorola Razr HD.

Re:3 pillars... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44656709)

Yeah you can fake that with a bit of photoshop (or your image manipulation program of choice), get a photo, paint the eyes flesh colored, and create a short animation of the person blinking.

And what ? (2)

lord_rob the only on (859100) | about 8 months ago | (#44646919)

Actually that means that thieves have to steal two objects (that NFC thing added to your phone) instead of one (your phone alone).
Harder for thieves maybe, but the harder it becomes for them, the more violent towards you they can become. I don't think it's a very wise idea ...

Re:And what ? (2)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 months ago | (#44647217)

Actually, the hard it gets the less crime there is. You don't really need to raise that bar very far.

Re:And what ? (1)

mattpalmer1086 (707360) | about 8 months ago | (#44648761)

I guess the point the OP was making is that the remaining crime may become more violent. But I agree that a lot of opportunistic crime would essentially disappear.

Re:And what ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647407)

The idea is not to prevent straight robbers. It is to prevent "thieves" which could very well have found your phone on a mcdonald chair, where you left it.

Re:And what ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647671)

By your logic, if it's just a password, they will kidnap you until you spill the beans.

Re:And what ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647753)

If they are going to become violent, can't they just demand your PIN already?

This will do more to encourage people who aren't using PINs already to start using them. It will bite some people in the butt, however overall it will be a net plus for the cell phone populace... provided they can get them for $20. That seems steep.

Re:And what ? (2)

swillden (191260) | about 8 months ago | (#44650375)

Actually that means that thieves have to steal two objects (that NFC thing added to your phone) instead of one (your phone alone). Harder for thieves maybe, but the harder it becomes for them, the more violent towards you they can become. I don't think it's a very wise idea ...

It's always amusing to see the lengths to which some slashdotters will go to criticize an idea.

Re:And what ? (1)

lord_rob the only on (859100) | about 8 months ago | (#44652569)

The role of of the comments is to stimulate debates. There are no debates without people for and against a concept.

Re:And what ? (2)

swillden (191260) | about 8 months ago | (#44653677)

The role of of the comments is to stimulate debates. There are no debates without people for and against a concept.

If I had more time, I'd invent some bizarre and ridiculous counterargument.

WHY passwords are used- Captain obvious here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647021)

The 4 digit pin isnt to keep some hacker from accessing your phone. its to keep a casual acquaintance/friend/coworker/family member from easily getting access to your phone which has private content on it. Even them most vanilla person in the world has personal info. The wilder ones have self-porn. I dont use a password but I also never leave my phone unattended. Also dont have nudity on my phone...

Re:WHY passwords are used- Captain obvious here (2)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 8 months ago | (#44647103)

The 4 digit pin isnt to keep some hacker from accessing your phone. its to keep a casual acquaintance/friend/coworker/family member from easily getting access to your phone which has private content on it. Even them most vanilla person in the world has personal info. The wilder ones have self-porn. I dont use a password but I also never leave my phone unattended. Also dont have nudity on my phone...

Do you have passwords for other accounts on your phone? Contact info? Addresses, calendar invites? Call logs?

Re:WHY passwords are used- Captain obvious here (2)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about 8 months ago | (#44647307)

In Canada, a password means that the police require a specific warrant to access your phone.

If it's not protected, they can just put their dick in there if they're arresting you or even just asking you questions.

Theres already an app for that ... (2)

MondoGordo (2277808) | about 8 months ago | (#44647063)

nothing new here folks .... NFC Secure ... https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.t3hh4xx0r.nfcsecure&hl=en [google.com]

Re:Theres already an app for that ... (1)

barlevg (2111272) | about 8 months ago | (#44647123)

What do you use as the NFC key? Only NFC device I can think of in my possession is, well, another phone.

Re:Theres already an app for that ... (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 months ago | (#44647231)

It will pair with any NFC key. So if you are using one for something else you could use that. You could get one of those NFC rings.
Maybe an old CC card?

Re:Theres already an app for that ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44664285)

Or SecureLock https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=at.jku.se.dipthesis

Intelligent thieves may exist (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647083)

If there are intelligent street thugs then they know that your phone could be tracked to the next user, no matter what they do and steal it for resale of most of the guts as replacement parts. You can't stop these a-holes no matter how "secure" the equipment is. It still has value when locked. Just not as a quickie sale as a burner phone.

NFC Ring looks better (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647125)

Hope it survives a cycle through the washing machine!

Why not embed NFC into say a piece of jewelery, say... a RING! Oh wait... someone already has done that:
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/mclear/nfc-ring

Re:NFC Ring looks better (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about 8 months ago | (#44647283)

Kickstarter products don't exist until you've opened the package. It's like software. If your best friend that you trust with your life promises the software will be ready tomorrow, then you don't depend on that software being ready until you've installed it.

This Skip is available in real life.

here's a fix (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647169)

The 12 character random password is typical of the stupid govt and NSA thinking. Anyone with a dozen or so passwords like this that change every 30 ro 60 days, some of which are only used a few times a month, will be writing them down.

How about some of the facial recognition for cell phones. Finger prints is not good because they would steal your fingers too.

pin is useless for your own phone. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647187)

a pin/password is useless for your own phone. Do you think a stolen phone will be returned if the pin can't be broken?
Now, if everybody else uses a pin, that would reduce the number of stolen phones, including the chance your phone is stolen, independently from weather your phone was locked or not.

Re:pin is useless for your own phone. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44648305)

A trojan pin, like 1234, 1111, 0000, or 9999, that hides your private data (or blows away the encryption key needed to decrypt the virtual filesystem until you re-authenticate using some more robust method), then makes your phone appear to be ready-to-reuse (by the thief), with pre-deployed rootkit you can access remotely and have loads of fun completely messing with the life of whomever ends up using that phone, is even better.

Let them steal your phone. The hours of entertainment you can by totally pwning their life & systematically stripping them of their dignity vastly exceeds your insurance deductible. Hell, think about this for a minute... thanks to their theft of your phone & subsequent use on another wifi network, you now have a totally compromised root box capable of running the Android port of Wireshark and sniffing not only the phone's local data traffic, but the unencrypted network traffic of every other device on that network, too.

Best of all, thanks to GPS, you even know where they live. After having your fun, burn the embarrassing data you've collected to a CD or DVD, and mail it to them. Make sure you have the camera spooling the next day, and be ready to trigger the streamed video to your own server once you notice they're about to check the mail & discover how completely and thoroughly they've been owned for the past few months. If you find anything *really* juicy, maybe include a note with it like, "If you don't strip nude, walk into the police station, and surrender yourself for theft, everybody in your address book gets a copy of this DVD"

Near Field Communication (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647205)

I know I'm not the only one wondering what the title meant.

won't even need a $5 wrench... (1)

slew (2918) | about 8 months ago | (#44647291)

Obligitory [xkcd.com]...

Re:won't even need a $5 wrench... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647393)

Does not apply. Phone passwords are not supposed to protect the phone from the NSA or other wrench-wielding-agency, it's supposed to protect yet another jackass from sending dickpix to your contacts.

fingerprint sensor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44647323)

Wouldn't a fingerprint sensor at the edge of the phone work better? unless of course, you're wearing gloves..

Re:fingerprint sensor (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 8 months ago | (#44647641)

If only somebody would invent or release a phone with a fingerprint sensor! maybe in 2020 or something like that... but who has the knowhow and innovative spirit to do such a thing?

SnowShoe would be a lot more convenient (2)

Laxori666 (748529) | about 8 months ago | (#44647467)

New tech startup called Snowshoe [snowshoestamp.com] has an interesting take on this. Basically it's a fingerprint that already works on all existing touchscreens. Doesn't require any battery power. I saw their 5-minute pitch from the latest TechStars, seemed interesting!

Re:SnowShoe would be a lot more convenient (1)

hibji (966961) | about 8 months ago | (#44650295)

Why would would it be more convenient? The snowshoe stamp requires the screen to be on. The stamp itself doesn't require battery power, but neither does an nfc chip. The stamp is also huge in comparison to an nfc.

12 Characters? (2)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 8 months ago | (#44647617)

Why would you ever need so many. Only allow fives tries a minute, after the twentieth try go into deep lock-down mode and only allow some admin password to unlock. There three digit password is good enough now.

Re:12 Characters? (1)

hsmith (818216) | about 8 months ago | (#44648067)

Because, the "twentith lockdown mode" is useless. Image the phone and you can have as many tries as you want.

Re:12 Characters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44648379)

A person robbing your phone is in it for the expensive toy, not the data.
On the other hand, long password would not stop the person/TLA that can image your phone from getting your data.

Re:12 Characters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44650389)

Why would you ever need so many.[sic]

You're both wrong [xkcd.com].

Two passwords? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44648235)

Why not implement a simple solution like two passwords?
1) A super-complex password required when the phone is turned on, or after a "long" timeout.
2) And a simple pattern/pin unlock to prevent idiots from messing with your phone.

Or, go with the Blackberry solution: allow "weak" passwords, but only allow 10 attempts before the phone wipes itself.

50 times a day... (2)

GumphMaster (772693) | about 8 months ago | (#44648281)

Those who check smartphones 50 times a day would probably get tired of that.

Further aiding and abetting their addiction is probably not a good idea.

Meh, not that inconvenient (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44648507)

Memory isn't the issue of inconvenience, you just need to remember one or two words for the alphanumerical correspondence on the dial pad. Tapping that in as frequently as 50 times a day will train your muscle memory quickly: my code is 9 digits and I can enter it with my eyes closed.

Real News: MotoX has NFC chip active when locked (1)

slacklinejoe (1784298) | about 8 months ago | (#44648921)

The part most folks are missing that while you could do this on certain custom roms, almost every phone maker has the NFC sensor turned off unless the device is unlocked. While I use tasker and NFC quite a lot, I can't make it do this without installing a custom rom that enables the NFC. Now the flip side is that if the device is processing NFC when locked, that means someone can bump into you and have your phone activate website URLs or trigger things like google wallet depending on your settings.

Re:Real News: MotoX has NFC chip active when locke (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44656879)

Maybe the Moto X's NFC is only listening for the NFC tag to unlock, like how it is always listening for the phrase "OK Google Now" but ignores everything else.

RFID wiping (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44649507)

implant/inject some rfid tags in you. your right hand = unlock phone. left hand = enable guest account (to pass to someone)...near the b-hole=reboot to recovery and wipe phone. :)

Atrix 4G (1)

chavez chiu (853423) | about 8 months ago | (#44664959)

That's why the phone is great, just a swipe with your finger on the fingerprint sensor. I've no idea why they get rid of this idea.
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<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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