Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

NSA Cracked Into Encrypted UN Video Conferences

timothy posted about a year ago | from the for-the-greater-good dept.

Government 427

McGruber writes "According to documents seen by Germany's Der Spiegel, the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) successfully cracked the encryption code protecting the United Nations' internal videoconferencing system. NSA first breached the UN system in the summer of 2012 and, within three weeks of initially gaining access to the UN system, the NSA had increased the number of such decrypted communications from 12 to 458. On one occasion, according to the report, while the American NSA were attempting to break into UN communications, they discovered the Chinese were attempting to crack the encryption code as well."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

A Must-Read About The UN (-1, Offtopic)

dryriver (1010635) | about a year ago | (#44669861)

Re:A Must-Read About The UN (0)

RockinRoller (3023071) | about a year ago | (#44670079)

since he did zero at the UN...how could he write so much? he must be vain.

Yo Dawg we heard the chinese (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44669899)

were trying to break in , so we did it first to warn you.

Re: Yo Dawg we heard the chinese (4, Insightful)

updatelee (244571) | about a year ago | (#44669975)

Exactly. So it's OK the USA does it but not the Chinese?

UDL

Re: Yo Dawg we heard the chinese (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#44670149)

Of course. We may do every kind of atrocity, for it is in the name of peace and democracy.

Re: Yo Dawg we heard the chinese (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670389)

So it's OK the Chinese does it but not the USA?

Re: Yo Dawg we heard the chinese (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670601)

Exactly. So it's OK the USA does it but not the Chinese?

Who is making moral judgements? As long as some countries might become a threat in the future, every other country will spy. The alternative is to be caught off guard and lose a war. You don't have to like it, but pretending to be shocked makes you come off as incredibly naive. Put "prisoner's dilemma" into the search engine of your choice to understand the problem better.

The dilema ... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44669927)

If the NSA can do it, so can other people. So should the NSA reveal what they can do so the UN can switch to more secure communications. Or should the NSA have continued to monitor with the knowledge that the Chinese, Russians and probably a few others were also listening in?

Re:The dilema ... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44669965)

If the NSA can do it, so can other people. So should the NSA reveal what they can do so the UN can switch to more secure communications. Or should the NSA have continued to monitor with the knowledge that the Chinese, Russians and probably a few others were also listening in?

Where's the dilemma? Yes. No.

Re:The dilema ... (3, Informative)

spire3661 (1038968) | about a year ago | (#44670013)

The NSA shjouldnt be fucking monitoring the UN. I really hate how everyone thinks it is okie dokie to spy all they want. Spying is an act of WAR.

Re:The dilema ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670073)

... there can be only one!!! Governments are OK with war.

Why that is the sentiment is beyond me.

I would rather the world was like Busch Gardens, the Old Country; you just walk around and enjoy the culture. Apparently, instead, we need to make every border crossing a potential invasion.

Is that because of religion and custom, and we're defending against it... or are we feeding that fire?

I hope that the people in charge know that answer and the reality is that this is much better than it could have been.

But I'm skeptical.

Re:The dilema ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670087)

Really? You expect that any nation is going to start shooting missles and sending in soldiers over the privacy of communications?

It is a calculated risk with just about no chance of a violent out-come. I'm thinking that most likely response is a lot of "We condemn these actions" and the very minor chance that it results in some economic sanctions (with even that being nearly zero chance).

Re:The dilema ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670097)

It wouldn't surprise me if the UN moves out of the US soon. They should at least sanction the US.

Re:The dilema ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670175)

Just don't move the assholes to Europe. Put it somewhere in Africa perhaps. Or Australia can have it if they really want it.

Re:The dilema ... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670243)

Good riddance.

The UN's special brand of corruption makes the entirety of the US - from our incompetent presidents, to our circus-like Congress, to our crushing-rights-under-jackboots three-letter organizations - look like goddamned saints.

Please. Get the hell out of my country. I beg you. Shit, I'll even help you pack.

Re:The dilema ... (2, Insightful)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about a year ago | (#44670293)

umm, you do know it was corrupted by the US right?

Re:The dilema ... (2)

Mashiki (184564) | about a year ago | (#44670347)

umm, you do know it was corrupted by the US right?

Haven't been paying attention to groups like the Arab League have you.

Re:The dilema ... (3, Interesting)

peragrin (659227) | about a year ago | (#44670285)

not going to happen unless the isa kicks the UN out(which we should do).

the UN is a bunch of useless cry babies. they don't do anything unless forced to and that takes a lot. Look at Un's response to Syria. Chemical weapons being used lets issue a statement.

The USA should just close 90% of the out of country bases, and go back to a mostly isolation stance. let the world fuck themselves over for the next 20 years until the world wants to apologize for being limp dick idiots. Let Iran have Nuclear weapons. Israel won't be the first target of Iranian nukes but either pakistan or Saudi Arabia will be. Let North Korea invade South Korea, and then blame Beijing for not controlling their pets. Let Russia stomp all over eastern Europe again. Maybe next time they won't cry about the USA being Bullies.

Tariff all imports 200% and force American industry to rebuild itself. Force the issue of just in time manufacturing(a combination of CNC machines, 3D printing, and robotics) to build generic fabrication facilities.

20 years of smaller Military(but let development continue) will put the USA in a spot so when we are forced to once again save the idiots from themselves we will have the tech and weapons in place.

Of course that is no longer really an option. At least not until we solve the Power (oil dependacy) and Fabrication issues(the just in time building I mentioned).

Re:The dilema ... (1)

oPless (63249) | about a year ago | (#44670457)

Yes, please ... why stop at 90% make it 100%. Hell I'll even help you pack.

Oh yes, take your goddamn nukes too.

At least this should help european states by upping our own defensive forces instead of reducing them.

Re: The dilema ... (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670533)

Thank you peragrin!

It's about time that someone here sees it like it is.

The world loves the USA when we are saving or protecting their asses, but they have a fucking short memory problem.

I agree with everything you said. Lets leave these fucking asshole (and ungrateful) Europeans to the Russians. How do you think the EU will be doing when all of Eastern Europe is under Russia again? Fuck them. As if the Germans don't do any spying of their own.

Leave Asia to the Chinese. Fuck em all.

Everyone hates the US so much, lets leave them on their own. See how much we are missed.

The funny thing is that prior to Snowden, it seemed like 3 or 4x a week there was something in the news about Chinese hacking and spying. Fuck they stole all of our IP and turned it into cheap shit. They can't even innovate. But everyone's forgotten about Chinese and Russian hacking and spying.

I agree peragrin - fuck them all - pull the US back, rebuild our industry, and put nation earplugs in for when the inevitable cries for US help come.

Re:The dilema ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670105)

I guess anything could be an act of war if it makes the other side angry enough, but historically speaking I don't know of any wars started by a simple act of spying.

Re:The dilema ... (5, Insightful)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about a year ago | (#44670131)

Spying is an act of WAR.

If spying were an "act of WAR", then EVERY government has a casus bellum against EVERY OTHER country.

Face it, espionage has been a fact of life between governments since at least the time of the ancient Greeks...

Re:The dilema ... (5, Insightful)

dotancohen (1015143) | about a year ago | (#44670381)

Face it, espionage has been a fact of life between governments since at least the time of the ancient Greeks...

And soon, it we don't so something about it:
Year 4026, in the Human's Republic of Earth: "Face it, government surveillance of citizens in their own homes has been a fact of life since at least the time of the ancient American empire..."

Re:The dilema ... (4, Insightful)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | about a year ago | (#44670469)

So you justify your actions by "everyone else is doing it"? That's just as immoral as "the (potential) ends justify the means".

An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind. In this case, trust is the sight lost. And not caring about trust between partners is short-sighted.

Re:The dilema ... (2, Insightful)

elucido (870205) | about a year ago | (#44670593)

Spying is an act of WAR.

If spying were an "act of WAR", then EVERY government has a casus bellum against EVERY OTHER country.

Face it, espionage has been a fact of life between governments since at least the time of the ancient Greeks...

Espionage is how wars are prevented. We'd have a world war constantly for hundreds of years if not for the spy wars. World War 1 would never have ended.

Re:The dilema ... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670137)

No, spying is NOT an act of war. In fact, spying probably stopped WW 3 from happening several times. Since we were spying on the USSR, (And them on us), both sides knew where things stood and how far they could push.

And as to the NSA spying on the UN, big deal. that is one place they should be spying on. You could probably cook a steak from all the radio waves emanating from the bugs, taps and other assorted intelligence gathering devices in and around that building.

Re:The dilema ... (5, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#44670157)

Spying is an act of WAR.

Spying is almost never considered an act of war. Although it has at times lead to war, for instance the Ems Dispatch [wikipedia.org] and the Zimmermann Telegram [wikipedia.org] .

Re:The dilema ... (2)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#44670165)

In your sad little world perhaps.

If governments believed that, the entire world would constantly be at war since everyone does it to everyone.

The world is bigger than your fantasy.

Re:The dilema ... (5, Insightful)

plover (150551) | about a year ago | (#44670199)

Spying is an act of WAR.

No, spying has been an illegal but ongoing act of governments everywhere, and has been true across history. It's unethical, highly offensive, unjustifiably immoral, and dangerous to the agent if you act on the knowledge gained, but it's not an act of war.

The primary differences between the NSA and all other spying is that they have essentially unlimited resources, technology, and personnel to throw at it, and they are very, very good at it.

Where the NSA is lacking, though, is with actual infiltration. They have no agents hiding inside every possible organization. They are instead performing their spying on the communications that the other people are using. It's cheaper, easier, more reliable, and more "politically acceptable" to tap conversations. It's expensive, difficult, and unreliable to have a source reporting from within the organization, and it's politically unpalatable when an agent is discovered and killed or tortured for their treason.

Typically, infiltration has been the job of the CIA and similar spy agencies in other countries, but their historic mission has been to infiltrate an entire nation-state. Nations are easier to spy on because the attack surface is large, and they can get useful benefits from spies anywhere in the government, military, or police. It's much harder to infiltrate a religious or tribal clan, where it's a smaller group where everyone is personally known to the others.

Where it gets dodgy, though, is not in the passive (or even aggressive) monitoring. It's when the monitors begin injecting their own information in order to influence the behavior of others. It's obviously one thing to overhear a voice on the radio saying "we'll meet at the ABC building on Thursday," but a completely different thing to alter the voice on the radio to say "let's meet at the 123 building on Thursday" to lead them into an ambush. Deploying an agent provocateur can indeed be an act of war, even via the proxy of communications.

Re:The dilema ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670251)

Sabotage is an act of war. Assassinations are definitely an act of war.

Spying is just good practice. Verbal and written agreements are all well and good, but a statement from a neighbor will never be as trustworthy as seeing it first hand. Like it or not, spies help keep the peace.

Re:The dilema ... (1, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year ago | (#44670279)

We have always been at war with Eurasia.

Re:The dilema ... (2, Insightful)

geek (5680) | about a year ago | (#44670291)

Spying actually prevents wars as it allows governments to act diplomatically before the shit hits the fan. However, spying on ones own citizens is what dictatorships do to oppress their own people. The NSA was created specifically to spy on foreign nations, just like every other country does.

It sucks but thats how the world is.

Re:The dilema ... (2)

DFurno2003 (739807) | about a year ago | (#44670323)

"I really hate how everyone thinks it is okie dokie to spy all they want." Not everyone.

WAR? (1)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | about a year ago | (#44670419)

The US hasn't declared war since WWII.

Re:The dilema ... (4, Interesting)

gmuslera (3436) | about a year ago | (#44670511)

Spying is not an act of war, but is an act of aggression. Doing it in the very place where peace and agreement is try to be made between nations is a clear signal that US don't care at all about those topics. Stop being fooled about "we are doing this because we care about people", all is just another plot for getting more power and more money.

Re:The dilema ... (-1, Troll)

CodeBuster (516420) | about a year ago | (#44670545)

Spying is an act of WAR.

Oh noes! Run and hide from the terrible military might of the UN! Maybe we'll all die laughing?

Re:The dilema ... (1)

elucido (870205) | about a year ago | (#44670581)

The NSA shjouldnt be fucking monitoring the UN. I really hate how everyone thinks it is okie dokie to spy all they want. Spying is an act of WAR.

Spying is how you prevent wars.

Re:The dilema ... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#44670171)

What dilemma? You keep spying and tell your government that you shouldn't use the encryption 'cause it's insecure.

Re:The dilema ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670203)

Let me put your mind at ease. The only way to be able to defeat the evil and oppressive governments of the world is to understand them. To understand their motives and their goals and their mindset. In order to do that the US must think like them and act like them; to become them in order to predict their actions. Unfortunately we have succeeded beyond our wildest dreams.

Re:The dilema ... (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | about a year ago | (#44670313)

It is similar to the 'stolen art conundrum'. If a picture has been stolen repeatedly over the centuries, and is stolen again, is it really a crime?

Diplomatic implications (5, Interesting)

shentino (1139071) | about a year ago | (#44669953)

If I was the state department I would be furious about this.

Short of a direct attack on a diplomat I don't think there is a worse breach of international custom and law.

Snooping on citizens is bad enough, but this is playing with fire.

Re:Diplomatic implications (4, Interesting)

jovius (974690) | about a year ago | (#44669997)

It's a cruel reality. Instead of using advanced high tech and knowledge to create impartial and protected communication networks for the UN the member countries try to take the systems down for their own use.

Re:Diplomatic implications (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670047)

The UN doesn't care any more. There is barely a power structure left which isn't dominated by US flunkies.

The world was rightly scared of the USSR, but it should be far more worried about a one-superpower world.

Re:Diplomatic implications (3, Insightful)

EmagGeek (574360) | about a year ago | (#44670067)

The US has veto power against any resolution the UN might pass against the US. Nothing to worry about...

Re:Diplomatic implications (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year ago | (#44670345)

As does any of the permanent members of the UN Security Council [wikipedia.org] .

Just to make that perfectly clear to all.

Re:Diplomatic implications (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670123)

Sure, like the State Dept and the White House didn't know anything. Sheesh, give us a break.

Re:Diplomatic implications (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670195)

The State Department is spying on the UN too. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spying_on_United_Nations_leaders_by_United_States_diplomats

I guess people have forgotten about Cablegate already.

Re:Diplomatic implications (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670237)

If I was the state department I would be furious about this.

Short of a direct attack on a diplomat I don't think there is a worse breach of international custom and law.

Snooping on citizens is bad enough, but this is playing with fire.

WTF? The only reason the State Department might get pissed off would be that they felt the NSA spied where only the State Department should be allowed to spy.

What?

You really think "diplomat" isn't a nice way of saying "spy"?

Re:Diplomatic implications (4, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#44670239)

In theory, yes. In fact it's like the school bully going through your lunch box and you catching him doing it. What are you gonna do? Beat him up? C'mon...

Re:Diplomatic implications (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670343)

You don't get out much, do you?

Intercepting secure communications has been a practice of private citizens, family members, employers, employees, business, and governments since any o9f them existed. For federal efforts, look at the origins and longevity of the "Ceasar Cipher", the alphabetic substitution cipher, documented from the reign of Julius Caesar in the first century, AD. And you cannot effectively pick "I will only decrypt the ones that are agreed by treaty to allow me to decrypt" and expect to get the most useful, even life saving data. Nor does it work to say "today, I will start decrypting: tomorriw, I shall not". Much of its usefulness is in having a *history* of the traffic, to be able to say "this sort of bragging nonsense is normal for that nutjob leader, ignore it" or "holy mackerel, they are actually sending troops".

Re:Diplomatic implications (1)

zippthorne (748122) | about a year ago | (#44670463)

Caesar cipher is pretty trivial to decrypt manually, though. There are newspapers which publish short sentences in Caesar cipher every week as a fun, easy puzzle for people to do while waiting for a bus or whatever.

Re:Diplomatic implications (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670487)

Oh, right. Countries will all publicly say this is terrible so they look good to their citizens, but then go right back to doing the exact same things themselves.

With spying, nobody is innocent.

War on Information imminent? (5, Insightful)

protoporos (900257) | about a year ago | (#44669959)

Am I the only one seeing a war on information soon descending upon us?
Governments, once they realize the full breadth & capability of the US surveillance, and the fact that they themselves are vulnerable, and not only their citizen... they will soon decide to take action! And of course the US, having the confrontation with China in mind (and that it cannot weaken its position in such a critical time), will not back down easily.

Net neutrality is the first that could go, but I'm not sure it will be the last.

Do you think that Snowden will prove to be the trigger to the 3rd WW? (but an information/electronic one this time)

Re:War on Information imminent? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670037)

I hope so ww3 everyone V america sounds good i'd enlist

Re:War on Information imminent? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670085)

Considering most governments already know that people have planted physical devices to monitor conversations in every embassy i do not think this will do much then have a few countries shame and scold us even though they are doing exactly what we are doing.

This will be no different then the US shaking there finger at china about the great firewall while at the same time trying to pass laws that will let them control what we can access online.

Re:War on Information imminent? (4, Informative)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about a year ago | (#44670271)

Well, the US has already said that military action could be an appropriate response to state hacking/cyberwarfare.

Re:War on Information imminent? (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year ago | (#44670403)

OMG! You're right!

Run Away! Run Away!

No, you're not. This sort of thing has been going on for a long time. Before you spied on encrypted communications you drilled holes in the wall and stuffed a microphone in it. Before that you stuffed your eye into the hole. I'm not sure what Ogg did, probably something like crawling into the ventilation passage in his enemy's cave and hope everyone didn't fart too much.

Re:War on Information imminent? (2)

elucido (870205) | about a year ago | (#44670599)

Am I the only one seeing a war on information soon descending upon us?

Governments, once they realize the full breadth & capability of the US surveillance, and the fact that they themselves are vulnerable, and not only their citizen... they will soon decide to take action! And of course the US, having the confrontation with China in mind (and that it cannot weaken its position in such a critical time), will not back down easily.

Net neutrality is the first that could go, but I'm not sure it will be the last.

Do you think that Snowden will prove to be the trigger to the 3rd WW? (but an information/electronic one this time)

You think they didn't know that already? They knew before you did.

analogy (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44669961)

Richard was fucking his neighbor's wife, when Wang entered the room to do the same. TFA didn't mention, but in the end they* decided to have a threesome.

* by 'they' I mean Dick&Wang, because the wife had been roofied

gibberish (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670043)

You sir are full of gibberish.

Re:gibberish (1)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about a year ago | (#44670365)

And you, Sir|Ma'am|Fido, could stand to improve your vocabulary.

Re:analogy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670201)

That puts the 'anal' in 'analogy'.

Let me fix that for you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670539)

Richard was fucking a dead horse when Wang entered the room to do the same. TFA didn't mention, but in the end they* decided to have a threesome.

* by 'they' I mean Dick & Wang, because the horse was still dead and soon Dick & Wang would be too since they didn't use condoms. :D

Leaked? (5, Interesting)

PCM2 (4486) | about a year ago | (#44669977)

So where did Der Spiegel get these documents? On Friday, Edward Snowden accused the US government of intentionally leaking documents to The Independent that were potentially damaging, in an effort to discredit the responsible reporting being done by The Guardian and the Washington Post. He said he had never worked with nor even spoken to anyone at The Independent. Is the same thing happening here?

Re:Leaked? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670035)

That's exactly it. You can safely assume that everyone already knew the NSA had access to the video conferencing, so releasing this now and in this manner is only about public opinion.

Re:Leaked? (1)

CRCulver (715279) | about a year ago | (#44670119)

Snowden has already worked with Der Spiegel.

Re:Leaked? (2)

mTor (18585) | about a year ago | (#44670169)

So where did Der Spiegel get these documents?

Presumably from Laura Poitras (she taped Snowden in Hong Kong and received materials from him) since she's worked with Der Spiegel in the past.

For example, she wrote this story from Snowden's files for Der Spiegel: http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/nsa-spied-on-european-union-offices-a-908590.html [spiegel.de]

Another source/translation of Der Speigel? (4, Interesting)

Shoten (260439) | about a year ago | (#44669979)

RT is infamous for being virulently anti-American; it's a Russian news organization with an agenda that is fairly obvious at times. Now, that said, Der Spiegel is a totally valid news organization...so can someone provide something directly from that, instead of interpretation by people with their own agenda regarding this?

Ah, never mind: here you go: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/25/us-usa-security-nsa-idUSBRE97O08120130825 [reuters.com]

Re:Another source/translation of Der Speigel? (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44670563)

RT is infamous for being virulently anti-American; it's a Russian news organization with an agenda that is fairly obvious at times

Although the BBC may have its faults [telegraph.co.uk] , RT, nee Russia Today, is both government funded and controlled.

VGTRK, Channel One and NTV will also collect new government cash. [hollywoodreporter.com]

MOSCOW – The Russian state-controlled English-language TV channel Russia Today has avoided cuts in funding for 2013 and is to receive 11.2 billion rubles ($355.6 million) from the government next year.

Similarly, the state run TV company VGTRK, which runs several channels, including Rossiya, Rossiya 2, Kultura and Rossiya 24, is going to collect 19.98 billion rubles ($634.3 million).

Fuck the (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44669999)

USA.

First you make bribing politicians legal, destabilize the entire world's banking industry and start war after war in 3rd world countries so your military industrial complex can get more tax payer money. And now new private contractors show up and bribe some politicians who in return give them the right and money to spy on whoever they want.

And do you even protest or riot? No you assholes whine on /. I think there have been more protests here in germany over that than in the US

Re:Fuck the (0)

maliqua (1316471) | about a year ago | (#44670049)

what do you expect they're reputation of being fat and lazy is not by accident .

LOL, a German bragging about social protests (-1)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about a year ago | (#44670245)

Where were your holocaust protests during WWII? I'm no defender of US practices but for a German to brag about protests while that country's citizenry sad idly by while 5+ million Jews were exterminated is beyond ridiculous. What do you guys protest? Too much salt in your BrÃtwurst?

Re:LOL, a German bragging about social protests (5, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year ago | (#44670441)

Oh give it up. How about early European settlers wiping out 12 million indigenous Americans by smallpox and influenza within a decade of landing on shore? Yes, we should remember the Holocaust during WWII. And Rwanda. And Nanking. And godknowswhatelse. Nobody's ancestors have much of a moral high ground.

Move along.

Re:Fuck the (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670273)

Oh please. That tirade from a country that started a war that killed millions, and tried to wipe an ethnic group off the face of the earth. Your indignation sounds a bit self-serving right now. Face it, white people are the problem, not which subgroup of them you happen to dislike at the moment.

Re:Fuck the (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670439)

Self-loathing bed-wetters actually believe this^^^

Re:Fuck the (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670301)

Enjoy your third world shithole, dickless.

Re:Fuck the (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670371)

People on /. don't just sit here and complain what is going on. They give full endorsements of what is going on and protect those doing such things over and over again. When pointed out how the current administration is corrupt, like you are saying, they line up and say that Bush did it and we shouldn't be saying anything about Obama continuing it, or as yesterday showed they just call you a racist.

No, there is no whining or complaining, but concentrated help of what the government is doing and begging for more government control here. Its become obvious people endorse theft of property from the middle class and you can either jump aboard and take it with them, or you can be the victim and defend it by saying "but Bush!"

geeks and grrrlz (0)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about a year ago | (#44670019)

Don't have a conniption fit. Maybe it was just a couple guys trying to stalk their girlfriends.
And it's not like anything important is ever accomplished at the U.N.
Mange your expectations.

So much for the US Tech Industry (5, Insightful)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about a year ago | (#44670027)

Why would any country trust a closed-sourced product produced by a US Technology firm?

Re:So much for the US Tech Industry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670053)

Because open source TOR wasn't compromised?

Re:So much for the US Tech Industry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670177)

TOR wasn't compromised, per say. The end-browser was compromised via JavaScript exploit for tracking purposes.

Now, TOR can be compromised, AFAIK, by total view of the network and traffic analysis. If you can view most of the network, you can use statistics to figure out the end server your "mark" is communicating with. You do not need to break TOR encryption to be able to know what is being communicated. Of course the person can try to generate "noise" connections, but those can be weeded out.

And if you really really need to know, you plant bugs (spyware, keyloggers, video surveillance, whatever is appropriate) at one end. No need to break crypto.

PS. Spying on politicians is NOT that bad. What do you think the purpose of sponsoring UN in New York is all about? It is about easy access to intercept communications. The more is known about the other side, the less secrets there are. And the less secrets in political circles, the better. No need for guesswork.

Now, spying on entire population(s) as some sort of a dragnet is stupid. It is stupid because it will,

    1. not work - information overload and "thought crime" is retarded way of preventing anything, and
    2. it literally kills public confidence in the government doing the spying.

#2 cannot be underestimated. The world runs on public confidence. If population will not work with the government entities, those government entities are fucked. Be that the police, the army or even the spy network. People, like some criminal's friend, is what you want on your side. If that friend will not report the person of interest because they do not trust you, then your work is much much more difficult.

Re:So much for the US Tech Industry (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670233)

2. it literally kills public confidence in the government doing the spying.

Maybe among a minority. But public confidence in the Soviet leadership when its repressive mechanisms were working best was remarkably high, and the vast majority of the Chinese population supports its government even though they are aware of censorship and monitoring. If a government can convince the people that the state, warts and all, is better than the alternative (collapse and civil war, or foreign invasion), then dissidents are going remain an insignificant minority.

Re:So much for the US Tech Industry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670213)

Because open source TOR wasn't compromised?

At least it is FOSS and thus amenable to repair!

Re:So much for the US Tech Industry (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#44670263)

But at least it was not built compromised, they had to work for it.

Re:So much for the US Tech Industry (-1, Troll)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#44670193)

Because all of the alternatives suck absolute ass and are more or less unusable unless you have a trove of Linux gnomes in the basement managing the shitty software to the point of making it work?

The same reason open source rarely gets used, it is, with very few exceptions, always half-assed incomplete software that requires a techie to just get it close to working when there aren't problems. Throw in some weird little quirk and you need a team.

Re:So much for the US Tech Industry (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670391)

You're talking out your ass. Apache, Ruby, PHP, Python... BSD/Linux behind OSX, iOS, Android.

Stick with what you know: Excel and MS Paint.

Re:So much for the US Tech Industry (-1, Troll)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#44670567)

And every single one of the things you mentioned are geek toys. Way to utterly miss the point. Seriously, half your list is programming languages? You're an idiot.

iOS is about as far from OSS as you can get, you know, the parts people pay for .... guess what ... NOT OSS.

Re:So much for the US Tech Industry (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about a year ago | (#44670305)

I'd assume they wouldn't. Chances are anything the NSA thought they were getting was just misinformation deliberately handed to them.

Time for the UN to leave NYC? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670061)

Doubt the collective will see the decryption news as a white hat proof of concept.

UN is worthless anyhow.. (0)

RockinRoller (3023071) | about a year ago | (#44670063)

Since the UN does nothing and accomplished nothing,,,,no breach here.

Hold the Phone Here (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670145)

Was the encryption cracked, or was it just bypassed?

Very worrisome if it's the former.

I can't tell if they just disabled encryption on one of the end points.

Re:Hold the Phone Here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670189)

If it is one of the many Cisco/Polycom/Lifesize/etc. video conferencing systems that are developed in America, it could just be as simple as a backdoor that is placed into the software at the agreement of one of those companies and the NSA and exploited when needed. It could also be a simple case of poorly implemented encryption that is easily exploited which is probably more common than you think.

Peculiar Outrage over Govts spying on each other.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670261)

Governments have spied on each other since the beginning of time. Odd to see how it's newsworthy that it continues. It's a necessity of survival to know what ones neighbors are up to.

Spy agency spies on extranational body (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670265)

In related news, water is wet.

I'm flabbergasted by the utter naifs who are upset about this.

WHAT THE FUCK DO YOU THINK A SPY AGENCY DOES!?!?!

the chinese (2)

calin2k (763711) | about a year ago | (#44670287)

the chinese where exploiting huawei routers firmware, while nsa where at it with the cisco stuff

Time to move UN headquarters.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670393)

I'm thinking Switzerland would make the perfect host for UN headquarters. It's quite obvious now that the Americans cannot be trusted to host such an important building.

Not sure I get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670467)

Aren't both the USA and China member states of the UN? With pretty far-reaching veto powers, even? Why would they need to break into the internal communications of an organization they're part of?

News? (0)

murdocj (543661) | about a year ago | (#44670509)

Security agency whose purpose is to decrypt communications of other nations successfully decrypted communications of other nations.

By the way, that's how Alan Turing helped win WW II.

Re:News? (0)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#44670571)

But OMG snowmen manning or something

Video conferencing equipment sucks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44670517)

The video conferencing equipment we have at work is terrible. There is no reason why other solutions should be more secure.

* Root login is enabled with default passwords
* Incredibly weak encryption
* Writable persistent storage, which means that you can plant stuff there which then attack the rest of the company.

The only thing that is impressive by this is how little companies care about security.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?