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Report: Snowden Stayed At Russian Consulate While In Hong Kong

timothy posted 1 year,5 days | from the cheapest-tour-ever dept.

China 107

cold fjord writes "The Washington Post reports, 'Before American fugitive Edward Snowden arrived in Moscow in June — an arrival that Russian officials have said caught them by surprise — he spent several days living at the Russian Consulate in Hong Kong, a Moscow newspaper reported Monday. The article in Kommersant, based on accounts from several unnamed sources, did not state clearly when Snowden decided to seek Russian help in leaving Hong Kong, where he was in hiding in order to evade arrest by U.S. authorities on charges that he leaked top-secret documents about U.S. surveillance programs. ... he celebrated his 30th birthday at the Russian Consulate in Hong Kong, the paper said — though several days earlier he had had an anticipatory birthday pizza with his lawyers at a private house. ... The article implies that Snowden's decision to seek Russian help came after he was joined in Hong Kong by Sarah Harrison, a WikiLeaks staffer who became his adviser and later flew to Moscow with him. Harrison, the article suggests, had a role in the making the plans. ' More at the South China Morning Post."

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in soviet russia pizza Delivery man eats part of y (-1, Redundant)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684675)

in soviet russia pizza Delivery man eats part of your pie

Re:in soviet russia pizza Delivery man eats part o (1, Insightful)

Sponge Bath (413667) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684697)

You should be a porn writer.

Re:in soviet russia pizza Delivery man eats part o (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44684845)

Brings potential new meaning to the term Russian reversal.

Re:in soviet russia pizza Delivery man eats part o (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44685495)

Well, isn't Snowden planning a sex change?

Re:in soviet russia pizza Delivery man eats part o (0)

Nyder (754090) | 1 year,5 days | (#44687627)

Well, isn't Snowden planning a sex change?

Well, first they have to capture him, then torture him for awhile, then they will tell us he wants a sex change.

Good. (1, Insightful)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684685)

I want Russia to remain strong, and if this includes Russia befriending those who whistleblow the US for their advantage, so be it.

While I had little love for either the USSR or the Cold War USA, a world with only one military superpower is turning out to be worse - and all the proxy hot wars in developing nations are carrying on anyway.

Re:Good. (1, Funny)

rolfwind (528248) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684721)

Putin will put out!

Re:Good. (0)

BrokenHalo (565198) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685491)

Hopefully only in the privacy of his dacha.

Re:Good. (1)

Joce640k (829181) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684745)

But... he's selling secrets to the commies!

Re:Good. (1)

Nutria (679911) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684781)

only one military superpower

Military superpowers need strong economies to fund those military machines.

Re:Good. (0)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684817)

While I had little love for either the USSR or the Cold War USA, a world with only one military superpower is turning out to be worse

The prez has a Nobel peace prize, like Mother Teresa. What can you possibly be afraid of?

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44684887)

The prez has a Nobel peace prize, like Mother Teresa. What can you possibly be afraid of?

Mother Teresa didn't have drones.

Re: Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44684927)

Mother Teresa had space fairies.

Re:Good. (0, Troll)

dmbasso (1052166) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684967)

Mother Teresa didn't have drones.

Yep, they weren't hers. The Catholic Church is the one owning around 1.1 billion drones.

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44685251)

The Catholic Church is the one owning around 1.1 billion drones.

Don't they need them as deterrent against the 1.6 billion drones of Islam?

Re:Good. (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685559)

Don't they need them as deterrent against the 1.6 billion drones of Islam?

Even they are not immune to the Chinese relativity theorem: No matter how exalted your triumphs, or abject your defeats, there will always be ten billion Chinese who couldn't give a fuck.

Re:Good. (0)

aristotle-dude (626586) | 1 year,5 days | (#44686131)

Mother Teresa didn't have drones.

Yep, they weren't hers. The Catholic Church is the one owning around 1.1 billion drones.

I'm pretty sure that even catholics still believe in free will but atheists like you don't. So who is the drone? If you do believe in free will then perhaps you should have a discussion with one of those prominent atheists like Dawkins who do not. To him, you are just another drone.

Re:Good. (1)

dmbasso (1052166) | 1 year,5 days | (#44686483)

I'm pretty sure that even catholics still believe in free will but atheists like you don't.

You sure seem to think you know something about me, but clearly you don't. Free will is a complex matter, and I'm not in the mood for going into details. So cutting to the chase, for all practical purposes my subjective experience of reality seems to support free will.

So who is the drone?

By your butt-hurt tone, I guess that would be you.

My point is that praying is a quick fix for the guilt of not doing anything. You see people in need and think "I should do something", and then you "pray for Gawd" and you feel good again! You feel good, not the people that you thought you should help. So if this is the kind of person you are (and you know the majority of those 1.1 billion I mentioned are like that) then yes, you are a drone.

If you do believe in free will then perhaps you should have a discussion with one of those prominent atheists like Dawkins who do not. To him, you are just another drone.

Perhaps you don't understand his position? As I said, it is a complex subject, and can be analyzed in different levels, possibly leading to some confusion. I would suggest a closer study of his arguments, and Sam Harris' as well.

Re:Good. (1)

PRMan (959735) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688497)

My point is that praying is a quick fix for the guilt of not doing anything. You see people in need and think "I should do something", and then you "pray for Gawd" and you feel good again! You feel good, not the people that you thought you should help. So if this is the kind of person you are (and you know the majority of those 1.1 billion I mentioned are like that) then yes, you are a drone.

Yes, because clearly Mother Teresa (the one who started the conversation) did NOTHING about the plight of destitute sick Indians but pray for them... And Christians don't start hospitals and universities all over the world, don't build wells for African villages for free, don't help in hurricane and tsunami areas for years without charging the locals and don't run food banks, etc. The day I see an atheist food bank, well project or anything else that helps humanity created and started by atheists, let me know...

Re:Good. (1)

dmbasso (1052166) | 1 year,5 days | (#44689023)

First read "The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice", by Christopher Hitchens, then come say how altruistic she was.

About atheist altruistic endeavors, you won't see many of them because:
1. the majority of atheists (myself included) are not organized in groups;
2. we don't publicize our good deeds in name of $DEITY, we don't publicize them at all.

Still, there are some atheist groups, such as the one in Austin, TX, that organizes these kinds of actions. You just have to look for it.

Re:Good. (1)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | 1 year,5 days | (#44691291)

Actually, prominent atheists like Daniel Dennett "believe in" free will (if such can be parsed for something like compatiblism). However if you are a Christian, you cannot, since in various points of the story of Moses' interactions with Pharaoh it is said that Yahweh 'hardens his heart' and makes him do things he otherwise would not. Oh and the cool part is Pharaoh is still blamed for these actions which a supposedly omnipotent divine force made him do, because it's totally the sock puppet's ethical culpability for what the puppeteer says and does. I can't wait to test that in court.

Re:Good. (1)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684929)

While I had little love for either the USSR or the Cold War USA, a world with only one military superpower is turning out to be worse
The prez has a Nobel peace prize, like Mother Teresa. What can you possibly be afraid of?

Ooooh, peace through sadistic corruption [wikipedia.org] . He really is following in her footsteps...

Re:Good. (4, Insightful)

Pino Grigio (2232472) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684977)

Were you even alive during the Cold War? How in the hell is today's world worse than it was during the Cold War? If you think it's worse now and need a flashback reminder as to how half the planet lived back then go and live in fucking North Korea.

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44685055)

Mod up. People forget what it's like for the world to be so close to armageddon that was not cooked up by the movies. A person getting a diplomatic message a few hours too late, a false sensor reading, any number of things could've started nuclear war.

Re:Good. (1)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685397)

Yeah and there's a terrorist hiding on every street corner.

The propaganda was strong then, too.

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44689819)

And like then, in spite of what the propaganda said, the real life and death struggle is not with the relatively comfortable people in the industrialized western world, but the third world countries that are used as pawns and have shit blown up on a daily basis for no good reason.

Re:Good. (1)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | 1 year,5 days | (#44691361)

You really should study the historical reality of the Cuban Missile Crisis in depth. Both sides were coiled tighter than overwound clocks (a metaphor which might be too old for your ken) and were actively hovering over preemptive nuclear strike as an option, with or without even the slightest provocation as a cover/excuse/defense. It is far too easy to take for granted after the fact that the world wasn't effectively destroyed during that time.

Re:Good. (1, Informative)

Nyder (754090) | 1 year,5 days | (#44687781)

Mod up. People forget what it's like for the world to be so close to armageddon that was not cooked up by the movies. A person getting a diplomatic message a few hours too late, a false sensor reading, any number of things could've started nuclear war.

I was alive during the cold war. The world was never in trouble. No one was going to let their nukes go, anymore then any country today with nukes are going to let them fly.

But America is scared that one of those countries without nukes is going to get a nuke and decide to let if off in America because the American Government has been abusing them for the last century or so. And there is a lot of various countries that are NOT happy with the USA. And I don't blame them, tbh.

Back then it was the "Red Menace" Communist. Now? It's terrorist. Tomorrow? Probably protestors.

Re:Good. (4, Insightful)

cavreader (1903280) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688483)

Since you were alive to see the Cold War you must have been alive in 1983 when the world came the closest to unrestricted nuclear war in it's history. The Russians interpreted a US-NATO Nuclear War Game as being a cover for a real attack. They misinterpreted some sketchy radar returns that could have indicated real launches and they started arming there missiles for launch. While the Russians have always had a lot of intelligence operatives their main weakness back then was integrating and analyzing all the different pieces of information gathered by their agents to really see the big picture. In this case a Russian spy working as a NATO military staffer told his Russian superiors that the war game was not real and used the fact that Reagan was on a foreign visit and had the war game been real he doubted the US President would be anywhere other than a deep bunker somewhere in the US. The real scary thing was a Russian military officer who was part of the process of arming and releasing their nuclear weapons refused to authorize the release. This officer was later arrested and charged with crimes against the Russian state but he had his sentence silently commuted several years after the incident. So saying no one would launch nuclear weapons is a weak foundation for your argument.

Re:Good. (2)

tragedy (27079) | 1 year,5 days | (#44689809)

Are you talking about operation Able Archer, which featured, among other things, US bombers repeatedly flying directly at USSR airspace then pulling back at the last moment? One of the most idiotic ideas imaginable from testosterone-addled military "thinkers".

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44689863)

I'm so glad to know that the Cuban missile crisis was just an American panic attack. When we get that time machine working we should tell Kennedy to just blow off the two weeks and go golfing.

Re:Good. (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685265)

"They're starving back in China, so finish what you've got". - John Lennon.

Re:Good. (4, Informative)

mrsquid0 (1335303) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685347)

The Cold War was a terrifying time. It is not surprising that the Baby Boomers, who grew up during the worst of it, are such a screwed up generation. However, half the planet did not live like North Korea. North Korea has always been an extreme case. Much of the communist world, while far worse off than the west was, was better off than much of the third world at the time. That is one of the reasons that communism was appealing to many people in the third world. As hard as it may be to imagine, it was an improvement.

Re:Good. (1)

kaatochacha (651922) | 1 year,5 days | (#44690355)

I always wondered why they were second world. Because they were halfway between one and three!

Re:Good. (1, Interesting)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685371)

Err, yes, I was "even alive" during the Cold War. My mother worked in Moscow for a time under Khrushchev. I can't speak on behalf of all Russians, but unless you're part of the emergent minority upper-middle class who have got to speak loudly about how much more "free" they are, and taking account of technological improvements, it was a better life in Russia then than now. (Don't confuse the USSR with Stalinism - that would be like judging the US by the heydays of black slavery.)

Now, I expect I have as much personal experience of North Korea as you - i.e. none - but it doesn't come close to representing what the USSR was like, and no amount of angry propagandising is going to help your case.

It is some of the ex-satellite states of Eastern Europe which have seen real improvement since the end of the Cold War - they were treated as resources for plundering, just as the US has kept so many South American nations under its heel via support for military coups. Fortunately, the people of Eastern Europe are enjoying autonomy now, but a lot of South America is still pretty fucked.

As you were saying...

Re: Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44688709)

How is this a troll?

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44689971)

Fortunately, the people of Eastern Europe are enjoying autonomy now, but a lot of South America is still pretty fucked.

Autonomy, yes, but they are mostly too small to fend for themselves, so economically dependent on staying "friends" with either the EU or Russia. Hence you go to Lithuania, and they can all speak Russian even though they generally don't want to, because they'd be broke by the end of the month if they decided to stop all dealings with their neighbors.

It is why Puerto Rico will never really become independent from the US, even if a lot of the people there would like it.

Re:Good. (1)

filthpickle (1199927) | 1 year,5 days | (#44686031)

My first thought upon reading that was also "there is no way you were really alive during the cold war". This is the internet, everything is the fault of the USA. We would be living in a perfect utopia if only one of the more enlightened countries, like Russia (try reading that with a straight face), were in charge.

Re:Good. (1)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | 1 year,5 days | (#44687581)

The problem is with the imbalance of power. It doesn't matter who has it.

It's quite sad to see that a particular view of the Cold War is being instilled in the minds of both older and younger generations: the older remember the news which made them scared (like we have "terrorists and paedos everywhere!" today); the younger recite a dilettante understanding which almost entirely reflects the viewpoint of Western history book authors.

Yeah, if you were a straight, white, middle class man living in a coastal city during the late '50s, perhaps of slightly above average intelligence, you'd probably have preferred the US.

Re:Good. (1)

filthpickle (1199927) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688347)

You originally said that the world is not better off now than it was during the cold war. Now your posts seem to be saying that you just meant that life in Russia during communism wasn't as bad as it was made out to be in the west. Of course it wasn't. Also, I wouldn't call the US out for being a homophobic society...glass houses and stones kinda thing.

Re:Good. (1)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688891)

I'm maintaining both these assertions. Although I accept that some of the former Soviet bloc states are much better off, the condition of the world overall has deteriorated, because there is no balance of power to mean that stronger nations must *give* as well as *take*.

It's simply wrong to suggest that life is better now for the average Russian because of the change to Putinism.

Re:Good. (1)

CRCulver (715279) | 1 year,5 days | (#44686119)

If you think it's worse now and need a flashback reminder as to how half the planet lived back then go and live in fucking North Korea.

North Korea resembles life in the USSR only under Stalin. However, the Cold War continued for decades after his death, and as stagnant and oppressive as Soviet politics were under later leaders, the USSR was for most of its history not so completely totalitarian like North Korea. After Stalin, dissidents were merely exiled or hospitalized, not shot dead or sent to labour camps with no food like North Korea.

Re:Good. (2)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | 1 year,5 days | (#44687079)

Really, though, that's exactly the same as it is in the west.

In the East, if you didn't respect the principles of the Soviet system, you got taken away.

In the West, if you don't respect the principles of American capitalism, you get taken away.

Or, to use a social rather than economic example, it's like whining that Saudi Arabia doesn't let women show off their hair, but having no problem with the fact that you'd get arrested in Washington for showing off your tits.

We're living and breathing some system, and we've got so used to its rules that we're convinced that they're less arbitrary than the rules of any other system.

Perhaps Western propaganda is more effective than Eastern, so there are fewer visible dissidents.

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44688617)

"In the West, if you don't respect the principles of American capitalism, you get taken away."

DING! DING! Congratulations you have won the award for today's Biggest Idiot award..

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44690423)

"it's like whining that Saudi Arabia doesn't let women show off their hair, but having no problem with the fact that you'd get arrested in Washington for showing off your tits."
I'm actually dumber for having read that. There are things in life, called LEVELS, that make a great deal of difference.
Say someone steals 20 cents from me. That is less serious than if they stole $20,000,000 from me.

Re:Good. (1)

cavreader (1903280) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688251)

There is a frightening amount of people who do not realize that history goes back further than 1990. During the cold war there were 2 very visible examples of "East" versus "West". E. Germany and W. Germany and N. Korea and S. Korea. A person could stand on the separation boundaries and see the differences for themselves. Does anyone remember in the 1970's the Russians had to send hundreds of undercover minders to keep their international athletes from defecting to the West. Getting into countries is one thing but not being able to get out of a country sounds like prison policy.

Re: Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44692525)

Why does the Soviet Sun rise with a smile on his face in the morning?

He knows that by evening, he'll be in the West.

Re:Good. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44685097)

I want Russia to remain strong

Do you know any Russians? Have you ever been to Russia? I know many Russians that are very good at research, the arts, etc... none of them are looking for jobs there. It is a big country, so it has some "might" to it, and it's military remains quite capable, but I do not see how someone who knows Russia today would call it "strong".

Re:Good. (1)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685453)

Yes, and yes, it's a shadow of its former self. But it's still militarily and diplomatically powerful, and not doing half bad with export of natural resources.

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44689737)

Well, then, I wish to say that I also wish with all my heart that Russia becomes strong... economically strong, culturally strong, and so on... but not from opposing the US, but joining as friends. If the only the powers that be become stronger by ostracizing the west, without all of the people also becoming stronger, then I fear the news with Navalny will be no longer a joke but everyday life for all citizens there.

Re:Good. (1)

Nyder (754090) | 1 year,5 days | (#44687685)

I want Russia to remain strong, and if this includes Russia befriending those who whistleblow the US for their advantage, so be it.

While I had little love for either the USSR or the Cold War USA, a world with only one military superpower is turning out to be worse - and all the proxy hot wars in developing nations are carrying on anyway.

I was raised during the end of the cold war and we were taught to hate russia and what it stood for. Who knew that after the cold war American Government would be come the bad guy? But then again, power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely.

I don't know about anyone else, but I want the American dream they told us we were living for, while undermining everything good Americans have believed in.

Re:Good. (1)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | 1 year,5 days | (#44687837)

The American dream of getting rich and comfortable if you work hard is almost identical to the Soviet dream of a harmonious workers' paradise. They're both a variant on the traditional religious promise of luxury after death if only you suffer throughout your life.

It's utter unreachable bullshit for the majority of the population. Unless you have great intellectual or social capital, you're going to be struggling until you die. The best you can hope for is enough propaganda to convince you that what you have is good enough.

The NSA is violating the Constitution (4, Insightful)

Subm (79417) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684691)

It's interesting to learn about Snowden's eating pizza. It's exciting to know he's successfully evading getting caught.

But the NSA is violating the Constitution, the executive branch is stepping on the gas to increase it, the legislative branch is asleep at the wheel, the judicial branch is represented by a few rubber stampers appointed by a Chief Justice who I don't think has the public's interests at heart, the fourth estate is facing persecution like never before, and the citizens are so materially comfortable they don't do anything.

I feel like there's more of a story here than Snowden's pizza that might at least get the citizens a little less comfortable and a little more active.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (2)

Joce640k (829181) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684757)

Oh, for mod points...

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (2)

jkflying (2190798) | 1 year,5 days | (#44686283)

Obligatory SMBC [smbc-comics.com] .

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44684759)

It's interesting to learn about Snowden's eating pizza. It's exciting to know he's successfully evading getting caught.

But the NSA is violating the Constitution, the executive branch is stepping on the gas to increase it, the legislative branch is asleep at the wheel, the judicial branch is represented by a few rubber stampers appointed by a Chief Justice who I don't think has the public's interests at heart, the fourth estate is facing persecution like never before, and the citizens are so materially comfortable they don't do anything.

I feel like there's more of a story here than Snowden's pizza that might at least get the citizens a little less comfortable and a little more active.

But this boat is sooo comfy. Quit rocking it. srsly.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (5, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684773)

The Snowden story is the tip of the iceberg. Whatever happens to him, whether he escapes the wrath of the US authorities or he gets caught and "rendered", will serve as a reminder to the world of what the US is turning (or has turned) into. His pizza, and whatever else he does, is very useful to know about in that respect: it keeps him in the limelight, and continues to discredit the administration.

Incidentally, none of the US powers that be is "asleep at the wheel": they're all very actively working against their constituents and against the population to keep themselves and their rich friends rich and in power.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (2)

LordLimecat (1103839) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685451)

The US is turning into what all governments eventually turn into; anyone who is shocked about the direction understands neither human nature nor history.

Thats one of the reasons, when someone says "but maybe the [1st | 2nd | 4th | 5th] amendments are outdated and need repealing [slashdot.org] ", you have to stand firm.

Thats actually a large part of the reason I take the conservative "limit government as much as possible" stance. It surprises me continually that people will vote for an increase in government size and then act shocked when that power is abused; does one suppose that only large businesses abuse power given too freely?

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44687859)

Size of government isn't the problem. The problem is the voters don't change the government when the government abuses its power or does other bad stuff.

As long as the voters keep voting in a crap government it doesn't matter what size it is. In fact it would be worse if it was a small evil corrupt government working in league with large corporations. You'd be even more screwed!

Because the last I checked a lot of the good stuff that theoretically applies to the US Government doesn't really apply to Corporations at all. Freedom of Information Act? Nope. Freedom of Speech? Nope- if Large Corp owns "everything" and doesn't want you to use their property to say/post certain stuff, you're just going to have to say it in the privacy of your home. That is if you actually own your home and aren't living in Corporation quarters in Company Town.

You don't even get to vote (or pretend to vote) every few years for who gets to lead the Company.

And when so many supposedly smart people keep getting fixated over the size rather than quality, it's no surprise things don't improve. You're trying to fix the wrong problem!

Many politicians are very happy to give you the smaller government you keep asking for. They just cut government jobs and then hand the jobs to their friends who then help them in return.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (1)

PRMan (959735) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688529)

Size IS the problem. With small budgets that can barely meet public services and nothing more, it would be very difficult for a government to go rogue. Even now, if the NSA were defunded, it would disappear overnight.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (2)

Antipater (2053064) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685617)

it keeps him in the limelight, and continues to discredit the administration.

Actually, an article like this helps the administration's angle. "He stayed at the Russian embassy" needs only the smallest of spin-jobs to become "He was working for the Russians the whole time."

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44691089)

It is quite possible that the Legislative and Judicial branches are now at the mercy of the Executive's abuse of new found power.
Voting on the Patriot Act to be signed by the POTUS was the death knell of the Legislative and Judicial branch and the Constitution for that matter. The Legislative basically committed suicide on this day. The Judiciary's lack of action caused them to be collateral damage later.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44684827)

Pizza is probably a metaphor somehow. We've got to think outside the box.... hmm.... Oh well who cares, learning about him eating pizza is as entertaining as learning about the kardashians picking their nose. Wake me up when civil unrest is over. zZzZzZzZzZzzz

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44684829)

What can you expect when we've heard more of Snowden than the wrongs that he uncovered? The media did a great job at redirecting the interest in this story from the crime to the one who exposed it. The media is just as much a part of this machine against the man on the streets as is Obama or Bush.
 
Not unlike their focus on Miley Cyrus while America is about to take yet another step into the realm of perpetual war.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44684907)

It's interesting to learn about Snowden's eating pizza. It's exciting to know he's successfully evading getting caught.

But the NSA is violating the Constitution, the executive branch is stepping on the gas to increase it, the legislative branch is asleep at the wheel, the judicial branch is represented by a few rubber stampers appointed by a Chief Justice who I don't think has the public's interests at heart, the fourth estate is facing persecution like never before, and the citizens are so materially comfortable they don't do anything.

I feel like there's more of a story here than Snowden's pizza that might at least get the citizens a little less comfortable and a little more active.

No it's a fairly lame attempt by Cold Fjord to keep the Snowden story limping along so he can expose him as the treacherous bastard he really is. The grand old US of A is absolutely justified in spying on all citizens whether they are American or not, in order to protect the virtuous and unchallengable policies of the US Government and their absolutely legal and above-board (but necessarily and rightly completely secret and without accountability to anyone but themselves) spy agencies.

Well done Cold Fjord, well done, I look forward to your righteous trolling of this article in the name of unwavering and unquestioning patriotism.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (1)

erikkemperman (252014) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685391)

Well done Cold Fjord, well done, I look forward to your righteous trolling of this article in the name of unwavering and unquestioning patriotism

Well, he doesn't seem to have posted to his own submission thus far... But it's early still.

Also, I've seen him modded Troll a lot recently. I don't think he is a true specimen though; he seems to genuinely believe what he posts and might not actually be here only to annoy others.

Personnaly I think he's often wrong, misinformed, even willfully obtuse. But he's not really a troll, if you ask me. And he's certainly a hell of a lot more courteous and polite than some others in the rightwing/neocon camp.

So sorry for offtopic, but I'll take cold fjord over APK or racist trolls...

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | 1 year,5 days | (#44686967)

I'll second this.

He seems to be getting better at refraining from posting when it would only hurt his credibility, too.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44685515)

Well done Cold Fjord, well done, I look forward to your righteous trolling of this article in the name of unwavering and unquestioning patriotism.

To be fair, he waivers [slashdot.org] sometime... or comes with a good mime of a waiver... or then, maybe his wife posted it?

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44684923)

It's interesting to learn about Snowden's eating pizza. It's exciting to know he's successfully evading getting caught.

But the NSA is violating the Constitution, the executive branch is stepping on the gas to increase it, the legislative branch is asleep at the wheel, the judicial branch is represented by a few rubber stampers appointed by a Chief Justice who I don't think has the public's interests at heart, the fourth estate is facing persecution like never before, and the citizens are so materially comfortable they don't do anything.

I feel like there's more of a story here than Snowden's pizza that might at least get the citizens a little less comfortable and a little more active.

Mmm, pizza. ;)

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684931)

It's also about laying the ground work for an non-falsifiable claim that Snowden wasn't a young man with a conscience about massive illegal activities but instead a Russian spy.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (1)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685593)

Why would he go public if he was a spy? He's more useful to the Russians in place. He was an IT guy working for a company that did background checks for the NSA (and the rest of the US intelligence community and contractors), how is that not more useful than a bit of public embarrassment that probably caused a tightening in security procedures?

The Snowden affair gives you an idea of how riddled the modern US intelligence/contractor community must be with actual spies. Not just foreign nationals, but also contractors spying on each other and their host agencies for commercial advantage.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (1)

chihowa (366380) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688233)

Why would he go public if he was a spy?

It doesn't have to make sense. It just needs to be continually repeated by the media to work. Fridge logic never seems to kick in over here (or anywhere?).

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (3, Informative)

Teancum (67324) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684945)

It's interesting to learn about Snowden's eating pizza. It's exciting to know he's successfully evading getting caught.

But the NSA is violating the Constitution, the executive branch is stepping on the gas to increase it, the legislative branch is asleep at the wheel, the judicial branch is represented by a few rubber stampers appointed by a Chief Justice who I don't think has the public's interests at heart, the fourth estate is facing persecution like never before, and the citizens are so materially comfortable they don't do anything.

Except for the last part in regards to the citizens, I agree with you.

Note also that the Chief Justice has very little actual authority except deciding very minor things that can also be overturned by the other justices... he is just the "first among equals" and his only real additional authority is to preside over the U.S. Senate in cases of impeachment of the President or Vice-President of the US.... and even that doesn't give him a vote since it requires a 2/3rd vote to accomplish anything in that situation other than for minor procedural and parliamentary rule issues. The Chief Justice also has the privilege by custom of being able to write the concurring or dissenting opinion (depending on his vote) for rulings made by the court. Then again, any justice can write such an opinion even if the the Chief Justice writes one too, so that is even minor. All judges are also appointed not by the Chief Justice, but by the President (and confirmed by the Senate). All the Chief Justice appoints are law clerks, staff, and having an influence on who is "admitted to the bar" and able to argue cases before the court.

As for why citizens are apathetic about what is happening to the American government, it has nothing to do with the luxury lifestyle (or lack thereof) they are enjoying. The problem is that citizens no longer have any influence on their government and even elections themselves don't matter. The whole thing with regards to elections is that the whole system is corrupt. A video I saw recently (it isn't that new of a video) sort of explains the problem here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ik1AK56FtVc [youtube.com]

I don't know if the solution presented here will work, but it is an interesting idea by itself. I certainly come from a different political perspective than the presenter, but completely agree with his conclusions on this particular matter.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (2)

mbone (558574) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685175)

Note also that the Chief Justice has very little actual authority except deciding very minor things that can also be overturned by the other justices... he is just the "first among equals" and his only real additional authority is to preside over the U.S. Senate in cases of impeachment of the President or Vice-President of the US.... and even that doesn't give him a vote since it requires a 2/3rd vote to accomplish anything in that situation other than for minor procedural and parliamentary rule issues.

No, that is not true in regards to the NSA. When it comes to FISA the SCOTUS Chief Justice is definitely not first among equals, but stands alone. From the FISC Wikipedia article [wikipedia.org] :

The FISA court's judges are appointed solely by the Supreme Court Chief Justice without confirmation or oversight by the U.S. Congress.

(Or, any oversight from the other Justices either).

I am sure this is what Subm was referring to

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (2)

Teancum (67324) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685449)

Interesting. I wonder how the Chief Justice can live with himself appointing such judges when that is clearly an unconstitutional act in and of itself? The more I hear about the FISA court, the more I hate it.

Heck, Congress didn't even have the authority to even pass such legislation in the first place. Of course unconstitutional legislation doesn't really matter to those guys, or to the judicial system itself either. It still boils down to the fact that the American people are no longer citizens but rather subjects. That is also an authority that the founders and authors of the Constitution of 1787 never intended to give to the Chief Justice.

For crying out loud, Congress has to confirm every 2nd Lieutenant, Ensign, and Postmaster of Podunksville. Why they gave up their role in confirming justices to this court is beyond stupid. Hell, how do these FISA judges even have any sort of legitimacy of any kind?

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (1)

Teancum (67324) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685761)

Note: The judges of the FISA court are confirmed by the U.S. Senate to become federal judges in the first place... and serve in other positions in the federal judiciary, but their appointment to the FISA court itself is done by the Chief Justice. A minor triviality that still is stupid, but they are appointed and confirmed in a normal constitutional process to become judges in the first place as serving on the FISA court is seen as a "committee" and not a "real court" from a farcical constitutional perspective. (aka a court that really isn't a court)

Technically all you need for getting a search warrant is to have any federal judge (for at least federal prosecutors or law enforcement officers of any kind) agree to the search. Obviously those in law enforcement know of judges who are friendly to their viewpoint, and it is a common corruption on all levels of government in America to have police short-circuit the whole 4th amendment process by running to judges who are friendly to give out warrants for almost any cause the police (FBI, NSA, whatever) want. Police officers do this also with state courts and state judges as well quite frequently.

The FISA Court doesn't handle any actual judicial cases, which is where the rationale and justification for its role in the judiciary happens. Theoretically, they can also be overridden by the U.S. Supreme Court itself, but good luck on seeing that happen. I'm not justifying this abomination of a legal body, but I can see how members of congress sort of skirted around the constitutional procedures to get this to happen.

FISC (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685187)

All judges are also appointed not by the Chief Justice, but by the President (and confirmed by the Senate). All the Chief Justice appoints are law clerks, staff, and having an influence on who is "admitted to the bar" and able to argue cases before the court.

Perhaps if FISC [epic.org] were a Constitutional court, it would be better. Oh, but a Constitutional secret court is an oxymoron, like 'limited government'.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44685287)

It's interesting to learn about Snowden's eating pizza. It's exciting to know he's successfully evading getting caught.

You only need to see the nick of the submitter to get an idea on the motives of this non-story. And the ID of the editor to understand why it was accepted.

Re:The NSA is violating the Constitution (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44686831)

So I guess you consider posting a rant on the internet "doing something about it"?

Why? (2)

Korruptionen (2647747) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684729)

Why is it that someone reveals exactly what we all had assumed was already going on for a long time... and people become obsessed with this person? Something isn't right about this who story.

It's as if... he's... a plant or something.

(flame suit activated.)

TheTrueHOOHA on spooky types .. (1)

dgharmon (2564621) | 1 year,5 days | (#44684871)

"It really concerns me how little this sort of corporate behavior bothers those outside of technology circles. Society really seems to have developed an unquestioning obedience towards spooky types." TheTrueHOOHA [arstechnica.com] , Feb 2010

"I can authoritatively state that those specific question types absolutely cannot be asked without specific cause [i.e. reporting]. If you got asked this, there's a specific reason, creepster." TheTrueHOOHA [arstechnica.com] , Nov 2008

More details (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44684911)

Business Insider
http://www.businessinsider.com/snowden-spoke-with-russia-in-hong-kong-2013-8

The Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/russia/10266386/Edward-Snowden-contacted-Kremlin-before-arriving-in-Moscow.html

This is bullshit Delivery, Propaganda style (5, Insightful)

Bucc5062 (856482) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685039)

I'll be clear, that article was a bunch of bullshit. Unnamed sources, conflicting stories, over the top innuendos that come together to to a good job of discrediting the man, thus his motive and his data. The story is a hack job of low hanging dfruit to get other media outlets an opportunity to shape or spin the idea that Mr. Snowden was not acting in the greater interests of the People, but was really "working for the Russians".

" because Havana, under pressure from Washington, said it would not allow the plane to land."

Are you serious. Cube caving to pressure from the United States? That is laughable. Russia maybe, the US...right

  "All I can say is that I have absolutely no idea about this," Ho said. "I was only his legal adviser and was not fully involved in his dealings." This from the local legal representative in Hong Kong. A person whom I would think likes to keep tabs on his very high profile client. Then this completely worthless statement

"A spokeswoman for the consulate in Hong Kong would neither confirm nor comment on the report.". So that lends what to the the legitimacy of the story? Nothing, but it does what it always intends, casts doubt. "What are they hiding, he really must have been there otherwise they'd say he was not".

The marketing department for the NSA and the US government is really starting to ramp up the spin. "Mr. Snowden must be a spy, he ran right to the communists.". "Mr. Snowden is a traitor for releasing secrets to our Russian enemies". Mr. Snowden is a terrorist because he helped them communicate better in secret" and the sad thing is the majority of the US (And world) population will buy the story hook line and sinker.

Then on the other side, even my supposed thoughtful reporting NPR station put out anotehr fluff piece, this time about the NSA LOVEINT activities. The two reporters made it seem like a joke, a trivial action taken by so "oh so naughty" analysts instead of what it was, a sever breach of privacy; an act that would put an average citizen in jail under arrest. The NSA violated the privacy rights of American citizens and it is reported as "shame on you, don't do that again"...sigh.

As a final point to the spin, Congress, coming back from break will not be able to investigate any violations to the Constitution by the NSA for the American public was just made aware the the Government "miscalculated" when we need to raise the debt ceiling and it needs to happen soon...let the hilarity begin. If that is not enough the President wants to shoot exploding objects into Syria which certainly means the media will be quite focused on anything but the NSA travails.

Right now, everything said about Syria is close to a dup for Iraq before the war. Obama, the man who voted against action in Iraq now ponders whether to attack Syria. If Assad bombed his own people with gas then he is despicable, disgusting, and immoral and worthy to be brought to justice for war crimes and crime against humanity. Syria, like this article is just a tool to divert attention away from the systematic destruction of privacy in this country. Sad times. Sad times.

Re:This is bullshit Delivery, Propaganda style (1)

mbone (558574) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685351)

" because Havana, under pressure from Washington, said it would not allow the plane to land."

Are you serious. Cube caving to pressure from the United States? That is laughable. Russia maybe, the US...right

This was one of the things that set my BS detector off. You can say many things about the Castro regimes, but being susceptible to US pressure is not one of them. We are not going to invade Cuba over this, and what other leverage do we have?

This seems like clumsy disinformation to me. If they had said, say, that Aeroflot refused to carry him because the Airline was worried about losing routes to the West, or something like that, it would have been more believable (at least to me).

Re:This is bullshit Delivery, Propaganda style (1)

cavreader (1903280) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688749)

The Castro brothers are getting old and will not be around much longer. Once they are gone I believe you will see a different attitude from those in the US and Cuba who realize both countries gain nothing by continuing the same type of adversarial relationship and actually stand to gain quite a lot if relations can finally be normalized. This cannot be done until the Castro brothers are gone because Fidel has defined his entire life as being a fighter against US imperialism and to adopt any different strategy at this point in his life is impossible.

Re:This is bullshit Delivery, Propaganda style (2)

gallondr00nk (868673) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685655)

Then on the other side, even my supposed thoughtful reporting NPR station put out anotehr fluff piece, this time about the NSA LOVEINT activities. The two reporters made it seem like a joke, a trivial action taken by so "oh so naughty" analysts instead of what it was, a sever breach of privacy

One element of propaganda is always humanising on side while demonising the other.

The LOVEINT angle struck me as a very awkward and ill thought out way of trying to do that. A couple of the reports I read had a sort of "oh look, they're jealous insecure paranoids too!" ring about it, which was probably not the intention. I imagine a lot of people saw that for the flagrant abuse of power that it really was.

It'll be fun playing "guess the planted story" over this, as they try and dress up the erosion of representative democracy as something good.

Re:This is bullshit Delivery, Propaganda style (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44685701)

Right now, everything said about Syria is close to a dup for Iraq before the war.

No one is saying Syria was involved in the 11 September 2001 attacks.

Re:This is bullshit Delivery, Propaganda style (0)

filthpickle (1199927) | 1 year,5 days | (#44686299)

Snowden is a traitor. A person can think what they like about whether he should have done what he did or not....but he is a traitor.

Re:This is bullshit Delivery, Propaganda style (1)

asylumx (881307) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688505)

All you'll get for saying this kind of thing around here is modded down & flamed. Trust me, I've made the same mistake.

Re:This is bullshit Delivery, Propaganda style (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44687015)

So this is anti-Snowden propaganda from Russian and Chinese news outlets?

I doubt this. (1)

mbone (558574) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685081)

I have seen nothing to confirm this, independently of Kommersant, in any of the flood of stories based on the Kommersant article. It certainly might be true, but it smells like disinformation to me.

Note that if he stayed at the consulate, it would have been easy for him to get travel documents from the RF. He could have made it to Cuba and on to where-ever before anyone knew he was moving. The Russians, I hardly need point out, have experience moving people and things around in the face of hostile interest from the USA. Now, he might not have known to insist on this, but Sarah Harrison sure should have.

Re:I doubt this. (2)

TapeCutter (624760) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685589)

As soon as they gave him one years asylum he became a Russian pawn. What happens to him after the one year is up will now be determined at various negotiating tables where his fate will be just another bargaining chip.

Re:I doubt this. (1)

mbone (558574) | 1 year,5 days | (#44687003)

Well, maybe. The Russians are not known for giving up defectors.

Now Wang Lijun, on the other hand, definitely was a pawn. There is a backstory there I would love to know.

Because. News Media (4, Insightful)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685099)

It's interesting that the best slur campaign the US can come up with involves Snowden eating pizza while trying to figure out where to run and hide. I don't give a flying f#ck if he lied, cheated and stole everything he turned over. The root of the matter is the NSA, and US government got caught with their hands full of illegal sh#t and many people in high place need to be held accountable. And that's not happening. In the meantime, the media is either trying to figure out how to spin this into reality tv for ratings. I can remember a day when the network news would have had a field day ripping apart all three branches of government over something like this. Instead, they carry on like a bunch of drama starved crack whores.

Re:Because. News Media (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44687103)

If news reporting on Snowden is anything other than glowing, then screw it, Kommersant and South China Morning Post must be part of the US propaganda machine. The original premise cannot waiver.

Looks like faith can be a strong motivator even outside of religion.

What is Snowden's Bitcoin Address? (1)

cellurl (906920) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685349)

Has he published it anywhere? (no, I don't want yours ;-)

$25 Vision Cruise Control DIY [indiegogo.com]

Re:What is Snowden's Bitcoin Address? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44686367)

There is a legal defense fund:
wikileaks.org/freesnowden

Re:What is Snowden's Bitcoin Address? (1)

Spy Handler (822350) | 1 year,5 days | (#44688391)

why would he need a legal defense fund? He's safely in the protection of Comrade Putin now.

But suppose if NSA had him in custody at Langley, he would be toast and no amount of bitcoins in his defense fund will save him.

Enjoying the secrets trend (2)

TheCarp (96830) | 1 year,5 days | (#44685789)

Not too long ago, this is the sort of revelation that would be in the public 30 years later.

Its not just heros like Snowden who are leaking, the trend seems to be moving strongly towards the inability of large organizations to keep any real secrets at all. Nobody is giving up missle codes or anything legitimate, but.... lies told to the public seem to have a lot less staying power than they used to.

I like this trend. May it continue for all of these orgs and may they have to eventually come to the conclusion that dealing honestly with the public is the only viable option in the future.

I don't expect it but....I hope for it.

What is this dribble? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,5 days | (#44688645)

Are you Americans so thick that you do not know Hong Kong = China. Let's re-edit the headline so it removes the bias always inserted by the owners of Slashdot...

"Report: Snowden Stayed At Russian Consulate While In China" Now what do you thing of the story. Would you expect Snowden to be in danger of arrest by CHINESE authorities? Of course not. To answer the filthy shills, while Hong Kong is given a 'light' 'independence' by the Chinese mainland, this is no different from the status of Wales within the UK. But is Wales British? Of course. And would being in Wales give you a different political situation from being in England? Of course not.

So, are you Slashdot readers so thick you'd fall for a standard 'Edward Bernays' ploy by this site? Are you so VERY VERY thick, you watch films like "Die Hard 5" and "G I Joe 2" and actually believe American authorities operate in Moscow. ARE YOU REALLY THAT THICK? The film-makers, pushing Washington propaganda clearly think so.

"in hiding in order to evade arrest by U.S. authorities". US authorities in China. You Yanks seriously believe there are US authorities in China arresting people? No wonder Obama thinks he can take the American sheep to war with Syria, then Iran, then Russia and China. Unlike the thickies that Slashdot targets with its propaganda garbage, Snowden was actually clued in to the geopolitical reality of this world. Could that be because as a former intelligence operative, he felt self-deluding idiocy serves no purpose?

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