×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Measles Outbreak Tied To Texas Megachurch

Soulskill posted about 8 months ago | from the stop-being-bad-at-science dept.

Medicine 622

New submitter the eric conspiracy sends this quote from NBC: "An outbreak of measles tied to a Texas megachurch where ministers have questioned vaccination has sickened at least 21 people, including a 4-month-old infant — and it's expected to spread further, state and federal health officials said. 'There's likely a lot more susceptible people,' said Dr. Jane Seward, the deputy director for the viral diseases division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ... All of the cases are linked to the Eagle Mountain International Church in Newark, Texas, where a visitor who'd traveled to Indonesia became infected with measles – and then returned to the U.S., spreading it to the largely unvaccinated church community, said Russell Jones, the Texas state epidemiologist. ... Terri Pearsons, a senior pastor of Eagle Mountain International said she has had concerns about possible ties between early childhood vaccines and autism. In the wake of the measles outbreak, however, Pearsons has urged followers to get vaccinated and the church has held several vaccination clinics. ... 'In this community, these cases so far are all in people who refused vaccination for themselves and their children,' [Steward] added. The disease that once killed 500 people a year in the U.S. and hospitalized 48,000 had been considered virtually eradicated after a vaccine introduced in 1963. Cases now show up typically when an unvaccinated person contracts the disease abroad and spreads it upon return to the U.S."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

622 comments

As usual. (5, Funny)

nospam007 (722110) | about 8 months ago | (#44691761)

Think of it as evolution in action.

Re:As usual. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691831)

Well, that or the failure of border protection? ;)

Re:As usual. (5, Informative)

Cwix (1671282) | about 8 months ago | (#44691945)

I assume you are trying to imply that the measles outbreak came from Mexico. Too bad you are full of shit. One of the members of the church visited Indonesia and brought it back.

Re:As usual. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692037)

One of the members of the church visited Indonesia and brought it back.

Seems like a fair trade. One of them got a virulent disease that's been plaguing mankind for thousands of years, and the other one got measles.

Re:As usual. (2, Interesting)

Derec01 (1668942) | about 8 months ago | (#44692071)

Whoa, not that AC, but chill. I took him to mean that US customs or border enforcement or some such should have been keeping an eye out, which is something that I would have assumed as well. Granted, there's a lot of reasons he could pass through and it wouldn't be noticed, but I'd think there's some protection.

Apparently measles is not strictly on the list, if I'm reading this right.

http://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/aboutlawsregulationsquarantineisolation.html [cdc.gov]

Re:As usual. (4, Insightful)

puto (533470) | about 8 months ago | (#44692185)

I did not take it as Mexico either, and I am a card carrying latino. Colombian not Mexican, but even in latin american countries they talk about the border, la frontera, even when it is an imaginary line when you are on a plane,train, flying, or driving, from a latin american country. The "border" can be customs at Miami International. And oddly enough as someone who has worked in Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Venezuela, Ecuador, Ecuador, and Chile I have caught dengue, chicken pox, and a host of other unamed maladies. And honestly I do do not get upset when someone makes a joke about cocaine, Pablo Escobar, or kidnapping in Colombia. Because while it does not happen to me it does happen.

Re:As usual. (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 8 months ago | (#44692127)

Well, that or the failure of border protection? ;)

Hmmm... a (1 in 100000 suicidal [wikipedia.org] ) terrorist attack using biological weapons?

Re:As usual. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691843)

Exactly! I think the same thing when I hear of blacks killing each other over shoes, women killing their offspring ("more from the fit, less from the unfit!"), and people who don't want children.

Re:As usual. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691849)

But their beliefs aren't in their genes.
I guess you could say it's memetic evolution rather than genetic.

Re:As usual. (2)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 8 months ago | (#44692011)

But their beliefs aren't in their genes.

This is probably false. Religiosity is strongly and negatively correlated with IQ [wikipedia.org] , and IQ is heritable [wikipedia.org] .

Re:As usual. (5, Insightful)

Derec01 (1668942) | about 8 months ago | (#44692137)

"Correlation does not imply.. etc. etc."

To be perfectly frank, I think a lot of skeptics are too ready to stop there and just infer the rest.

That forgets that childhood poverty and subsequent poor educational environment are highly negatively correlated with IQ, while the distressing situation is highly correlated with forming a religious community and the comfort that can provide.

It's way too complicated at present to ascribe that to genetics. It stinks of the same easy answers religion is blamed for providing.

Re:As usual. (5, Interesting)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 8 months ago | (#44692329)

That forgets that childhood poverty and subsequent poor educational environment are highly negatively correlated with IQ

The standard deviation for IQ is about 15 points. Fraternal twins, even when raised apart, have a SD of about about six. Identical twins, even when raised apart, have a SD of about three. So your IQ is about 80% inherited. Of course it can be affected by other things, but overall, IQ is more strongly inherited than height. Height can certainly be affected by environmental factors like nutrition, but the overwhelming factor is the height of your parents.

Re:As usual. (2)

Derec01 (1668942) | about 8 months ago | (#44692169)

But their beliefs aren't in their genes.

This is probably false. Religiosity is strongly and negatively correlated with IQ [wikipedia.org] , and IQ is heritable [wikipedia.org] .

As an addendum, judging by the linked graph, you get almost all of the intelligence boost to your population with 15% atheism, and just noise after that. Honestly, it's noisiest exactly around 0% atheism. Almost like there's another variable in play :)

Another way to read it is just that the most intelligent countries are all over in terms of belief.

Re:As usual. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691853)

YES!! One of the oldest rules of survival - STUPID ANIMALS DIE!!!!

Re:As usual. (5, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 8 months ago | (#44692069)

One of the oldest rules of survival - STUPID ANIMALS DIE!!!!

Only up to a point. Natural selection works both ways. Stupid animals may die because they make stupid mistakes. But smart animals may also be under a disadvantage because their more active brain consumes more energy, and the curiosity that comes with intelligence may get them in trouble. If wild animals, such as rats, are captured, selectively bred to improve their intelligence, and then released, they will regress to their original level. So you want to be smart, but not too smart.

Re:As usual. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692073)

That's not a rule of survival at all.

Re:As usual. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691867)

Please check which option you'd like:
[ ] vaccinations
[x] Darwin Award registration

Re:As usual. (4, Informative)

ericloewe (2129490) | about 8 months ago | (#44691897)

Yeah. Too bad that idiots can spread diseases before they die of their stupidity (Yeah, they're not going to die, but it applies generally).
Herd immunity doesn't work if a bunch of idiots decides that vaccines are evil/dangerous/demonstrative of a lack of faith/useless/*insert absurd argument here*.

Let's also thank the media, for creating hysteria where there should be none, and not having the guts to admit they were just spreading FUD after it becomes obvious that their latest sensationalist bullshit is just that.

It's also nice how a "senior pastor" quickly becomes a medical authority for these people. Do they have their doctors fix their plumbing as well?

Re:As usual. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692055)

I am not sure that Herd Immunity means what you think it means. It is completely reasonable to delay vaccinating infants if there is the slightest pretext to do so.

Re:As usual. (1)

Gareth Iwan Fairclough (2831535) | about 8 months ago | (#44692199)

It's also nice how a "senior pastor" quickly becomes a medical authority for these people. Do they have their doctors fix their plumbing as well?

Actually, my grandfather was a plumber before he became a priest. That was back in the early 1930's mind you.

Re:As usual. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692305)

So he switched from dealing with human shit to dealing out bull shit?

Re:As usual. (4, Insightful)

squiggleslash (241428) | about 8 months ago | (#44691973)

OK, you know it's measles we're talking about? Something that was pretty common until vaccinations. I'm old enough to have had it myself.

We're still here, so my guess is that evolution isn't going to take care of "people who prefer not to be vaccinated against measles".

Re:As usual. (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | about 8 months ago | (#44692049)

Think of it as evolution in action.

The parents are fine, because they were all vaccinated when they were kids. It's their children who are made to suffer their stupidity. If anything, a special child-abuse team should be set up to ascertain whether the parents have learned from their mistake and are willing to make changes to their beliefs, or if they are still a danger to the future health of their children.

Re:As usual. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692279)

If a deliberately unvaccinated child dies as a result of his parent's "choice", when the advice came from the pulpit of the parent's church, should anyone be held responsible for manslaughter? Keep in mind these are the "it's a child, not a choice" people.

Re:As usual. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692053)

The idea that genetics play a part in religious belief, or belief in anti-vaccination nonsense, is unproven (there's a correlation between IQ and religiousity - greater IQ less religious, but no causation).

So calling this evolution is also nonsense. Evolution isn't stupid people being killed, it's specifically to do with population genetics.

Further, natural processes such as evolution have nothing to do with what's right, or moral or ethical (e.g. look up the naturalistic fallacy) so even if evolution were involved it wouldn't mean that we shouldn't do anything to help these idiots.

And that's especially applicable to children who were brainwashed by their stupid parents. These parents should be charged with a form of child abuse.

Re:As usual. (1)

mendax (114116) | about 8 months ago | (#44692143)

Think of it as evolution in action.

I'm not sure if this fellow intended to be funny or serious. But when I read this story that was the first thought that went through my mind. Such stupid are not worthy of remaining in the gene pool. But this is not an act of me judging others, but a recognition of the reality of evolution. If such ignorant people wish to make such deadly decisions about their own well-being, so be it. Perhaps some members of this church will be candidates of the next Darwin Awards. I'd like to see that!

Re:As usual. (5, Insightful)

Xtifr (1323) | about 8 months ago | (#44692145)

I prefer to think of it as child abuse. And before you say it, no, there is no correlation between low intelligence and believing stupid things. Intelligent people are, in fact, quite adept at coming up with elaborate justifications for believing the most incredibly stupid things. So this is not just killing stupid kids.

Furthermore, it's not just the children of these deluded fools who are at risk. There are a lot of children who cannot get standard vaccines because of various allergies. Normally, these children are protected by herd immunity [wikipedia.org] , but when enough people begin to refuse vaccinations based on stupid, insane, and utterly discredited theories, the herd immunity protection goes away.

Frankly, I think the anti-vaxxers are shouting fire in a crowded theatre, and should be treated accordingly.

Re:As usual. (1)

stms (1132653) | about 8 months ago | (#44692153)

Now if evolution could somehow weed out people who fail to empathize with those whom they disagree with we'd be set... and yes, I realize the irony/hypocrisy of this statement.

Accelerating evolution (1)

whoever57 (658626) | about 8 months ago | (#44692249)

They should pass a law such that unvaccinated kids are separated from other kids at school and put in classrooms together (quarantine). See how long the kids remain either free of measels or unvaccinated!

Re:Accelerating evolution (1)

whoever57 (658626) | about 8 months ago | (#44692261)

Slight correction: make that unvaccinated kids that have no medical reason to be unvaccinated.

Just goes to show... (3, Insightful)

MrEricSir (398214) | about 8 months ago | (#44691773)

...that you shouldn't listen to people who have no idea what they're talking about.

Re:Just goes to show... (4, Insightful)

OzPeter (195038) | about 8 months ago | (#44691963)

...that you shouldn't listen to people who have no idea what they're talking about.

How do I know that you know what you are talking about?

Re:Just goes to show... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692081)

Request a citation.
 

Re:Just goes to show... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692285)

Through inductive reasoning. Either he knows what he is talking about or he doesn't.
If he does, it is the case that you shouldn't listen to people who have no idea what they're talking about, therefore you should listen to him because he does.
If he doesn't, it is not the case that you shouldn't listen to people who have no idea what they're talking about and thus, you should listen to him. But then you shouldn't listen to him, because in that case he is the kind of person he's warning you away from. So you both should and shouldn't listen to him.

This rule applies to EVERYBODY (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692019)

Christianity has no position pro-/anti-vaccine or pro/anti-medicine. Just as there are "scientists" who, without any proof, believe in "cold fusion", space aliens, etc and doctors who insist that HIV and AIDS are not related and/or not dangerous and/or cured by thing like urine... there are a few preachers who cherry-pick a sentence or two out of context from their Bibles and then tell their supporters to prove their faith by handling snakes and praying for health when medicine is what God himself would recommend...

There are snake oil salesmen in ALL areas of human activity and ALL people who choose to follow other people ought to exert at least a little effort to determine if they are worth following... of course, people who tend to be "followers" generally do so because they lack the motivation/capability to be leaders and likely also tend to be too lazy to do the research...

Yeah, laugh at the crazy religious people... then get back to the website you were previously reading that was asking you for money to support their SETI activities...

Re:Just goes to show... (4, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 8 months ago | (#44692029)

Why would anyone go to a church for medical advice anyway? Do they go to their doctor for religious advice . . . ?

But I guess some folks believe that their church has answers for everything.

Should I buy a Chevy or a Ford truck . . . ? Let's take a look at the Bible Consumer Reports and see what Jesus would buy . . .

Re: Just goes to show... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692197)

Well his disciples preferred Honda. "They were all with one accord - Acts 2:1"

Re:Just goes to show... (3, Insightful)

Princeofcups (150855) | about 8 months ago | (#44692065)

...that you shouldn't listen to people who have no idea what they're talking about.

Emotional solutions usually trump rational ones. A lot less energy required for thinking, and a lot more self-righteous feel-good dopamine rush.

Muhahaha (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691775)

Where is your god now??

Re:Muhahaha (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691851)

Punishing churches with women pastors apparently.

Re:Muhahaha (0)

judoguy (534886) | about 8 months ago | (#44691879)

Why would one question the existence of God because of an incomplete understanding of God by believers? You wouldn't denigrate Science because these same people didn't understand the science behind vaccinations.

Re:Muhahaha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691977)

Scientists prefer repeatable miracles.

Re:Muhahaha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691987)

Why would one question the existence of the Tooth Fairy because of an incomplete understanding of Tooth Fairy by believers? You wouldn't denigrate Science because these same people didn't understand the science behind vaccinations.

Re:Muhahaha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691993)

Your logic is flawed. Science is not telling them to not believe in God.

They can choose to believe in what ever they want until it poses a public health risk and puts others in jeopardy. At that point they either get vaccinations or move into a compound or colony without direct contact with other people.

cases are in people who refused vaccination ... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691799)

Interesting!

It's almost as if these "vaccines" actually work!

Maybe these "vaccines" were intelligently designed or something!

Re:cases are in people who refused vaccination ... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691871)

I don't think these people are doubting that vaccines work. Rather they are more afraid of their kids having autism than measles. And they don't understand that vaccines don't cause autism.

Re:cases are in people who refused vaccination ... (5, Insightful)

MarcoAtWork (28889) | about 8 months ago | (#44692005)

and probably do not understand how nasty measles can be and what kind of lifelong disabilities it can leave you (deafness, meniere's, ...)

Re:cases are in people who refused vaccination ... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692335)

One of my friends was against vaccinations, despite being college educated and having 3 kids. She was at a nearby children's hospital for a broken arm for her older son. On the way back to their room from the bathroom, she heard an ungodly noise from a room and the room door was marked with a negative pressure sign. She asked a passing nurse why the negative pressure and what the noise was. The nurse said it was to prevent the spread to unvaccinated children at the hospital but could not tell her what the kid had. So, she asked the doctor that was helping her son with his arm what would cause that noise and he said something to the effect of "sounds like whooping cough." She looked it up that night and not only had all her kids vaccinated the next day, but started volunteering for a local vaccination group. In her words, "I'd rather have a kid with developmental disorders than either having one with permanent disabilities or none at all."

Please Explain (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692117)

This is one of those situations I just don't understand people's thoughts.

The autism caused by vax was reported by a doctor doing research. So we should listen to doctors doing research like this, I can understand that part. He was proven to have fabricated the data for his research, we then should not listen to this doctor. I think these people never heard the second part, but you have so I understand that.

Now my question:
AWG research showed that man made CO2 was going to cause global warming, done by researchers (Phil Jones at the CRU). I understand that. He has admitted to falisifying data and deleting it to prevent peer review. You probably also know that. However, you probably also still listen to Phil's research and violently shout down anyone who says different.

Why is it one researcher who falsifies data should be ignored and you are an idiot if you listen to him, but a second researcher doing the same thing you would have to be an idiot to not listen to. I just can't figure that part out.

Re:Please Explain (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692181)

Even if this is a troll, there are many who think this way, so:

Fabricated evidence should be ignored.

If the only evidence for global warming were fabricated, global warming should be considered unsubstantiated.

There is more evidence for global warming than that which was fabricated.

Similarly, if there were many legitimate studies which showed that vaccines caused autism, they should be paid attention to. There are not.

If one person fabricated data which showed that the Earth revolves around the Sun, would you stop believing in heliocentrism?

Re:Please Explain (1)

bdwebb (985489) | about 8 months ago | (#44692267)

I don't think the parent was saying anything about global warming...or did I miss that somewhere in the thread?

You are obviously right in that those who falsify research should be ignored but the problem is that the initial findings are sensational and PERFECT for media organizations whereas the subsequent retraction and discovery that the 'scientists' in question are crackpots is sensational in that people lose respect for the media organizations who have reported those findings without questioning the methodology or vetting the research properly. Ultimately most people get their information from the media and when you have irresponsible organizations struggling for headlines instead of doing any real reporting, this is exactly what happens.

This story [slashdot.org] from earlier makes an excellent point:

How can we correct this thought process? A greater emphasis on, and better understanding of, the method might do the trick. It’s significantly harder to deny the import of challenging findings when you have the tools necessary to evaluate the process by which scientists arrived at their results. That new study on global warming is tougher to dismiss when you know (and care enough to check) that the methods used are sound, regardless of what you think the authors’ motivations might be. In the absence of such knowledge, the virtue assigned to “science” might also be a motivational force for ideological distortion, the precise opposite of impartial truth-seeking.

People just need to make more of an effort.

Re:cases are in people who refused vaccination ... (4, Informative)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | about 8 months ago | (#44692129)

I don't think these people are doubting that vaccines work. Rather they are more afraid of their kids having autism than measles. And they don't understand that vaccines don't cause autism.

I think many have this false belief due to (at least) one now widely discredited study published proposing this link - this/these ideas are still pushed by some people and celebrities, like Jenny McCarthy [newyorker.com] .

From Anti-Vaccine Body Count [jennymccar...ycount.com] :

The United States Anti-Vaccination Movement is composed of a variety of individuals ranging from former doctors who should know better, to semi-celebrities who have no medical training, to anti-government conspiracy theorists who distrust anything that the government says.

  • Number of Preventable Illnesses: 120,487
  • Number of Preventable Deaths: 1,283
  • Number of Autism Diagnoses Scientifically Linked to Vaccinations: 0

Unfortunately, some people would rather believe that some *thing* - the vaccination - caused their child to "get" Autism rather than living with the understanding that it was genetic - and came from them.

Re:cases are in people who refused vaccination ... (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 8 months ago | (#44692315)

If a good many conservatives believe 90%+ of all climate scientists are lying about global warming, then it's perfectly consistent of them to believe 90% of vaccine scientists are lying about autism connections.

Re:cases are in people who refused vaccination ... (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 8 months ago | (#44692341)

It's easy to verify if shots cause autism: those who float in a pool will get autism and those who sink won't.

There's your problem (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691839)

Terri Pearsons, a senior pastor of Eagle Mountain International said she has had concerns about possible ties between early childhood vaccines and autism.

See, this is why should never have started letting women be pastors.

*ducks*

Re:There's your problem (2)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 8 months ago | (#44692077)

No this is why you don't listen to Hollywood actors when it comes to vaccination.

Re:There's your problem (2)

sconeu (64226) | about 8 months ago | (#44692105)

No this is why you don't listen to Hollywood actors when it comes to vaccination.

"Actor" (actress).... rather a stretch when it comes to describing Ms. McCarthy, isn't it?

Soon to follow (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 8 months ago | (#44691881)

A river of blood, locusts and frogs.

Seriously, though, frogs has to be the oddest possible plague. They are about the least threatening creatures ever (perhaps along with sheep) and eat bugs. Also, they look nice.

Plague of frogs == awesomest thing ever.

Re:Soon to follow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691953)

Frogs would be annoying. They hop around and stuff

Re:Soon to follow (3, Informative)

chuckugly (2030942) | about 8 months ago | (#44691979)

Each Biblical plague was an affront to an Egyptian deity, more or less.

Re:Soon to follow (1)

xevioso (598654) | about 8 months ago | (#44692293)

This doesn't really answer the question. Why would any Egyptian deity be insulted by or take offence at a frog?

You don't need to vaccinate your children... (4, Insightful)

jd.schmidt (919212) | about 8 months ago | (#44691883)

...so long as you keep the little plague bearers quarantined away from me and mine.

Vaccines are science, if you think they are causing health issues use real science, not a personal feeling. This issue is MUCH bigger than a simple personal choice.

Re:You don't need to vaccinate your children... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691955)

There was some blog article somewhere. This woman decided she didnt want her kid vaccinated. All was well and good. Then some other kid caught the measles, and the school board told her that her child had to stay at home for 8 months in case he/she was a carrier now (or some such length of time... it was however long it takes the disease to run its course). At first she thought they were joking ("how am I supposed to work?), but now, they were serious.

^^ this is the solution for people who refuse vaccinations.

Re:You don't need to vaccinate your children... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692099)

No, the solution is to put them in prison for negligence.

If your child is healthy enough to be vaccinated, it should be mandatory. Refusal to vaccinate puts both the child and anyone around them with a weak immune system at risk.

I wouldn't throw stones. (2)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 8 months ago | (#44692045)

Vaccines are science, if you think they are causing health issues use real science, not a personal feeling.

Yet you base your response to them on personal feelings... rather than science. Except in extraordinarily rare cases, measles vaccinations confer immunity for life.

Re:I wouldn't throw stones. (2)

jd.schmidt (919212) | about 8 months ago | (#44692177)

How so? Actually if vaccinations did confer lifelong and perfect immunity I wouldn't care as much, it is precisely because they don't that I am so worried.

Look at it this way, there are several diseases we have effectively eradicated because of public vaccination policies. But in some cases these have become political footballs in a nation, for various reasons, and eradication has stalled. I know we all like to have personal choice and hate it when we are made to do something, but this IS one of those things people really need to be made to do. (of course you catch more flies with honey, but have no doubt about the end goal!)

And yes, as policy I don't mind telling people if they must insist on not vaccinating their kid, maybe those kids ought go to a school of likeminded parents.

Re:I wouldn't throw stones. (2)

jd.schmidt (919212) | about 8 months ago | (#44692247)

Also I have to add, there are some people who really can not have the vaccine for legitimate reasons. Should these kids be quarantined instead?

The goal should not just be control, but eradication of these diseases. There is a greater public goal involved.

Re:You don't need to vaccinate your children... (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 8 months ago | (#44692179)

...so long as you keep the little plague bearers quarantined away from me and mine.

I don't understand; aren't "you and yours" vaccinated?

The media is also responsible (5, Insightful)

Mindragon (627249) | about 8 months ago | (#44691909)

Ever since they gave a lot of "talking time" to folks that may not have any idea at all what they are talking about, our "fair and balanced" media also shares a hand in the killing of these people.

And God will strike down the unbelievers... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691937)

...and (today) God's name is MEASLES.
Poor fools listened to a man on a pulpit.

Just Rewards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691957)

I would say that these folks got their just rewards for refusing to vaccinate.

On the other hand, the kids did not have a choice to be vaccinated or not, and didn't deserve to get this disease. Shame on the parents. Their stupid decision made their child's life miserable.

Furthermore, everbody who gets vaccinated contributes to the herd immunity [wikipedia.org] effect of the community. By refusing to vaccinate, parents and others put their entire community at higher risk for disease. It's not just a personal choice, it's a personal choice that has an effect on the whole community. For that I wish a thousand cases of measles upon the non-vaccinators.

It's obvious. (4, Funny)

mcmonkey (96054) | about 8 months ago | (#44691967)

The only logical conclusion is god hates these people.

I have no measles, so I know god loves me.

Re:It's obvious. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692023)

After reading the story of Job as a kid I started thinking,"With a God like this, who needs Satan?"

Wise words of Mr Nukem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691971)

Let god sort 'em out

Better than the Herpes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691981)

Hey, it's not as bad as the deadly infant herpes outbreak associated with Orthodox Jews cutting up and then orally sucking on little boys' penises.

Religion is disgusting.

This is god's punishment... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44691997)

...for ignoring HIS science.

Re:This is god's punishment... (0)

Xtifr (1323) | about 8 months ago | (#44692161)

Ha, so true! If I had mod points, I'd donate 'em all to you! :)

Jenny McCarthy Body Count (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692075)

This site used to be called the Jenny McCarthy Body Count.
http://www.jennymccarthybodycount.com/Anti-Vaccine_Body_Count/Home.html

Gods will. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692103)

Hope they are ready to be judged.

Wow. Blatant hate-fest. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692111)

Had this been centered around anything but a church it would never be posted here.
 
I hope you tolerant, logical, loving people are proud of how fast you are to kick the hate into high gear and wish ill on the innocent. Not to even mention the number of logical fallacies to outright lies I've seen present from the self-appointed enlightened posters here.
 
You're no better than anyone else. A bunch of hateful Neanderthals when it serves your purposes. Pathetic.

Re:Wow. Blatant hate-fest. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692217)

If there was a group of atheists who all caught measles because of their idiocy everyone would be hating on them too. So stop your sad little cry about religious intolerance.

This isn't a religion issue. (1, Insightful)

Karmashock (2415832) | about 8 months ago | (#44692119)

Its a "lots of humans gathering in one place" issue. It could be tied to just about any place that happens. I'm sure your local sporting stadium contributes to the spread of disease on an ongoing basis.

Three ways ways deal with this issue:

1. Everyone becomes shut-ins that don't go anywhere, meet anyone, or do anything outside their little domiciles.

2. We wear hazmat suits when we walk around. Gloves and breathing masks at a minimum. And eating anything you don't bring with you from an inspected source is forbidden.

3. What we're doing now.

Re:This isn't a religion issue. (1)

The Living Fractal (162153) | about 8 months ago | (#44692125)

The only people refusing to get vaccinated are the religious nut jobs here.

And they are the only ones getting the disease.

Please try again.

Re:This isn't a religion issue. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692219)

Right. No one but the religious think that vaccines cause autism.
 
Bury your head in the sand and keep up your petty hate spewing. It serves you well.

Re:This isn't a religion issue. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692301)

Incorrect. Vaccines do not work 100%. This can harm innocent people who actually got the vaccine, as well as those too young to get the vaccine.

Re:This isn't a religion issue. (2)

Karmashock (2415832) | about 8 months ago | (#44692351)

Bill Maher has said some anti vaccination stuff as well so that's not actually true.

Furthermore, most people indifferent to religion get vaccinated about as much as anyone else. You have to appreciate that the anti vaccination people are always a fringe group and rarely represent any significant portion of the population.

Beyond that, these things spread through human contact. Its just a biological fact. Someone at work coughs and everyone gets a cold. Hospitals sadly are often the source of most minor seasonal illnesses. Why? They're full of sick people. Sitting in a hospital waiting room is one of the better ways to get the seasonal flu or cold going around. Some guy is won't be feeling well in that room... and he'll cough... and you'll breath that in... and enjoy sniffling for three days.

Its not a religion issue. The people trying to make it one just have giant hate boners for the faith cults. Its sad that most of them don't get the punch line to the joke... which is that the hard core anti religion crowd are also a faith cult. Not a theistic one... but psychological nature of the relationships and the circular self justifying logic loops are mostly the same.

Placebo Effect (1)

Neo-Rio-101 (700494) | about 8 months ago | (#44692141)

Some of these religious nutters are relying on a "belief in God" or "faith" to save them from their ills, including some very serious diseases.

What they are, in fact, relying on is the placebo effect. If the mind is tricked enough into believing that the body is going to get well, it can have some benefits, especially in overcoming limiting beliefs such as shyness, fear of heights, etc. or at least make the patient happy while their body heals naturally.

However there is a reason why medical trials include placebo sugar pills against the actual drug to be tested... and that's because placebos DON'T work against disease!

Derren Brown did a TV special on the placebo effect. The show's second part was pretty much the final word on why religion is bunk, and why people still believe in it anyway.

vaccination is against god's will they think (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692165)

presumably when they get their leg run over by a hummer that is also god's will, and as they lie in the road screaming in agony and people offer to call an ambulance and take them to a hospital where the medical care available due to years of advances brought about by scientific understanding (not to mention the invention of cellphones and the internal combustion engine) will remedy it in a routine manner and alleviate the pain will reject the offer as what has happened to them is clearly "gods will".

Similar to the outbreaks of Whooping Cough in BC (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 8 months ago | (#44692233)

This is fairly similar to the outbreaks of Whooping Cough in WA, ID, OR, and BC, all of which are highly correlated to "parents" who resist immunization on fanatical religious grounds.

Seriously, if you're concerned about mercury in shots, there are alternate versions of distribution of vaccines, but not getting shots spreads disease and ends up killing kids.

Prominent figure reversing her incorrect opinion?? (5, Interesting)

bdwebb (985489) | about 8 months ago | (#44692297)

This is the part that is shocking about this to me:

Terri Pearsons, a senior pastor of Eagle Mountain International said she has had concerns about possible ties between early childhood vaccines and autism. In the wake of the measles outbreak, however, Pearsons has urged followers to get vaccinated and the church has held several vaccination clinics.

I respect the hell out of the fact that she actually went against her own original beliefs and recommendations and, in the wake of the outbreak she reversed her opinion no matter the fact that it may have made her look 'stupid'. High five to Terri Pearsons for doing the right thing.

These fucking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44692299)

idiots. Imagine you have an infant that can't get vaccines yet and one of these either religious nuts or those homeopathy gobbling new age turds infect your child because they're simply stupid.

I think you should be able to sue. It's reckless endangerment and while I couldn't give less fucks if every single one of them dies I do care about children that haven't yet decided to abandon all forms of logic. Really, stupid people should just take the quick route and jump off a cliff

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...