Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Tor Usage More Than Doubles In August

timothy posted about a year ago | from the gee-fellas-I-wonder-why dept.

Privacy 186

hypnosec writes that the Tor network has witnessed a massive rise in the number of users connecting to it for the month of August. "The privacy-enhancing network is known for providing an anonymous browsing experience through the use of a series of encrypted relays, and has had as many as 500k users throughout this year so far. But if we check the latest statistics available through Tor Metrics Portal there has been a whopping 100 percent increase in the number of Tor clients and as many as 1,200,000 users are connecting to the network. The previous peak for the network was in January 2012, when it saw as many as 950,000 users."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

So is this because... (4, Interesting)

barlevg (2111272) | about a year ago | (#44706157)

(a) Awareness of NSA surveillance has caused people to seek out TOR, or

(b) Increased awareness of TOR, thanks to the coverage of NSA surveillance, has caused people to try to evade said surveillance?

..or (0)

edxwelch (600979) | about a year ago | (#44706189)

Re:..or (2)

barlevg (2111272) | about a year ago | (#44706199)

...which has suddenly exploded in popularity over the past month?

Re:..or (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706445)

...which has suddenly exploded in popularity over the past month?

The increased media coverage of the NSA has also lent itself to increased mention of personal security and anonymity, and the tools one may employ to protect against invasion of your data. When Tor is mentioned, Silk Road follows.

An interview in a popular magazine with the man running Silk Road surely increased traffic, as well,

http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/08/14/meet-the-dread-pirate-roberts-the-man-behind-booming-black-market-drug-website-silk-road/ [forbes.com]

Re:..or (1)

andreMA (643885) | about a year ago | (#44707081)

I doubt that Silk Road is a significant factor in increased Tor usage, but if it is Bitcoin being in the news recently (and the attendent running in circles like chicken little by law enforcement) might be a factor..

Re:..or (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706213)

(d) some entity (NSA or otherwise) is trying to compromise the network by owning a majority of nodes

Re:..or (1, Offtopic)

holmedog (1130941) | about a year ago | (#44706493)

My lack of mod points is disgusting right now. Have a free comment and my well wishes.

Re:..or (5, Funny)

TooTechy (191509) | about a year ago | (#44706603)

The NSA removed your mod points for security reasons

Re:..or (1)

bartosek (250249) | about a year ago | (#44706733)

No it was the TSA that confiscated them. The NSA just downloaded everything from your phone while it was passing through the X-ray machine

Re:..or (5, Interesting)

Smask (665604) | about a year ago | (#44706705)

(e) botnets that use TOR for command and control stuff.

Re:..or (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706711)

Nodes =/= Users

Why would the NSA want to increase the noise across any nodes they already run?

Re:..or (1)

larry bagina (561269) | about a year ago | (#44706985)

(e) you and 5 moderators have no idea what you're talking about.

Re:..or (1)

CreatureComfort (741652) | about a year ago | (#44707113)

The NSA already owns a majority of the nodes...

Re:So is this because... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706207)

Either way, it's a bunch of people saying "fuck you" to the NSA.

The NSA can eat shit ... and so can the USA and their "spy on the world" bullshit.

You want to understand why the rest of the world is starting to lose patience for America? The NSA and their spying is a pretty good example -- self entitled assholes who think their wishes trump everything else.

The rest of us have no interest in giving up our rights for your benefit. Just because you guys are giving up all of yours doesn't mean we need to, or should continue to respect you.

Re:So is this because... (5, Interesting)

Noxal (816780) | about a year ago | (#44706267)

I'm a US citizen that's strongly opposed to all of this bullshit. I've lost my own patience for my government.
What should people like me do to show people like you that we're just as fed up as you are, if not more? Protest? Rebel? Sign some pledge? Comment on Slashdot?
What more do you want to see from the people of the United States?

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706329)

Run for Congress if you think you can do a better job.

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706793)

Run for Congress if you think you can do a better job.

I'll get right on that. Please provide me with a few hundred million dollars to fund my campaign. Oh yeah, those are gonna need to be no strings attached dollars so that I'm not bought and paid for like 99.8% of the people who are currently in congress.

I may as well be up front about some things as well. I fucked a lot of whores and the police have a fairly large file on me due to my past associations with people who are somewhat heavily involved in the drug trade. If I'm up front about that stuff, it'll make it harder to blackmail me about it down the road.

Re:So is this because... (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about a year ago | (#44707003)

> I'll get right on that. Please provide me with a few hundred million dollars to fund my campaign. Oh
> yeah, those are gonna need to be no strings attached dollars so that I'm not bought and paid for like
> 99.8% of the people who are currently in congress.

Will need more than that too. Most are bought and paid for by the parties who broker the money.

If you don't get on your knees for party money, and of course, agree to tow their line, then they will work against you, both of them. They don't like being cut out of election deals.... afterall... everybody likes to get his beak wet right?

Re:So is this because... (1)

dcollins117 (1267462) | about a year ago | (#44707075)

Sounds like you'll fit right in.

Re:So is this because... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706509)

Just tell your opinion to anyone who asks you, like you have done with this post. Some widespread protest would be nice, but to be fair it doesn't seem to happen in other countries either.

Oh, and by the way, if you go abroad please just ignore those morons who troll Americans in real life and on the Net with Anti-American opinions, trying to drag them into 'political' discussions (or just assuming that every American loves baseball). I know how annoying they can be but they are really just a loud minority and most of the time don't know what they are talk about.

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706587)

Just tell your opinion to anyone who asks you, like you have done with this post. Some widespread protest would be nice, but to be fair it doesn't seem to happen in other countries either.

This, I do cheerfully. It's pretty easy these days to convince even non techies of the need for privacy. I send them to eff.org as a start then over to torproject.org (posting anon due to my mod status)

Re:So is this because... (5, Insightful)

N0Man74 (1620447) | about a year ago | (#44707025)

Just tell your opinion to anyone who asks you, like you have done with this post. Some widespread protest would be nice, but to be fair it doesn't seem to happen in other countries either.

This, I do cheerfully. It's pretty easy these days to convince even non techies of the need for privacy. I send them to eff.org as a start then over to torproject.org

(posting anon due to my mod status)

I've been telling my opinion on things such as this for years, and most people have just always looked at me as extremist, paranoid, or unpatriotic when I point out government overstep on constitutional freedoms of its citizens...

Maybe the climate is changing so that people will be more susceptible to opinions, but the truth is that the average person can't be convinced that anything is true unless the talking heads tell them its true too.

Re:So is this because... (2)

Seumas (6865) | about a year ago | (#44707513)

People have been concerned with privacy for decades, but suddenly reddit children got ahold of it this year and now it is suddenly hip to give a fuck... and worse, they think they're the first people to ever discover the concept of privacy and give a shit about it.

Anyway, I say most of us are probably at least halfway toward death. Maybe a lot closer for others of us. Enjoy the ride, read some good books and have a few parties. Let the shitty little snots enjoy the fucked up dystopia they and their parents have created for themselves, when we're gone.

TL;DR: After a life time of giving them, I am all out of shits to give.

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706557)

4th box. [wikipedia.org]

Re:So is this because... (3, Interesting)

somersault (912633) | about a year ago | (#44706585)

Protest, yes. Regular protests, everywhere, until something is actually done. I don't understand why a bigger deal wasn't made of the Patriot act. I'm not even that into politics, but that one was very obviously a no-no, fancypants Constitution or not.

Re:So is this because... (1)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | about a year ago | (#44707207)

Did you write your representatives? I know there were lots of people who wanted something done but did anyone other than me bother writing or calling their representatives. I wrote mine but Mark Kennedy, Wellstone, and Dayton all voted for it.

Re:So is this because... (5, Insightful)

Digital Vomit (891734) | about a year ago | (#44706607)

If the entirety of human history is any indicator, the governed won't see any changes in a situation like this until they're willing to use lethal force against those who govern them.

When enough of the key positions of political and economic power in a society are filled with sociopaths, the only way you can stop them is to kill them. You can't vote a replacement or try to replace them by running for office yourself because they have the power to corrupt the voting process and to filter out those who attempt to run for office who pose any real challenge to their own power. You can't stop them with protests because they have the force the police to crush any serious protests and they have the force of the media to destroy the message of such protests. The only thing that works when corruption gets really, really bad is lethal force by the governed.

So, unless you're willing to take up arms against your fellow man, you'll just have to bend down and take it. We all know this is true, and we all try to dance around this fact because we like to think we're civilized and above the use of violence, but the fact of the matter is that a small portion of the population is extremely selfish and has no compunction against using violence against you. When enough of these sorts of people get into the place where they have most of the money, power, and weapons, they *will* use those things against everyone else in order to retain their position.

Yes, violence sucks. Yes, it's bad. Yes, we should avoid it if at all possible. But there comes a point when that's all you can do, and that's when the sociopaths hold *all* the cards. How far off do we all think that is? There comes a time when violence is necessary because there are evil, selfish people in the world.

To quote one of The Founding Fathers of the USA, "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

So, to answer your question of "What more do you want to see from the people of the United States?", here's an answer that will work: gather together a million like-minded, armed citizens and take the White House and Capitol Hill. Depose all the corrupt leaders by killing or imprisoning them and seizing all their assets. It won't be pretty, and you'll probably end up splitting the US into smaller nation-states, and you'll likely have to do it all again in a few generations, but it's the only way to keep the boot of the government from stepping on the face of humanity forever.

But, good luck with all that, because I hear Miley Cyrus is twerking again or something.

Re:So is this because... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706731)

If the entirety of human history is any indicator, the governed won't see any changes in a situation like this until they're willing to use lethal force against those who govern them.

East Germany. Czechoslovakia (twice, if you consider the disolution of the union of the countries). Poland.

Only read the first line, but... (1, Insightful)

jopsen (885607) | about a year ago | (#44706963)

If the entirety of human history is any indicator, the governed won't see any changes in a situation like this until they're willing to use lethal force against those who govern them.

Let's take at the history of nonviolent resistance: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonviolent_resistance [wikipedia.org]

In fact, if you look at, it looks as if through the entirety of human history non-violent resistance is really in these days :)
(In fact, never before in the history of mankind have you as an individual ever been more empowered than now).

Re:Only read the first line, but... (4, Insightful)

geek (5680) | about a year ago | (#44707099)

If the entirety of human history is any indicator, the governed won't see any changes in a situation like this until they're willing to use lethal force against those who govern them.

Let's take at the history of nonviolent resistance: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonviolent_resistance [wikipedia.org]

In fact, if you look at, it looks as if through the entirety of human history non-violent resistance is really in these days :)

(In fact, never before in the history of mankind have you as an individual ever been more empowered than now).

Tell that to Syrians, Iranians, North Koreans, Yemen etc etc. Hell, tell it to Russian homosexuals

Re:Only read the first line, but... (0)

cyber-vandal (148830) | about a year ago | (#44707169)

Violent resistance isn't working too well for the Syrians either.

Re:Only read the first line, but... (2)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | about a year ago | (#44707277)

That wasn't the argument. The argument was "no change has ever happened without lethal force". You're arguing "because non-violent change has sometimes not born fruit, violence always has to be used to bring about change." The actual argument is "non-violent change has been quite successful quite frequently. Here's how. It's cheaper than violence. Try it." Pay attention.

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706983)

If the entirety of human history is any indicator, the governed won't see any changes in a situation like this until they're willing to use lethal force against those who govern them.

I am sorry, but I stopped reading there because I know your statement is false. Check Gene Sharp [wikipedia.org] and his work. For an introduction, watch the documentary How to Start a Revolution [wikipedia.org]

Re:So is this because... (0)

N0Man74 (1620447) | about a year ago | (#44707051)

And that's exactly why people like Ghandi and MLK were such dismal failures, they weren't willing to use force.

Re:So is this because... (4, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#44707089)

Yes, violence sucks. Yes, it's bad. Yes, we should avoid it if at all possible. But there comes a point when that's all you can do, and that's when the sociopaths hold *all* the cards. How far off do we all think that is? There comes a time when violence is necessary because there are evil, selfish people in the world.

The only reason that time is not now is that there aren't enough like minded people to join the revolutionary army. If you look at the Declaration of Independence, most of those grievances are trifling next to what we read about in the news every day. The crimes committed by the thugs that call themselves our government more than justify revolution today. All we need are people willing to lay down their lives for freedom. Unfortunately, as you note, more people care about their bread and circuses than they do freedom and justice.

Re:So is this because... (2)

Seumas (6865) | about a year ago | (#44707563)

Good luck with all that, fellas.

How many missiles, jet fighters, tanks, machine guns, infantry, medics, apaches, and nukes do you have for all this "standing up to tyranny" stuff? Don't get me wrong, I understand that the intention of the founding fathers was to provide the means for people to defend themselves - as a people - against the inevitable tyranny of governments . . . but in our modern world with our modern military, it's a little unrealistic even if you had 100% of the citizens involved, don't you think?

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44707131)

How 'bout I just join the sociopaths? Sounds easier and faster, and better for myself in the long run, anyway.

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44707561)

If that's your line of thinking, you already have.

Re:So is this because... (1, Insightful)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | about a year ago | (#44707231)

God damn you're a fucking idiot. There's plenty of change that happened in the last 50 years that didn't involve violence - groundbreaking, fundamental change that tossed out the current power structure in its entirety. The most significant examples are probably South Africa and India. If you can't name the people involved, you have no standing in this discussion.

Furthermore, there are purely logical, sociological and philosophical problems with your approach.
Off the top of my head:
Logical: the entire point of a democracy is the non-violent change in government. You completely missed the point of democracy if you think change can only come through violence.
Sociological and economical: The cost to society of a civil war is huge. You can see it in the Middle East, you can see it in our own civil war, you can see it throughout history. Compared to that, the option of just slowly working to change the system to work more like you imagined is a fucking panacea.
Philosophical: the founding fathers fought a bloody war to give you the ability to change political systems through non-violence. They also made it quite hard to do it. Now you're proposing that all stuff was just fairies pissing in the wind, and we're going back to the middle ages.

but it's the only way to keep the boot of the government from stepping on the face of humanity forever.

What are you, 15? Anytime 3 or more people get together, you'll get a form of government. Heck, 5 year olds in the sand pit form ad-hoc governments with one kid in charge and bossing every one around. The only way to keep the boot of government from stepping on your face is to set up rules so that it's not supposed. Everything else is just some Pioneer/Rambo fantasy.

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706659)

What more do you want to see from the people of the United States?

How about waking the fuck up ...

How about voting the right people in ...

How about not making bribery LEGAL ...

Or my personal favorite ... stop taking it up the ass, turn Homer Simpson from being the sterotypical American icon the rest of the world labels you as, you sad pieces of shit, and show your Gov who's who and what's what.... actually no .. forget about it, we can't ask the underevovled to stretch beyond its sad pertetic nature .. We, the rest of the world are content with watching you cannibalise yourselfs into irrelevance. Cya!

Re:So is this because... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706689)

What more do you want to see from the people of the United States?

You need to convince either your lawmakers or your citizenry than this isn't acceptable. You need to remind them that "border checks" can't be 100+ miles from a border. You need to remind them that "secure in her person and papers" has no realistic reason to be restricted to things which are paper and in filing cabinets. You need to explain to them that a free society isn't spied on constantly by its government. You need to learn that American corporate interests don't trump national laws or interests. You also need to stop telling the rest of the world what they should do while you're doing the exact same things.

America needs to get back to being a champion of freedom, instead of a bunch of scared idiots saying "yes sir" to everything your government does that goes against your Constitution.

In the last decade or so, America has yielded to the fascisti, and are apparently too uninformed to know it. And since America is now exporting this to the rest of the world, it's now becoming our problem.

Re:So is this because... (5, Insightful)

magical liopleurodon (1213826) | about a year ago | (#44706701)

I'm a US citizen that has lost patience with the American people. Anonymous Coward is exactly right. Where were the riots over this? The outrage just wasn't there. But then there are riots all over the U.S. over the Trayvon Martin verdict. Stupidest fucking thing I've ever seen. And the media trying to make this a white vs black thing, even though George Zimmerman is hispanic. Zimmerman should probably go in the witness protection program and change his identity......and there you have it right there. The U.S. government really *is* a reflection of the American people. The American people do not respect rights and due process. So neither does the government. The American people are uninformed on The Constitution, so, like the American people, the government ignores it too.

What do I want to see from the people of the United States? idk, it seems like a lost cause. How many are even aware of the NSA spying? Do they care? They probably care more about Miley Cyrus 'twerking'.

A minority of Americans have woken up (Libertarians/Ron Paul crowd -- which is growing). Will it be enough to change the direction of the country? I hope so. Julian Assange is right about libertarianism being America's last hope.

Re:So is this because... (4, Insightful)

Stuarticus (1205322) | about a year ago | (#44707085)

And the media trying to make this a white vs black thing

More one of those murderers vs minors things.

Re:So is this because... (2)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year ago | (#44707457)

The weird thing is, it hasn't seemed to affect Obama's popularity at all (see here for one example of a daily tracking poll [rasmussenreports.com] ). I can understand not protesting, since it's tough work, but how can people brush it off so easily? Is it possible that the only people who are upset about NSA tracking are people who didn't like Obama anyway?

Re:So is this because... (2)

Seumas (6865) | about a year ago | (#44707603)

Our last couple generations have been raised in an educational and society system that coddles us and makes us obedient to authority. We aren't independent, we aren't taught critical thinking skills, and we not only accept that our government is overstepping these bounds, but *expect* that they should be doing *more* . . . so they can "provide" more for us and "protect" us more.

So, why aren't more people pissed off and doing something about it? Because they don't think anything is wrong.

What have you done? (1)

jopsen (885607) | about a year ago | (#44706907)

I'm a US citizen that's strongly opposed to all of this bullshit. I've lost my own patience for my government. What should people like me do to show people like you that we're just as fed up as you are, if not more?

Anything really, just do something, please...
But may I ask, if you have:
- Donated to the EFF?
- Signed all applicable petitions? (optin.stopwatching.us, perhaps? and more...)
- Written a personal letter to your representatives?

Those things are the least you can do... as a concerned citizen it is probably you moral duty to do so...
These things don't really cost you anything, nor does it cost you anything to get your friends and family to do the same.

Many will tell you that these things don't change much, that is however not an excuse to skip them!
In fact writing you representatives is not something many people do, and doing does likely make a difference, even if they don't reply.

That said these things was just the least you could do. Next digging through a congressman's trash to find well trash, just kidding :)
But I'm sure there's lots of opportunities to volunteer and spend more than 5min stopping the crimes your country is committing... It's a worthy course.

Re:So is this because... (2)

fl!ptop (902193) | about a year ago | (#44707121)

What should people like me do to show people like you that we're just as fed up as you are, if not more?

Vote. Talk to your neighbors. Get involved. Volunteer. Organize. Protest at your local county courthouse.

"The price of freedom is eternal vigilance." - Thomas Jefferson

Re:So is this because... (2)

dtotheatothevtothee (2758181) | about a year ago | (#44707127)

I'm a US citizen that's strongly opposed to all of this bullshit. I've lost my own patience for my government. What should people like me do to show people like you that we're just as fed up as you are, if not more? Protest? Rebel? Sign some pledge? Comment on Slashdot?

Buy more ammo!

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44707367)

Run a Tor relay. And please stop voting for democrats and republicans.

Re:So is this because... (3, Interesting)

Sloppy (14984) | about a year ago | (#44707405)

I'm a US citizen that's strongly opposed to all of this bullshit. I've lost my own patience for my government.
What should people like me do to show people like you that we're just as fed up as you are, if not more?

Fuck it. It's not true, but if it helps, think of it like this: the president ordered the NSA to order Snowden to "leak" what they've been up to, as a sort of Public Service Announcement to America and the rest of the world, to make us think about privacy issues.

Your own federal government is just one of a hundred potential adversaries. The fact that they intercept network traffic is not merely a statement from your government that they have malicious intent. It's also a proof-of-concept that there are technical problems with the network; that parties with malicious intent are able to do damage. And that means that even if your government didn't have malicious intent, you would still have the problem and adversaries would still be spying on you.

You can't solve that second half of the problem by running for Congress or persuading your government to become benevolent. You solve it by working on key exchange. That is what everyone needs, because we have had some great tech for decades now, but there's some kind of difficulty that is keeping people from using it. Solve it, for everyone from grandma to teenager, and you're the hero of the century.

If you want to work on the civics problem in parallel with the technical+techsocial problems, ok. But don't for a moment ever lie to yourself and think it will make one iota of difference as to how much privacy anyone has. The AC you replied to, doesn't get it. The US government isn't his real problem either; he just thinks it is. He hopes his bitching will shame one of the adversaries on his hundred-long list, to shape up and behave civilized, leaving him with a mere 99 to go. That is a doomed strategy.

Re:So is this because... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706677)

All wishful thinking aside, it could also be a new botnet that communicates over Tor.

Best and easiest free privacy, it's called Tails! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706759)

I'm posting this from Tor.

Actually, I'm using a specialized Linux distribution with Tor built in for all communications. It's called Tails. Tails.boum.org to download it. Just burn the disc, and all communications through the live cd are sent through the Tor Network. It's probably the best thing going right now for privacy.

Tails.boum.org. It's seriously very easy and natural to just fire it up sometimes. Try, you might love having some privacy in your internet usage sometimes like I do. Go get it!

Re:Best and easiest free privacy, it's called Tail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706855)

And how do we know this distro wasn't created by the NSA?

Re: Best and easiest free privacy, it's called Tai (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706987)

Have you audited EVERY line of code in Tails? No? And you trust it wholeheartedly because it's branded as 'secure'?

Unless you're on some random persons Internet connection, you aren't secure or anonymous.

Re:So is this because... (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about a year ago | (#44707297)

(a) Awareness of NSA surveillance has caused people to seek out TOR, or

(b) Increased awareness of TOR, thanks to the coverage of NSA surveillance, has caused people to try to evade said surveillance?

Probably both.

And probably a field day for the NSA as well because well, it's so easy to pick up on TOR traffic if you're an exit node. (Especially since most "dumb" people use it so the traffic being sent out the node would have tons of identifying stuff on it).

Hell, the NSA probably runs quite a few monitored exit nodes themselves just for that purpose. (Wasn't it somewhere that said the US government had some of the large numbers of exit nodes?).

Reasons for the increase? (1)

King_TJ (85913) | about a year ago | (#44707299)

I'd say that one significant factor is the easy to install and use Tor Browser bundle with FIrefox.

Not all that long ago, setting up Tor was kind of laborious. Now, you can do it as easily as you install any other new piece of software.

And to be honest, I wasn't even keeping up with it enough to realize they'd put something like that out, until I read the recent news article revealing the govt. was finding out the source IP addresses of some Tor users thanks to a security vulnerability in the older version of Firefox the browser bundle was based on. (A problem since corrected.)

Impressive... (2)

wbr1 (2538558) | about a year ago | (#44706167)

Especially since freedom hosting and tormail are gone.

Maybe a percentage of that was FBI agents infiltrating The Silk Road?

re: SIlk Road (4, Insightful)

King_TJ (85913) | about a year ago | (#44707369)

Speaking of SIlk Road -- have you ever actually looked around that site at any length?

After ignoring it for the longest time, I finally created an account there and took a good look at it, just to satisfy my curiosity.

What surprised me the most about it was the LACK of anything really exciting up there for sale! I mean, when you read the news hype and all the supposed angst from politicians and law enforcement over its existence, you expect the place to be a hotbed of sex slavery, child porn, virus/malware dealers, email spammers, and what-not.

In reality, I saw a fair number of people simply offering to exchange your bitcoin for US currency or bars of silver, a few people selling used electronics gear, and a lot of offers to sell information on how to supposedly do such things as hacking an ATM machine (reminds me of the old "G-Files" people passed around the local BBS's in the late 80's except those were free!).

Sure, there were some people offering to sell you pharmaceuticals and even small amounts of drugs like cocaine, but that's one category out of dozens - and there wasn't even a dramatic number of ads posted for them.

Mountain out of a molehill, all in all.

New Motto Needed (1, Funny)

Digital Vomit (891734) | about a year ago | (#44706175)

Tor: It's Not Just For Pedophiles Anymore!

Re:New Motto Needed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706393)

So, Tor suffers the same kind of propanda as the MAFIAA spreads on torrents? Never peeled that kind of onion so have no basis to judge, but the comment reminds me of governent and MAFIAA propaganda. Or is that part of the humor? I really should drink more coffee.

In need of more relays (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706179)

This in fact means that the Tor network is in need of more relays and exit nodes. If you have access to a server that meets the requirements, you could consider it.

Re:In need of more relays (2)

Goaway (82658) | about a year ago | (#44706217)

I'm sure the NSA will be happy to provide some.

People need to remember that if you access the regular internet through Tor, and don't very carefully make sure to encrypt everything, you are actually opening yourself up to more spying.

Re:In need of more relays (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year ago | (#44706343)

Explained [eff.org] , with pictures.

Re:In need of more relays (1)

trevc (1471197) | about a year ago | (#44707059)

So you don't think the NSA knows how to do man-in-the-middle https attacks? So naive. There is no where to hide.

Re:In need of more relays (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year ago | (#44707123)

For sites they can have a certificate for, yes, they may. But they can't have certificates for all the sites in the world.

Re:In need of more relays (1)

budcub (92165) | about a year ago | (#44707547)

Its not just NSA that you're hiding from, its your ISP and others. Who knows, maybe 5-10 years from now when you go to apply for a job, besides the drug screening, credit check, social media background check, they'll want to examine your internet usage to make sure you're not doing something your employer doesn't approve of.

Re:In need of more relays (1)

Seumas (6865) | about a year ago | (#44707631)

Not a chance in hell. There have been incidents of people being held accountable for operating a Tor node. I believe they've also been held responsible for the data on/transferred through them. If not in the US, then certainly other countries, which means there's no reason it would not happen here.

More Tor usage is good (5, Informative)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year ago | (#44706181)

More Tor exit nodes is better. The NSA surely has many honeypot nodes, we need to drown them out with more legitimate exit nodes.

Re:More Tor usage is good (5, Informative)

blueg3 (192743) | about a year ago | (#44706407)

While more Tor exit nodes is better, all use of Tor should be done assuming that the exit node is controlled by a hostile party. A lot of the exit nodes are controlled by people much more unpleasant than the NSA.

Note that exit nodes are the weak link in Tor. Your traffic through them is not encrypted by Tor, so you must use SSL. They are, by design, a man in the middle, so you must be prepared for MitM attacks.

Re:More Tor usage is good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706835)

A lot of the exit nodes are controlled by people much more unpleasant than the NSA

What could logically be a greater threat than a group which is not only (1) more heavily armed than anyone on the planet, but (2) has the legal "right" to employ physical force against others?

Re:More Tor usage is good (1)

mlw4428 (1029576) | about a year ago | (#44707055)

While not greater, are you assuming that not having a "legal right" to kill deters killers? Have you checked out the Mexican cartels lately? As for being heavily armed, the cartels are known for having quite a few nice weapons of their own. You don't need a tank or a fighter jet to cause a lot of damage.

Re:More Tor usage is good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44707591)

You're thinking on the wrong scale.

Let's look at the two parties motivation:

NSA, secrectly monitor your traffic for illegal/suspecious behaviour

Cyber-criminals, compromise you bank account/credit card and take your money.

As a populace you probably have more to worry about from NSA than cyber-criminals.

As a person you have more to worry about from cyber-criminals than the NSA. Which was the OP's

Re:More Tor usage is good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44707019)

While more Tor exit nodes is better, all use of Tor should be done assuming that the exit node is controlled by a hostile party. A lot of the exit nodes are controlled by people much more unpleasant than the NSA.

Exactly. That's why I use Ned's Secure Access - a VPN service sold to me by some nice gentlemen in dark suits and sunglasses. I was leery at first, thinking they were Mormons, but they were very knowledgeable and very persuasive. Much better than those pricks at Flowers By Irene.

Re:More Tor usage is good (1)

joe_frisch (1366229) | about a year ago | (#44706859)

Trying to out-spend the NSA on setting up nodes is not likely to work.

  I think the only safe assumption is that the NSA or other government organizations has access to any data transmitted through a commonly-used system. A real expert in security and encryption might be able to determine that a particular system is safe, but as a random user you can't necessarily trust any statements made by "experts" because those experts could be NSA plants.

I don't think you can use technology to stop government spying, you need to change the LAWS.

Re:More Tor usage is good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44707033)

I don't think you can use technology to stop government spying, you need to change the LAWS.

HA, ha, ha! That's rich... 'cause they're obviously not already breaking existing laws and lying about it.

"Tor, summarized for mortals" (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706187)

Re:"Tor, summarized for mortals" (1)

Slagothor (1156549) | about a year ago | (#44706681)

Sorry I'm out of karma, but +5 Insightful. Thank you.

Not surprising.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706193)

The NSA are the ones that have pushed people to use TOR.

Re:Not surprising.. (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year ago | (#44706293)

The NSA are the ones that have pushed people to use TOR.

... and, don't forget, provides most of the exit nodes.

Re: Not surprising.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706519)

Exactly!

Seems the NSA decided to double down on the Tor network since the cat is out of the bag. Quite logical that people would flock to it given the circumstances, thinking the NSA can't handle the extra load. The irony here, is that I'm betting the NSA was waiting for this to happen.

Oh! Did they fire 90% of their sysadmins yet?

Re: Not surprising.. (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year ago | (#44706599)

Exactly!

Seems the NSA decided to double down on the Tor network since the cat is out of the bag.

Not that [eff.org] smart, I might even be grateful to them for the extra bandwitdh (still keeping in mind other elements may still make part of the communication trackable: DNS queries, cookies and what not).

Isn't this what a TOR attack looks like? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706227)

Isn't Tor unsecure if some adversary controls a large fraction of the network?

Re:Isn't this what a TOR attack looks like? (1)

stewsters (1406737) | about a year ago | (#44706529)

Or can monitor every connection and retain the data indefinitely, even from US Citizens without a warrant.

Anyhows (4, Interesting)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#44706241)

> "there has been a whopping 100 percent increase in the number of Tor clients

Half of them in those new, billion-dollar data centers, no doubt. Maybe they can't crack the traffic yet, but they could get relatively accurate dynamic topologies, and use their other, non-Tor nodes, also judiciously placed around in Internet backbones, to learn connections to individual computers.

Tor will be the one goverments attacked first. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706295)

Trying to stop Tor will be the next stage on the war on terror / porn / insert-what-ever-you-need-to-not-argue.

Tor, now 98.2% run by secret services (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706311)

Following the NSA's example, other nations secret services are now rapidly deploying their own Tor honeypots.

Re:Tor, now 98.2% run by secret services (1)

pellik (193063) | about a year ago | (#44706559)

Unless they are sending all of their data to the NSA this is good for Tor.

hedging (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706359)

Mozilla may probably incorporate Tor

I think the reporter is going out on too much of a limb. Let's just say that Mozilla might possibly contemplate considering thinking about perhaps incorporating Tor.

That's a lot of child porn. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706433)

wow, pedophile activity is skyrocketing.

Thanks obama.

New Breaking Bad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706481)

Could it be that torrent sites like the Pirate Bay are increasingly blocked around the world (including where I live in the UK) and people are using Tor to circumvent these restrictions?

All the new TOR users are spineless pussies. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706577)

During the US involvement in Viet Nam hundreds of thousands of people
engaged in protests. And that is exactly what needs to happen now.

But the sad truth is that most Americans are spineless idiots. The odds are
heavily in favor of the show going on as it is now, and there is nothing you
basement-dwelling nerds can do about it. Tough shit, pussies.

Oh yeah (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706683)

Thank you very much for paint a target on your forehead people, keep it up!

FBI Agent

Great, that's how it's supposed to be. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706741)

It's precisely how the Internet has to evolve. Default anonymity.

Now someone puts this at the heart of the IP protocol.

Locallink addresses keep local and plain text or single layer TLS.

Everything that goes in or out gets Tor-ified. No escape, no exception.

Welcome to our new crypto clusterfuck overlord, game over NSA and friends.

Pirate bay (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706849)

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/13/08/10/1519211/the-pirate-bay-launches-browser-to-evade-isp-blockades

That's why.

Liability of exit nodes (4, Interesting)

garry_g (106621) | about a year ago | (#44706975)

The increased usage increases the problem of bad throughput ... haven't used it in a while, but when I played around with it a bit, latency (which would be expected) but more importantly throughput was bad to unbearable ... more users require more performance at the exit nodes, which means more exit nodes are needed ...
Having run an exit node for a short while myself, I know of the results: within less than 4 weeks, we received an inquiry into the owner/operator of the machine with the node's IP address, due to reported child porn access. Luckily, the police seemed to be halfway knowledgeable, and with the provided infos on the operation of the node (stats about the node throughput, etc.) they stopped investigating the issue. Needless to say node operation was terminated the day we received the initial inquiry. Without decent "provider status protection" for exit nodes, the risk for operators may be a bit too high unless extensive (and expensive) measures are taken to block illegal material ... which, in turn, makes the whole network subject to other manipulation, and goes against the reason for the network ...

But is there more traffic? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44706995)

So it appears there are more people using Tor. If the amount of traffic hasn't changed, than it's most likely a botnet. Does anyone know if the amount of traffic has spiked in correlation with the amount of "people" using Tor?

Encryption + VPN + Tor is not anonymous (5, Interesting)

WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) | about a year ago | (#44707149)

Tor is great to stop your neighbor from spying on your people-dressed-as-cows porn fetish, since it's trivial for someone who lives close to you to sniff your packets (a fact confirmed to me by my ISP btw). SO it's great for privacy from nosy ./ curious / thrill seeking neighbors or defending yourself against common cyber criminals. If you're hoping to position yourself AS a criminal using Tor, for-gheeda-bow-tit.

Just saying this so no one makes the youthful mistake of thinking they can, for instance, order molly from the silkroad and never have that fact traced back to them. Criminals are going to do what they do and Tor isn't going to protect them and that's between those people and law enforcement. What we don't want is young people whose brains and judgement aren't fully developed yet , but whose taste for adventure is, being caught in the meat-grinder of an incarceration-for-profit system complete with mandatory minimum sentences because they were severely misled on technical matters.

Do you know what the cost of owning (statistically , virtually) ALL of the exit nodes and most of the intermediate nodes of Tor is? It's effectively zero to the collective financial and technical resources of the "five eyes", that's what it is.

Oh but WoofyGoofy I use a VPN and encrypt everything !!!! And therefore what do you think follows? When you also own both ends of the connections and every major ISP etc etc How hard is it to attach unique identifying packets to your packets as they pass back into the network and then track them through it? Or a little Bayesian analysis based on just the time and size of your packets? Tor is based on the idea that most nodes are not pwned. That assumption is almost certainly false. Remember this also- law enforcement only needs a subpoena for your online activities and email if it's recent- 18 months. When the information you generated is older than that- and Google et.al. keep it FOR-EVAH-AH - that's forever to the phonically challenged- law enforcement can look at it without even so much as a warrant- just ask and ye shall receive, and yes, that includes the CONTENT of your emails etc. Look it up.

There are a lot of dangers to the total information awareness that's been set up. The one people focus in on is J Edgar Hoover style political repression.

Another one is that we're creating a generation of people who get caught for *absolutely* *every* transgression. Call them "generation busted".

People didn't evolve to be either perfectly compliant nor perfectly spied on all the time, everywhere and and norms of society didn't evolve with that as a fact either. Young people whose judgment is not in effect are a potential gold mine for people who make money off things like parole and incarceration and they will push to increase their revenue flow just like any other corporation would.

After all, who do you THINK lobbied for mandatory minimum sentencing? Who do you think pushes for three strike laws for what are basically non-violent offenders- stealing pizza, shit like that? This is a real danger.

I know one friend's son who is constantly in trouble with the law over shit like smoking ladies soap bubbles and petty shoplifting and such shit. Basically, it's like watching a lamb being fed to the wolves piece by piece. Soon enough he'll have enough of a record that they'll lock him up, making him permanently unemployable and then wait for him to commit a robbery or suchlike. It's sickening. The kid has severe mental health issues, probably was born that way and should be on some form of permanent public assistance. There exist people like that. It's cheaper than locking him up. Let him smoke dope, watch TV play games and just exist in whatever way makes sense to him. People are born who are just like this for reasons we don't understand, it's not anyone's fault, least of all his.

Just as bad is kids who are transgressive as a kind of experimentation, like, oh I don't know our coke snorting (he admits to it) President. Go to a hotel room with the couple of strippers standing before you ? Sounds great! Guess what happens once you're there.... busted ! This is a noose that just too tight.

Then there's the defense of the power positions of the financial and political elites. This would look like helping LockheedMartin spy on their competitors so they get some contract so they remain healthy because US intelligence knows them, works with them and they're considered a part of "national security". Then it extends to any employee who makes real trouble for Lockheed Martin, or a start up that threatens their position etc etc. You see where this goes. I am just using Lockheed Martin as a completely random example. I have no knowledge of any of their activities related to this hypothetical.

Just about anything can be construed as necessary to national security, nothing more so than the system itself- "the way we do things around here".

The potential for suppression of political change ala the Hoover report which read : "Martin Luther King is the single biggest negro threat to the nation" .. is virtually unlimited. It doesn't help that this was followed by his assassination allegedly by a low IQ guy who recanted his confession 3 days later. Knowing what we know about the ability of law enforcement in the South in the 1960s and the just general ability to get someone to confess to things they never did, it's not hard to imagine we don't know the real story.

These are the dangers or TIA. You should not think that using Tor will help you or anyone escape them. The only fix is legislative.

In order to effect legislative change, you have to address the real , legit and vital function surveillance plays in keeping the 11th century headcases from killing everyone, which is just that they will do if they get the chance. You can't just blink that part of reality away. Doomsday apocalyptic terrorism - it's a problem and in the extreme it's the worst problem we have by far. You can see why they would legitimately want to know potentially everything. I would, so would you if it was your job.

I am not saying I have a solution but an absolute motherfucking firewall between terrorism cases and ANYTHING ANYTHING else no matter how destructive seems like a good place to start, because there is a real qualitative difference between very bad guys who do very bad things and terrorists who want to destroy civilization itself and in the balance hangs the functioning of civil society.

Why, no drug dealing is not a form of terrorism nor are common murder plots, the activities of the mafia, kiddie porn, gun running, money laundering and all the other stuff we naturally abhor. I am not defending any of those things and anyone who uses this post to suggest otherwise needs to construct a plywood platform whose dimensions are equal in feet in each direction to the number of letters in this post, then shove it up their ass, no matter the time, money manpower or effort to do so required. That is not optional.

Use JAP for private browsing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44707209)

Use JAP. Developed in Germany, a country with strict privacy laws.

How Ironic (1)

organgtool (966989) | about a year ago | (#44707617)

As many people have already stated, this is likely due to the revelation of the depth of NSA spying. The irony lies in the fact that the X-KEYSCORE software that the NSA uses to determine which traffic to log specifically targets Tor traffic. Therefore, these people are probably drawing more attention to themselves by using Tor than by not using it. That wouldn't necessarily be a bad thing if Tor guaranteed anonymity but based on the articles I've been reading lately, it seems like people with sufficient resources can defeat Tor's methods of anonymization.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?