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Raspberry Pi, Smart Highways Win World's Biggest Design Prize

Soulskill posted about 8 months ago | from the i-would-play-quake-on-both dept.

Transportation 91

An anonymous reader writes "Last night the €500,000 INDEX: Award was awarded to five designs that can improve life for millions of people around the world. The winners include high-tech highways that light up at night, the $25 Raspberry Pi computer, a simple piece of paper that can cut food waste by extending the life of fresh produce by 2-4 weeks, and a plan for adapting to climate change."

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91 comments

Futile Fads (1, Troll)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | about 8 months ago | (#44716789)

The fact is that imperialism, the highest and last stage of capitalism, is in irreversable decay. Capitalism long ago hit its limit and dstopped being a progressive motor for technology and culture. Now it destroys much more than it builds and threatens all of humanity with world war and ecological crisis. The only way out was shown by the Bolsheviks in 1917: a world workers Soviet republic!

Re:Futile Fads (-1, Offtopic)

Bodhammer (559311) | about 8 months ago | (#44717049)

Wrong - Communism is a death cult that has kept millions of people in misery. http://www.scottmanning.com/content/communist-body-count/ [scottmanning.com] , http://www.hawaii.edu/powerkills/NOTE1.HTM [hawaii.edu]

WRONG (1)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | about 8 months ago | (#44717115)

Communism saved the world from Nazi fascism, and workers revolution in the U.S. will save the world from bloody U.S. imperialism!

WARNING (1)

jmhobrien (2750125) | about 8 months ago | (#44717211)

Don't get baited by this troll.

Re:WARNING (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717767)

Don't reply to the troll, just let the moderation system do its work, and most people won't even see his posts.

Posting anonymously to avoid drawing any more attention, but please mod down.

Re:Futile Fads (1, Offtopic)

gstoddart (321705) | about 8 months ago | (#44717273)

Wrong - Communism is a death cult that has kept millions of people in misery.

Strangely enough, so is Capitalism.

Re:Futile Fads (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44718121)

socialist economic strategies and capitalist economic strategies are both forms of "man's dominion over man" take either to extremes and they become evil,and eventually equivalent. The difference between a 100% company owned town without government restriction and a 100% government owned town without private employment is just the name of the owner, not the nature of the system, at least to those at the bottom.

Re:Futile Fads (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 8 months ago | (#44717413)

...imperialism, the highest and last stage of capitalism, is in irreversable decay.

It's so rotten, one might rightly say imperialism is already with one foot into the grave.
The silver lining: communism is one step ahead of imperialism.

Cut food waste or...? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 8 months ago | (#44716871)

Cut food waste by extending the life of fresh produce or... drive up the demand for cooled storage devices?

Re:Cut food waste or...? (2)

Skapare (16644) | about 8 months ago | (#44716885)

The latter will do better to benefit the one percenters.

Re:Cut food waste or...? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 8 months ago | (#44716925)

The world wide 1% yes. The US 1% no.
World Wide the 1% makes over $33,000

Re:Cut food waste or...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717179)

People that make $33,000 can't afford refrigerators? His 1% seems to fit fairly well.

Re:Cut food waste or...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44718193)

Damn, I'm in the 99% even measured against the whole planet :-P

Re:Cut food waste or...? (3, Informative)

jellomizer (103300) | about 8 months ago | (#44716917)

Refrigeration doesn't do much with produce. Other than keeping it cold.
I usually keep my fruit un-refrigerated. It tastes better and lasts just as long.

Re:Cut food waste or...? (2)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 8 months ago | (#44717159)

Refrigeration doesn't do much with produce. Other than keeping it cold.
I usually keep my fruit un-refrigerated. It tastes better and lasts just as long.

Refrigeration provides a controlled clean environment; the temperature doesn't have much to do with it for many foods, but the sealed space keeps out insects etc. and the humidity control is an added bonus.

THIS is something that could be extremely beneficial to most of the world, especially areas near the equator.

Re:Cut food waste or...? (4, Interesting)

c0lo (1497653) | about 8 months ago | (#44717649)

Refrigeration doesn't do much with produce. Other than keeping it cold.

Ummm... reduces lost of water by evaporation (juicier for longer time).
Slows down the ripening process... when if comes to shelf life, the supermarkets will count as a loss a too high quantity of ripen fruits that need to be sold in a short time (at a lower price). Because ripe fruits can be damaged not only by bacteria/fungi but also by... hold on... their own weight (have you tasted a peach ripen on the tree until juicy, fragrant and so soft you can take a bite from it with you lips? You won't be able to ever buy it from the supermarket).

I usually keep my fruit un-refrigerated. It tastes better and lasts just as long.

From which I deduce you eat all your fruit mostly within 2 weeks of purchase. The fruit wholesalers may keep it for 2 years in cold storage though (and still have the audacity to sell it to you as fresh).

Re:Cut food waste or...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44719035)

and still have the audacity to sell it to you as fresh

outrageous! audacity is allready v2.0.3. Plus it is free software.

btw, I suspect those fruit wholesalers are funded from high up. heard rumours that they are selling those fruits in bulk to people who make loops with them inside a studio.

Re:Cut food waste or...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44722453)

From which I deduce you eat all your fruit mostly within 2 weeks of purchase.

2 weeks ?! Are you serious? Who doesn't?

We eat most of our fruit within about 3 days of purchase. But we have numerous good markets (and farmers markets) within easy walking and biking distance. I realize that not all readers are so fortunate.

Re:Cut food waste or...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44718151)

cooling slows the rate chemical reactions reducing the of growth of micro-organisms as well as over ripening etc... so fruit will not rot nearly as fast in if cooled and the hotter the climate the more of an issue this is.

Re:Cut food waste or...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44716953)

If it helps against the fungi and the like then it would benefit even in the case of the latter

Re:Cut food waste or...? (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about 8 months ago | (#44716969)

You can't go demanding that other people don't have the basic food safety you do.

Well, I mean, you can, but it's tantamount to killing those people.

Re:Cut food waste or...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717285)

You can't go demanding that other people don't have the basic food safety you do.

Well, I mean, you can, but it's tantamount to killing those people.

No, it isn't. At worst, it is tantamount to demanding that those people are killed.

Unless you are in a position of power, just demanding something doesn't make it happen.

Re:Cut food waste or...? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 8 months ago | (#44717993)

You can't go demanding that other people don't have the basic food safety you do.

I only implied (not said explicitelly) that the supermarkets and produce wholesellers will need larger cool spaces for keeping the produce for longer (as spoilage at the buyers side will be lower, the demand of fresh produce will lower as well)

Will this push them to sell the excess of US produce in Ethiopia or Somalia? Given the transport costs, somehow I doubt it; and, if I'm right, food unsafety for the other people will continue without me demanding it

Finally... no, I'm not saying the fenugreen paper is bad. I'm just saying that it will do very little to guarantee the food security of those that are in need for it in today.
Saying otherwise it's like saying "eat all your greens, sweetie, people in India will be starving if you don't"

How can the Pi win this award when there are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44716955)

...so many other, so much better ARM SoC devices? Just look at the ODROID selection, the MK808/908 selection, the CubieBoard etc.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717007)

i bet some dullard will reply to this quoting the $25/$35 price tag of the pi, claiming that the price is the most important and striking attribute of it. and for that schmuck i'd like to point out that there are other arm socs priced just the same (or a measly dollar higher) that are still so much more than the overhyped pi.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717113)

And yet, you didn't provide names of any that match the Pi's price.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 8 months ago | (#44717127)

i bet some dullard will reply to this quoting the $25/$35 price tag of the pi, claiming that the price is the most important and striking attribute of it. and for that schmuck i'd like to point out that there are other arm socs priced just the same (or a measly dollar higher) that are still so much more than the overhyped pi.

I think you have explained it right there. No matter how good or bad your product is, it is nothing without hype. All people care about today is hype.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717909)

All people care about today and also every single day before that is hype.

Fixed. What, you thought people were somehow more rational in some past golden age?

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (5, Informative)

jmhobrien (2750125) | about 8 months ago | (#44717349)

From the above list:
ODROID - $90
CubieBoard - $90
MK908 - $65
RPi - $30

How dare people vote with their dollars.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 8 months ago | (#44719037)

i bet some dullard will reply to this quoting the $25/$35 price tag of the pi, claiming that the price is the most important and striking attribute of it. and for that schmuck i'd like to point out that there are other arm socs priced just the same (or a measly dollar higher) that are still so much more than the overhyped pi.

Are there any with a warranty of more than four weeks that you can actually mention by name?

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717101)

Ummm maybe because only techie hipsters have heard of any of those? Raspberry Pi is a viable platform that people can easily get a hold of, has a growing community (developers, tutorials, etc), and is affordable.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44718001)

And exactly who buys the Pi? Non-techie non-hipsters? Fat chance. Just look at the nature of the responses OP got and you see who stands in the Pi crowd.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44718511)

And exactly who buys the Pi? Non-techie non-hipsters?

Not necessarily, the complement of "techie AND hipster" is "not techie OR not hipster", so (in addition to non-techie non-hipsters, because that's an inclusive OR) there could be techie non-hipsters as well as non-techie hipsters buying the Pi.

Although I don't expect many non-techie hipsters buying them except to be ironic.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44721751)

> And exactly who buys the Pi? Non-techie non-hipsters?

If you read that as "schools" and "teachers," then yes.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717107)

I've never heard of these other devices but am quite familiar with the Pi. An honest question: What makes these devices better?

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (2)

AJodock (1901718) | about 8 months ago | (#44717351)

The Pi is an ARMv6 with a FPU attached, and a decent GPU. Most of the new ARM SBCs out there now are ARMv7 which should be more efficient. Often they have NEON support to help with hardware decoding media http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARM_architecture#Advanced_SIMD_.28NEON.29 [wikipedia.org].

Also Debian and Ubuntu only have official builds for ARMv7. The Debian team rebuilds ARMv6 as a seperate distro (Raspbian) for the Pi.

Many of the other boards are well within $10 of the price of a Pi, but include eMMC flash on the board so no SD card is required to boot the OS making the TCO about the same or cheaper if you are buying fast SD cards to boot quickly on the Pi.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3310907/what-are-the-advantages-of-armv7-over-armv6-when-compiling-iphone-apps [stackoverflow.com]

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (3, Informative)

ebenupton (2424660) | about 8 months ago | (#44717691)

A couple of points to bear in mind:

- You can now buy a Model B Pi bundled with a fast 8GB SD card for $40 from both our primary distributors.
- Most other cheap boards use the Cortex A8 core, which is rather a primitive implementation of the ARMv7 ISA. In particular, while it's great at memcpy() and reasonable at integer operations, it has rather poor floating point performance; for a floating-point performance comparison of ARM11+VFP, Cortex A8 and the (more modern and capable) Cortex A9, see:

https://www.riscosopen.org/forum/forums/5/topics/466?page=7 [riscosopen.org]

In other news, the FreshPaper guys are amazing. Definitely the stars of the show here in Copenhagen.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (1)

rephlex (96882) | about 8 months ago | (#44722739)

Eben, why were you terminated as a director of the Raspberry Pi Foundation?

http://opencorporates.com/filings/180901240 [opencorporates.com]

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (1)

ebenupton (2424660) | about 8 months ago | (#44723293)

I resigned as a Foundation trustee in December, though I continue to run the Foundation on a day-to-day basis. I am also managing director of the Foundation's wholly-owned trading subsidiary, Raspberry Pi (Trading) Ltd, which handles the engineering work associated with the Pi.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (1)

rephlex (96882) | about 8 months ago | (#44727993)

Thanks for replying, but you didn't answer my question. I want to know why you are no longer a Raspberry Pi Foundation trustee. Why did you resign?

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (2)

ebenupton (2424660) | about 8 months ago | (#44729461)

Replying on the (probably optimistic) assumption that you're actually interested.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation is a somewhat unusual charity, in that it derives the bulk of its funding from trading activities rather than through "shake the tin" fundraising. In this respect we resemble charities which run high-street retail businesses to supplement their charitable income. Once you reach a certain size, it is considered good practice to separate trading activities into another, generally wholly-owned, business entity, and to have substantially non-overlapping board membership between the charity and the trading entity. I resigned in order to reduce the overlap to a single person, Jack Lang, who chairs the boards of both entities; we subsequently added Louis Glass to the Foundation board, restoring it to the original complement of six people.

More detail in our public filings at Companies House (http://www.companieshouse.gov.uk/).

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (1)

rephlex (96882) | about 8 months ago | (#44735969)

If I wasn't interested I wouldn't have asked the question. I'm definitely not the only person who is curious about this situation.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 8 months ago | (#44719057)

The Pi's CPU is a dog, mostly because there's only one of them. But the GPU seems fairly credible and XBMC actually runs properly on it. That's a lot of people's use case in particular, so IMO that's the killer app for people not using the GPIO. libsf is still sketchy on Mali...

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44732225)

> The Pi's CPU is a dog, mostly because there's only one of them.

Is there a comparable multicore mobile CPU that doesn't cost more than the entire Pi...?

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717187)

Because two of those three devices only run Android, and are therefore "better" in the same sense that my phone is better than my laptop.

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (5, Informative)

The-Ixian (168184) | about 8 months ago | (#44717703)

FTFA

  1. The ability to provide kids with a tool that can help them understand computer coding and the ability to distribute computer power widely for very little money: In our globalized world, many of us are illiterates to a language, which increasingly characterizes our world and our choices. That language is computer encoding and this illiteracy means that few of us are actually able to understand, let alone write the programs that – everyday – decide what we buy online, who we are friends with on Facebook, and what answers we are offered when we are Googling. Raspberry Pi is a part of the solution of this serious illiteracy.
  2. The low price of Raspberry Pi ensures that creativity and play can be added to children and young people’s use of computers and programming. Raspberry Pi is awarded as a market leader with a very open approach to sharing, which actively encourages other companies to clone what they’re doing

I think it has as much, or more, to do with the culture surrounding the Raspberry Pi foundation as it does with the price point.
 
This is good work these people are doing and it is about making a difference (hence the whole point of the award).

Re:How can the Pi win this award when there are... (1)

Lincolnshire Poacher (1205798) | about 8 months ago | (#44722433)

I think it has as much, or more, to do with the culture surrounding the Raspberry Pi foundation as it does with the price point.

Perhaps when the Raspberry Pi Foundation has an Education Strategy I'll be more supportive of such awards. Until then, talk of helping youngsters learn to program is twaddle.

The new school term is about to start and still no 'Education Packs' available, or even planned. They're happy enough to sit back and take the dollars from people running HTPCs instead.

Let's see what the last update was. April 2012:

The Foundation is currently scrambling to gets its education pack ready by the time units are ready for the classroom.

Uh-huh.

Fresh stuff (1, Funny)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 8 months ago | (#44716957)

> [FreshPaper extends] the life of fresh produce by 2-4 weeks

"Well, kids. I'm back with our month supply of Brussels sprouts, asparagus, and celery. Where's the FreshPaper? I can't find it."

(Kids get an evil look on their faces and stare away.)

Re:Fresh stuff (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 8 months ago | (#44717247)

LOL, I must have been the only kid who looked forward to when the Brussels sprouts came out of the garden. :-P

Still my all time favorite vegetable, and I'm a vegetarian, so that's saying something.

Re:Fresh stuff (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 8 months ago | (#44722559)

LOL, I must have been the only kid who looked forward to when the Brussels sprouts came out of the garden. :-P

Still my all time favorite vegetable, and I'm a vegetarian, so that's saying something.

The odd thing about Brussels Sprouts is that I can eat one, and it tastes good, the second, so-so, and beyond that I can't stand them.

OTOH, I can eat asparagus until the smell of my pee gets the neighbors to call to report a sewer line break somewhere.

A question of cost. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717041)

Will the "FreshPaper" cost the same as replacing spoiled produce or less? If not then I only see this being a niche product for those who are already trying to be more environmentally conscious. The only reference to price in the article is the use of the phrase "low-cost", which is ambiguous at best.

Re:A question of cost. (2)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 8 months ago | (#44717155)

Well considering people do not have the opportunity to go to a market or store every day, it might be worth the time, fuel and energy saved. Not to mention that people might buy and eat more vegetables, knowing they would be able to use them all.

Re:A question of cost. (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 8 months ago | (#44717189)

Will the "FreshPaper" cost the same as replacing spoiled produce or less? If not then I only see this being a niche product for those who are already trying to be more environmentally conscious. The only reference to price in the article is the use of the phrase "low-cost", which is ambiguous at best.

Well, if it's reasonable in bulk, I can see this being a significant waste saver -- not at the consumer level, but at the grocery store level. Stores toss HUGE quantities of produce because of spoilage. If they can keep them fresh longer, that means more profit for them, better produce for the consumer, and (hopefully) lower prices.

Re:A question of cost. (1)

Qwertie (797303) | about 8 months ago | (#44717455)

It says here [fenugreen.com] that 40 sheets cost $25 (62 cents). At that price, I don't think folks that can't afford refrigeration will be eager to buy it.

I was curious how it can keep food fresh without actually touching the food, so I looked at their web site [fenugreen.com]. Here's what it says under "How it works":
  • Take out one sheet of FreshPaper
  • Toss in fridge drawer or anywhere you keep produce (fruit bowl, carton, bag)
  • Enjoy fresh produce for 2-4 times longer!

Thanks for nothing, web site! Well, their FAQ says this:

How does FreshPaper work?
FreshPaper is infused with organic spices that inhibit bacterial & fungal growth, as well as enzymes that cause over-ripening. FreshPaper is a safe, remarkably effective, organic solution to spoilage.

Re:A question of cost. (2)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 8 months ago | (#44717803)

Reposting from an AC further down (it all sounds a bit snake-oil to me, too):

Consumer Reports covered Fresh Paper a few months back, and from their testing, determined an air-tight container performed better.

https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2013/06/claim-check-fenugreen-freshpaper/index.htm [consumerreports.org] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDR20j0aTUY [youtube.com]

Re:A question of cost. (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 8 months ago | (#44719681)

You really shoudn't repost things from people who can't comprehend what they're posting.

Re:A question of cost. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44719933)

What part of "Reusable airtight containers seem like a better way to save the world." is hard to comprehend?

Re:A question of cost. (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 8 months ago | (#44720275)

If you have an issue with what appears to be a perfectly sound and simple scientific experiment with a clear conclusion, why don't you post about that instead of content-less ad hominems?

And, to quote another AC who you presumably think has no idea what they're talking about:

What part of "Reusable airtight containers seem like a better way to save the world." is hard to comprehend?

Re:A question of cost. (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 8 months ago | (#44720399)

Why are you people so dumb? Did you read/listen to the links? Are you really saying the experiment was sound and didn't correct for a major confounding factor? Do you not realize that you cannot extrapolate from the quote you posted that 'air tight performed better'.?

How is someting that takes a non-renewable resource to produce a plastic non-biodegradable container better for the planet than a piece of paper soaked in ground up fenugreek seeds? What is wrong with your thinking and comprehension skills?

Re:A question of cost. (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 8 months ago | (#44720557)

How is someting that takes a non-renewable resource to produce a plastic non-biodegradable container better for the planet than a piece of paper soaked in ground up fenugreek seeds?

Possibly because, for the very reason that it is non-biodegradable, that plastic container will last you a decade or more.

How do the resources required to make and deliver one plastic container weigh up against the resources required to keep someone in the middle of a third-world country in Freshpaper - which doesn't keep things as fresh as an airtight container does - for 10 years?

What is wrong with your thinking and comprehension skills?

What's wrong with your ability to disagree constructively without descending to insults?

Highways that lit up at night ? (2)

dargaud (518470) | about 8 months ago | (#44717131)

Great, more light pollution for astronomers.

Re:Highways that lit up at night ? (2)

RavenLrD20k (311488) | about 8 months ago | (#44717903)

If you looked at the concept art, you'd see that the lights are physically low level aimed directly across the road in front of a traveling vehicle. As the vehicle moves, the lights would "move" in sequence of illumination. No vehicle, no light. This would actually reduce the amount of light pollution over technologies currently in use. It would also reduce the amount of energy required by lighting systems.

Re:Highways that lit up at night ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44718975)

Most highways around where I live don't have ANY lighting. So yes, this would add to light pollution and energy consumption even if it's LED based. Even if the light is pointed downward, there will be light pollution from scattering. And no, it's not going to be minimal either. The concept pics shows 1 car, so you get the impression that the light will be mainly off. Although this is sometimes the case, most of the time the lights will be mainly off with moderate to heavy traffic. And if the system is quick enough so it turns off quickly after a car passes, it will also turn on quickly when the next car passes within seconds. Depending on the implementation, the flashing lights could be worse than Vegas.

Re:Highways that lit up at night ? (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 8 months ago | (#44719699)

Right, because turning off all the lights unless somebody passes causes more light pollution than having all the lights on???

Re:Highways that lit up at night ? (1)

houghi (78078) | about 8 months ago | (#44723409)

No, actually LESS, because instead of having the lights on all the time, like they do now, it would mean they are on only when a car drives by.

about high-tech highways that light up at night... (4, Funny)

Gravis Zero (934156) | about 8 months ago | (#44717137)

from TFA:

If the road could talk to you, what would it say?

i'm guessing it would be something like, "OWW! OWW! GET OFF ME! IT HURTS!"

Re:about high-tech highways that light up at night (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 8 months ago | (#44717407)

"If the road could talk to you, what would it say?"

i'm guessing it would be something like, "OWW! OWW! GET OFF ME! IT HURTS!"

Bah, it's a road, so if you anthropomorphize it, it's saying "oooh, yeah, a little to the left".

Re:about high-tech highways that light up at night (1)

KalvinB (205500) | about 8 months ago | (#44717719)

Why not just put the images in the street lamps and use a simple motor to select the image appropriate for the conditions?

Re:about high-tech highways that light up at night (2)

RavenLrD20k (311488) | about 8 months ago | (#44717945)

Greater probability of mechanical failure, whereas Glow in the dark temperature reactive paint may just need a very rare periodic repaint, just as the normal road paints require that are in use today.

Re:about high-tech highways that light up at night (1)

gweilo8888 (921799) | about 8 months ago | (#44720933)

Have you looked at a road lately? Even though the markings are mostly not in the vehicles' tire tracks, they paint becomes worn very quickly indeed. We put up with it for paint because it's a radically different color to the background, so even heavily-faded paint is easy to see. Paint emitting a relatively dim glow is not going to be so easy to see, and it is going to need much more frequent repainting. Not to mention that the markings will have to cover a much larger proportion of the road to have any real utility, making the volume of paint required significantly higher.

We already have enough difficulty and expense maintaining the world's roads. Making them even more expensive and difficult to maintain is an idiotic idea, done largely in the name of being pseudo-futuristic. For the most part, you don't pay direct attention to the road surface when driving anyway, except when slowing for junctions. You focus most of your attention further down the road, or at least you are driving properly and anticipating problems. The correct answer isn't nonsensical painted snowflakes shimmering on the road. It is easily-maintained, automated road signs that would very quickly pay for themselves in a reduced failure rate and far-less-frequent maintenance.

You know, the same thing as the messaging gantries we have over many large roads now, although a far smaller scale is needed on most roads.

But that's not sexy and futuristic, so it doesn't win awards. Idiotic rubbish like this does.

Re:about high-tech highways that light up at night (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 8 months ago | (#44719711)

Images? Motor? um, simple transparent lcd would be more efficient.

Re:about high-tech highways that light up at night (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44737491)

You prefer 50% light absorption in the polarizer film? From a 300W light source?

2-4x longer, not weeks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717145)

2-4x longer doesn't necessarily translate to 2-4 weeks longer as the article mentions.

And the fifth? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717153)

OK, so five designs won the award. You listed four of them. Now how hard would it have been to also add the fifth? It's not as if the summary was extraordinarily long anyway.

day-glo paint on asphalt? (1)

turkeydance (1266624) | about 8 months ago | (#44717263)

won't that make the road slicker, like logos on basketball courts? for the entire length of a high-speed highway, that's dangerous.

nothing seems real (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717271)

The veggie paper doesn't have any test data. The lighted up highways is just speculating. Nothing real, nothing proven. These are winners? I'd hate to see the losers

Fresh Paper (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717359)

Consumer Reports covered Fresh Paper a few months back, and from their testing, determined an air-tight container performed better.

https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2013/06/claim-check-fenugreen-freshpaper/index.htm [consumerreports.org]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDR20j0aTUY [youtube.com]

Re:Fresh Paper (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 8 months ago | (#44719719)

No, no they didn't.

Re:Fresh Paper (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44720219)

Yes, yes they did.

"Bottom line. Reusable airtight containers seem like a better way to save the world. FreshPaper helped in only one of our scenarios: Used with strawberries stored in their original containers and placed in the fridge, it staved off mold for at least two weeks, by which point those without FreshPaper had grown fuzzy. The countertop strawberries were quickly fuzzy whether they had FreshPaper or not; the airtight-container fruits were inedible (though mold-free) either way after three weeks."

The airtight containers were not tested at room temperature. They were refrigerated both with and without the paper. In the airtight containers (in the fridge), fruits performed the same with or without the paper.

In summary, the only benefit of the paper is if you want to keep your produce in its original container and spend nearly $1 to preserve it one week less than storing it a reusable airtight container with or without the paper.

Re:Fresh Paper (1)

Daetrin (576516) | about 8 months ago | (#44720035)

From the linked article: "Bottom line. Reusable airtight containers seem like a better way to save the world. FreshPaper helped in only one of our scenarios: Used with strawberries stored in their original containers and placed in the fridge, it staved off mold for at least two weeks, by which point those without FreshPaper had grown fuzzy. The countertop strawberries were quickly fuzzy whether they had FreshPaper or not; the airtight-container fruits were inedible (though mold-free) either way after three weeks."

Okay, i'm confused. It sounds like the FreshPaper is definitely not performing as well as advertised (shocker) but isn't complete snake oil.

However i'm not getting how a result of "inedible (though mold-free)" fruit is a win for air-tight containers. If the fruit is inedible (thought it would have been nice if they'd specified in what manner) then i don't really care if it has mold on it or not.

Re:Fresh Paper (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44720305)

Check out the youtube video from Consumer Reports, it seems to explain it all with a little more detail.

Personally, I simply freeze my fruit after a week. Works great for smoothies.

Re:Fresh Paper (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44720881)

However i'm not getting how a result of "inedible (though mold-free)" fruit is a win for air-tight containers.

The win was the "three weeks" part.

mod do3n (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#44717369)

the bootoms butt irc network. The You don't need to Sling, return it to

Raspberry Pi is just a breakout board (1)

Animats (122034) | about 8 months ago | (#44718545)

The Broadcom BCM283 system on a chip is impressive, cramming all that capability into one cheap part. So is the Allwinner, which is similar, costs $7, and is the basis of tablets that cost $40. The Raspberry Pi is just a breakout board with a crappy connector layout. There are lots of other ARM boards, most with better layouts.

Re:Raspberry Pi is just a breakout board (1)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | about 8 months ago | (#44718953)

You are overlooking the community that has grown up around the Raspberry PI. There are a huge number of people using these boards. The couple of times I have needed an answer to a question I have jumped on their forum, and had an answer in a flash.
Happily, their forum seems to be completely free of the infamous RTFM attitude people so frequently complain about in other Linux forums.
Some of the other boards may be better, but I would bet none have as many people using them.
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