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Official: Microsoft To Acquire Nokia Devices and Services Business

Unknown Lamer posted about a year ago | from the totally-didn't-see-that-one-coming dept.

Microsoft 535

Many submitted, and symbolset emailed me to wake up, sending this bit of interesting news out of Redmond: "Microsoft Corporation and Nokia Corporation today announced that the Boards of Directors for both companies have decided to enter into a transaction whereby Microsoft will purchase substantially all of Nokia's Devices & Services business, license Nokia's patents, and license and use Nokia's mapping services. Under the terms of the agreement, Microsoft will pay EUR 3.79 billion to purchase substantially all of Nokia's Devices & Services business, and EUR 1.65 billion to license Nokia's patents, for a total transaction price of EUR 5.44 billion in cash. Microsoft will draw upon its overseas cash resources to fund the transaction. The transaction is expected to close in the first quarter of 2014, subject to approval by Nokia's shareholders, regulatory approvals and other closing conditions." And, yep, Elop is part of the deal (quoting Ballmer): "Stephen Elop will be coming back to Microsoft, and he will lead an expanded Devices team, which includes all of our current Devices and Studios work and most of the teams coming over from Nokia, reporting to me."

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Beware of Microsofties bearing gifts (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743515)

A classic Trojan horse manouver pulled off in style by Steven Elop. Now he can go back to Redmond, where they'll hold a Triumph in his honor.

Re:Beware of Microsofties bearing gifts (5, Insightful)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44743541)

Before MS commits it to the memory hole... (4, Informative)

sethstorm (512897) | about a year ago | (#44743855)

As Quoted from: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/news/press/2010/sep10/09-09statement.aspx [microsoft.com] : (Archive mirror [archive.org] )

Microsoft Business Division Transition
Sept. 09, 2010
E-mail to Microsoft full-time employees from Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Steve Ballmer.

Sept. 9, 2010

I am writing to let you know that Stephen Elop has been offered and has accepted the job as CEO of Nokia and will be leaving Microsoft, effective immediately. Stephen leaves in place a strong business and technical leadership team, including Chris Capossela, Kurt DelBene, Amy Hood and Kirill Tatarinov, all of whom will report to me for the interim.

The MBD business continues to grow and thrive, with 15 percent growth in the last quarter. It has been good to see the great response to Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010, the growth of our Dynamics business and the way we have been successful in extending all our MBD products and services to the cloud. I appreciate the way that Stephen has been a good steward of the brand and business in his time here, and look forward to continuing to work with him in his new role at Nokia.

Please join me in wishing Stephen well.

Steve

Re:Beware of Microsofties bearing gifts (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743729)

so .... Microsoft has become Apple?

Re:Beware of Microsofties bearing gifts (0)

gigaherz (2653757) | about a year ago | (#44743833)

That seems to be their goal and intention. They only lack their own Steve Jobs as the brand's face.

Re:Beware of Microsofties bearing gifts (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743863)

So apart from the vision, agility, quality, execution, origination of new ideas, brand recognition, marketable "face", and retail presence, they are the new Apple.

Gotcha.

Re:Beware of Microsofties bearing gifts (5, Funny)

Rational (1990) | about a year ago | (#44743919)

Indeed. The quip about "two turkeys not making an eagle" is applicable here.

and there goes the Nokia Android (1)

stud9920 (236753) | about a year ago | (#44743531)

I was hoping Steven Elop would go to sink MS into the ground as CEO, and anticipating Nokia being free to build a nice Android phone. Guess it will never happen.

Re:and there goes the Nokia Android (1)

Urkki (668283) | about a year ago | (#44743603)

I doubt there's an agreement that Nokia will not re-enter the phone business... So this might actually make Nokia Android, or Nokia Sailfish phones a possibility in 1-2 year timeframe. It's a long shot, but one can always hope, eh?

Re:and there goes the Nokia Android (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743669)

All that left of Nokia is a shell of debt.

Re:and there goes the Nokia Android (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743711)

No. What we need is not more Android but more choice. Nokia has been the only ones that has been serious about Windows 8 Phone Series for Handsets Professional Touch Edition 2013. In a world where everyone is moving toward Android we need something to balance that, and that's where Microsoft + Nokia makes sense. We should not live in a world where Google is the only choice.

Re:and there goes the Nokia Android (5, Insightful)

Stormwatch (703920) | about a year ago | (#44743799)

If you want "more choice", Nokia had that before. It was called MeeGo, and Elop killed it.

Oh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743537)

Welcome back

Future of Nokia, future of WP (1)

Urkki (668283) | about a year ago | (#44743543)

So, Nokia will become a network infra company, with hefty cash reserves and some nice patent licensing revenue. Oh, and then there's the location business, essentially competing with Google, but... good luck with that.

But all the (remaining) Nokia fans, start to look for a new phone brand!

How many will choose Microsoft?

I have a suspicion about what happens to Windows Phone sales, everywhere except the US maybe. And low end Lumias like 520 were doing pretty good... Sad.

Re:Future of Nokia, future of WP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743703)

Nokia(Navteq?) actually has way better map data than google. Maybe they will license it to Apple now as they are no longer a direct competitor?

Re:Future of Nokia, future of WP (1)

sunspot42 (455706) | about a year ago | (#44743791)

Maybe Apple will buy the maps...

Re:Future of Nokia, future of WP (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743843)

Microsoft is buying the nav/maps too.

Re:Future of Nokia, future of WP (3, Informative)

Urkki (668283) | about a year ago | (#44743941)

Microsoft is buying the nav/maps too.

Not according to the press release [nokia.com] :

Following the transaction, Nokia plans to focus on its three established businesses, each of which is a leader in enabling mobility in its respective market segment: NSN, a leader in network infrastructure and services; HERE, a leader in mapping and location services; and Advanced Technologies, a leader in technology development and licensing.

Re:Future of Nokia, future of WP (1, Funny)

DogDude (805747) | about a year ago | (#44743911)

I have a suspicion about what happens to Windows Phone sales, everywhere except the US maybe.

Of course, you're aware of MS Phone's strong growth in all markets, right?

Re:Future of Nokia, future of WP (2)

Urkki (668283) | about a year ago | (#44743977)

I have a suspicion about what happens to Windows Phone sales, everywhere except the US maybe.

Of course, you're aware of MS Phone's strong growth in all markets, right?

MS does not (yet) make phones, so I doubt there's any growth at the moment... They just make a smartphone OS, and Nokia phones using this OS have seen some nice growth this year. On the other hand, sales of Microsoft's own tablets, with a sister OS... not so hot. So current growth of Nokia Lumia sales is not much of an indication of what will happen to future Microsoft phones, one way or another.

Re:Future of Nokia, future of WP (0)

dbIII (701233) | about a year ago | (#44743993)

I still haven't seen many apart from under dusty glass in a shop so think the "all" bit is hype and suspect it's not doing well anywhere.

Hmm... (5, Interesting)

Bogtha (906264) | about a year ago | (#44743545)

So Elop left Microsoft to head up Nokia, where he made supposedly very idiotic changes that had the effect of destroying Nokia's share price. Microsoft then buys Nokia at a fraction of the cost it would otherwise have been, and Elop returns to a prestigious role at Microsoft, where he's in with a shot at the CEO role.

That doesn't look the slightest bit dodgy at all.

Re:Hmm... (1, Insightful)

Engeekneer (1564917) | about a year ago | (#44743579)

It's just incredible. I don't even blame Microsoft that much. What the hell was the Nokia board thinking? "Oh, this guy has run our company to the ground, he seems ok! Let's give him a few more years as CEO."

Re:Hmm... (1)

oji-sama (1151023) | about a year ago | (#44743611)

'Hey, things are looking up, let's sell our brand!'

Re:Hmm... (5, Interesting)

guttentag (313541) | about a year ago | (#44743853)

What the hell was the Nokia board thinking?

The New York Times has that quote [nytimes.com] :

In a statement, Risto Siilasmaa, chairman of Nokia’s board and Nokia’s interim chief executive, said that “the deal offers future opportunities for many Nokia employees as part of a company with the strategy, financial resources and determination to succeed in the mobile space.”

In case you missed it in all that PR-talk, the Nokia board believes that Microsoft has the strategy to succeed in the mobile space, despite the fact that Microsoft's failed strategy and partnership with Nokia is what caused Nokia's failure. In other words, he's been asleep for the last three years.

A better question is "what was Microsoft thinking?" Nokia makes good hardware, but so does Microsoft. What Microsoft needs in the mobile space is a good operating system, which Nokia had until Microsoft convinced it to supplant it with Windows. Nokia's not failing because it didn't make a good phone, it's failing because it filled good hardware with Microsoft's software. Now Microsoft is buying a company allegedly for its expertise in cramming poor MS software into good hardware? It doesn't make any sense. If your head doesn't hurt yet, wait for the claims that Microsoft only bought Nokia to get Elop back to take a leaf out of Apple's playbook, buying next to get Jobs back.

A brief history of Stephen Elop:
-CIO of Boston Chicken (Boston Market) when it filed for bankruptcy protection and left that year. The company was bought by McDonald's for its real estate holdings two years later.
-CEO of Macromedia, acquired by Adobe three months after he took the job.
-Worked at Adobe for a year, resigned.
-Worked at Juniper for a year, resigned.
-Worked at Microsoft for two years
-Named CEO of Nokia three years ago this month, big contribution was throwing out in-house work and betting the company on Windows mobile, and ultimately oversees the sale of the company to Microsoft.
-Next up: Back at Microsoft, poised as the only act who could possibly top Ballmer as worst CEO ever. For the record, he doesn't throw chairs... he throws phones [youtube.com] . "I can take care of that for you right here. It's gone!" Remember those words when Windows is the next "burning platform." The problem is... Elop doesn't have anyone to sell Microsoft to...

Re:Hmm... (2)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44743927)

The problem is... Elop doesn't have anyone to sell Microsoft to...

Attachmate is where old software goes to die.

Re:Hmm... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743997)

A brief history of Stephen Elop:

-CIO of Boston Chicken (Boston Market) when it filed for bankruptcy protection and left that year. The company was bought by McDonald's for its real estate holdings two years later.

-CEO of Macromedia, acquired by Adobe three months after he took the job.

-Worked at Adobe for a year, resigned.

-Worked at Juniper for a year, resigned.

-Worked at Microsoft for two years

-Named CEO of Nokia three years ago this month, big contribution was throwing out in-house work and betting the company on Windows mobile, and ultimately oversees the sale of the company to Microsoft.

-Next up: Back at Microsoft, poised as the only act who could possibly top Ballmer as worst CEO ever. For the record, he doesn't throw chairs... he throws phones [youtube.com] . "I can take care of that for you right here. It's gone!" Remember those words when Windows is the next "burning platform." The problem is... Elop doesn't have anyone to sell Microsoft to...

So is Elop a raging idiot who runs companies into the ground out of incompetence or rather a stealthy hitman who failed his missions inside Adobe and Juniper? I'm inclined to believe the latter.

Re:Hmm... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743953)

What the hell was the Nokia board thinking?

Best guess seems to be: The largest shareholders of Nokia (the type that get people on the board) are even larger shareholders of Microsoft. Microsoft has been clearly failing (I don't mean losing money; failing to keep mindshare and deliver new things) for several years. The idea was to sacrifice Nokia's success to bolster Microsoft's. This move seems to back that up. How the hell someone would prove this I have no idea, but anyone who is employed at Nokia, has evidence of this and hasn't given it to the Finnish financial authorities should do that now.

Re:Hmm... (3, Funny)

dbIII (701233) | about a year ago | (#44743999)

What the hell was the Nokia board thinking

He's giving me this much to recommend Elop?

Re:Hmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743591)

In fact, this is such a surprise move that nobody saw it coming at all. Not ever, certainly not when he took first over at nokia.

Re:Hmm... (3, Interesting)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about a year ago | (#44743593)

One article says the share price is down 53% during his tenure, just under three years. That's damn fine work, especially in this market!

[aside: yes, we know pretty much everybody on Slashdot called this from day 1]

Re:Hmm... (5, Informative)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about a year ago | (#44743595)

So Elop left Microsoft to head up Nokia, where he made supposedly very idiotic changes that had the effect of destroying Nokia's share price. Microsoft then buys Nokia at a fraction of the cost it would otherwise have been, and Elop returns to a prestigious role at Microsoft, where he's in with a shot at the CEO role.

That doesn't look the slightest bit dodgy at all.

EMBRACE EXTEND EXTINGUISH.

Re:Hmm... (2)

Urkki (668283) | about a year ago | (#44743615)

MS did not buy Nokia, MS bouth Nokia phone business, which I think is roughly half of Nokia. Nokia shareholders will not become MS shareholders here.

Re:Hmm... (1)

quax (19371) | about a year ago | (#44743643)

It is truly odious, isn't it?

Re:Hmm... (4, Insightful)

LordLucless (582312) | about a year ago | (#44743689)

What's incredible is that I haven't seen any mention of the shareholders or board of directors attempting to sue Elop's ass off for malfeasance.

Re:Hmm... (2)

Dracos (107777) | about a year ago | (#44743697)

That was precisely the plan all along. The only surprising piece of this is that the this purchase is about a year earlier than expected. The remaining parts of Nokia, including the patent portfolio, will be snapped up by Redmond soon enough (read: after the stock value deflates more).

Re:Hmm... (1)

a_n_d_e_r_s (136412) | about a year ago | (#44743795)

The remaining parts is useless for Microsoft. So no need to buy them.

It was the devices Microsoft wanted all along.

Re:Hmm... (4, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year ago | (#44743717)

So Elop left Microsoft to head up Nokia, where he made supposedly very idiotic changes that had the effect of destroying Nokia's share price. Microsoft then buys Nokia at a fraction of the cost it would otherwise have been, and Elop returns to a prestigious role at Microsoft, where he's in with a shot at the CEO role.

If Elop becomes CEO at Microsoft, it will essentially prove the company still has absolutely no idea how to move forward in today's technological world.

And I'm perfectly okay with that.

Re:Hmm... (3, Funny)

rastos1 (601318) | about a year ago | (#44743917)

Now the next step is to return to Maemo to raise the share price back.

Indestructible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743547)

Perhaps they are looking for the Nokia 3310 indestructibility features to put on Windows.

Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (5, Interesting)

Dzimas (547818) | about a year ago | (#44743551)

Suddenly, the big money is being earned from hardware (a reversal of the PC industry, where hardware companies slugged it out for razor thin margins and software makers raked in billions). Both Google and Microsoft recently purchased established phone hardware manufacturers. While many hypothesized that they did it to compete with Apple, I think they did it to combat the threat from companies like Samsung, LG and HTC. If you look at Apple's sales figures, the reason is crystal clear: the iPhone is both their highest margin and most profitable product. There is no point in Google and Microsoft doing all the hard work to build and maintain a mobile operating system only to have companies like Samsung walk away with tens of billions of dollars in profit from premium handset sales each quarter. Google, Apple and Microsoft want to dominate the flagship handset market with a handful of must-have devices each year, forcing Korean and Taiwanese companies into the low end.

Re:Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (2)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44743627)

Nokia has been losing billions on Windows phones. Never made a dime of profit on that, even after their "platform support payments".

Re:Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (2, Insightful)

Dzimas (547818) | about a year ago | (#44743687)

Sure. Currently, only Apple and Samsung are making money in this market. Google plans to join them. And now Microsoft is moi ing the party. This wouldn't be the first time that MS has come from behind: Word utterly crushed Word Perfect to become the standard in the early 90s, Excel pushed Lotus 1-2-3 into has-been status, Internet Explorer killed Netscape as a viable company, and people were surprised when MS released the Xbox and went on to make a fortune in the console industry. Now, they're trailing in the mobile market. They have $68 billion in the bank, a solid hardware manufacturer in their back pocket. Next up? My guess is that they'll take a page out of Google's Nexus playbook (ugh, bad pun) and release surprisingly solid mid-range handsets at very good prices until things stick.

Re:Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (1)

Keruo (771880) | about a year ago | (#44743749)

a solid hardware manufacturer in their back pocket. Next up?

Well, if you look what happened with Palm deal and Windows Mobile, it's not hard to guess what happens next..

Re:Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743859)

Or the LG deal (2009). Or the Motorola deal (2003). Or the Nortel deal. Or the Verizon deal. Or the Ericsson deal. Or the Sendo deal.

Re:Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (3, Insightful)

NickFortune (613926) | about a year ago | (#44743947)

This wouldn't be the first time that MS has come from behind: Word utterly crushed Word Perfect to become the standard in the early 90s, Excel pushed Lotus 1-2-3 into has-been status, Internet Explorer killed Netscape as a viable company, and people were surprised when MS released the Xbox and went on to make a fortune in the console industry

Hmm. Of course most of those victories were achieved at least in part by leveraging MS' control of the underlying operating system. Admittedly the Xbox didn't have that advantage. That said, while the platform is certainly making money, it's still not clear that MS have recouped the massive investment they needed to brute force their way into the market.

This situation is different again. MS aren't competing against Apple, Google and Samsung. They're competing against Apple and Android. Every hardware manufacturer in the far east is eyeing Android and thinking "we could sell our phones under our own brand". So all the hardware guys that usually support are potential competitors. That's on top of Apple, Google and Samsung.

Even worse, they're pretty much tied to the windows brand for whatever phone they use. So the symbol that everyone sees when they're bored at school in computer class and the one that everyone sees when they're bored at work and wishing they were elsewhere doing something, anything else ... that's going to be the brand on the phone. All the Nokia ads I say downplayed the Windows brand as far as possible, which I think was clever of them. But I don't think MS' corporate pride will allow that.

What might save them in this market is big business. If they can get some large corporations to declare themselves as winphone shops and make everyone use the platform for all work related activities they could use that to make inroads into education and home use. But the business dudes all have iPhones or Android already and it works for them. It's going to be hard work getting them to give up those machines for windows. Especially with BYOD as an emerging trend.

If you ask me, their best hope might be to launch an Xbox phone. Xbox users tend to like the platform; load it up with plenty of free mobile games and they could build a user base pretty quickly, to say nothing of finally finding takers for their app store. But that wouldn't get them a "serious" offering so I don't think they'll do it.

Re:Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (2)

evilviper (135110) | about a year ago | (#44743731)

Yeah, it's vastly easier to acquire a company when it is failing... People have been known to sabotage a company just to drop the stock prices to the point that they can buy a controlling interest in that company, then stop the bleeding and turn things around.

Re:Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743961)

But Microsoft would never do the only thing that would turn things around for Nokia: killing Windows Phone and making devices with an OS that wasn't almost universally rejected by consumers.

Re:Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (4, Interesting)

Stormwatch (703920) | about a year ago | (#44743909)

You know what's sad? Nokia's smartphone division, back in the Symbian days, was consistently profitable. They used to sell more phones than Apple and Samsung put together. Since the move to Windows Phone, they were never profitable. Not a single semester out of the red... except that one time when they sold a building and did some scuzzy math with that.

Re:Suddenly, the money is in hardware. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743991)

.... Nokia's smartphone division, back in the Symbian days, was consistently profitable. They used to sell more phones than Apple and Samsung put together. ....

This bit of your comment is the trick. Mobile phones is a scale game. The largest producer gets the cheapest components; gets to share large fixed development costs over more phones; has more buying power for production and even gets to partially control the retail channel. Apple managed to change that by dividing the market into high end smartphones and the rest for a little while which allowed them to gain an edge; Android changes that a little bit since multiple manufacturers buy together; still the principle is sound.

The only good news with this is that this is almost certain to be an infinite money sink for Microsoft. Think about enough fail to drag the entire company down into the ditch.

Foulplay (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743553)

Hopefully some Institution will show that buyout the red card. I was obvious that Elop was destroying Nokia for a cheaper buyout by Microsoft. Some People really should go to Jail this time.

A sad day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743559)

I'm Swedish and not Finnish but this still makes me feel sad. I've owned many Nokia phones through the years. My first few phones, the iconic 3310 and and recently an N900 were Nokias. I've suspected this would happen since the post-Maemo fiasco and MS boss debacle, but this marks the definitive end of an era. Oh well... Life moves on.

Re:A sad day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743719)

I'm sure you will appreciate Windows Phone one day. Jut give it time, it really is better.

The End of Nokia (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743565)

Microsoft succeeded in its strategy to take-down and take-over a major phone rival. First plant a CEO to destroy the company and lower its shares.... wait... and take over the company. What is left of Nokia is not likely to survive as they all had synergies with the devices unit, which will be taken-over by Microsoft.

Clearly, Nokia had problems when Elop took over... but he destroyed any potential Nokia had left (think N9/MeeGo). And now he gutted the company even further and will take the devices unit with him as a rejoins the Microsoft family he was clearly so fond of. The poor must have really missed his family.

Struggling What to Say... (2)

philovivero (321158) | about a year ago | (#44743567)

...I keep trying but no matter how hard I work at it, no useful syllables are formed.

This probably encompasses the user experience of an MSNokia phone, so maybe that's apropos.

Re:Struggling What to Say... (1)

DogDude (805747) | about a year ago | (#44743923)

This probably encompasses the user experience of an MSNokia phone, so maybe that's apropos.

I can speak just fine, thanks. I'm looking forward to buying my next Nokia/Windows Phone, if that's what you were wondering.

Countdown to shareholder lawsuits (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743575)

24, 23, 21...

Re:Countdown to shareholder lawsuits (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | about a year ago | (#44743973)

If it was ever going to happen, it should have happened years ago.

New patent troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743577)

my understanding of this is that Nokia is now little more than a huge collection of patents worth supposedly truck loads of cash. Does this ring alarms for anyone else?

Re:New patent troll (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743629)

It would, if they didn't have a core business with the networks. And at least potentially with Maps.

And the circle is complete (1)

chickybrick (3033037) | about a year ago | (#44743597)

By this point Nokia was basically a Microsoft division anyway, just without the official ownership (though there was proxy ownership via Elop). This was going to happen soon or later. It's an interesting situation though - who would license Windows Phone now that it's seen as a loser in the market AND Microsoft would be competing with you?

Nokia Phones by MS = New Blackberry? (1)

Uzull (16705) | about a year ago | (#44743599)

With the strong influence Microsoft has on big corporation's IT (Exchange/Office/Outlook) it would not surprise me that within one or two we would see strongly integrated phones for those corporations. If they make some attractive, usefull and secure phones (Nokia WP are hardware wise very attractive...), Microsoft could wipe out Blackberry.

Re:Nokia Phones by MS = New Blackberry? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year ago | (#44743723)

Microsoft could wipe out Blackberry.

Yeah, that'd be quite the accomplishment.

Re:Nokia Phones by MS = New Blackberry? (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | about a year ago | (#44743985)

If they had pushed for MeeGo, they could be on par with iOS now, maybe rivaling Android even. Instead, they're left with the crumbs.

Re:Nokia Phones by MS = New Blackberry? (1)

Therad (2493316) | about a year ago | (#44743813)

Wp market share is actually bigger than blackberry at the moment. And I don't understand why MS didn't release WP7 & 8 as THE business phone instead of trying to break into the saturated consumer market. If they had done that, they could probably take a large chunk of the consumer market afterwards.

Re:Nokia Phones by MS = New Blackberry? (1)

DogDude (805747) | about a year ago | (#44743929)

. And I don't understand why MS didn't release WP7 & 8 as THE business phone instead of trying to break into the saturated consumer market. If they had done that, they could probably take a large chunk of the consumer market afterwards.

As far as I'm concerned, WP8 IS the business phone OS (that's why I use them). The Exchange and Office integration is second to none.

aaaaand..... (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about a year ago | (#44743601)

....the other she drops.

Re:aaaaand..... (3, Funny)

roc97007 (608802) | about a year ago | (#44743609)

Shoe! The other shoe drops. Yeesh.

Re:aaaaand..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743803)

No no, `she' was better.

MS will be free to dump more money into WP (5, Interesting)

whoever57 (658626) | about a year ago | (#44743605)

Microsoft has been paying Nokia $1B/year. As part of a much larger organization, it will be much easier to hide how much money Microsoft is dumping into Windows Phone, including support for marketing and selling handsets below cost.

Nokia handsets, meet XBox!

Re:MS will be free to dump more money into WP (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743745)

You break it you buy it.

Foreign purchase rules in Finland? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743617)

If this happened to a major Australian company the Australian Federal government would have a big say in approving the purchase. Does Finland have similar laws?

Re:Foreign purchase rules in Finland? (1)

Nikker (749551) | about a year ago | (#44743759)

If anything Microsoft could just leave an office or just change the name on the building. The government would just really care about employing their constituents and bringing/keeping tax money into the country.

After this (1)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about a year ago | (#44743625)

what will be left of Nokia?

Re:After this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743657)

Hmmm I have been to Nokia HQ.... to the left of it is some water..... ...about the same value as Nokia itself after Elop has run away with the heart of Nokia.

Re:After this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743811)

Not much.

Re:After this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743889)

Maps, patents and nokia-siemens networks (NSN).

We saw it coming (5, Informative)

ecloud (3022) | about a year ago | (#44743673)

I worked at Nokia from 2011-2012. Everyone was saying then that the reason for Elop (who was otherwise so useless) was to devalue Nokia enough that it would be a good deal for Microsoft. And here we are... the other shoe drops. But there will be a third shoe when he becomes CEO of Microsoft. They deserve each other.

So wait... (1)

taxtropel (637994) | about a year ago | (#44743675)

Let me get this straight...the same man, who single-handedly ended Nokia's push into open source software and at the same time drove Nokia into oblivion is coming to run Microsoft? That will work out well.

Re:So wait... (1)

frootcakeuk (638517) | about a year ago | (#44743931)

We can only hope! (shame about Nokia)

Crazy is... (1)

edelbrp (62429) | about a year ago | (#44743683)

as crazy does.

Glad they Sold Off Qt First (5, Informative)

GumphMaster (772693) | about a year ago | (#44743705)

I am certainly glad they sold off Qt first. If Microsoft got their hands on it the writing would be on the wall even in the face of pledges to KDE.

Re:Glad they Sold Off Qt First (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743867)

It wouldn't do MS any good really. The KDE Free Qt Foundation (http://www.kde.org/community/whatiskde/kdefreeqtfoundation.php) agreement basically means that the owner of Qt can't close it off. Not without triggering a BSD licensed Qt release.

Does anyone really believe... (1)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about a year ago | (#44743713)

the EU will let this happen?

I don't think so, and it does have major antitrust repercussions.

Re:Does anyone really believe... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743781)

I don't really understand the details, but I think they only applies if they operate in the same space. For example if MS already build/sold phones, this would increase their market share in the phone space. Expanding into new areas is acceptable.

Of course the line between phones and tablets and some of the services existing/aquired is a little blurry.

Inspiring... (3, Interesting)

evilviper (135110) | about a year ago | (#44743715)

How I read the open letter:

"Nokia has an identity spanning 150 years of heritage, innovation, excellence, and change. That ends today. By this evening those 150 years will be a rumor. They never happened. Think about that. Today is history. Today will be remembered. Years from now, the young will ask with wonder about this day. Today is history, and you are part of it..."

Mission Accomplished Mr. Elop (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743735)

Subject says it all.

NSA (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743797)

Microsoft will now add a NSA backdoor into every Nokia phone.

He Never Sold his House in Redmond (5, Interesting)

Mr Europe (657225) | about a year ago | (#44743815)

Do you find it peculiar the Elop never sold his house in Redmond and his family didn't move to Finland though Stephen said hey would ? Can you avoid thinking of a conspiracy ?

Re:He Never Sold his House in Redmond (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743903)

They don't. Nobody cares. It doesn't make any difference.

If Nokia wasn't already backdoored (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743817)

Well, if Nokia isn't already backdoored, it will be as soon as MS gets their bloody little hands on it.

Count on it.

Who didn't see that coming? (2)

Ecuador (740021) | about a year ago | (#44743827)

I mean, everybody and their mother could see his "moves" were suicidal, the only reason to not expect that he was destroying the company for MS to pick it up cheap was the sheer audacity of the fact...
As a side note, I finally switched to a Galaxy S3 from a Nokia N9 over half a year ago, due to the fact nobody was developing for the abandoned platform. However, in every other way (except screen size I guess) the N9 and Maemo/Meego was so superior to S3/Android that for about 2 months I was constantly on the verge of getting another N9. In retrospect, my favorite feature of the N9 was how multitasking and switching between apps worked. On Android and iOS, apart from the fact that it is much slower to switch between apps, I am never certain my apps have not exited in the background and will launch from scratch and you have to jump some serious UI hoops if you actually want to force an app to restart. N9's swipe interface was the thing closer to a full desktop - fast switching between active apps (a swipe and a tap), exiting vs minimizing app having the same UI cost (single swipe from different side) and apps not dying by themselves in the background (at least in the same usage pattern that in iOS and Android kills them).

updates? (1)

bored_engineer (951004) | about a year ago | (#44743831)

Not even the slightest hope of an update for my N810, then?

Elopcalypse Complete. (3, Insightful)

sethstorm (512897) | about a year ago | (#44743837)

Given that Microsoft all but ensured that it would be an acquisition, Elop was the person who burnt the platform.

Shame that they took over Nokia and bastardized it to be an unremarkable Windows Phone platform.

Least they could do after sending Elop there... (5, Funny)

zedrdave (1978512) | about a year ago | (#44743883)

You break it, you buy it...

Ballmer last-minute cleanup (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44743901)

I guess that's Ballmer mopping up after himself before leaving I don't know what promises he made to Elop to make him drive Nokia to the ground, but given how disastrous the whole Microsoft/Nokia partnership has been I can certainly understand Elop insisting for completion before Ballmer is out.
Ballmer's successors would certainly not have bothered.

Arrr! Corporate raiding (1)

dbIII (701233) | about a year ago | (#44743969)

Send in a boarding party, drive down the price, get a lot of expensive people to walk the plank, buy the bits you want at a reduced price.
I think it hurts enough people that there should be laws against it. What do the free market libertarians think? Should a company that relies on government protection of copyrights for it's survival be able to do such an end run around governments when it feels like it?

Planned? (1)

Racerdude (1006357) | about a year ago | (#44743981)

I would be very curious to know if that was already discussed/planned (by Microsoft) when they allowed Nokia to become a 'premium' partner for using their Windows Phone OS a few years back
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