×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Sleep Found To Replenish a Type of Brain Cell

Soulskill posted about 7 months ago | from the if-you-need-me-i'll-be-replenishing dept.

Medicine 136

New submitter wrackspurt writes "Sleep deprivation has long been thought to be prevalent in the industrialized world. A new study (abstract) explains one very good reason why at least seven hours of sleep a night is necessary. Quoting the BBC: 'Sleep ramps up the production of cells that go on to make an insulating material known as myelin which protects our brain's circuitry. ... The increase was most marked during the type of sleep that is associated with dreaming - REM or rapid eye movement sleep — and was driven by genes. In contrast, the genes involved in cell death and stress responses were turned on when the mice were forced to stay awake.'"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

136 comments

I know that I need mine (3, Funny)

ModernGeek (601932) | about 7 months ago | (#44759629)

If I don't get an ample amount of sleep at night, I am absolutely useless for any sort of skilled work.

Re:I know that I need mine (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759891)

I noticed that I need 9 hours of sleep to function, and my creativity drops if I don't get enough. Does anyone else have an above-average sleep requirement?

Another problem I have is falling asleep, which doesn't help with the 9 hour requirement at all, and melatonin is becoming less effective. Fun... Good thing I don't have to start work at 9...

Re:I know that I need mine (5, Interesting)

jellomizer (103300) | about 7 months ago | (#44759973)

1 Hour, Things after a few hours start to move funny
2 Hours, I go for an hour or so, then I doze in and out for the rest of the day
3 Hours, I go a few hours, and blink out for a few minutes every half an hour
4 Hours, I can get threw the day, but I can't do much
5 Hours, I am am at reduced functionally
6 Hours, I can function during the day, but I am tired.
7 Hours, I am fine, however I am kinda grumpy
8 Hours, No problems
9 Hours, A lot of sleep and a LOT of energy
10 Hours, Too much sleep and I am kinda groggy
11 Hours of sleep I get Grumpy again
12 Hour a sleep I wander around like a zombie I spend the day like I just woke up.

Re:I know that I need mine (5, Funny)

Antipater (2053064) | about 7 months ago | (#44759997)

4 Hours, I can get threw the day, but I can't do much
5 Hours, I am am at reduced functionally

Only got 5 hours last night, eh?

Re:I know that I need mine (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760221)

Yeah, your wife kept me up late. Hope she didn't wake you up when she came home.

Re:I know that I need mine (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44761209)

Aww c'mon, why did someone down vote this? The "your wife" jokes never get old.

Re:I know that I need mine (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760321)

4 Hours, I can get threw the day, but I can't do much

5 Hours, I am am at reduced functionally

Only got 5 hours last night, eh?

LOL! ;)

Re:I know that I need mine (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760269)

1 Hour, Things after a few hours start to move funny
2 Hours, I go for an hour or so, then I doze in and out for the rest of the day
3 Hours, I go a few hours, and blink out for a few minutes every half an hour
4 Hours, I can get threw the day, but I can't do much
5 Hours, I am am at reduced functionally
6 Hours, I can function during the day, but I am tired.
7 Hours, I am fine, however I am kinda grumpy
8 Hours, No problems
9 Hours, A lot of sleep and a LOT of energy
10 Hours, Too much sleep and I am kinda groggy
11 Hours of sleep I get Grumpy again
12 Hour a sleep I wander around like a zombie I spend the day like I just woke up.

1 bottle of beer before sleep, I don't sleep properly then wander around like a zombie I spend the day like I just woke up.
2 bottles of beer before sleep, insomnia. I get Grumpy
3 bottles of beer before sleep, restless sleep. I am kinda groggy
4 bottles of beer, I sleep and a LOT of energy
5 bottles of beer before sleep, No problems
6 bottles of beer before sleep, I am fine, however I am kinda grumpy
7 bottles of beer before sleep, I can function during the day, but I am tired.
8 bottles of beer before sleep, I am am at reduced functionally
9 bottles of beer before sleep, I can get through the day, but I can't do much
10 bottles of beer before sleep, I go a few hours, and blink out for a few minutes every half an hour
11 bottles of beer before sleep, I go for an hour or so, then I doze in and out for the rest of the day
12 bottles of beer before sleep, I get to lunchtime before I realise I have a hangover.

Re:I know that I need mine (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44761349)

How about the 2-hour/day Uberman sleep schedule [kuro5hin.org]?
Some people claim success. That schedule allows you to work two full time jobs, exercise, and even have time left over for hobbies.

Re:I know that I need mine (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44761485)

How do you sleep 1 hour? For me, it is usually just easier to skip the whole night altogether. If I go to sleep at 5 am, I'll sleep through a jet engine passing by at 6 am.

Re:I know that I need mine (5, Interesting)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 7 months ago | (#44760609)

Does anyone else have an above-average sleep requirement?

I used to think I needed more sleep than average. But once I put a little thought into my sleep patterns and methods, I learned a real lesson about it. My wife and I spent a little money on a really good mattress (OK, it wasn't so little) and really good pillows (You ought to try MyPillow). Then, on a lark I tried using an Android app on my Nexus 7 called "Sleep as Android", which tracked my movement as I slept and tried to wake me when my sleep was the shallowest. Then, it graphs out your sleep patters (when you're sleeping deeply and not moving and when you're restless or snoring or tossing and turning). Finally, when you wake up you rate how you feel on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. After the few months, I was surprised to find that when I sleep between 7:15hrs and 7:30hrs I felt best and had the best, most productive days. Occasionally, I would try to sleep 8 or more hours and I'd never feel as well or work as well.

So now, I sleep almost exactly 7:15hr to 7:30hr every night. I wake up without an alarm and fall asleep quickly and have great dreams. (the app has some "lucid dreaming" features that will play a little sound when you get into the deepest sleep state, and that got me in the habit of lucid dreaming - during which I'm almost always playing music, for some reason).

It's worth taking an informed approach to sleep instead of just assuming "I need 9 hours". We sleep such a large percentage of our lives, and most of us really don't give much thought to it.

Re:I know that I need mine (4, Insightful)

TemperedAlchemist (2045966) | about 7 months ago | (#44760943)

That's about spot on. You falling asleep quicker would account for the discrepancies, it takes most people thirty minutes to fall asleep.

When it's said that you should get eight hours of sleep per night, what's actually meant is that you should get eight hours of uninterrupted sleep in a dark, silent, and comfortable room on a consistent and precise schedule.

Naturally there's more to sleep than simply duration. A lot more, in fact.

---

I envy people like you. For some reason fate has decided to curse me to severe insomnia, and I require sleeping pills to maintain anything remotely normal.

Re:I know that I need mine (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44761295)

It's worth taking an informed approach to sleep instead of just assuming "I need 9 hours". We sleep such a large percentage of our lives, and most of us really don't give much thought to it.

So you changed multiple factors. Great. Now we have no idea what to do. Was it the better mattress or the Android app? Or was it the pillow?

You've changed too many things to gather any useful information about your sleep.

Re:I know that I need mine (2)

sporkbender (986804) | about 7 months ago | (#44760887)

I found that I am the same way, I need 8 hours, but only get 4-6 because I cannot fall asleep (I take a sleep aid and melatonin has never helped). Go to the doctor, I finally did and found it is more than stress....I have a hyperactive thyroid.

Re:I know that I need mine (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760011)

Protip: Manning the fryer at McDonalds is not skilled work.

Re:I know that I need mine (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760119)

Protip: Manning the fryer at McDonalds is not skilled work.

Its close to being skillet work though.

Re:I know that I need mine (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760023)

It's a medical fact that each hour of sleep deprivation per hour has the same effect on reaction times, coordination and cognitive thinking as drinking a pint of beer.

How many times have you read about a pile-up caused by some car or truck driver, who has been on the road for 16+ hours?

Re:I know that I need mine (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 7 months ago | (#44760037)

If I don't get an ample amount of sleep at night, I am absolutely useless for any sort of skilled work.

The tireder I gets the more me grammer suffers.

Re:I know that I need mine (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760753)

The tireder I gets the more me grammer suffers.

Well Popeye, tell Olive Oyl to stop keeping you up so late.

Re:I know that I need mine (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 7 months ago | (#44761245)

When I was a wee young coder in college I pulled an all-nighter on a coding project. Big ol' statistical engine. Somewhere around 3 AM the code took on a narrative form ... I went off to the dorm for a couple hours sleep and came back to look at it ... whaaaa??? It looked perfectly fine to an exhausted brain. Perception clearly suffers from sleep deprivation.

Re:I know that I need mine (2)

NewtonsLaw (409638) | about 7 months ago | (#44761539)

You guys are all sissies! :-)

The longest I've gone without sleep is almost 48 hours and I have to say the last few hours of that were really trippy!

I was working hard to get a big software project out the door and I have to say that I was pretty productive right up to about hour 40 -- then I started making mistakes (despite the coffee). By about the 44th hour I was decidedly paranoid so decided to walk home and have some sleep.

That walk home was so damned scary. The sun was just coming up and it felt like there were people hiding behind every lamp-post and in every shadow.

Once I did get home and fall into bed, I could not get to sleep for several hours because I was constantly getting up to check if the door was locked and to check every little noise.

It's an experience that everyone should have at least once (so they can understand it) but hell, I'd never do it again.

When I was younger I could pull the occasional overnight coding session (24hrs straight) and recover with just 4-5 hours of sleep but these days (I'm 60 now), even missing an hour's sleep makes me feel crappy the following day.

What's always annoyed me most about sleep deprivation is that you feel crappy -- right up until the mid/late evening of the next day when it's time to go to bed. Suddenly, the feelings of fatigue subside and you're tempted to stay up even later than you did the night before. They say most people's circadian cycle is closer to 25 hours than 24 hours and in my case I know that is true.

I was once working in an isolated location (more productive coding that way) and simply went to bed when tired -- got up when I awoke. Sure enough, my sleep period slowly drifted around -- getting about an hour later every day until over the period of nearly a month, I was right back where I started.

Sleep is interesting stuff -- it's just a shame I'm never awake when it happens :-)

I think its safe to say (-1, Redundant)

i kan reed (749298) | about 7 months ago | (#44759661)

We have enough studies telling you not to do this particular thing where you feel like complete and utter crap if you do.

Can we research how a lack of oxygen makes your brain stop working too? That'd be nice.

Re:I think its safe to say (5, Interesting)

gstoddart (321705) | about 7 months ago | (#44759777)

Well, it's one thing to say lack of sleep makes you sleepy and ineffective.

To me it sounds like something else entirely to say the myelin isn't getting replenished -- especially since myelin breakdown has been linked with Alzheimer's and dementia.

So (based on my complete lack of attending med school) ... doesn't this potentially make more longer term problems in the brain?

My read on this is this has much broader implications than how you're going to be ineffective the next day. As in, in the long run, your brain may simply be degrading more than it can keep up with than if you'd had enough sleep over that time.

Next time the wife complains when I go take a nap, I'll remind her that I'm re-building my myelin and I need to do that so I don't get any dumber. :-P

Re:I think its safe to say (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 7 months ago | (#44759967)

Myelin degradation is part of a whole spectrum of neurological diseases. Which makes me wonder about the importance of the TFA's findings - at a very broad level one would expect that chronically sleep deprived people would have a higher incidence of neurodegenerative diseases - something I don't think happens (although that's a WAG of my sleep deprived brain).

Of course, TFA studied utilized some very broad brush assays and basically theorize that when the brain is awake, it tends to repress SOME aspects of myelin precursor production. It does NOT say that pulling all nighters will give you multiple sclerosis.

Interesting, but come back in five years and read the Nature or Science mini review on the subject before snacking on Oligodendrite Precursor laden twinkies.

Re:I think its safe to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760207)

Alzheimer's, dementia, MS, and others.
This could possibly end up having legal repercussions for those of us expected to forego sleep to do 52 hr stretch, middle of the night, server cutovers.

Re:I think its safe to say (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 7 months ago | (#44759947)

We have enough studies telling you not to do this particular thing where you feel like complete and utter crap if you do.

Unless you're Michelangelo. Or DaVinci, or Edison...or Napoleon. All people who clearly weren't operating at their best.

(Or Madonna, Jay Leno, Margaret Thatcher...all complete losers by any measure)

Re:I think its safe to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760083)

We have enough studies telling you not to do this particular thing where you feel like complete and utter crap if you do.

Unless you're Michelangelo. Or DaVinci, or Edison...or Napoleon. All people who clearly weren't operating at their best.

(Or Madonna, Jay Leno, Margaret Thatcher...all complete losers by any measure)

I'm not familiar with the medical history of most of those but you do know what happened to Margaret Thatcher, right?

Re:I think its safe to say (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 7 months ago | (#44760133)

We have enough studies telling you not to do this particular thing where you feel like complete and utter crap if you do.

Unless you're Michelangelo. Or DaVinci, or Edison...or Napoleon. All people who clearly weren't operating at their best.

(Or Madonna, Jay Leno, Margaret Thatcher...all complete losers by any measure)

I'm not familiar with the medical history of most of those but you do know what happened to Margaret Thatcher, right?

She's currently suffering severe oxygen deprivation.

Re:I think its safe to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760229)

Which at least relieves her family of pain of having to remind her e.g. that her hisband had died. She doesn't really seem like a poster child for the long term benefits of sleep deprivation.

https://www.google.com/search?q=thatcher+dementia

I got something good from it. (4, Insightful)

Valdrax (32670) | about 7 months ago | (#44760019)

We have enough studies telling you not to do this particular thing where you feel like complete and utter crap if you do.

Well, cool. You must feel pretty proud about learning absolutely nothing from this study except how your preconceived notions (aka "common sense") were correct to brag about it here and bash the authors for their useless work, but personally, I was fascinated by the info about sleep mediating gene activation and its effects on myelin growth.

Providing a mechanism to explain why you feel like utter crap is important -- especially for people who just like to soldier through chronic sleep deprivation and say they can handle it. Turns out, no, you can't -- you're literally killing your brain slowly, and that candle you're burning will run out much quicker. I've been trying to get myself into bed earlier each night, and I've heard studies that tell me that I'm shortening my life by not getting enough sleep, but now I know how and why and that I may be doing long-term brain damage by not fixing that problem, and that provides extra impetus to stop coasting and solve it right now.

This article, in the long run, may save my life (or at least greatly extend it) by giving the final kick in the pants to do something solid about it. (Especially since I'm half-dead today from lack of sleep.)

Re:I got something good from it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760479)

Providing a mechanism to explain why you feel like utter crap is important -- especially for people who just like to soldier through chronic sleep deprivation and say they can handle it.

If we can diagnose it, we can medicate it.

Honestly, I'd rather get a good night's sleep (and maybe afternoon nap) than take a myelin regenerative drug with coffee, but I do see value if we can learn to artificially stimulate many of the benefits of sleep.

Medication (1)

SirGarlon (845873) | about 7 months ago | (#44760603)

Yeah, for instance, the unfortunate souls who have sleep apnea but don't respond positively to the CPAP machine or other devices. It would be nice to have another option for treating those folks (including my dad).

Re:I got something good from it. (3, Insightful)

b4upoo (166390) | about 7 months ago | (#44760675)

It also makes a point that our government may not like. Forced sleep deprivation which has been a form of torture of prisoners meets any definition of torture as it causes a brain injury that is permanent. Bradly Manning was constantly awakened for meaningless searches while in isolation. Even in situations such as the Branch Davidian incident the use of loud, obnoxious music was used to try to disrupt the lives of the occupants.

Re:I think its safe to say (2)

TemperedAlchemist (2045966) | about 7 months ago | (#44760885)

If you're not interested in the basic research, at least be interested that this is the groundwork for potentially eventually curing humans of sleep entirely.

Where? (1)

uberbrainchild (2860711) | about 7 months ago | (#44759665)

So where can i get some myelin? hehe

Re:Where? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759723)

In your dreams, uberbrainchild, in your dreams!

Re:Where? (4, Funny)

Minwee (522556) | about 7 months ago | (#44759803)

From delicious, tasty brains.

Re:Where? (2)

idontgno (624372) | about 7 months ago | (#44759995)

Oh.

Zombies aren't shambling horrors mocking life with their undeath. They're just REALLY sleep-deprived.

Makes perfect sense. I turn into a zombie after 22 continuous hours without sleep, so that must be what's happening.

Back in teh 80's (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759687)

Back in the 80's, I constantly heard "You'll sleep enough when you're dead." or "Sleep is for wimps."

And sleeping was for "lazy" people.

I'm glad that we are becoming enlightened about the importance of sleep and that if anything, sleep makes one operate at their best.

Re:Back in teh 80's (2)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 7 months ago | (#44759831)

And which hair metal band were you a part of?

Re:Back in teh 80's (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44761353)

thatcher famously slept very little, and espoused that as a personal virtue. And, see! the bitch is dead.

Re:Back in teh 80's (2)

Joce640k (829181) | about 7 months ago | (#44759907)

Back in the 80's, I constantly heard "You'll sleep enough when you're dead." or "Sleep is for wimps."

It was a trap! They wanted you at your worst.

Re:Back in teh 80's (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 7 months ago | (#44760257)

He probably hung around with Warren Zevon.

Re:Back in teh 80's (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760547)

I hope he wasn't the inspiration for "Excitable Boy."

Military also has this kind of mindset. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44761289)

Ditto with my stint in the Navy. It's one of the main reasons why I was a one-termer. (At least I managed honorable discharge.)

And if you screw up, it seems their idea of compensating for that is to give you a more fucked up sleep schedule. So if you're not careful, it can easily snowball from there.

Myelin (2)

cookYourDog (3030961) | about 7 months ago | (#44759713)

May provide for insights into research on multiple sclerosis, a disease in which the body attacks its own myelin sheaths around nerves.

Re:Myelin (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44761643)

Yes it would. More specifically a means of healing rather than identifying a cause, although this may be related to that too.

killed the economy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759765)

He got his freakin' health care reform and killed the economy some more.

He got his Arab spring and the MB took over Egypt--and hooked up with AQ to try and take over Syria (hello United Islamic Republic).

He got his big adventure in Libya and got a dead ambassador and retinue.

Is there any reason to think that if he starts taking pot shots at Assad he is not going to fuck it up and blow it up into WWIII?

Linus Torvalds on sleep (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759771)

"A lot of people believe in working long days and doing double,triple, or even quadruple shifts. I’m not one of them. Neither Transmeta nor Linux has ever gotten in the way of a good night’s sleep. In fact, if you want to know the honest truth, I’m a firm believer in sleep. Some people think that’s just being lazy, but I want to throw my pillow at them. I have a perfectly valid excuse, and I’m standing by it: You may lose a few hours of your productive daytime if you sleep, oh, say, ten hours a day, but those few hours when you are awake, you are alert and your brain functions on all six cylinders. Or four or whatever."

from "Just for Fun: The Story of an Accidental Revolutionary" by Linus Torvalds and David Diamond

Engineering the Brain (3, Insightful)

mfwitten (1906728) | about 7 months ago | (#44759775)

Is it possible that controlled sleep deprivation could result in the culling of strictly unnecessary brain cells, so that the overall result is a more power-efficient brain? The first time I pulled an all-nighter to work on mentally taxing problems, I had to sleep 19 hours to recover. After doing that kind of work regularly, only a few hours or recovery became necessary.

Re:Engineering the Brain (5, Funny)

Minwee (522556) | about 7 months ago | (#44759815)

Let's just say that you don't notice the problem as much as you used to.

Re:Engineering the Brain (1)

mfwitten (1906728) | about 7 months ago | (#44759851)

I've already made that observation. The question is: Why?

Re:Engineering the Brain (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759931)

Just in case you aren't playing along with the GP's joke...:

You don't notice the negative effects of sleep deprivation as much because the negative effects of sleep deprivation have made you less able notice them.
One step short of "You're so stupid that you can't even recognize that you're stupid."

Re:Engineering the Brain (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760033)

Yeah, I get all that but... I've forgotten the question.

Re:Engineering the Brain (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 7 months ago | (#44760021)

Because for FPS play, twitching out doesn't really require functional myelin cells, just a lot off caffeine to replace the neurotransmitters that you've used up.

apnea (4, Informative)

nblender (741424) | about 7 months ago | (#44759813)

I'd been living with sleep apnea for years, but didn't realize it. I just thought that getting up to pee 3 or 4 times in a night was normal for a 42 year old... Turns out it's not. It was my body's way of trying to figure out why it was awake and concluding it must be because my bladder was full. I did a sleep study and found that I would stop breathing 260 times in the first 3 hours of sleep after which time I started waking up and that was the end of the study... I was fitted with a sleep apnea dental appliance (the TAP3 device) and the first night I slept through the entire night for the first time in years... My wife kept waking up to make sure I was still breathing because I wasn't snoring or making any noise at all. After some adjustment, I can say I sleep like a baby now... I spent a lot of money on matresses and pillows before, thinking it was the bed's fault...

The way the dental appliance works is by extending your lower jaw (as though you have a terrible underbite) which opens up your airway.

Very occasionally, I will forget it when I go somewhere for an overnight, and I sleep like shit those nights... I wake up multiple times, have a sore throat in the morning (from snoring loudly), have no energy, and no motivation.

I've had it for 2.5 years now and can't imagine life without it. I also can't imagine life with a CPAP machine though I hear they work great for some people.

Re:apnea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759901)

I did a sleep study and found that I would stop breathing 260 times in the first 3 hours of sleep

Wow, that's a pretty severe case.

My father in law has a machine with a mask he wears at night because he's also got a pretty serious case of it.

Though, in his case, losing about a hundred pounds or so would probably make a huge difference.

Re:apnea (3, Funny)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 7 months ago | (#44759923)

After some adjustment, I can say I sleep like a baby now

You wake up every few hours screaming because you need your diaper changed?

Re:apnea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760135)

Fuck you asshole.

Re:apnea (3, Funny)

Bigbutt (65939) | about 7 months ago | (#44760801)

Nah, I wake up every couple of hours needing to be fed. Now where is that breast?? :D

[John]

But I already knew this. I always knew this. (2)

Narcocide (102829) | about 7 months ago | (#44759817)

I could feel it killing me, when I was forced to wake up too early as a child. I could feel it stretching my consciousness thin... the most appropriate description for the feeling is the one used by Bilbo Baggins; "... like butter scraped over too much bread."

I predict that next they will discover that while 7 may be an absolute minimum for basic health, some people will need more depending on their brain capacity and "usage patterns." I predict they will eventually discover that having at least 8 hours every night during childhood will prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease in old age. I further predict that never going under-slept (sleeping in up to even 10+ hours if necessary to stop feeling groggy or "stretched") will eventually prove to extend longevity by 20-50% and cure a whole host of neuroses and other emotional and psychological disorders.

Re:But I already knew this. I always knew this. (1)

Quirkz (1206400) | about 7 months ago | (#44760401)

I predict the human race will die out within a generation if people follow your suggestions. I also guess you have never had kids.

Re:But I already knew this. I always knew this. (2)

Narcocide (102829) | about 7 months ago | (#44760595)

Note: being a parent doesn't make you automatically right, or even more informed about basic health in any way whatsoever. Convenience to you doesn't automatically make it healthy for the kids either.

Re:But I already knew this. I always knew this. (1)

Quirkz (1206400) | about 7 months ago | (#44761639)

I'm not talking about kids' health. I'm talking about *having* kids. It is impossible to be a parent and consistently get a good night's sleep, thus it is impossible to have our neuroses cured and extend life by 20% without giving up kids. I know one of your lines mentioned childhood but the others do not, and if you meant to imply this is only for kids, that wasn't clear. And if you were talking exclusively about kids, most of them need far more than 10 hours in their early years, so it's confusing either way.

we will be lazy apes in the future (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44761187)

A 1997 study in the BMJ based upon 918 men age 45–59 found that after a ten-year follow-up, men who had fewer orgasms were twice as likely to die of any cause as those having two or more orgasms a week.[112]

The U.S. Government is like a corporation (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759819)

The U.S. Government is like a corporation, except that it makes its own laws, has a military and law enforcement apparatus, has the power of taxation, and need not pay attention to the economic realities that any private sector corp must.

In other words, it is the one corporation in the U.S. that actually CAN do all of the sinister things that leftist Demoprogressotards scream delusionally about Big Corporations doing, and get away with it forever.

Re:The U.S. Government is like a corporation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760477)

Yet another vivid example of the dangers of sleep deprivation.

Why does too much sleep make you groggy? (1)

Toe, The (545098) | about 7 months ago | (#44759839)

Too many brain cells, and the brain doesn't know how to use them yet?

Re:Why does too much sleep make you groggy? (3, Insightful)

Narcocide (102829) | about 7 months ago | (#44759979)

Because 16 hours is a long time to go without food, even if you are asleep the whole time. You need to strike an appropriate balance between rest and nutrition and activity. We have lost our natural rhythm.

Re:Why does too much sleep make you groggy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759989)

You may have cause and effect confused. Too much grog makes me sleepy.

Interesting (1)

kilodelta (843627) | about 7 months ago | (#44759877)

I wonder if this might have something to do with the rise in rates of ALS and Parkinson's. Both related to degradation of the myelin sheath.

blah (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759879)

shame some of us work 16 hour days and cant sleep by nature

Senate Breaks Own Rule (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44759957)

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/09/04/senate-breaks-own-rules-in-rush-to-vote-on-syria-war.html

Senate Democratic leadership tossed aside the rules for moving legislation with regard to the resolution authorizing the use of military force against Syria, angering some Republicans and creating confusion on Capitol Hill in the run up to the war vote.

-=-=-=--

Warmoingering socialists - that's you shitbird Obama supportrers.

Fuck you all.

What if? (1)

Carnivore24 (467239) | about 7 months ago | (#44759975)

What if you don't sleep and just take drugs to boost myelin?

Re:What if? (2)

Narcocide (102829) | about 7 months ago | (#44760095)

Other things will go wrong instead; its not just cellular structure that is replenished during sleep but critical fluid chemical balances as well.

Luckily for you though, the United States military already has a drug [wikipedia.org] to manually re-balance those other chemicals. It has been tested extensively for years and has been reported to keep your reaction times and accuracy levels to within well-rested parameters for up to 40 hours without any of the side effects of amphetamines traditionally used for such exercises.

So... BEER! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760025)

So, since beer = more dreams at night, beer = more good brain cells? Time to dig out the old college octo-bong.

NO WAR FOR BIG OIL (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760053)

And as Obama prepares to wage war on the strategically irrelevant Syrians.... we have this,

http://hotair.com/archives/2013/09/03/oregon-bakery-closes-doors-after-state-investigates-over-refusal-to-cater-same-sex-wedding/

  Of Course: Gay Extremists and Bullies Now Intentionally Driving Christian Businesses out of Business

Wait, this is a goof post isn't it? Because I was promised- promised, I tell you- that this kind of thing would *never* happen. Gays just wanted to be equal with straight couples, and they would *never* use their special protected status to coerce people to do something they believe to be wrong.

Also...

About a dozen rather belligerent cross-dressers in Portland decided to hang out in a bar on Friday nights.

About a year ago, the owner of the bar asked them to hang out somewhere else, since most of the regular clientele refused to come into the bar when the cross-dressers were there, and he was losing money.

The State of Oregon just fined the bar owner $400,000 for asking the cross-dressers to move on.

Four Hundred Thousand Dollars.

Pretty soon ministers will be charged with hate crimes for preaching from the Bible. Churches will be forced to host "wedding" receptions for gay couples. Christians are the new enemies of the State.

Too many homosexuals don't just want the rightto get married. They want the right TO CRAM IT IN YOUR FACE while you can't respond in any fashion remotely hinting of negativity.

that's the gay mafia at work there. You will accept all their perversions and like it or they will hound you with every form of intimidation they control.

Re:NO WAR FOR BIG OIL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760145)

You know, I think the militant gays are just angry

But then again I'd be pretty damn angry if I had a dick in my ass too

Sleep Hygiene (2)

wrackspurt (3028771) | about 7 months ago | (#44760117)

Dr. W.C. Dement [wikipedia.org]books are a good place to start if your interested in an overview of the importance of sleep. Sleep hygiene [wikipedia.org] is probably the idea currently being pushed to the forefront. The idea that a good night's sleep is as much a part of overall health as other good hygiene practices.

Death practice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760255)

It's important to sleep as much as possible, to reduce our waking lives to the extent possible.

And where did the 7 hours even come from? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760389)

They never even tested lack of sleep, they tested NO sleep. Why did that even make it through?
The team hasn't even begun to test lack of sleep or different sleeping patterns, yet.
Worse, you even misquote the BBC article of saying such a thing when it never.

Not to mention that the process where it becomes active, REM sleep, happens in cycles, not "AT THE ENND FO SLEEP" like every generic moron that listens to TV thinks. (even a glance at wikipedia would show you that Sleep [wikipedia.org], yes, there is the graph a few scrolls down)
On average you hit a full cycle in around 90-110 minutes and it repeats a little. (which is why 90 minutes is the best napping time for a reason)
If you want anything of worth back from it, long. Small naps only recharge you a little and leave you groggy, which is why things like polyphasic sleep are too limiting, bi- and tri-phasic sleep are better in that regard since they give the body the time it needs for a cycle.
Siestas have already been proven to be very helpful, and they have been known to decrease overall illness and death in those that practice the "afternoon nap".
Admittedly more research needs to be done in that area, but considering the types that practice it vary from many cultures, countries, climates and dietary intakes, it seems to be the sleep itself rather than the former possible reasons.

Hell, some people don't even need that much, and some require a strange amount of sleep to even feel good.
It varies very wildly from person to person, age to age, and body shape to body shape. (I can't remember if heavier people required more or less sleep, I think it was more and very light required less)

To really be of worth, they will need to research this in their coming experiments.
These findings are very interesting and finding any way to boost these levels would be very helpful since a lack of them is known to be damaging.
Although, a massive increase could also be the reason why it is attacked by autoimmune illnesses, still not sure.
So finding that out too would be extremely useful as then there could be pretty concrete figures on what is likely to lead to neural damage over a long period, or even short period.

The Real Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760451)

The real question for /. is if coffee has the same effect.

Sleep Deprivation and OPCA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44760851)

Does anyone with an appropriate background know if sleep deprivation will cause olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA)? Is myelin directly involved in this? I ask because OPCA killed a relative of mine, who also suffered from sleep apnea. When this relative began treatment for sleep apnea, their brain didn't seem to atrophy any further. At that point the damage was already so severe that they still asphyxiated.

Related to MS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44761333)

Could this be related to MS (Multiple Sclerosis)? MS is caused by damage to the myelin sheath covering nerves. Its thought to be related low levels of light, and white blood cells attacking it. Its counter intuitive that low amounts of light and not enough sleep go hand in hand (most people sleep in the dark). But its interesting anyway.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...