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FBI Cyber Division Adds Syrian Electronic Army To Wanted List

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the checking-it-twice dept.

United States 74

coolnumbr12 writes "The U.S. government has had enough of the Syrian Electronic Army's hacks of Western media and government outlets. A week after the SEA shut down the New York Times, the FBI Cyber Division unit has officially added the pro-Assad hacker collective to its wanted list. The FBI issued an advisory that included information about the SEA, its capabilities, and some of its more heinous attacks. The advisory also warns networks to be on the lookout for attacks, and that anyone found to be aiding the SEA will be seen as terrorists actively aiding attacks against the U.S. websites."

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haha (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44771895)

Hacking websites = terrorism now ?

See the danger of such a slippery slope ? The government can't see it. They're dead serious. Hacking websites = terrorism. It boggles the mind.

Frankly, what the U.S. government does on a daily basis is far more terrifying than anything some script kiddies hijacking DNS entries could do.

Captcha: encroach

Re:haha (1)

ZiakII (829432) | about a year ago | (#44771913)

Where do you see the mention of terrorism at all? This seems pretty standard for the FBI cyber group.

Re:haha (1)

ZiakII (829432) | about a year ago | (#44771921)

Nope I'm an idiot I see it now anyone found helping speel.

Re:haha (5, Informative)

Derec01 (1668942) | about a year ago | (#44772105)

No, you were right. Direct link below to the FBI advisory PDF. There is no mention of terrorism.

http://info.publicintelligence.net/FBI-SEA.pdf [publicintelligence.net]

Re:haha (1)

erikkemperman (252014) | about a year ago | (#44772587)

Thanks, that's helpful. The summary is rather sensationalist (whodathunk, right?). Although, on the other hand, this would have been a lot more obvious if these TLAs did not make such a habit of conflating terrorism with whatever else they want to "tackle". In other words, no-one would (should) have been surprised if their original advisory did label them terrists.

Honest question, though, how does this Federal BI propose to get at these guys, assuming most of them are not US citizens nor located within its borders? I mean, it's been clear for a while now that the US govt considers the whole world to be withini their jurisdiction, de facto, but is this now official?

Re:haha (1)

Derec01 (1668942) | about a year ago | (#44772671)

I think partially it's unclear, despite the name, where exactly they are, or if it is anything more than a loose affiliation, some of whom may be in the US.

I'm sure there's evidence aside from the group's own testimony. However, come to think of it, if I were a domestic hacker group, and I wanted to throw a sensationalist red herring in there, this isn't a bad idea. You could potentially end up drafting unsuspecting Syrian experts into running cover for you while they do their own thing.

Re:haha (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about a year ago | (#44772707)

The term CNO is used. I wonder if that links back to some new law?

Re:haha (1)

AJH16 (940784) | about a year ago | (#44774227)

The most wanted list has frequently (probably the majority of the time) been primarily composed of people that aren't within the US. It isn't people they think they CAN go after necessarily, it's just people they want if the opportunity arises. So basically, it's more a way to provide information about the group and give a heads up to authorities everywhere to be aware of them. Traditionally, it was to limit someone's ability to operate in the US, though the value of listing a hacker group is possibly a little more dubious, though as members are identified, I would assume their information would be posted along with the entry. If they were ever dumb enough to try and come in to the US, a whole lot of law enforcement and border protection people would know what they look like.

Re:haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44774459)

Pretty sure that for a long time Osama Bin Laden was topping their most-wanted list, despite the fact that it was very unlikely he would be within our boarders. I think the main thing is, that they want to get them if they ever get the opportunity.

Lern 2 read (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44771961)

Direct from the fucking summary:

The FBI issued an advisory that included information about the SEA, its capabilities, and some of its more heinous attacks. The advisory also warns networks to be on the lookout for attacks, and that anyone found to be aiding the SEA will be seen as terrorists actively aiding attacks against the U.S. websites."

If you help the Syrian Electronic Army (a group that hacks websites) then you are now a terrorist actively aiding attacks against the U.S. [websites].

Re:Lern 2 read (1, Insightful)

Eyeball97 (816684) | about a year ago | (#44772285)

Yes, that's fucking right. The fucking summary fucking written by the fucking OP, which fucking uses HIS fucking words, not the fucking FBI's

Re:Lern 2 read (1)

Rakarra (112805) | about a year ago | (#44778225)

Direct from the fucking summary

When it comes to getting to the truth, there's little worse than quoting a Slashdot summary.

How about the article headline ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44771979)

If you click that link in the summary, it takes you to an article with this headline:

FBI Adds Syrian Electronic Army To Wanted List; Supporters Of Hacker Collective Will Be Regarded As Terrorists

Re:How about the article headline ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772127)

If you click that link in the summary, it takes you to an article with this headline:

FBI Adds Syrian Electronic Army To Wanted List; Supporters Of Hacker Collective Will Be Regarded As Terrorists

Of course, nothing in the actual advisory says anything about anyone being a terrorist...

Way to fall victim to sensationalist yellow journalism.

Re:How about the article headline ? (1)

khellendros1984 (792761) | about a year ago | (#44772167)

OK, now read the actual security advisory [publicintelligence.net] and try to find a mention of terrorism, instead of looking to the sensationalized newspaper and Slashdot headlines.

Re:haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44771951)

Hacking websites = terrorism now ?

See the danger of such a slippery slope ?

Whoopee! What a great waterboard this slippery slope makes!

Re:haha (1)

Fluffeh (1273756) | about a year ago | (#44772279)

Why is it that the first thing that connected in my mind when I read waterboard and slippery slope was a huge great big slip & slide connected to the garden hose, set up in the back yard and doing huge superman dives to see how far onto the grass you can slide off the end of it...

Re:haha (1)

Etherwalk (681268) | about a year ago | (#44772019)

Hacking websites = terrorism now ?

Everything is terrorism now. See, e.g., "terroristic threatening."

Idiot! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772761)

Except that the advisory doesn't mention "terrorism" at all. That comes from the sensationalist article, and is repeated in the Slashdot summary, and by gullible, smug idiots like you.

Re:Idiot! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44781373)

If anti-terrorism legislation is used to provide all law enforcement with mass collected data(PRISM), what does that make the people whose data has been collected?

Slippery slope (3, Insightful)

fox171171 (1425329) | about a year ago | (#44772059)

Hacking websites = terrorism now ?

See the danger of such a slippery slope ? The government can't see it. They're dead serious. Hacking websites = terrorism. It boggles the mind.

Frankly, what the U.S. government does on a daily basis is far more terrifying than anything some script kiddies hijacking DNS entries could do.

Captcha: encroach

This week it's hacking a website.

Next week it's: "You broke a website's TOS! Terrorist! Off to Gitmo with you!"

Re:Slippery slope (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772913)

Not very likely.

Transporting people to and imprisoning people at Guantanamo bay is very much more expensive than any regular form of detention, which they can use on you anyway and have used on others already (Aaron Schwartz for example) because of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

Re:Slippery slope (2)

wbr1 (2538558) | about a year ago | (#44773403)

Hacking websites = terrorism now ?

See the danger of such a slippery slope ? The government can't see it. They're dead serious. Hacking websites = terrorism. It boggles the mind.

Frankly, what the U.S. government does on a daily basis is far more terrifying than anything some script kiddies hijacking DNS entries could do.

Captcha: encroach

This week it's hacking a website. Next week it's: "You broke a website's TOS! Terrorist! Off to Gitmo with you!"

It is worse.. it is not just hacking the site, it is aiding the hackers in any way. "Oops, grocer you sold that terrorist a bagel, you are a terrorist. Sorry Mr, Consultant, you set up this asshats home network, you are a terrorist!"
(Yes the jewish food/muslim terrorist dichotomy was intended).

And before you guys step in and say it is about 'intent', intent matters not one whit when you are against the -letter- of the law (or how it is enforced), and some prosecutor/lea has an axe to grind (be it because of personal dislike of the target or for personal gain). The may even come up with some parallel construction to cover other up more 'evidence' they extracted about you (See, he called his sister in Dallas the same day the terrorist hacker was in Dallas! They must have been in cahoots!).

Re:Slippery slope (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44782403)

You only need to look at history to see how things generally play out when fundamental rights are ignored.
If the presumption is that the accused is guilty unless proven innocent, it generally turns out badly.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisition

Re:Slippery slope (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about a year ago | (#44774345)

Next week it's: "You broke a website's TOS! Terrorist! Off to Gitmo with you!"

Could be worse. They could use the DMCA on you!

Re:haha (1)

steelfood (895457) | about a year ago | (#44772063)

Wish I had mod points right now. Eventually, everything's going to be terrorism. Robbery? Terrorism. Mugging? Terrorism. Shushing someone in a theater? Terrorism.

Terrorism is by definition a slippery slope. Everyone gets terrorized at some point in time. If not by parents during early childhood, then by experience later, or by interacting with different people during adulthood.

Double think required (1, Troll)

boorack (1345877) | about a year ago | (#44772431)

And above it all: resisting terrorist government activities (like: US govt financing and arming al-quaeda terrorsits in Syria and waging iillegal war against Syria in order to aid and bring al-quaeda to power) is now considered terrorism. Strong double think abilities are required to grasp conduct of US government officials.

Re:haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772887)

You sure are smug, aren't you? Just one thing: The advisory doesn't mention "Terrorism" at all. But I bet that's not going to stop you prancing around arrogantly and being proud of yourself for claiming that shushing people in a theater is soon going to be called terrorism.

Re:haha (3, Informative)

Derec01 (1668942) | about a year ago | (#44772079)

The one page advisory does *not* use the word terrorism.

The story mentions terrorism. The headline mentions terrorism.

However, the actual one page FBI advisory does NOT use the word terrorism.

Re:haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772083)

Hacking websites = terrorism now ?

It is when US is being hacked.
It is not when US does it to other countries

Keep up...

Re:haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772357)

Fuck the US Gov, they've gone plain stupid. Rebel you dolts, rebel.

Re:haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772359)

But, but, but isn't it easy to nab the local hackers (NSA) first? Also FBI could make an example of NSA to deter other hackers.

Re:haha (1)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44772365)

Hacking websites = terrorism now ?

Weren't you here for the Aaron Swartz thing?

Re:haha (1)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about a year ago | (#44772413)

what the U.S. government does on a daily basis

You should pay closer attention, daily was 10 years ago.

Re:haha (1)

gagol (583737) | about a year ago | (#44772811)

Being upset in front of a cop can be considered terrorism, especially if you have the wrong name...

whatever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772905)

So known terrorists hacking websites = everyone else hacking websites now?

Re:haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44773589)

As others already noted, terrorism is the FBI's term, but a misleading summary.

It does show something else: the government isn't the only side that is lying with the intent of getting popular support. These fake accusations were intentional attempts to damage the FBI. As usual in war, truth is the first casualty.

Re:haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44773613)

and since we can execute suspected terrorists with drone strikes without even as much as a trial.

Does this mean anyone who hacks webs sites can be summary executed now?

Re:haha (1)

Xicor (2738029) | about a year ago | (#44774317)

hacking websites in general may not be terrorism, but hacking news sites and saying the white house was attacked, causing the stock market to plummet 5% in an hour does count as terrorism

jokes on them... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44771935)

the Syrian Electronic Army is a CIA front group just like al-Qaeda

wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44771957)

So does that mean the US government can drone-bomb you for supporting the SEA? I mean that other American citizen they bombed was just making anti-American speeches on youtube...

The US is getting fucking scary, seriously this is getting bad.

Re:wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772021)

very few will belive you, as their heads are in the sand.

He's not a terrorist (2)

maroberts (15852) | about a year ago | (#44772017)

He's a very naughty boy!

I'm sure defacing websites may be some sort of crime, but terrorism? Terrorism seems to have suffered from mission creep. Defacing websites may be highly annoying, but probably ought to qualify as a semi-legitimate form of protest.

No threat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772037)

These script kiddies don't threaten anyone. They wouldn't even be able to hack an unpatched winXP.

Also what kind of cheap companies get their domain names at such crappy registrars who are vulnerable to lame fishing attempts ? Look no further for the real threat: stupidity and incompetence.

Re:No threat (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about a year ago | (#44772111)

This. A thousand times this. If the bar for 'cyrberterrorist' is set here, then any kind of 'hacktivism' is going to be terrorism. However, if they were applying this standard both ways, the NSA has been engaged in widespread acts of war against the entire world. However, I support endorsing a peace treaty that will surrender the NSA, it's contractors, and it's co-conspirators to punishment by other nations.

Re:No threat (1)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44772437)

The life expectancy of an unpatched Windows XP installation exposed to the Internet is now under one minute.

Context (1)

wrackspurt (3028771) | about a year ago | (#44772085)

Isn't it a kind of perfect storm? The rise of the Internet and 9/11 making terrorists of everyone. Without the Internet going through growing pains and the general public woefully sad of security would we have the mess we have now? 9/11 would have been just another horrible terrorist act but it happened while the Internet was going through it's growing pains and law enforcement agencies and all the three lettered organizations were given ever broader powers to try to tame a new world wide venue for every aspect, the good, the bad and the ugly, of much of humanity. Is this how what would otherwise be manageable growing pains turn into wars and dark periods of history. Just contingency gone very bad.

FBI is just another word for Gestapo. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772129)

As such they are certainly to be feared, but at the same time they deserve no more respect
than a pack of hyenas.

"Terrorism" was an insert by the IB Times (5, Informative)

Derec01 (1668942) | about a year ago | (#44772133)

I commented on this elsewhere, but I'll do it again because people are getting whipped up about it.

The IB Times is entirely responsible for using the label terrorism. The FBI did not call it terrorism. Here's a direct link to the FBI advisory requesting information about website defacement. Consistent with the FBI's domestic focus.

http://info.publicintelligence.net/FBI-SEA.pdf [publicintelligence.net]

To be honest, that is incredibly bad journalism. No one is sourced for the word terrorism; it is an invention of this Ryan Neal fellow.

Re:"Terrorism" was an insert by the IB Times (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about a year ago | (#44772151)

Ryan Neal is a pseudonym for Bill O'Reilly, who is just Joe Biden in a costume. Obama doesn't exist - he's a shadowpuppet.

Re: "Terrorism" was an insert by the IB Times (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44774853)

Does it matter whether the word terrorism is explicitly used? Only difference that might make would be in some small extension of law. Maybe...

Point is, they're a supposed Syrian hacking group, who have now been put on a US list of online targets. If a member was found in the US and caught, do you really think the word terrorism would be left out of their arrest or charges? Absolutely not, and you know it!

And for the real kicker, look just what the word terrorism, and its continuous use in the media and fear-mongering, has spawned.

I'm sure plenty of people have been suspected or charged with terrorism, despite their actions being quite far from an actual terrorist act. But don't let that sway you from splitting hairs. Defending anything the FBI, DHS, or NSA does just makes you look like a shill and a loyal member of the brainwashed flock.

Feel free to tell Mr. Neal the error of his ways (5, Informative)

Gravis Zero (934156) | about a year ago | (#44772273)

from TFA

The advisory also warns networks to be on the lookout for attacks, and that anyone found to be aiding the SEA will be seen as terrorists actively aiding attacks against the U.S. websites.

i'm no friend of the SEA (or the sea) but if you read the actually advisory [publicintelligence.net] then you likely noticed that neither "terrorism" or "terrorist" is anywhere in the advisory.
since he's written a flat out lie under the guise of fact, i think people should inform him of the error of his ways.

his facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ryanwneal [facebook.com]
his twitter feed: https://twitter.com/ryanWneal [twitter.com]

feel free to mod up +1 pwn4g3

Re:Feel free to tell Mr. Neal the error of his way (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about a year ago | (#44772697)

Great link GZ. One question, the wording "CNO efforts against" is it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_network_operations [wikipedia.org] ? Under US mil as "Information Warfare" How the US gov see/use the term?
Would it fall in the "terrorists, nation-states, and criminal groups" as a new terrorist definition or still under criminal law?
Thanks

Re:Feel free to tell Mr. Neal the error of his way (1)

Gravis Zero (934156) | about a year ago | (#44772789)

sorry but propaganda/psyops doesnt qualify as military CNO. check your own wikipedia article.

Types of Military CNO

According to Joint Pub 3-13, CNO consists of computer network attack (CNA), computer network defense (CND) and computer network exploitation (CNE).[1]
Computer Network Attack (CNA): Includes actions taken via computer networks to disrupt, deny, degrade, or destroy the information within computers and computer networks and/or the computers/networks themselves.
Computer Network Defense (CND): Includes actions taken via computer networks to protect, monitor, analyze, detect and respond to network attacks, intrusions, disruptions or other unauthorized actions that would compromise or cripple defense information systems and networks. Joint Pub 6.0 further outlines Computer Network Defense as an aspect of NetOps:
Computer Network Exploitation (CNE): Includes enabling actions and intelligence collection via computer networks that exploit data gathered from target or enemy information systems or networks.

u mad bro?

Re:Feel free to tell Mr. Neal the error of his way (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about a year ago | (#44772833)

Why would anyone be mad?....
So what is the line "may also be observed participating in CNO efforts against US Web sites and networks" about then in a US legal setting?
Or is it just a way of saying groups of computers on a network?
Thanks

Re:Feel free to tell Mr. Neal the error of his way (1)

Derec01 (1668942) | about a year ago | (#44772863)

I think the particular usage of CNO here is mostly descriptive rather than a legal category, as the term itself is broad. Therefore I don't think you can infer a legal classification into crime, terrorism, act of war, etc. from that usage.

Re:Feel free to tell Mr. Neal the error of his way (1)

BitwiseX (300405) | about a year ago | (#44775039)

I think the particular usage of CNO here is mostly descriptive rather than a legal category, as the term itself is broad. Therefore I don't think you can infer a legal classification into crime, terrorism, act of war, etc. from that usage.

According to a reply to my tweet, that's exactly the statement he used to infer terrorism.
Miles Mawyer @milesmawyer 33m
@IBTimes @ryanWneal I'm irritated and disappointed by your use of the "T" word. It's not a generic term for "Bad Guys". FBI didn't use it..
Ryan W. Neal @ryanWneal 29m
@milesmawyer Good point, but that's what they mean with "CNO efforts against US Web sites and networks."
Miles Mawyer @milesmawyer 3m
@ryanWneal That just means you're equated hacking with terrorism. That's still a broad and inappropriate generalization.

Ya whatever, (4, Insightful)

Adult film producer (866485) | about a year ago | (#44772319)

the FBI should add itself to its wanted list.

Re:Ya whatever, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772601)

I agree with that. Under the constitution they shouldn't even exist, but I am sure the forces in D.C would have created another "evil doer"...

Re:Ya whatever, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44778421)

And after they add themselves to their wanted list, they should add the NSA and rest of the information terrorism aka "intelligence" agencies.

If we are jumping at every shadow (2, Insightful)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44772443)

Then have not the terrorists won?

Tai Game Crack (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44773105)

Re:If we are jumping at every shadow (1)

Hutt1235 (3045695) | about a year ago | (#44773275)

I have question, What you mean with terrorists Hamlet Devnozashvili Las Vegas 11 Ave Email - hutt1-petviashvili1@hotmail.com Website - Stick War [stickwar.info]

Re:If we are jumping at every shadow (1)

gallondr00nk (868673) | about a year ago | (#44773569)

The terrorists won around the time that the Patriot Act was passed. What we've been witnessing the last twelve years is occupation; constant fear and the ever ballooning corpulence of the security state.

Where to start? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44772459)

"anyone found to be aiding the SEA will be seen as terrorists actively aiding attacks against the U.S. websites."
the people making copper wire (which are used in network cables)?
people making electricity, because it powers computer?
people making computer components?
people making (american made) operating systems?
srsly, who to blame when "aiding"?
-
methinks that there is really just a limited numbers of cables leaving syria.
why not just put a monster fat firewall/ tap / scanner on those cables leaving the country? sure the "other" three letters can help with this?
of course if them hackers are not in syria, this will not work ...

At this point (1)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44772473)

Is there somebody the FBI doesn't want?

Re:At this point (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#44775773)

Is there somebody the FBI doesn't want?

your mom.

(too easy)

Why (2)

umghhh (965931) | about a year ago | (#44773051)

  • anything US gov does now is said to be wrong/fascist/illegal/etc? That borders on stupidity to the point that one could have thought this could be a NSA attempt to disqualify /. as a valid forum to discuss issues. To me attacking sites like the one of new your times or banks etc is illegal activity. Sometimes it may be justified but that is rare.
  • summaries do not point to the source anymore? Usually one must click few times to get there only to find out that summary was inaccurate.
  • is /. following general media which rarely uses deep analysis and shows restraint which leads to hysterical and inaccurate reporting? It looks almost like the (more or less autistic) brains of /. see a small irregularity and out of it make a rule: "US spied on others so spying on US cannot be persecuted". What sort of HS is this?

Quite frankly it makes less and less sense to take part in discussions as voice of reason all too often cannot be heard because of the noise of hysterical and mostly not thought trough posts? I admit I am not much better but maybe some constraint were in place. It does not really help if anything is announced as a slippery slope towards a fascists state etc. The summary is also not so good his time and could have been stopped because it is just incorrect (in using the word terrorist etc) and that makes a difference.

We are under attack (1)

TomGreenhaw (929233) | about a year ago | (#44773145)

Time to run security scans and make sure our security measures are buttoned up. Its just like a hard drive failure is a reminder to check your backups - its time to break out the security tools and double-check firewall settings. Its gone from script kiddies all the way to military organizations intent on screwing us over. These idiots have decided to wage a war on our computers. WTF

Another TLA? (1)

xbytor (215790) | about a year ago | (#44774177)

How can people tell if it's the SEA, NSA, CIA, or FBI that is misbehaving? Press releases?

Seatac airport wants its code back (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44775047)

thanks

Firewall of America (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44775281)

So America, how does it feel to have less internet access rights than Syria.
Censoring anti-government websites, isn't that exactly what the Great Firewall of China is all about?

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