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Thought Experiment: The Ultimate Creative Content OS

timothy posted about a year ago | from the bits-and-bobs dept.

OS X 226

Dave Girard has written a lengthy description of how to design the best possible operating system for creative pursuits (video editing, photo manipulation, and sound editing, in particular) — at least the the best possible one he can imagine by selecting from the best tools and behaviors that he finds in Mac OS X, Windows, and (mostly Ubuntu) Linux. He makes a compelling case for the OS (or at least a GUI on top of it) having baked-in support for a wide range of image formats and codecs, and makes some pointed jabs along the way at what each of these three big players do wrong.

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the best os for creative people (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795523)

is paper-and-pencil-OS, or PPOS.

Re:the best os for creative people (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795545)

That doesn't fit the wide range of image formats criteria. However, having one format that is universally readable is probably better than our current Tower of Babel.

Re:the best os for creative people (1)

somersault (912633) | about a year ago | (#44795601)

If you're talking in terms of images, then you mean bitmaps. They're very simple, but they're also a complete waste of space in most situations. JPEGs, GIFs and PNGs are also pretty much "universally readable". GIF is about the only format that desperately needs a replacement right now.

Re: the best os for creative people (4, Informative)

loufoque (1400831) | about a year ago | (#44795729)

PNG is already a replacement for GIF.

Re:the best os for creative people (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795819)

Creative people don't use JPEGs for work, and rather than PNG I'm sure they use PSD or some other layered file format.

Re:the best os for creative people (1)

rvw (755107) | about a year ago | (#44796059)

Creative people don't use JPEGs for work, and rather than PNG I'm sure they use PSD or some other layered file format.

They don't? I think about 90% of the web's images are JPEG. PNG is great for replacing non animated GIF. For lossless images it can be used, but it will be 10x the size of JPEG, and that is still not acceptable. Isn't JPEG with maximum quality lossless as well? Even that is less than half the filesize of a similar PNG.

Think about this: what is better - a 6400 dpi high quality JPEG, or a 1600 dpi lossless PNG, both similar in size?

Re:the best os for creative people (2)

beelsebob (529313) | about a year ago | (#44796089)

They don't? I think about 90% of the web's images are JPEG. PNG is great for replacing non animated GIF

Actually, there's animation in the png spec too.

Think about this: what is better - a 6400 dpi high quality JPEG, or a 1600 dpi lossless PNG, both similar in size?

Almost certainly the png. Less, useful information is better than more, noisy information in most cases.

Re:the best os for creative people (1)

doti (966971) | about a year ago | (#44796383)

No, they don't use JPEG for work. They use lossless formats, and only produce a JPEG as a particular output for the web.

Re:the best os for creative people (1)

BenoitRen (998927) | about a year ago | (#44796427)

Isn't JPEG with maximum quality lossless as well?

I used to think this, but it's not because of things like rounding errors.

A lossless JPEG format specification exists, but never gained widespread adoption.

Re:the best os for creative people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795611)

Yes. Now I want you to render on paper a preview of the video I'm cutting.

Seriously guys, how can you have the same format for images and video? Do you want the same format for text and music? Just shut up.

Re:the best os for creative people (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795845)

Yes. Now I want you to render on paper a preview of the video I'm cutting.

Seriously guys, how can you have the same format for images and video? Do you want the same format for text and music? Just shut up.

An I-frame of a video is nothing but an image. Indeed, a video itself is nothing than a sequence of images to be shown in a fixed rate with an accompanying sound file. Therefore an image is ultimately nothing else than a single-frame silent video.

Indeed, the old MJPEG format is, as the name already reveals, nothing but a sequence of JPEG images and accompanying sound. More modern video codecs apply inter-image compression (P-frames, B-frames), but every single video format to day still has I-frames, which are nothing but encoded images.

And of course you can have a paper preview of a video. Indeed, replace paper with celluloid, and you've got the format in which movies have been stored for decades.

Re:the best os for creative people (2)

Culture20 (968837) | about a year ago | (#44795855)

Yes. Now I want you to render on paper a preview of the video I'm cutting.

Do you want a storyboard or flip book?

Re:the best os for creative people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796099)

Seriously guys, how can you have the same format for images and video? Do you want the same format for text and music? Just shut up.

No, but I do want the same format for a single sample of audio, and for multiple samples of audio. That would be the fair comparison to an image (a single sample of imagery), and a video (multiple samples of imagery).

So he wants KDE? (4, Interesting)

Njovich (553857) | about a year ago | (#44795531)

Aside from a couple of things (not sure how 30 bit monitor support would work here), it sounds like he's describing KDE.

Of course, in the real world, KDE is awesome for more advanced tasks like creative designs, but the limited support for the most used quality creative software keeps it down a lot...

Re:So he wants KDE? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795627)

Any Kreative artist would immediately want to pop a Kap in the Kreators for the Krap naming Konventions.

Attention to detail is paramount! Being "cute" is for the dorks who like familiar patterns (why else is it such a geek thing to endlessly repeat memes/TV programmes/etc.).

Re:So he wants KDE? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795921)

KDE's moved away from that naming practice since five years ago.

Re:So he wants KDE? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795971)

iAgree

Re:So he wants KDE? (3, Insightful)

MrMickS (568778) | about a year ago | (#44795629)

~sigh~ have you read the article. KDE/Linux doesn't have the image formats built into the OS. It's one of the things OS X does right.

Re:So he wants KDE? (-1)

Njovich (553857) | about a year ago | (#44795653)

I wouldn't claim it is perfect, but what image support are you missing exactly if you take the KDE suite as a whole?

Of course, KDE isn't an operating system.

Operating environment independent of kernel (2)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#44796303)

Of course, KDE isn't an operating system.

That depends on how you define "operating system". I'm aware that some define OS as kernel, but I was under the impression that KDE on Linux felt like KDE on FreeBSD. I read the article, and only a few items related to video drivers or multitasking performance would need direct support from a kernel.

  • Page 1: A system-wide image loader and a file manager with image thumbnails.
  • Page 2: System-wide support for video containers and codecs used in professional video production (which would likely require the OS to be paywalled due to patent royalties), uploading to multiple video sharing providers, support for displays deeper than 8 bits per channel with color correction (kernel?), support for displays with higher density than 96 dpi, recent OpenGL (kernel?), best-of-breed compilers (again, paywall if GCC/LLVM isn't good enough), system-wide support for pressure-sensitive pen input, and user control over startup (kernel?) and the behavior of the window manager and file manager.
  • Page 3: Search by size, format, dimensions, structured metadata within files, full text extracted from binary formats, and easy ability to add searchable comments to a file. Search box in all file choosers. Web search tools to find stock media to incorporate in your project (which may require the OS publisher to run its own search servers, which may in turn require ads).
  • Page 4: File manager support for adding colored labels (such as "draft", "final", "managed by art department", "managed by editorial department", etc.) to files or folders. Thumbnails in window pickers. Multi-window multitasking with tools to make the workspace associated with a document fill the left or right half of a screen. Smart support for recently used folders in file choosers, including disambiguating identical names and listing open windows in the file manager. High performance under multitasking load (kernel).
  • Page 5: All applications are scriptable, be it through command-line equivalents of GUI operations or through high-level events sent to an application. Scripting language bundled with the operating system so that users don't have to go through the IT department to get one installed. System-wide backup that allows backing up the installed applications (with configuration) and data separately and restoring to any point in time. Don't take the color out of system icons. Don't completely rearchitect your UI around passive home viewing of works created by others. And don't shun paywalled technologies entirely.

Re:So he wants KDE? (3, Interesting)

AbigailBuccaneer (3053535) | about a year ago | (#44795705)

I think this is merely due to the fact that the definition of "OS" varies from OS to OS. In the GNU/Linux world, the "OS" generally refers only to the kernel and the minimal set of command-line utilities necessary to get a basic system up and running, whereas in Windows and OS X the definition of "OS" also includes the desktop environment and many programs that come installed by default. If Windows or OS X were to be split into a desktop environment and kernel, then their support for these image formats would almost certainly end up in the desktop environment part.

If a KDE/GNU/Linux distribution installation comes with first-class support for these image formats, I don't see that there's any reason to disqualify it for having the image support in the KDE part of the installation rather than the GNU/Linux part.

Re:So he wants KDE? (4, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#44795739)

~sigh~ have you read the article. KDE/Linux doesn't have the image formats built into the OS. It's one of the things OS X does right.

Given that (especially for 'creative' type use cases, who get the oddball formats) you may have a change of format before you have an OS version bump, why would you want to couple image formats directly to the OS?

A mechanism for the OS to do some useful things with formats it understands, and a plugin mechanism for vendors to tell the OS about theirs(with a few common ones preloaded so jpeg and whatnot work out of the box for normal users), certainly; but don't basically all modern graphical shells do some degree of that already?

This can lead to issues, like the blasphemous nightmare that is fucking around with a directshow filter graph after half a dozen shovelware media-viewer programs have had a fight over it; but it's really the only alternative to either treating images purely as files, nothing more, or assuming that your OS vendor will be always accurate and always timely for every little subcommunity's oddball file format of choice.

Well-documented file format (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#44796377)

or assuming that your OS vendor will be always accurate and always timely for every little subcommunity's oddball file format of choice.

That's why MPEG documents its file formats thoroughly, even if MPEG-LA ends up paywalling the right to actually use them.

Re:So he wants KDE? (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year ago | (#44795767)

~sigh~ have you read the article. KDE/Linux doesn't have the image formats built into the OS. It's one of the things OS X does right.

What is "built into the OS" supposed to mean? If you mean that the typical linux distribution doesn't come with libraries for parsing images, you're wrong. If you mean something else, what else could you possibly mean?

Re:So he wants KDE? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795945)

A standardized interface which all image libraries follow, so that the same code can work with any type of image, maybe?

A program shouldn't need to have different code to read/write png, gif, jpeg etc. There should be a common API where the code just loads a standardized plugin (standardized across the OS, not just for the application in question), similar to how video codecs work. Unless the code wants to do stuff specific to a certain image format (or implements a new one), it shouldn't have to know anything about that image format.

That way, you could for example install a plugin for a certain raw format, and suddenly all programs dealing with images would know how to read/write that format. The desktop would know how to display a preview, the image editing program would know how to import/export the format, the video editor would know how to insert such an image into a video, ...

Re:So he wants KDE? (-1, Flamebait)

smash (1351) | about a year ago | (#44796093)

But how does that enable open-source wheel reinvention every 6 months?

Re:So he wants KDE? (2)

smash (1351) | about a year ago | (#44796083)

Plus anything to compare to automator. Seriously, those who call themselves nerds. Google/youtube/play with a friend's mac and try out automator.

Re:So he wants KDE? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795631)

Actually he's just described OSX. Not perfect but what is?

Re:So he wants KDE? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795669)

Let's just wait another 15 years and we might see a *working* color management solution under linux. THEN, KDE will be great for creative stuff. This already makes me stick to apple for now.

Re:So he wants KDE? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796061)

Did you know that you need to also calibrate your eyes, since our eyes are adjusting the colour balance.

Part of OS X colour management is the completely grey theme and widget set. They first did this wrong, it started with a blue theme, but the creatives complained about it messing with their eyes, if you look at OS X now it is all grey scale.

Re:So he wants KDE? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796339)

well, actually I would say you're calibrating your brain, not your eyes, which report the same colour info regardless.

He wants Adobe CREATIVE suite (1)

mschaffer (97223) | about a year ago | (#44795977)

Either the OP wants Adobe Creative suite or is complaining that something like this isn't freely available in a modified Ubutntu install out-of-the box.
Who else would redefine "creative" in this way?

Re:So he wants KDE? (1)

smash (1351) | about a year ago | (#44796073)

Did you entirely miss the systemwide scripting support (amongst other things)?

Solution: Window Blinds theme (0, Troll)

SplatMan_DK (1035528) | about a year ago | (#44795585)

Most of what he proposes could be done with a Blinds theme (a GUI tweaking utility for Windows made by StarDock).

It hacks the Windows GUI though the WPF and Win32 APIs and changes pretty much whatever you like.

Stuff like inserting an OS-wide search field in file dialogues or using an alternate image preview library is within the capabilities of a Blinds Theme.

StarDock even has a tweak called "Modern Mix" which forces single-screen Metro apps to work in a regular (and realizable) desktop window.

There are a lot of ugly things to say about Windows, but the architecture allows what the author is proposing. Virtually every OS component in Windows is available for tweaking or replacement.

- Jesper

Re:Solution: Window Blinds theme (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795647)

Oh great, an _additional_ item to install serially after you get a basic Windows running, with its own installer and set of annoying dialogs. Not like it wouldn't be better to have file formats supported natively, PDF support, something like VirtuaWin or Expose, and Microsoft dev tools included rather than a £17,000 extra to make WIndows within spitting distance of everything else.

Re: Solution: Window Blinds theme (1)

SplatMan_DK (1035528) | about a year ago | (#44796333)

Besides trolling as AC you also put your lack of OS knowledge on display.

You came put every conceivable thing into an OS in a way which appeals to "everyone". For example some security guru might not want the "creative" OS described simply because previewing/thumbnailing PDF and RAW files (effectively rendering them) is a security risk.

Your mind seems to tell you that it's possible to construct the "perfect" OS'a'la'Deathstar so you dont have to tweak it but people's needs are too diverse to get such a beast running on current generation computers.

Tweaking to suit your needs is far better than to make the end-of-all-OS monster with a billion features from which you ever only use 2%.

- Jesper

Re: Solution: Window Blinds theme (1)

SplatMan_DK (1035528) | about a year ago | (#44796371)

Apologies for the typos. The spellchecker and on-screen keyboard of my mobile OS lacks the rich features of my Desktop and the platform I am on wont let me tweak it to my needs ... ;-)

Re: Solution: Window Blinds theme (1)

tomboalogo (2509404) | about a year ago | (#44796449)

"monster with a billion features from which you ever only use 2%"
kinda like Microsoft Word turned into....

Beos was a media OS, went out with a sputter. (4, Insightful)

ehack (115197) | about a year ago | (#44795587)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BeOS [wikipedia.org]
"BeOS was optimized for digital media work and was written to take advantage of modern hardware facilities such as symmetric multiprocessing by utilizing modular I/O bandwidth, pervasive multithreading, preemptive multitasking and a 64-bit journaling file system known as BFS. The BeOS GUI was developed on the principles of clarity and a clean, uncluttered design.

The API was written in C++ for ease of programming. It has partial POSIX compatibility and access to a command-line interface through Bash, although internally it is not a Unix-derived operating system."

There's a reimplementation, Haiku
https://www.haiku-os.org/ [haiku-os.org]

Re:Beos was a media OS, went out with a sputter. (3, Funny)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year ago | (#44795865)

"I once preached peaceful coexistence with Windows. You may laugh at my expense - I deserve it."
-- Jean-Louis Gassee, CEO Be, Inc.

Re:Beos was a media OS, went out with a sputter. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796265)

and your parent says

The API was written in C++ for ease of programming.

which would also deserve a laugh, no?

Re:Beos was a media OS, went out with a sputter. (3, Interesting)

Life2Death (801594) | about a year ago | (#44796033)

Mod parent up. I came here to say this. BE is still used today to mix audio since its a real-time OS and very capable of doing things other OSes of the its day just plain were not up to.

The interface is ultra minimalistic and it follows a lot of what an awesome OS should be.

Re:Beos was a media OS, went out with a sputter. (1)

coofercat (719737) | about a year ago | (#44796081)

Since it's a thought experiment, and it's slashdot... I think all this, running on a Raspberry Pi. ;-)

Re:Beos was a media OS, went out with a sputter. (4, Interesting)

LoRdTAW (99712) | about a year ago | (#44796129)

I was going to say BeOS as well. One interesting thing was their codec API. All you needed to do was drop a codec binary in a directory and any program could now open that file. So if you wanted to play mp4 files through your favorite video player, you simply dropped an mp4 codec in there and any video player could now open those files. The idea was to move all media processing into the OS API so building applications was more modular.

Another interesting thing was that audio CD's were mounted as a directory full of wav files with CDDB data that you could simply encode or play directly or drag and drop into another folder.

It also used a microkernel (Though JBQ once told me directly that it was marketing BS and wasn't much of a microkernel) and ran most of the OS in user space including drivers. You never had to worry about trying to run new beta drivers, just copy them over and restart the corresponding server. If the driver crashed you were informed via a message box with a humorous Damn button instead of an Ok button. Though, it was also a drawback as the networking server in user space was notoriously slow. So slow that 100mbit cards couldn't push more than 10Mbps. Though its strong point was multithreading and parallel processing built into the API. It scaled nicely with multiple CPU's (I ran mine on an Abit P6 with dual 333MHz celerons OC'd to 450MHz) and there were reports posted of it running on quad and octal Xeon systems playing two dozen videos and all the demo apps without the machine breaking a sweat. You also had the pretty sweet Pulse application which was a CPU monitor which also allowed you to switch CPU's on and off. Before R3 you could actually turn off all of the CPU's and crash the system :-).

Some of this might sound trivial by todays standards but they were doing this in 1998. Before Microsoft got its shit together with 2000 (NT 5) and before MacOS X. In fact, Be was founded by ex Apple employees and BeOS was supposed to be an alternative to MacOS on the old PowerPC Macs. It was very efficient and made old Pentium 133MHz systems with 32MB RAM feel fast. But its closed source nature coupled with user space networking made it slow to adopt new technology. It was a nice OS with a pretty cool community. Too bad its pretty much dead.

Re:Beos was a media OS, went out with a sputter. (3, Interesting)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about a year ago | (#44796387)

If the driver crashed you were informed via a message box with a humorous Damn button instead of an Ok button.

Sounds like XV. Not officially updated since 1994 and still one of the best image viewers out there. It had "Bummer!" and "That sucks!" buttons for write errors such as disk full or permission denied.

And they were right. It's not OK.

Re:Beos was a media OS, went out with a sputter. (1)

unique_parrot (1964434) | about a year ago | (#44796167)

your post made me download the virtual machine image to try it out right now!

BeOS (4, Funny)

marcello_dl (667940) | about a year ago | (#44795599)

Thought experiment, what if we completed the pro feature list of the main linux multimedia apps and optionally ported them to a BeOS derivative (haiku)?

You see, thinking is easy.

Creative? (1)

mschaffer (97223) | about a year ago | (#44795613)

Since when does creative = audio & visual pursuits only.
Why isn't the title simply something like "ultimate audio-visual os"
say what you mean. mean what you say.

Re:Creative? (2)

MrMickS (568778) | about a year ago | (#44795637)

~sigh~ this is addressed in the first paragraph of the article. I guess it was too easy just to jump on that fairly minor point though rather than actually comment on the article at length. Slashdot at it's worst.

Re:Creative? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795667)

Addressing it doesn't excuse the lack of proper vocabulary.

Pickle Juice (1)

mschaffer (97223) | about a year ago | (#44795965)

Oh, sorry. When you read this, somewhere in the first part of my post I actually mean that "Pickle Juice" means that I am talking about not expressing yourself accurately and you need to read an article just to see how some prat has redifined a word or phrase that most people would assume means something else.

"Slashdot at it's worst" indeed!

Headlines have a maximum length (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#44796419)

Headlines have a maximum length. For example, I've often had to abbreviate Microsoft as M$, recalling its origin as a BASIC interpreter publisher, to fit it in the 50-character headline of a Slashdot post. How would you have rewritten the headline to be no longer than the original headline?

OSs are supposed to be generic (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795635)

Sorry art folks, you shouldn't ask for a new OS for every different use case. What you want can and should be achieved with UI tweaks.

Re: OSs are supposed to be generic (4, Insightful)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about a year ago | (#44795649)

No they're not. They're meant for the tasks at hand.

You mean to tell me the OS running a point of sale terminal and the OS running the systems at the airport should both be set up to run nethack? Or that a Wii U is supposed to do actuarial tables?

Re: OSs are supposed to be generic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795673)

An OS's primary goal should be to manage the hardware and let the software on it operate.

The things you mentioned, actuary tables, and the like, are applications.

Refers to applications and libraries (2)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#44796441)

An OS's primary goal should be to manage the hardware

The screen is hardware. A window manager application divides it into areas for applications. The disk drive is hardware. A file system divides it into areas for documents, and a file manager application allows arranging and locating these documents. The "OS" of the article refers not to the kernel [slashdot.org] as much as to window manager and file manager applications and system-wide libraries that support audiovisual creative use cases.

Re: OSs are supposed to be generic (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#44795755)

It depends on what you mean by 'OS': Should the POS and the server be running nethack? Obviously not. Is there any particularly good reason why either device should be running an OS that wouldn't support nethack if it were installed? No, not really (and, in fact, both of them probably do).

As for the Wii U, I assume that if Nintendo felt like releasing a sequel to 'Dr. Mario', where you play as Actuary Wario and attempt to manage the risk pool of Dr. Mario's patients, it wouldn't be the OS that stops them.

Re:OSs are supposed to be generic (1)

rioki (1328185) | about a year ago | (#44795885)

I could not agree more with that. An operating system is so basic that you can basically do nothing with it. The problem is that OS vendors started to make their default OS installation useful out of the box by adding applications. Yet that are applications on top of the Operating System, that they get shipped on the same disk as the OS is just an arbitrary decision of the OS vendor. The author of the article has totally no clue about what actually makes an OS.

Re:OSs are supposed to be generic (4, Insightful)

drkim (1559875) | about a year ago | (#44795951)

Sorry art folks, you shouldn't ask for a new OS for every different use case. What you want can and should be achieved with UI tweaks.

I agree. I actually RTFA and it feels like he's asking (and answering) the wrong question.

Like if you were to ask: "What is the best kind of paper to print targets on to improve your firearm accuracy?" instead of asking "What is the best ammo/gun/sight to use to improve your firearm accuracy?"

I don't think the OS is the thing to streamline, the actual creative software UI is more important.
I work in both Adobe Creative Suite, and Autodesk 'Smoke,' and they both have a fairly good interface for previewing and moving between applications and/or file/media types.

Smoke runs as a sort of single application, and you just click buttons or swipe between pages of apps. However you can easily move from paint to video editing to sound mixing, without leaving the main program. The UI is consistent from module to module. Smoke has (in the past) been ported for IRIX, LINUX and Mac OS.

In the Adobe CS you still have to launch different apps, but a good deal of file manipulation "common ground" is had in their 'Bridge' app. Moving media between apps is also streamlined, you don't need to render and export/import to move a project or media between apps.

Re:OSs are supposed to be generic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796429)

Sorry art folks, you shouldn't ask for a new OS for every different use case. What you want can and should be achieved with UI tweaks.

I agree. I actually RTFA and it feels like he's asking (and answering) the wrong question.

Like if you were to ask: "What is the best kind of paper to print targets on to improve your firearm accuracy?" instead of asking "What is the best ammo/gun/sight to use to improve your firearm accuracy?"

So, instead of asking an almost certainly obviously wrong question*, you want to ask a more subtly wrong question** which is more likely to lead down a path full of useless and contradictory 'answers' instead?

* There is the possibility that someone is printing their targets on dark paper and, as a result, is having trouble seeing the target in enough detail to know where to aim, but that would be a pretty obvious issue.
** Unless something is wrong with your firearm or ammunition, it is technique, not equipment, that is the primary factor in obtaining accuracy.

Re:OSs are supposed to be generic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796453)

..would agree with the rest, insofar as the average `creative professional' could not care less what OS is underneath, they only want to switch on a monitor and find their specific app and familiar UI running - and most of these would be in trouble if they had to boot the box themselves - "What the Hell am I, Steve Wozniak, or what? sumbdy switch this damn contraption ON again, I don't get paid enough for this.."

Would take issue with your claim Smoke was 'ported' to IRIX tho - was written for IRIX, then ported Linux, then MacOS, no? Besides, I thought Smoke was merely the video editing aspect of their compositing line, been a while tho. Nor do I know why they killed combustion (or even discreet as brand, for that matter..), or jump around hardware like a flea with a bad tic when somewhat related products like Max are presumably still PC, etc. - Autodesk tho, who the hell knows how they arrive at decision. As noted tho, doubt most of the end users care a jot about the hardware or OS, end of the day, it (and they) have but one job to do.

Re:OSs are supposed to be generic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796023)

Competent multi-tasking can be achieved with UI tweaks?

But yes, I agree that OSes are indeed supposed to be generic.
What the author is really asking for is a visual-media-specific configuration - a distro in Linux parlance. He doesn't mind which platform the distro uses, but good luck creating and distributing a custom Windows or OSX "distro".

Ooooh, pointy jabs at OSs (1)

Horshu (2754893) | about a year ago | (#44795643)

Sounds so provocative and original.

Re:Ooooh, pointy jabs at OSs (4, Informative)

robthebloke (1308483) | about a year ago | (#44796169)

Sorry, but pointy jabs at OSes are well deserved in this case (ex-film industry guy here). Linux is used extensively within the film industry, but each studio requires a small army of linux gurus to patch and modify the OS and kernel just to keep the OS from constantly falling over. Whilst none of the gurus complain (they get paid a healthy salary), it's a real shame that an artist simply cannot perform these tweaks themselves (recompiling a kernel is not for the faint of heart!). You'll also find a few Mac pros knocking about, but there the problems are just plain ridiculous. The lag between new OpenGL version & GPU features, v.s. the adoption into OS X is just insane. If you're predominantly linux, with a few hundred mac OS X boxes, it's kinda nice to be able to provide the same toolset to users on both platforms (As an R&D programmer, my role was to help improve the performance of art tools). Sadly, if you have OS X in the mix, this becomes extremely unpleasant. You end up with the high performance version on linux (leveraging any GPU feature available to give the artists the ability to work on scenes with hundreds of millions of polygons), and then you have the crippled OS X version that craps out after 10 million (even though the GPU used in both machines is identical). Windows isn't without it's problems (being effectively stuck with a single user->single computer mindset), but at least you can still exploit the underlying hardware. The reality is, if you're a creative professional, working with computers is still a massive ball-ache. It's a shame that people who write the OSes haven't really put much consideration into figuring out how their users actually use the things.

Intent-aware OS and I/O bottleneck aware kernel (4, Interesting)

advid.net (595837) | about a year ago | (#44795671)

If I copy huge files, while doing video processing, running a VM, and switching from one tab to another in the web browser, the system become quite unusable...
He could still be responsive with dynamic I/O priority handled by GUI and kernel.

What we lack most is some intention-aware GUI and OS kernel, working together so that the right process get the right priority and that I/O bottlenecks are handled gracefully.

Content creation activities are often I/O and CPU demanding, and even on creativity praised OS such as Mac OS we have this big problem of I/O channel unawareness.

Example:
One need to be able to start a huge file copy with a background intent so it will be throttled when the user starts a video effect preview which writes temporary files on one of the same disks of the copy.
The GUI gives the video preview higher priority, even on I/O, and the kernel detects the bottleneck on one of the disks and decide to almost freeze the file copy.
But then the user start the full video rendering in background, the GUI assigns the lower priority and the file copy resume to full I/O speed.

Re: Intent-aware OS and I/O bottleneck aware kerne (1)

loufoque (1400831) | about a year ago | (#44795761)

If you want a good kernel and good file management, then you want Linux.

Re: Intent-aware OS and I/O bottleneck aware kerne (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795833)

Last time I checked, reading a scratched DVD put the cdrom driver into deadlock and thus the whole OS into a halt because of its integration with the filesystem, I couldn't even start any other process since it involved reading from disk. Top quality! Was able to recover a machine with a reboot.

I wonder if this monolithic thing has something to do with a driver fucking up the whole system...

Re: Intent-aware OS and I/O bottleneck aware kerne (1)

loufoque (1400831) | about a year ago | (#44795953)

The Linux kernel is not responsible for lousy device drivers.

Re: Intent-aware OS and I/O bottleneck aware kerne (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796315)

Linux's shitty driver interface is the root cause of all shitty drivers.

Re:Intent-aware OS and I/O bottleneck aware kernel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795777)

All that exists in Linux. Both processes (nice) and I/O (ionice) have priority levels you can manipulate -- a normal user can decrease the priority of any task they own.

Experience shows that we don't know enough about usage patterns to make it automatic. The process scheduler prior to the current default in Linux tried to do that for "interactive" processes, and failed miserably.

The missing bit, is only the user interface to easily manipulate the priority of a given task. It wouldn't be too difficult to add to for example the window manager (say next to the window control buttons) so it'd affect the process owning that window -- maybe a drop-down menu with two sliders, one for CPU priority and another for I/O priority? --, it's just that nobody needs that enough to actually support a developer to add them.

I've solved the issues I've encountered by overriding the applications I don't want hogging my resources by scripts that execute the application niced. Works fine. Having a two-disk RAID-0/1 also helps a lot, although a four-disk RAID-10f2 would be even better.

Re:Intent-aware OS and I/O bottleneck aware kernel (3, Interesting)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year ago | (#44795831)

All that exists in Linux. Both processes (nice) and I/O (ionice) have priority levels you can manipulate -- a normal user can decrease the priority of any task they own.

Experience shows that we don't know enough about usage patterns to make it automatic

And yet it doesn't seem like anyone is even trying. Why don't file copies get launched at a low I/O priority by default, just a notch down? Why doesn't the foreground app get a boost, just one point? Etc.

I see ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795897)

All that exists in Linux. Both processes (nice) and I/O (ionice) have priority levels you can manipulate -- a normal user can decrease the priority of any task they own.

Experience shows that we don't know enough about usage patterns to make it automatic. The process scheduler prior to the current default in Linux tried to do that for "interactive" processes, and failed miserably.

The missing bit, is only the user interface to easily manipulate the priority of a given task. It wouldn't be too difficult to add to for example the window manager (say next to the window control buttons) so it'd affect the process owning that window -- maybe a drop-down menu with two sliders, one for CPU priority and another for I/O priority? --, it's just that nobody needs that enough to actually support a developer to add them.

I've solved the issues I've encountered by overriding the applications I don't want hogging my resources by scripts that execute the application niced. Works fine. Having a two-disk RAID-0/1 also helps a lot, although a four-disk RAID-10f2 would be even better.

And you expect a "creative" type or anyone for that matter to deal with all that when they're working?

The process scheduler prior to the current default in Linux tried to do that for "interactive" processes, and failed miserably.

"failed miserably"? In what way? Maybe it wasn't implemented right.

Re:Intent-aware OS and I/O bottleneck aware kernel (3, Interesting)

RamiKro (3019255) | about a year ago | (#44795925)

The Linux scheduler under-prioritizes user interaction (keyboard\mouse\remote input and monitor\serial output) over disk and memory i/o by design since it's a server OS. There are out of tree schedulers that resolve all that and even a few Real Time ones that can guarantee interaction but Linus (justifiably) rejects them since Linux IS a server kernel.

Not enough (2)

tuo42 (3004801) | about a year ago | (#44795687)

A true OS aimed at "creative" in my opinion needs much more than this. To name a few things:

- OS level handling of color information and an OS API/CMM which every application accesses and uses (no app-specific color management and no app-specific algorithms and "rules". Same for printer drivers
- specialized file system which offers the possibility to actually have "asset" folders. Not the possibility to create a folder and name it assets, but an actual logic to files stored in it's parent folder which different applications again can understand and access. Same goes for projects. The OS has to understand what we are working on, and not give us the possibility to think up our own project folder structure, which is different from company to company to freelancer
- integrated, transparent versioning of projects, their main files and assets. as simple right click => "create versioned directory/project", with an OS API which the applications hook into. the file manager needs to have the possibility to easily roll back the whole folder including assets to version 06, for example, without losing other version. easy ability to branch from one version to another and develop them simultanously. this needs to have a very good UI so I can QUICKLY find what I am searching for
- these functions need to work on network shares, with multiple users, and need an easy export/import feature, so I can export/pack the project, send it to an external, and get the new one back, and I can quickly and easily import it back in.
- fonts are assets! not something you hide somewhere in the OS folder. also, and I mean it: some kind of DRM fonts, so I can send out copyrighted fonts to an external which will only work inside the project folder I just exported and sent him. - integrated time logging. set up OS wide rules which applications to log, and when to stop logging (after x minutes without mouse movement etc.). easy export of "how long did I work in project XYZ, on file XYZ, in application XYZ". Again, has to work with multiple users over the network

For most of these functions, there is a solution, sometimes even a close on in some OS (Timemachine, Shadow files) etc., but you have to piece the stuff together, and most of the times, one component or another breaks the concept due to an update, or it simply is to cumbersome for some people to handle and again the whole thing breaks down. or it is damn expensive. Many time loggers come to mind, which scan window titles to try to find out which file you are working on, and often break with new versions of applications or foreign versions.

Such an OS would be a killer app/OS, but it will never exist. If market share is low, the big apps won't be ported. And if the big apps are not available, market share stays low.

And I don't think it is possible to create such a thing as a framework layout on top of an OS...it would not feel intuitive enough, and would not hook deeply enough into the inner workings of the OS.
The only company who could pull this off is Apple, but if they would have wanted to, they would have done it already as the last three major OS versions where quite lackluster IMHO when it comes to innovation.

regards

tuo

Re:Not enough (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year ago | (#44795789)

OS level handling of color information and an OS API/CMM which every application accesses and uses

Who doesn't have this? All major operating systems include OS-level color correction.

specialized file system which offers the possibility to actually have "asset" folders. Not the possibility to create a folder and name it assets, but an actual logic to files stored in it's parent folder which different applications again can understand and access

So far you have utterly failed to explain the difference.

The OS has to understand what we are working on, and not give us the possibility to think up our own project folder structure

What? Seriously? That was the dumbest thing I expect to read all day... and it's 0350. The fact that Unix doesn't understand what you're working on, and gives you the possibility to think up your own project folder structure is a benefit, not a weakness. Those who do not understand Unix are doomed to make dumb suggestions about operating systems.

integrated, transparent versioning of projects, their main files and assets

Finally, something you said makes sense. All operating systems should include a versioning filesystem. What year is it, anyway?

these functions need to work on network shares

Yes, managed on the server. Because they're implemented at the filesystem level.

fonts are assets! not something you hide somewhere in the OS folder

It should be possible for applications to load fonts which are not stashed somewhere in a folder... like they can on Unix today. Or any other operating system. If your favorite creative apps don't do this, it's not because the OS doesn't support it. It's because the apps suck.

And I don't think it is possible to create such a thing as a framework layout on top of an OS...

That's because you understand neither frameworks nor operating systems.

Re:Not enough (1)

tuo42 (3004801) | about a year ago | (#44795849)

While you are right that all OS have color management implemented, most applications implement their own. Apply the same color management in Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Indesign and Adobe Photoshop, and you will get three different results. That's why third-party solutions - quite expensive ones, mind you - exist to handle this dilemma. And no OS I know of implements the needed algorithms for serious color management.

Regarding your comment about folders: the problem is that most creative workflows span more than one person or even one company. Most of the times, a couple of freelancers are on board, one company provides this, one company provides that. As long as each of them has it's own structure of how to manage projects on the FS level, you run into problems. If you tell me that is not the case, I cannot take you seriously.

Third, regarding fonts: the problem is that many fonts are copyrighted and thus are not allowed to be sent to freelancers. So when text has to be modified, everything has to be sent back to the company who is allowed to work with the font. This is also a very recurring problem which costs money and time!

I understand very much that you like Unix and you like to tell people they are idiots because you think they don't understand unix. That's fine if that is the way you roll. But work in the creative industry on bigger projects for a couple of years, and you will understand my post.

The question was: what would be the perfect OS for creative work, and I stated my opinion by expressing the needs of this particular field of work.

And yes, I know what a framework is, but english is not my native language. The reason I mentioned it is that these frameworks exist, and bigger agencies struggle to keep them working, because they are on top of an OS, and every application update, every OS update might break them and you wait for an update for a couple of days or weeks. Again, this happens every year and decreases productivity. Plus: they never feel as integrated as they should be.

regards

Re:Not enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796459)

The font thing is just like any other software you need to pay for a license for. If this and that software or library isn't paid by both companies that use it, then you can't use it. End of story. If you want to make all fonts free, i'm all for it, but basically use free fonts. It's a lisencing issue, that the OS cannot override, so i don't see why you prought it up. Fuck DRM by the way.

Secondly, an asset directory? That isn't a filesystem problem. FS is there for handling directories and files. It does not give a crap what you put there, it only stores the data. This is not an OS problem either. There are too many different kinds of projects to force everyone to use the same directory structure.

Third, FS level versioning. It's ok for somethings, when you do not have a project for it (like people doing their personal finance or something), but it is not a replacement for a real version control. There are a lot of them, depending on the needs (non distributed like subversion for work, that you "can't" do anywhere else than office, distributed system such as Fossil, GIT, Mercurial, bazzaar, veracity for work you need to have version control without connection to the company servers) many of them have a tool that integrates to the file manager (like tortoiseSVN, tortoiseGIT etc), so that "right click -> create repository" is possible.

The only useful thing at FS level version control is when you need to undo something you haven't yet commited and then closed the editor, and that requires automatic versioning. It should also need to be such, that the changes are disgarded once the file has been commited to the real version control. So this is not really an OS problem. Also some version controls, like Fossil and Veracity, also have other benefits like intergrated ticket system and wiki.

Fourth, you can keep your automatic logging. Besides i bet there are software for that. Otherwise, it's not an OS problem.

I don't want these things to keep bloating the damn OS, they aren't essential to the OS, so they do not need to be in the OS. Choose the tools you need, but don't expect everyone to need them.

What you are basically describing is a work environment. Maybe it would be useful, if many of these tools came packaged in one easy to install software package. It's all doable without having them on the OS disk or download.

Color management algorithms are patented (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#44796495)

And no OS I know of implements the needed algorithms for serious color management.

How much of that is because "the needed algorithms for serious color management" were invented less than 20 years ago, and the patent holders price a license too high for an operating system intended to cover both home users and professional graphic artists?

Re:Not enough (2)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about a year ago | (#44796435)

The fact that Unix doesn't understand what you're working on, and gives you the possibility to think up your own project folder structure is a benefit, not a weakness. Those who do not understand Unix are doomed to make dumb suggestions about operating systems.

Welcome to GNOME and the new world order!

Go to a terminal, cd into some project directory heirachy. Start a program which uses the gnome based file dialog boxes (openoffice, inkscape, and so many more) to edit a file using the commandline.

Now go to save as.

Where are you? Certainly not in $PWD, that's for sure. Quite possible in the last place you were when you used such a program.

Who needs directory heirachies anyway?

Re:Not enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795811)

The OS has to understand what we are working on, and not give us the possibility to think up our own project folder structure, which is different from company to company to freelancer

It's also different from project to project and it's really not the job of applications or OS to impose this on users. When it is done, you typically end up with some 'black box' bogosity that causes more problems for professional use than it solves.

integrated, transparent versioning of projects, their main files and assets. as simple right click => "create versioned directory/project", with an OS API which the applications hook into. the file manager needs to have the possibility to easily roll back the whole folder including assets to version 06, for example, without losing other version. easy ability to branch from one version to another and develop them simultanously. this needs to have a very good UI so I can QUICKLY find what I am searching for

This would be a mess for similar reasons to the above. Simply save different versions of the project from your non-destructive editing app and label them appropriately.

fonts are assets! not something you hide somewhere in the OS folder.

Surely it would be an apps responsibility to subset and embed them?

You're a (web?) designer, the workflow you're describing would be an absolute nightmare for high-end A/V. We have huge amounts of data and some editing operations are destructive, especially when collaborating with 3rd parties. It's not realistic that data can be versioned at each stage, especially not with the requirements for working with DPX / ProRes and various offline proxies.

Re:Not enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796187)

It's not realistic that data can be versioned at each stage, especially not with the requirements for working with DPX / ProRes and various offline proxies.

Why would it have to be "realistic"? With that kind of attitudee you'll never be making anything new. Having more than 2 colors on computer monitors wasn't realistic just some decades ago. Having a computer at all wasn't realistic at some point. Being an artist by trade hasn't been realistic for most of humanitys existance. In ten years I expect to be able to have running versioning of everything I ever do on a computer. It needs to record everything, and be able to do those things in backwards order. Call up a slider, move the positioning bar to wanted time, there, everything as it was. A global Undo, but with the ability to move forward also, and to different branches, and to combine them. Why would that be unrealistic?

Re:Not enough (1)

loufoque (1400831) | about a year ago | (#44795959)

So basically, since you're incompetent and can't set up the right software and subsystems for your workflow, you need the OS to mandate it for you?

NeXTstep: Display PostScript, Pantone, &c. (1)

WillAdams (45638) | about a year ago | (#44795713)

My Cube was the most productive machine I've ever owned/used.

Sadly, Mac OS X loses much of that synergy (limited Services, no DPS, Pantone per application, no global Webster.app, no systemic Digital Librarian, &c.)

It kills me that I can't find a vector drawing environment as productive as Altsys Virtuoso --- Freehand is close, but it's been EOL'd, and I dread when I won't be able to install it on a new machine.

Re:NeXTstep: Display PostScript, Pantone, &c. (1)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | about a year ago | (#44795905)

Was Freehand ever ported to Intel on OS X? In a weird way the Windows version may live on a bit longer.

Re:NeXTstep: Display PostScript, Pantone, &c. (1)

WillAdams (45638) | about a year ago | (#44796051)

Unfortunately, no, it requires Rosetta, so won't run (directly) on anything newer than Mac OS X 10.6.x --- I managed to score the nicest Mac running 10.6 I could at work, and I'll use it until I'm forced to replace it. Hopefully by then there'll be an alternative (I've got hopes for Tribaloid, and wish that the Cenon folks took interface more seriously, and regret Andrew Stone moving on to do iPad apps....)

Running Freehand in Windows using Parallels may be the best option for the long run, but that makes me very, very sad.

This article makes no sense (2)

John Burton (2974729) | about a year ago | (#44795793)

It's titled as being about operating system features, but it's almost entirely about application level stuff such as codecs and user interface.

Re:This article makes no sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795931)

Re:This article makes no sense (1)

loufoque (1400831) | about a year ago | (#44795973)

Yes, it is stupid.
The best OS for creative editing is the OS that supports all of the software that you plan to use. Typically, it would be Windows, since some critical software only runs on that operating system.
More and more software gets ported to Mac and Linux though, so it's mostly a matter of what you need to use in your workflow.

Thought Experiment = Dream (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795795)

And, in his world, the OS could run any piece of software that all other OSes (extinct, existing, or to be) could run and faster as well.

Just a thought. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44795895)

Wouldn't an OS work instead of a government? Faster decision making, maintained/organised, less room for corruption etc etc

Video Editing (3, Interesting)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year ago | (#44796001)

Right now is Windows. Final Cut Pro was bastardized into Imovie pro. and Linux has absolutely nothing that is useable.

Windows has a lock on it as the only platform that runs AVID and Sony Vegas for the only two professional platforms for video editing and After Effects as the ONLY EFX software platform that is useable.

And this makes me sad. All the Linux options are utter garbage or for making videos of your cat, none are usable for a feature length film or even a professional looking TV show.

The only good option is to use Blender, a 3D graphics program to do some video editing by using one of it's side functions, but it is unusable for anyone doing professional work or needs to collaborate with others OR work with large projects, Blender chokes hard on anything large. And the problem is that 99% of all the developers out there are far more interested in ooooh shiny features and not basics that need to be 100% reliable.

Re:Video Editing (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796391)

Lightworks for Linux? www.lwks.com

An OS for that? (4, Insightful)

dreamchaser (49529) | about a year ago | (#44796003)

You don't need an OS for that. What would be needed would be an application suite that handles everything on his wish list seamlessly. It could run on any OS.

Re:An OS for that? (2)

thegarbz (1787294) | about a year ago | (#44796095)

So tell me again how an application suite solves the issue of kernel level multi-tasking support?

The problem is a suite of applications for doing anything creative ever would be infinitely harder than simply creating the correct OS to run a creative application to begin with. The alternative is to create an overly complex super application with hooks directly into kernels to allow it to run it's own multitasking stack, a system that trawls through the filesystem and indexes everything the OS already does because it needs to implement metadata search, an application which comes with its own drivers to get around lack of support for proper monitor support, lets ignore the requirement for system service control, low OS overhead, and logfile / debugging tools.

No a lot of this is very OS based and absolutely not suitable for one super application.

Re:An OS for that? (1)

RamiKro (3019255) | about a year ago | (#44796139)

Let be more specific. He is describing Adobe Bridge.

30bit monitor? How about simple Colour Management? (0)

thegarbz (1787294) | about a year ago | (#44796125)

The writer seems to live in a dream world with strange priorities. 30bit monitor support? Really? That's high on your todo list? If you had a HP Dreamcolour monitor you wouldn't be complaining about the lack of 30bit colour support... not while you're so busy swearing at your computer because a basic app on the screen can't even display the correct colour to begin with due to lack of colour management support.

Seriously for someone wanting a Creative OS how is this not on the list? Linux's colour management would be a load of crap if it could be said to exist at all. Windows colour management is a haphazard approach that works well if you code for the specific API the OS provides. No experience with Mac but apparently it's better still. Right now to get the correct colour to display on my screen my choices are Firefox trawling through the about:config dialogue, or Firefox with a plugin that identifies the correct monitor profile. Not even Internet Explorer, or the Windows bloody desktop correctly manages colour.

Ugh (4, Interesting)

RazorSharp (1418697) | about a year ago | (#44796127)

With a dual-boot setup, this machine was also my first foray into Linux outside of a virtual machine.

He also just kind of lumps all Linux distros into one, it's not until the last page that you get to this:

Things that are coming in Ubuntu are meaningless to me because all the programs I use that have Linux versions require RHEL-based distros.

First, some specific examples would be nice. I've never had this problem and unlike most Linux users, I deal with the world of making "creative content" more than maintaining servers or hacking out code. Most Linux programs don't seem to care about what distro you're using. Ubuntu Studio is my OS of choice for the creative stuff. I used to use Mac OS X but it's just pointless now because there's a free alternative for everything I do on Linux.

I use Mint for the standard OS stuff. The Red Hat distros I always viewed as more server-oriented, which is why I found this statement to be so bizarre. Ubuntu Studio is tailored to the creative types so he should have reviewed that distro specifically. He mentions Ubuntu here and there throughout the article, but from his statements it's very apparent that he's using the standard distro with the Unity interface. The applications that Studio comes preinstalled with can be manually installed on Ubuntu, and the XFCE interface it uses can also be installed on Ubuntu, but what makes studio unique is its low-latency kernel.

That's not to say that Ubuntu Studio is the uber-creative OS this guy seeks. I'm an amateur musician and when I need to do image manipulation professionally it consists of little things (I'm not creating 3D models, animations, etc.). Maybe the professional creator who "works efficiently at an almost pathological level" needs some of the advantages of Mac OS X and the propriety software available on it, but it would have been nice if he had at least singled out the Linux distro that's attempting to compete and only used that one as a comparison.

As an amateur, Ubuntu Studio fits my needs perfectly and allows me to avoid the high costs of buying OS X software. The OS X software does look nicer but that's not worth anything to me as it doesn't alter the end result. Comparing Ubuntu Studio to OS X for me is like comparing my made in Mexico Fender Jaguar to a custom shop American Jaguar. Sure, I had to change the pickups to get an optimal sound, I had to adjust the neck a little to get the action just where I wanted it, but it was still a way better deal than forking over several times as much cash for the custom shop guitar. The custom shop guitar would have all sorts of little cosmetic details that would really impress people who see it, but when people listen to the final recording they can't tell the difference.

This will be the next big thing (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year ago | (#44796143)

This will be the next big thing ... after HURD

Re:This will be the next big thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796319)

Yup, as soon as they have spent seven releases updating the brown background to various shades of brown

Since this is all imaginary (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44796399)

It should also be able to output all media to a 3D printer and do so in a private spacecraft (that only reaches the upper atmosphere ballistically).
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