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176 comments

I would have... (3, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | about 7 months ago | (#44800987)

But there's no beer on Mars.

Re:I would have... (4, Funny)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 7 months ago | (#44801367)

Well, at least the hard part is over now. Now all we have to do is build a rocket and living quarters to get there and stay.

Re:I would have... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44802257)

This will turn out to be Space Cadets [youtube.com] all over again.

coincidentally (4, Funny)

bitt3n (941736) | about 7 months ago | (#44800989)

all of them are mothers-in-law.

Re:coincidentally (0)

ackthpt (218170) | about 7 months ago | (#44801013)

all of them are mothers-in-law.

And quite suspiciously the applications are signed in handwriting resembling that of their sons-in-law.

Re:coincidentally (4, Funny)

Longjmp (632577) | about 7 months ago | (#44801133)

Not all, the rest are telephone sanitizers.

Re:coincidentally (-1)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 7 months ago | (#44802421)

Not all, the rest are telephone sanitizers.

Joke all you want... this says something; There's over 200k people in western countries everywhere that are willing to die to make a political statement on someone else's behalf. Oh, I know... you think Mars has nothing to do with ... 'that'.

But anyone who's willing to take a one-way trip and never see their family or friends again... is exactly what 'that' is all about.

Re:coincidentally (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801127)

If only they could spare room for a comparatively smaller number of politicians.

Perhaps in the glovebox with promises of rehydration on landing...

Re:coincidentally (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801129)

with a significant number of politicians, lawyers and lobbyists. They have apparently nobly accepted a one-way ticket to help keep costs down.

Re:coincidentally (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801599)

As long as there are no crying babies and people kicking my seat on the flight, I am okay with that.

Can't we just send them all? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801017)

I'm personally of the opinion that anyone with an inclination to volunteer to take what will invariably amount to a one-way trip to Mars based on the technology that we have so far is probably somebody that the world may be better off without.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (4, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | about 7 months ago | (#44801025)

I'm personally of the opinion that anyone with an inclination to volunteer to take what will invariably amount to a one-way trip to Mars based on the technology that we have so far is probably somebody that the world may be better off without.

Sadly, those we would most like to send, are probably the least likely to apply.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (0)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | about 7 months ago | (#44801161)

I'm personally of the opinion that anyone with an inclination to volunteer to take what will invariably amount to a one-way trip to Mars based on the technology that we have so far is probably somebody that the world may be better off without.

Sadly, those we would most like to send, are probably the least likely to apply.

I understand there will be a need for telephone sanitizers [wikipedia.org] on mars...

Re:Can't we just send them all? (1)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 7 months ago | (#44801419)

We could always offer to commute any death row inmates' sentences if they'll agree to go. But I think they'll probably catch on to the ruse pretty quickly, not to mention the damage they might cause when they realize the real implications of a "one-way trip" when it comes to Mars.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about 7 months ago | (#44801507)

IT comes down to are you the experiment, or the experimenter, in the case of these applicants, they're the former.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (4, Insightful)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 7 months ago | (#44801105)

I'm personally of the opinion that anyone with an inclination to volunteer to take what will invariably amount to a one-way trip to Mars based on the technology that we have so far is probably somebody that the world may be better off without.

They are people with "the right stuff". While the Apollo astronauts knew the plan was to come back, they must have been ready to face a one way trip, as the probability of that was, or must a least have seemed high.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (1)

SirGarlon (845873) | about 7 months ago | (#44801567)

Only if excessive credulity now counts as a virtue. The Mars One project has a very poor explanation [mars-one.com] how they are going to finance the construction and launch of the rocket, and none at all how they are going to finance all the testing [mars-one.com] they claim they'll do.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (4, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 7 months ago | (#44801657)

They are people with "the right stuff". While the Apollo astronauts knew the plan was to come back, they must have been ready to face a one way trip, as the probability of that was, or must a least have seemed high.

The difference being that this trip IS a "one way" trip.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (4, Insightful)

SecurityGuy (217807) | about 7 months ago | (#44801227)

Really? Why? Every single one of us is going to die of something, someday. I didn't apply, but thinking about it now, it's tempting. Getting to stand on another planet? Maybe even breaking ground for those who will come later? Really, that's kind of awesome. It's fine to say that maybe someday the technology will exist to make this safer, or even routine, but I'm pretty certain to die of something else before that happens.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801527)

Why don't you become the first to stand barefoot and live in the caldera of a volcano? I mean we all have to die of something someday. I guess in your world that means any stupid thing you choose to do is as good as doing intelligent things?

Re:Can't we just send them all? (1)

richlv (778496) | about 7 months ago | (#44802213)

that was a stupid comment, because going to mars is way more intelligent than what 90% of earth population is doing

Re:Can't we just send them all? (0)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | about 7 months ago | (#44802471)

Even if that means I'm stupid, I can't wait to get the popcorn and see people like you die on Mars. :-)

Re:Can't we just send them all? (4, Insightful)

SecurityGuy (217807) | about 7 months ago | (#44802531)

Why? People die doing things all the time now. Climbing mountains. Racing cars. Swimming. Running. Sleeping.

I don't know, I think I'd be chuckling to myself thinking yep, I'm dying, just like every one of you schlubs will. But I'm doing it on Mars.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (0)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | about 7 months ago | (#44802679)

Sure, if you want to die on Mars, go ahead and chuckle while you suffocate. I'm not against suicide. As long as participants realize that it's really just for TV entertainment, that's okay.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (1)

richlv (778496) | about 7 months ago | (#44802631)

i'm not applying, because i kinda like it here. but belittling those who did sounds damn shortsighted

Re:Can't we just send them all? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44802845)

Have you watched any of the Mars One videos? Most people applying there are complete morons.

Re:Can't we just send them all? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801847)

Most people want to live a long life. People who have already lived a long life are not necessarily the best-suited for this mission. Ditto for people with terminal diseases, or the suicidal.

Personally, I don't understand people who don't want to live forever, but I understand and accept there are people like that.

Probably won't even be a particularly pleasant death, unless you cheat and suicide early, depriving the Earth of knowledge that could be gained in your final hours (the attitude that this is okay would likely be screened against).

Re:Can't we just send them all? (3, Interesting)

SecurityGuy (217807) | about 7 months ago | (#44802393)

I want to live forever. Or at least long enough that I don't want to anymore. The problem is, that's not an option. When I was young(er) and (more) naive, I believed that maybe we finally live in a time where technology and medicine would advance fast enough that I wouldn't have to suffer death, at least not for a long, long time. It's become apparent that that's not the case. Why not do something fantastic before the inevitable?

Re:Can't we just send them all? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801493)

They're just harmless delusional nutters. We should send the Assads of the world first and kill all their offspring.

Salaried? (5, Insightful)

kaka.mala.vachva (1164605) | about 7 months ago | (#44801087)

Will these people get paid for the seven years they train? I'm in a pessimistic mood today, so I'm assuming that they will not actually reach Mars - just wondering what they will get for the seven years they put in.

Of course the application wasn't free (5, Insightful)

ModernGeek (601932) | about 7 months ago | (#44801135)

I believe the application fee was $35, so they have already raised a whopping $7 million that I assume will be leveraged for more publicity stunts in raising further money for the mission.

The main speciality of the Mars One project is fundraising and public relations, not space travel.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801357)

I doubt that mars one is going to ever happen, but in the event that it does, whoever does get selected will end up dying relatively quickly. The mission will with most certainty fail for the humans involved but will succeed for science.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801523)

Right... I'd love to see you back your statements with science tool.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801649)

@ $200k/lb that 7 million will pay for a medium sized dog, his favorite chew toy and a set of Google Glasses to record his last howl.

But wait! The pet industry is $50 billion/yr... could this be the start of a trend? I can see it now. Think of the publicity you could generate funding a short, $7 million Hollywood film called, "Fido Goes to Mars!"

Hey, stranger things have come out of product placement in movies... who would have thought that a chimpanzee and an astrologist could have launched a successful political career culminating with Nancy Reagan hosting parties for heads of state.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (4, Funny)

hedwards (940851) | about 7 months ago | (#44801705)

I doubt they turned a profit on that. $35 probably barely covered the cost of reviewing the application.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (3, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 7 months ago | (#44801733)

Wait...you think they actually reviewed the applications? They're likely scanned into a database for "future use".

I'm just jealous I didn't think of a stunt like this.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 7 months ago | (#44801889)

Yes, because at this point they're still hoping to actually do this. So, somebody needed to review the applications. Sure, they might have made some profit on this, but it's not like they're getting to keep all that money. Which even if they did, the $7m or so would be a drop in the pool of funding needed to even try this.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44802377)

The cynical view would be that it isn't clear that they are anywhere near prepared for such a trip, in which case their expenses come to zero dollars.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44802389)

No, they won't ever go anywhere. The entire program is disingenuous. Slashdot, stop giving these people free publicity. The more they get, the more damage their inevitable failure will do.

They have no engineers on staff. There are no feasibility studies, no technical documents, no explanation of how their tech will work. Also, apparently the public gets to choose who goes? Really? This isn't Survivor: Mars. Basically the entire program is PR and media people.

When pressed on any of these points, they fall apart (look up the Mars One AMA on Reddit). They claim they have "letters of intent" from SpaceX and a bunch of other contractors; apparently nobody told them that contractors are always happy for more business, but you actually need to give your contractor some specs at some point.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801973)

If those publicity stunts involve swimming or diving, include me out because there is no water on Mars

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (2)

ubungy (1471733) | about 7 months ago | (#44802463)

The application fee was variable depending on location. Some were $35 some were much lower. Also, they didn't reach the goal of half of a million applicants. This put them below their forecast funds from applications. Sorry can't find source.

Re:Of course the application wasn't free (1)

Kittenman (971447) | about 7 months ago | (#44802685)

I believe the application fee was $35, so they have already raised a whopping $7 million that I assume will be leveraged for more publicity stunts in raising further money for the mission. The main speciality of the Mars One project is fundraising and public relations, not space travel.

Agreed. It struck me as a reality show, rather than as a serious space mission (that's a mission into serious space).

202586 (5, Insightful)

plopez (54068) | about 7 months ago | (#44801147)

Lemmings.

Re:202586 (1)

Monty845 (739787) | about 7 months ago | (#44801349)

Summed it up in one word. Someone offered me the chance to go to mars, hell yeah I'd go, but I'd want to know a lot more about the details of the plan then those guys are providing. There are tons of big hurdles, they can be overcome, but its not gonna be simple, or cheap. I don't think a reasonable person would put faith in the group running this to be able to overcome those hurdles. Now if SpaceX was recruiting for a mars mission, sign me up.

Re:202586 (5, Interesting)

Calydor (739835) | about 7 months ago | (#44801503)

I'm pretty sure that being picked as one of the lucky few does not suddenly rob you of the right to say you've changed your mind when you see the rocket put together by the cheap brand of duct tape. On the other hand, this publicity stunt might actually make people in power realize that there are people out there who will volunteer despite the risk, and that maybe it's worth a try after all.

Re:202586 (4, Interesting)

kannibal_klown (531544) | about 7 months ago | (#44802015)

True, but it's a decision you'd want to make earlier-than-later.

Deciding to at least start the program is a life-changing thing. For example, I doubt you'd be able to keep your job so that means losing your job AND your home since you couldn't afford payments past X months.

So let's say they talk a great game and it looks like they have their "act" together. They have scientists, their mockups look sound, etc.

A hypothetical 2 years period goes by while you're training and what-not... and you realize WOW these people do NOT know what they're doing. Their ships aren't going to be able to get 10ft off the ground let alone make it to Mars. These conditions are not going to last more than X months let alone the planned Y decades. These people have no idea what they're doing.

So you quit... and now what. You're unemployed and homeless... and when asked about the 2 year gap on your resume you labeled a psycho for thinking that Mars One (now known as a cluster-f#@k) was actually going to happen.

Modern era Mayflower (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801155)

Here's why people apply and who applies: Some do it for the 15 minutes of fame, surely, but many others are serious about it. They know the risk, they know it's a one-way ticket, but their lives are going nowhere on this planet, they've got nothing to lose and this may be just the ticket for them to do something useful for humanity.

Others may have a successful life already but they don't think in terms of "me" and "my" but in terms of humanity and its long-term goals over several generations.

And even if the mission fails, one learns from mistakes and at least they've done something to improve the next mission's chances. Both categories of applicants are real heroes. Live or die.

Re:Modern era Mayflower (1)

rodrigoandrade (713371) | about 7 months ago | (#44801643)

Please mod up!! The title alone is worth a +5.

Agree 100%. I can't think of the pilgrims wanting to come back to Europe.

Re:Modern era Mayflower (4, Insightful)

spyfrog (552673) | about 7 months ago | (#44801753)

The difference being of course that the Mayflower settlers had a good chance of being self sustained. They didn't change planet to one totally inhospitable towards humans. They believed that they would be able to survive by simple using the same techniques as in England. This turned out to be wrong but it was more a lack off knowledge than anything else that killed them off - the place apparently supports life since people live there to this day.

Going to Mars is a totally different ballgame. You can't support yourself on Mars, at least not from the beginning. You have to trust that provisions come from Earth. If your supplies doesn't come, you starve or die from suffixation.

Re:Modern era Mayflower (1)

cjjjer (530715) | about 7 months ago | (#44802029)

Maybe. Maybe not.

What if there is indigenous people on Mars (live below the surface) and welcome these travelers with open arms and help them settle under the planet's surface in exchange for interesting technology, different food and clothing material. Then the new settlers start arriving in the thousands bringing diseases and claiming Mars land as their own.

What? it could happen...

Re:Modern era Mayflower (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44802823)

Suffocation you mean

Re:Modern era Mayflower (1)

jklovanc (1603149) | about 7 months ago | (#44802005)

And even if the mission fails, one learns from unforeseenmistakes

Knowing that something will fail and doing it anyway is just stupid.

By the way they are not the Modern Mayflower. Many of the Mayflower passengers were fleeing religious persecution due to their Puritanism. The trip to Mars, which will not happen any time soon, has nothing to do with that.

Re:Modern era Mayflower (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44802405)

The Puritans were not 'fleeing' religious persecution. Being 'Puritans', they strongly disapproved of the increasing liberalism in Europe. They traveled to the new world so that they could enforce their views in the new colonies.

Who is that? (2)

gr8_phk (621180) | about 7 months ago | (#44802061)

Others may have a successful life already but they don't think in terms of "me" and "my" but in terms of humanity and its long-term goals over several generations.

While I agree with some of your statements, this one seems false. If someone was truly concerned about the long-term prospects of humanity I doubt they would conclude the best thing for them to do is die in one of the first colonies on mars. Realizing their rarity, I should thing they'd wait until a functional colony is established and only THEN try to have some kind of influence on its development.

Re:Who is that? (3, Insightful)

dgatwood (11270) | about 7 months ago | (#44802739)

More to the point, they would try to influence the preparation to ensure that by the time they get there, the colony would be almost self-sustaining already. There's no reason it can't be done. Drop a bunch of large modules with breathable air and CO2 scrubbers, and verify remotely that they are all functioning before you send people. Then drop enough spare parts to scrub the air for at least a few decades, along with enough non-perishable food to last a similar period of time. Then drop enough building materials to build a huge, sealed, glass habitat to serve as a greenhouse for plants. Then drop equipment needed to build it (think "electric crane"). Then drop bags and bags of dirt. Then drop crates of seeds. Then drop enough solar panels to cover the state of Rhode Island and enough wire to hook it all up. Then remotely control all the equipment to make sure everything is working correctly. Then send the people to put it together. By that time, you've launched a dozen or more unmanned missions over the course of a decade, so you're sure of the launch vehicle and the landing craft. You've provided enough materials to create a sustainable living space, and you've provided enough materials to survive until they finish creating that space.

That's a lot! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801197)

202,586 people from around the world? How many of them are woman/man?? Taxi Porto Seguro [taxiportoseguro.net]

So you won't die alone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801231)

if NASA still favors the "one way mission". How many applicants are women?

Obligatory! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801239)

I have a hard enough time on this planet, much less going it on the next farthest rock out!

On a serious note... as long as I had tasks and hobbies to entertain myself on the trip to Mars, I think I'd be fine. Getting along with people is the least of my problems. To me repititious boredom would appear to be the real killer. There is also that little psyche bit of knowing that you're on a one way ticket to an uninhabittable barren wasteland.

Of course, having a sense of adventure would probably help that!

Re:Obligatory! (2)

phobos512 (766371) | about 7 months ago | (#44801485)

Hey, man, we're all on a one-way trip to somewhere, man. /said the hippie to no one in particular...

Re:Obligatory! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801569)

barren? Tell that to the martians!

Re:Obligatory! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801961)

To me repititious boredom would appear to be the real killer.

The real killer would be starvation. What, you think food grows there? Who's going to send the supply ships when the company goes bankrupt?

Great, now examine them... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801249)

Great, now examine them for mental and physical problems that will prevent them from making the trip. How many will you eliminate? I doubt the first person to go there will be drawn from this pool. NASA got this one right. You need military people. They have the best chance of handling the shit that will certainly happen without coming unglued.

Re:Great, now examine them... (5, Funny)

spleendamage (971412) | about 7 months ago | (#44801533)

Just find someone who is addicted to single-player turn-based strategy computer games. They'd complain about the trip being too short.
Like ... my friend, not me.

Re:Great, now examine them... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801933)

Six dollars [gog.com] of game, $400 of laptop, and a couple spare solar fins on the ship to keep the battery charged.

Day 422: I seem to be the only Mars One colonist to notice that we have actually landed on Mars. I found one of the old Mars Rovers and have taken to behaving as if it was a stubborn pet dog to stay sane. While my garden is growing almost as well as the test garden did on earth, I have no idea where the other colonists manage to keep finding the Mountain Dew and beef jerky that provides their sustenance.

Its the Titanic all over again (1)

ClassicASP (1791116) | about 7 months ago | (#44801253)

Relatively few have enough sense to know when to abandon ship!

Re:Its the Titanic all over again (1)

bkmoore (1910118) | about 7 months ago | (#44801303)

The Titanic, but without the luxurious accommodations and there won't be any break-dancing peasants in steerage either.

Re:Its the Titanic all over again (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 7 months ago | (#44802037)

on the titanic you at least got on the ship..

this is more like a guy in liverpool selling tickets to the titanic III.

they have no plan to actually do the trip and if they had that part squashed out they wouldn't need measly 7 million from applicants and could find suitable persons quite easily..

Futile (2, Funny)

HyperQuantum (1032422) | about 7 months ago | (#44801375)

So... they think they can escape the divine judgment by running away to Mars...

Really pointless, as they will find out.

Re:Futile (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801597)

Whatever you say, General Merritt.

You should have stayed on the Wheel.

That's all? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44801391)

Seems low, because I'm pretty sure there are way more than 200,000 idiots out there. Maybe most of them got lost on the way to the post office.

Hardly enough enough bodies . . . (4, Funny)

StefanJ (88986) | about 7 months ago | (#44801487)

. . . to fertilize King Barsoom II's lawn and flower gardens! MARS NEEDS MULCH!

But seriously: Initial training for the would-be colonists will consist of living for five years in trailer homes buried beneath the soil of Antarctica's "dry deserts." People who can't cope with the psychological pressure, or who are judged insufficiently entertaining by the casting group of the MARS LIVE! production company and its advertisers and charter sponsors, will be summarily kicked off of the program. (They will receive copies of the home game, which consists of a refrigerator box equipped with fake controls and a framed color print of a Mars probe landing site.)

Celebs (1)

eyenot (102141) | about 7 months ago | (#44801539)

I only heard about this because Pee-Wee Herman shared the news of it, and of his application, some time ago. I'd like to say I hope he makes it, but then we'd be without Pee-Wee Herman here on Earth.

I forwarded the news to Jane Wiedlin (Guitarist for The Go-Gos) who said she'd be interested in going, but I never saw anything on her FB that said she had filed the paperwork.

I tried to get a couple of other celebs interested but so far all I know is Pee-Wee Herman put in his application. Wouldn't it be interesting if he wins the contest?

$35 and a mouse click are meaningless (2)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 7 months ago | (#44801937)

Build the rocket and ask who wants to actually take the trip. Lots of people are willing to indulge in a hypothetical sacrifice. BTW, I'm planning to stop eating red meat any day now.

And now it's time for a name change (1)

Minwee (522556) | about 7 months ago | (#44802123)

They might get more attention, and make it easier to understand their goals, if they called it Duna One [kerbalspaceprogram.com].

If I were 20 I would have signed up (1)

Nimey (114278) | about 7 months ago | (#44802179)

If I was 20 and single again, I'd do it. But I'm 34 and have family responsibilities, so that's impossible.

Just think (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44802323)

It would be so exciting to be the first corpse on Mars!

Everyone should go ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44802645)

`

Just like in the short story "The Marching Morons".

`

Money to be made (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44802727)

If you could get the cost of a trip to Mars down to something like USD $500,000. about the cost of a mortage on a really nice house. And there are about 200,000 people who want to go to Mars, that's about a $100 billion. If only someone could capitalize on that...

Of course the current cost of getting an indvidual to mars is something ridiculous like tens of millions, or even 100s of millions.

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