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SSD Failure Temporarily Halts Linux 3.12 Kernel Work

Soulskill posted 1 year,10 days | from the must-be-nvidia's-fault dept.

Bug 552

jones_supa writes "The sudden death of a solid-state drive in Linus Torvalds' main workstation has led to the work on the 3.12 Linux kernel being temporarily suspended. Torvalds has not been able to recover anything from the drive. Subsystem maintainers who have outstanding pull requests may need to re-submit their requests in the coming days. If the SSD isn't recoverable he will finish out the Linux 3.12 merge window from a laptop."

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Really? (5, Insightful)

koan (80826) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822461)

No backup?

Re:Really? (4, Insightful)

gagol (583737) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822543)

I found spinning rust to at least give some clues prior to a crash and burn. I would say, single ssd is not ready for anything critical, in my opinion. Worst case scenario, you can always get the platters transfered in a good drive and recover from there (pricey, bur cheap if data is valuable enough).

Re:Really? (5, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822743)

Maybe Linus doesn't consider Linux to be critical...

Microsoft sure as hell doesn't seem to find Windows to be critical.

Re:Really? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822745)

I used to think that too, until I had a mechanical hard drive experience controller failure without warning. Single drive is not ready for anything critical, regardless of the storage mechanism.

Re:Really? (4, Interesting)

chuckinator (2409512) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822979)

Seconded. I've had a RAID1 mirror on my primary workstation at home for roughly... 4 years. I had one of those "oh, drat, my drive is starting to click, and we all know what that means..." moments and barely had time to backup the /home partition to an external machine while I went hardware shopping. Since that event window closed, that configuration has saved my butt twice. One time, the mirrored pair started to go after kinetic shock from moving to a new residence, and it didn't even stress me out to wait for a new pair from my online vendor of choice. I don't know what happened the second time, but I'm guessing that some bad components on the mobo were dirtying the 5V and 3.3V power rails into the drive connector because the whole rig decided to go kaput shortly after in a way that forced an upgrade to the latest CPU socket du jour mobo. Thankfully, I was already budgeting for new guts for that rig due to performance demands.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44823059)

Agreed. Any "single drive" system is a terrible idea for anything critical. What kind of idiot would run a critical system without (at least) a raid 1, and nightly (at least) backups?

Re:Really? (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822797)

So you've never had a hard disk controller failure then?

" Worst case scenario, you can always get the platters transfered in a good drive and recover from there"

What makes you think you can't take FLASH devices and access them in a similar way to platters? Just like with platters, you won't be able to access data on any damaged portions but unlike with platters it is unlikely that the platters will trash the read/write heads of the new drive.

Re:Really? (2, Funny)

jimbolauski (882977) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823089)

So you've never had a hard disk controller failure then?

" Worst case scenario, you can always get the platters transfered in a good drive and recover from there"

What makes you think you can't take FLASH devices and access them in a similar way to platters? Just like with platters, you won't be able to access data on any damaged portions but unlike with platters it is unlikely that the platters will trash the read/write heads of the new drive.

I don't know what your talking about it's very easy to desolder a couple hundred pins on a board, then install a new chip and resolder the new chip back in. That's just as easy as popping off the back of the HD removing a couple a screws and pulling out the platter.

Re:Really? (5, Informative)

tlhIngan (30335) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822985)

I found spinning rust to at least give some clues prior to a crash and burn. I would say, single ssd is not ready for anything critical, in my opinion. Worst case scenario, you can always get the platters transfered in a good drive and recover from there (pricey, bur cheap if data is valuable enough).

Sudden SSD failure is actually not really a failure that's detectable. Good SSDs have tons of metrics available through SMART including media wear indicators that tell you impending failure long before it happens.

But when an SSD suddenly dies, it's generally because the controller's FTL tables got corrupted. For high performance drives, it's remarkably easy to do as performance is #1, not data safety. There's nothing wrong with the disk or the electronics.

The FTL (flash translation layer) is what maps a sector the OS uses to the actual flash sector itself. If it gets corrupted, the controller has no way of accessing the right sectors anymore and things go tits up. It's even worse because a lot of metrics are tied to the FTL, including media wear, so losing that data means you can't simply erase and start over - you're completely hooped as the controller cannot access anything.

If you want to think of it another way, treat it like the super block on a filesystem, and the filesystem tables. Now imagine they get corrupt - the data is useless and recovery is difficult, even though the underlying media is perfectly fine. It's possible to hose it so badly that recovery is impossible.

For speed, FTL tables are cached - and modern SSDs can easily have 512MB-1GB of DDR memory just to hold the tables. Of course, you can't write-through changes since the tables themselves need to be wear-levelled on the flash media.

One of the iffiest times for this comes when an SSD is power cycled - pulling the power on an SSD can cause corruption because the tables may be in the middle of an update. But things like firmware bugs and other things can easily corrupt the table as well (think a stray pointer scribbling over the table RAM). A good SSD often has extra capacitance onboard to ensure that on sudden power failure, there is enough backup power to do an emergency commit to flash. This protects against power cycling, but firmware bugs can still destroy the data.

Of course, SSDs without such features mean the firmware has to be extra careful. And sometimes, such precautions can miss a point in time where you cannot pull the power at all.

It's sort of reminiscent of that Seagate failure that resulted in a log file reaching a certain size disabling the drive - the data and media were perfectly fine, it's just that the firmware crapped out.

Re:Really? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822549)

Given the utter arrogance of Mr. Torvalds, it doesn't surprise me at all... Why bother with backups, when you're God, right ? /s

Re:Really? (5, Funny)

pubwvj (1045960) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822941)

Ah, even Jesus saves. ;-)

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822563)

Probably not the most recent code...been there done that

Happens to the best of us it seems

Re:Really? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822573)

you know what he said ...
Only wimps use tape backup: real men just upload their important stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it ;)

Re:Really? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44823035)

you know what he said ...
Only wimps use tape backup: real men just upload their important stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it ;)

Exactly. Nothing much was lost here. He doesn't develop that much himself - he mostly pulls from his maintainers. So no loss, only a delay while he play around with the failed drive. Delays doesn't matter much in his world - in a business setting, the drive would be replaced in an hour.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822595)

No backup?

For a day of work? You'd basically need RAID for that to make any sense.

Re:Really? (1)

pubwvj (1045960) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822843)

There are automated solutions that keep hourly backups. Even a day's worth may be worth saving. Provided you do important work and don't just surf the web. :)

Re:Really? (1)

MightyYar (622222) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822957)

Crashplan even runs on Linux (and Windows and Mac, and with some nudging FreeBSD). Dropbox (or Sparkleshare if you want to stay Open Source). My goodness, the carelessness here is crazy.

Re:Really? (5, Informative)

You're All Wrong (573825) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823091)

Are you attempting to claim the prize for the person with the least understanding of the Distributed Source Code Control System in use?

There was absolutely no code on his system that wasn't on between dozens and thousands of other systems depending on its age.

Just read TFA: "I had pushed out _most_ of my pulls today". His "pulls" are code that is *elsewhere*. He's just a conduit (and gatekeeper) between a few dozen elsewheres and a server with a fat pipe. And by the construction of the system, it really shouldn't matter how those pulls ordered. (If there'll be a merge conflict one way round, there'll be a merge conflict in other permutations too.)

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822963)

I have automated hourly backups, both on Linux (backintime) and Mac (time machine, ugh). Time machine is prettier, but I have had three separate occasions on three different machines / backup drives where certain files were dropped from the backup without warning. When I went to restore them, the backup was months old, even though there were recent changes.

Luckily I don't trust just one backup system, and always have a redundant one going offsite, generally using rsync, but there is a lesson to be learned here...

Re:Really? (5, Funny)

Anonymous CowWord (635850) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822601)

Haven't you heard?

"Only wimps use tape backup: real men just upload their important stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it ;)" - Linus Torvalds[1]

1: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/linux.dev.kernel/2OEgUvDbNbo/bTk-VE1zrnYJ [google.com]

Re:Really? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822959)

oh the irony

there are 2 kinds of people who work with data: those who have lost data and those who will lose data. do you know where your backups are?

Re:Really? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822605)

Ask Obama!

He's got a backup...

Re:Really? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822645)

No backup?

http://lkml.indiana.edu/hypermail/linux/kernel/1309.1/01690.html

I long ago gave up on doing backups. I have actively moved to a model
where I use replacable machines instead. I've got the stuff I care
about generally on a couple of different machines, and then keys etc
backed up on a separate encrypted USB key.

So it's inconvenient. Mainly from a timing standpoint. But nothing more.

Linus

Re: Really? (0, Troll)

cerberusss (660701) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823031)

What's pretty funny is that if he ran OS X together with Time Machine he'd just pop in a new drive and restore from the backup that same day. He'd be running again in the time it took to put a new SSD in his machine.

Now I know there's plenty of Time Machine horror stories, but I'm just saying it would have been possible.

Note that I run Linux on all my servers, and 50% of my employer's desktops run on Linux. The rest runs on Mac.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822669)

No backup?

Non-discoverable backup, non-discoverable buses [indiana.edu] , it's all just one happy Linus world.

captcha: stupid

Re:Really? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822707)

RTFM ;-). Looking at the thread [indiana.edu] :

I long ago gave up on doing backups. I have actively moved to a model
where I use replacable machines instead. I've got the stuff I care
about generally on a couple of different machines, and then keys etc
backed up on a separate encrypted USB key.

I only periodically back up the stuff i really care about (pictures, music, movies) and generally have a majority or all on laptop and desktop.

Re:Really? (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822729)

No. Not really. He has thousands of them all over the internet [git-scm.com] . How else do you think he is going to finnish the job with his laptop (excuse the pun.)

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822737)

Only wimps use tape backup: _real_ men just upload their important stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it ;)
-- Linus Torvalds

Re:Really? (1)

sjames (1099) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822853)

The world is his backup. No code seems to be lost, just temporarily not where he wants it to be.,/p>

Re:Really? (4, Funny)

stewsters (1406737) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822871)

Yeah, i wonder if anyone has ever told him about git. Too bad he didn't back it up. Now we will have to start a new Linux kernel.

Sarcasm Intended.

Re:Really? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822927)

No backup?

Didn't he write some source code control system or other to prevent this...?

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822987)

Git is a distributed backup in his eyes. Everyone has the source, so it won't go amiss.

He need only dropbox his patches ;)

Re:Really? (1)

Deemus (115875) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823007)

I'm sure the NSA has a copy somewhere. :)

Sounds like (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822465)

He should listen to Steve Gibson and run Spin Rite.

Re:Sounds like (1)

nucrash (549705) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822883)

I was going to post something to this effect. I think the big issue is being in the middle of work more than anything else. The problem is if Linus is still using a Mac, Spinrite 6.0 won't work. Spinrite 6.1 will though it's in beta.

Random Guy Faces Harddisk Failure (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822475)

News at 11.

Pity that this excuse never helped me in college.

But I thought Git was great! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822477)

*snicker*

Re:But I thought Git was great! (1)

swan5566 (1771176) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822993)

Well without any pushing to a remote repo it's as mortal as any other source control.

None of that mattered, because (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822505)

obviously a professional like Torvalds had redundancy and backups, right?

Re:None of that mattered, because (4, Informative)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822995)

That is correct. In fact he wrote the code that is the industry standard [git-scm.com] and uses it every day. How else do you think he is going to continue completion of the project on his laptop.

Good example of why I don't use Linux (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822511)

Re:Good example of why I don't use Linux (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822585)

omg lel upboated! whuts ur reddit usrname?

Eggs, Basket (5, Funny)

Sneakernets (1026296) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822513)

That's all that Ballmer needs to stop Linux? Just find Torvald's SSD?

Re:Eggs, Basket (2, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822597)

Makes me wonder what would happen to Linux development if Torvalds was to get hit by a bus, or be incapacitated in some way. Is kernel development that reliant on one person that a single laptop breaking brings everything to a halt?

Re:Eggs, Basket (0)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822629)

Here's hoping there's some dead-man switch set up so that if Linus doesn't log in for, say, 5 days, the entire shebang is uploaded and mirrored.

Re:Eggs, Basket (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822767)

You know that the kernel is open source and already widely available?

Re:Eggs, Basket (1, Troll)

CastrTroy (595695) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822899)

Yeah, but who takes control after he dies? Linux is already fragmented enough with all the distributions, I would hate to think what would happen when Linus dies or gets tired of programming, and then a bunch of companies/people decide to fork the kernel, because they all want to be in control of the "official" kernel.

Re:Eggs, Basket (2)

bobbied (2522392) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822917)

Who needs that? You can always take the last source release and start your own build.

This guy only controls the Linux Kernel by convention (and because it is convenient). Anytime he is unable or unwilling to keep the kernel development going, any number of others can step up and take over.

It will be interesting to watch when it happens though. I suspect that unless Torvalds appoints a successor and willingly hands over the keys the Linux Kernel will fracture into 3 or 4 major branches. Even if he does appoint someone or some organization to take over there is a risk of the kernel fracturing into multiple efforts.

Re:Eggs, Basket (1)

sjames (1099) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822893)

Only in the short term. In the bus scenario, another leader would be chosen by the developers. There are several good choices there.

Next project - backups! (2)

ruiner13 (527499) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822525)

Maybe Linus needs to create a backup program like he did when he wanted a better version control system and created git? Also, why is the only copy of the changes on his local workstation and not a server with redundancy? This seems rather amateurish.

Re:Next project - backups! (5, Funny)

geek (5680) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822691)

Allow me to channel Linus Torvalds a minute:

"What do you mean there wasn't a backup disk? Fucking kill yourself with a pipe wrench. I hate you, your mother was a whore and your dad was the neighbors dog. People like you make me sick."

Re:Next project - backups! (4, Insightful)

PRMan (959735) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823085)

It's comments like these that make me wish Slashdot mods could go to 10 instead of 5. Nicely done.

The drive with his latest NSA instructions"failed" (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822531)

How convenient Linus! Feeling the heat, huh?

Linus said something... (3, Interesting)

IMarvinTPA (104941) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822553)

Linux said "So I don't want to necessarily blame the harddisk, since it's just ten
days since I upgraded the rest of my machine, after it worked years in
the previous one. That just makes me go "hmm". As far as I know, all
the fans etc were working fine, but.."

There's his problem: "after it worked years in the previous [machine]."

His SSD died a natural death of old age.

IMarv

Love it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822921)

It's so fun to watch all of the Linux Army out there is a tizzy to defend Linus. Watch the lame excuses getting modded up. If anyone else would have had the same happen these same apologists and moderators would be throwing dungballs at the crash victim instead of turning themselves into human shields for their messiah.

Re:Love it! (1)

jedidiah (1196) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823047)

Just how exactly does "that disk was too old" constitute defending Linus?

Sounds like he should have known better. That's probably the way most of the rest of us will take it.

Re:Linus said something... (2)

kwalker (1383) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822983)

That's not how drives die of old age. A sudden and permanent drive failure like what is described is almost always a controller failure. When mechanical drives die of old age, they generally develop bad sectors and read-errors accumulate on the platter, but you can still read from the un-damaged areas. When SSDs die, those worn-out sectors go read-only or begin throwing similar read/write errors, depending on the firmware.

After having a 40GB IBM Deathstar suddenly go down in flames, and dozens of "salvage my data!" calls from friends and family, I don't trust any single drive of any age or provenance. ALWAYS have backups.

Platters of spinning rust (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822555)

The one (personal) thing storage-related that I'd like to re-iterate is that I think that rotating storage is going the way of the dodo (or the tape). "How do I hate thee, let me count the ways". The latencies of rotational storage are horrendous, and I personally refuse to use a machine that has those nasty platters of spinning rust in them.

Bet you regret knocking those platters of spinning rust [slashdot.org] now, don't you Mr. Torvalds?

Re:Platters of spinning rust (1)

PortHaven (242123) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822719)

No the real question is why he didn't simply have two mirrored SSDs.

RAID? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822607)

Surely he's not working on a single drive system?

You trust Torvalds after this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822621)

I don't feel anything but shame for someone losing data in a hard drive crash who has or should have network backups available to them. If this happened to anyone but Linus the majority of the comments would be calling the coder a n00b. If it was Balmer there would be an absolute riot of anti-MS venom....
 
I guess the great Linus has fallen into shadow.

Re:You trust Torvalds after this? (1)

MouseAT (945758) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823025)

We're not complaining because we know full well that Linus has backups. It's called the Git source code repository. All he's lost is time, and assuming that he's saved a whole load by not having to run backups, he's probably ahead on average.

He just needs to switch to his other machine, and re-download the sources from Git. Problem solved, system working as intended. Once he gets a new drive for his old machine, it's a case of re-install the OS, re-sync with Git, done. Maybe copy a few config files off his laptop to save time getting his preferences the way he wants them.

RAID? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822627)

Someone get this man some drives and an admin. STAT!

No RAID? No backup? (2, Funny)

Nick (109) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822637)

Was he too busy treating people horribly to audit his DR procedures?

Re:No RAID? No backup? (4, Funny)

samjam (256347) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823019)

His SSD gave up out of shame for all the threats and abuse it had been forced to witness

Hmmm.... (1)

gr0wler (2742977) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822663)

....I hear rsync is lovely this time of year....

HA HA (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822675)

Couldn't have happened to a nicer guy

Linus is a millionaire
No RAID
No software mirroring
No RSYNC
No backup
No excuses

Linus, you are losing it.

Intel? (1)

stkris (1843186) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822695)

So Linus got bitten by the same Intel SSD bug that bit me and many others?

Re:Intel? (3, Informative)

stkris (1843186) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823015)

More info here: http://goran.krampe.se/2013/01/02/ssd-nightmare/
"So power cycling can apparently trigger this - and the disk for some odd reason (self protection?) decides to decapitate itself and set accessible cylinders down to 16 instead of 16384."

Pathetic (0)

timeOday (582209) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822709)

Has anybody created a good near-real-time incremental backup system for linux?

I use a Mac at work and Linux at home (because I like the power, and I'm cheap) but I haven't found anything as convenient as Time Machine for Linux. On my MacBook I just plug in my firewire drive every morning when I arrive at work, and have incremental backups of everything at something like 30 minute intervals. Torvalds, obviously, does not have a similar setup.

Re:Pathetic (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822807)

Rsync to a second drive with a cron job?

Re:Pathetic (2)

Viol8 (599362) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823013)

You beat me to it. Anyone with a vague clue about unix would have thought of that. Obviously vague clues are a rare thing for the parent poster.

Re:Pathetic (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822819)

First, there's RAID, so that the death of a single drive doesn't make you lose any time. Just replace the dead disk, and go about your work. Everybody likes to say that RAID isn't a backup, but it's better than nothing. If you have RAID, and pair it with nightly backups of everything that's changed, which is pretty easy to set up, then you're pretty well covered. The only important part being that you actually have to be connected to another machine with a reasonably fast connection in order for the backup to be done. For laptops, this often isn't possible, especially if you are on the road. But even then, you can make sure you copy the really important stuff off to a USB hard disk or some other medium. It's better than nothing.

Re:Pathetic (1)

Dragonslicer (991472) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822831)

If 30 minutes is near enough to real time for you, you could use rdiff-backup on a cron job. That's what I do at home, though I only run it once per day.

Re:Pathetic (1)

timeOday (582209) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822991)

Looks intriguing, although I see there hasn't been a release in over 4 years. Is it just that good, in your experience?

Re:Pathetic (1)

Dragonslicer (991472) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823087)

I haven't had any problems with it, but I also haven't tested the backups much. I know I've seen it get updated in Ubuntu more recently than four years ago, though. The lack of frequent updates are probably more because of how simple it is. There might be some more advanced features that it doesn't have.

Re:Pathetic (1)

jabuzz (182671) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822937)

They have. You use something like inotify or a DMAPI enabled file system generate a queue of things that need to be backed up and constantly run through it. To get good performance however is going to cost $$$

why this news? (4, Insightful)

Laxori666 (748529) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822715)

Why is this news... is this our version of People magazine, where instead of hearing about all the details of the Kardashians' lives, we hear about every email or event that happens to Linus?

Re:why this news? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822777)

Because it's proof that Linus is an egomaniac and a jerk and now the blade of karma is coming down on him.
 
As someone said upstream... couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

Re:why this news? (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822973)

A hard drive failure is proof that he's a jerk?

Interesting personality test you have there...

My mouse died last week, does that mean that I'm a bad person, or am I just a lush?

Was it an Intel ssd? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822735)

Did it have an 8mb partition by any chance?

Backups? RAID? (1)

pubwvj (1045960) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822761)

I find it amazing to consider that he is not working on a redundant and well backed up machine. Where's last hour's backup? Yesterday's backup? Even pig farmer's know to backup their data.

Sounds like a 3.11 problem... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822771)

Ghost of WfW

Someone flame him... (1)

HockeyPuck (141947) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822779)

I'm no kernel maintainer but...

If his workstation is so important why doesn't he mirror the disks?
Back them up regularly?
Run a remote desktop to a server with the above conditions

Re:Someone flame him... (5, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822939)

He has backups all over the world. But like with any backup, you can't actually restore from it until you replace the failed disk.

Stop stalking Linus (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822789)

It is not necessary to publish every single thing Linus does, or is involved, in Slashdot. I remember time when linux did not get any airtime from press, but if thing progress the way they have for latest decade in couple years time there is a news title 'Linus farted'.

Lame (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822803)

I use md RAID 1 on my build machine. That would have been sufficient to preclude this silly mess.

Shutup about backups. This isn't about backups. Kernel.org and many other places back up the kernel tree.

This is about availability, of which there is currently none, due to Linus's obvious lameness.

The obvious fix .. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822805)

Is to send a profanity-laced e-mail to the hard drive. Perhaps then it will see the error of its ways and begin working properly.

Oblig. Balmer (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822847)

BACKUPS, BACKUPS, BACKUPS

He deserves it. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822851)

What kind of an idiot uses a year-old SSD for critical work? Oh, yeah, the kind of idiot who routinely flames other people for trying to get him to make code changes he doesn't like, rather than explaining his position in a calm, rational fashion.

Karma's a bitch, no matter how famous you are.

BREAKING: Development was also held up.... (2)

musth (901919) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822855)

...for over an hour when Torvalds had to make an emergency run to Albertson's for some toilet paper and hostility medication.

Welcome to how SSDs fail. (5, Interesting)

Mike_EE_U_of_I (1493783) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822861)

I've owned several hundred hard drives over the last 30 years. I've never had an active hard drive drive just blank out. I have had drives that had not been powered for a couple of years refuse to ever come back. But if I did not feel the need to even power the thing on for years, you can imagine how little I cared for what was on it.

    In the last four years, I've owned around 20 SSDs. I've had five failures. Every single one was the drive just instantly lost everything. Amazingly, in four of the five cases, the drive still worked fine! It had simply lost all the data on it and believed itself to be a blank drive.

    That said, the speed of SSDs makes them worth the risk to me. But I take backups far more seriously than I used to. I need them far more often.

Re:Welcome to how SSDs fail. (3, Informative)

RichMan (8097) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822971)

A hard shutdown of high-speed SSD is death. It takes really really good firmware to recover without reinitializing the drive.

The basic SSD "format" is susceptable to damage on power fails in a way that hard drives are not. The mapping and setup stables of the SSD are critical and constantly in flux unlike a harddrive where the mapping is only updated when a failure occures.
SSD drives need internal power fail control so they can gracefully shudown and firmware that supports it.

Re:Welcome to how SSDs fail. (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823017)

Oh man thats scary. Any *good* solution? I've heard Raid is a no no on SSD as it will shorten its life. Maybe regular BTRFS/LVM snapshots exported to a spinning disk ?

Re:Welcome to how SSDs fail. (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823075)

SSD isn't for your main file storage anyways, install speed sensitive software and OS on SSD for better performance, everything else goes on cheaper and bigger rust

Re:Welcome to how SSDs fail. (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | 1 year,10 days | (#44823055)

Personally, I'd rather just spend the money on a boatload of RAM. Modern OSes are good enough at caching that I very rarely find that I'm waiting on my workstation to access the disk. Sure boot-up is slower, but I generally only reboot my machine when there's updates that required it. Once you got most of your working data in memory, everything is snappy anyway. Perhaps if I was dealing with a much larger dataset (editing videos, or lots of different photos), I might see a reason for having an SSD. But as it stands now, I find that my computer responds quite quickly with a mechanical HDD.

Obligatory quote (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44822947)

"Only wimps use tape backup: real men just upload their important stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it ;)"
- Torvalds, Linus (1996-07-20). Post. linux.dev.kernel newsgroup.

Kernel Panic!!!! (4, Funny)

Cmdrx (655099) | 1 year,10 days | (#44822997)

Now there a new meaning for Kernel Panic!

Commit early, commit often (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44823033)

Linus is such an ass.

Hah! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,10 days | (#44823065)

Stupid faggot deserved it (I hate that asshole). Also, anyone using an SSD for critical or semi-critical work is a tard. I might use one in a HTPC. I wouldn't even use one in my laptop (and I take daily backups). The things are too new and die too suddenly.

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