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Snowden Nominated For Freedom of Thought Prize

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the is-there-a-trophy? dept.

EU 212

First time accepted submitter DigitalKhaos23 writes "Snowden is a candidate for the European Parliament's Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, named after Soviet scientist and dissident Andrei Sakharov, which honors people or organizations for their work in the defense of human rights and freedom of thought. The article adds: 'Edward Snowden risked his life to confirm what we had long suspected regarding mass online surveillance, a major scandal of our times. He revealed details of violations of EU data protection law and fundamental rights.'"

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Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (5, Insightful)

Todd Palin (1402501) | about a year ago | (#44827369)

Let's take Obama's Nobel Prize away and give it to Snowden.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (5, Insightful)

epyT-R (613989) | about a year ago | (#44827493)

I agree 100%. He's done more for liberty in the USA than any politician has done in 50 years. he's actually managed to push surveillance as a topic of conversation at the average american's dinner table. That alone is an excellent achievement, nevermind the rest he has done.

Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (5, Insightful)

BBCWatcher (900486) | about a year ago | (#44827555)

Considering the last 50 years, I rate Jimmy Carter and his Carter Center very highly, though a big percentage of his good work has been done after his political career ended in 1981.

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827607)

Considering the last 50 years, I rate Jimmy Carter and his Carter Center very highly, though a big percentage of his good work has been done after his political career ended in 1981.

Carter is a great former president, Obama was a great future president.

Time to find a good incumbent.

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (3, Insightful)

Will.Woodhull (1038600) | about a year ago | (#44827711)

Carter was, and is, one of the best statesmen the USA has ever had as President. Unfortunately he was inadequate as a politician. He never was able to get Washington to work.

Obama is also having trouble getting Washington to work. But in this case its because he has to deal with a badly broken Republican party. The Republicans were enticed into bed with a pretty little tea bagging wench and are now saddled with a marriage partner who cares more about being given the bling she has set her silly dreams on than about making the marriage work.

Time and again Obama and professional Republican politicians have started to work out the meaningful compromises that make a democracy work, only to have that dumbass wench throw a hissy fit because she won't get the bling that she thought she had been promised.

The Republicans need to toss the bimbo out. Let her make her own party. Yeah, divorces are messy and both sides lose, but marriages like this one that should never have happened are messier for longer, and can really get dangerous to everybody, especially when there are so many firearms in the household. </rant>

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (5, Insightful)

jez9999 (618189) | about a year ago | (#44827821)

This isn't true. I think Obama has a fundamental lack of respect for liberty (he laughs off the idea of ending the drug war), privacy (massively expanding unwarranted surveillance), and the constitution (numerous violations such as unwarranted search and seizure), not to mention international law (pardoning the Bush administration for war crimes, torture, etc.)

He's not hamstrung by the Republicans; he's just a very big disappointment as a president. It's somewhat redundant, if true, to say that he should be impeached, given that that has applied to pretty much all US presidents for the last few decades.

I'm fine with Obama (1, Interesting)

mozumder (178398) | about a year ago | (#44827929)

This isn't true. I think Obama has a fundamental lack of respect for liberty (he laughs off the idea of ending the drug war),

He doesn't enforce federal drug laws in states that legalizes weed. That alone is a drug-war breakthrough.

privacy (massively expanding unwarranted surveillance)

your metadata was never private. IP headers are public. Do you know how many people get to see your IP headers as it travels across the internet?

Libertarians need to give up liberty. You never had freedom in any society where you weren't the highest power. You were victimized by the "America is free" lie that you were taught as a child. Ha ha. Smart people always knew you never had freedom.

It is disgustingly narcissistic to assume you had these rights, and libertarians are the most narcissistic members of society, always about "me, me, me!"

You don't get what you want in society, since you have minimal rights and powers. You are only allowed what the rest of society decide for you, and the rest of society couldn't care less about your metadata rights.

not to mention international law (pardoning the Bush administration for war crimes, torture, etc.)

It's bad form to attack previous administrations. The goal of every administration is to move forward, and not focus on the past. The last thing any administration wants to do is put a previous administration in the news and give them any attention. You don't even MENTION the previous administration, and erase them from history.

The fault is in the American public in electing the previous administration in the first place, and when you move forward, you fix the source of the problem by fixing the public's attention.

Parent is trolling (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827969)

I know this is Slashdot and a lot of readers lack critical thinking skills, and take everything at face value, so I'll point out the obvious:

Parent is trolling. He doesn't believe a word he is saying. He's just posting to rile up the gullible Slash-nerds, and it's probably going to work. Watch the overly-serious, self-righteous replies.

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827945)

Don't forget directly ordering the extra-judicial killing of US citizens.

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (1)

flyneye (84093) | about a year ago | (#44828213)

Could be worse. Coulda been his girlfriend Hillary.

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828307)

Carter was an honest man in a den of thieves. It was never going to turn out well.

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (0)

flyneye (84093) | about a year ago | (#44828203)

Obama wouldn't make a good future janitor.

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (0)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44827689)

President Carter's reputation was enhanced on leaving office for two reasons: First, he engaged in various humanitarian efforts that were worthy. Second, having left office he was no longer in a position to make poor policy decisions for the country. He has been damaging his legacy of late with a variety of outrageous statements.

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827755)

Ah if only you were joking, Carter was a fucking disaster as is anyone who thinks highly of him (stop damaging your brain with the BBC, it might be better than US shit but it's still shit nevertheless).

The alternative? Despise everything that comes from the MSM anywhere, distrust it, disbelieve it, they're all full of shit about everything they write about most of which only serves as misdirection. The people who have made western civilization fall deathly ill are people exactly like you and until I realized better: me.

So please change and thus make a tiny feasible improvement to help rebuild all that has been lost to ideologies & politics and fragmented into all manners of special interest groups be it company lobbying or gender peculiarities or farmers or anything at all else.

Please.

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827931)

Aha. So, because some random ass-fuck on Slashdot posts, "Teh Cartur iz teh disastur! Everything teh media sez is teh wrong! But I am smart!!111!!1" we're supposed to suddenly abandon all common sense and believe your bullshit?

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year ago | (#44827767)

He's history's greatest monster!

Re:Don't Forget Jimmy Carter (1)

hawkinspeter (831501) | about a year ago | (#44828173)

I thought it was Cthulhu.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (1, Insightful)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about a year ago | (#44827577)

He's done more for liberty in the USA than any politician has done in 50 years.

Except that what he has done is being largely ignored by most of "my fellow Americans", in the Nixon sense of the word.

Most Americans are more concerned about what the Kardashians are up to, and not what the NSA is up to.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (1)

epyT-R (613989) | about a year ago | (#44827597)

I know... it's like throwing pebbles at an oncoming asteroid.. However, it is the first relatively significant pushback to date.

largely ignored by most leading intellectuals.... (5, Interesting)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#44827629)

Let's take Obama's Nobel Prize away and give it to Snowden.

I agree 100%. He's done more for liberty in the USA than any politician has done in 50 years. he's actually managed to push surveillance as a topic of conversation at the average american's dinner table. That alone is an excellent achievement, nevermind the rest he has done.

That all being true, no matter what Snowden or any other activist does to try and roll back the fascist encroachments of absolute power - the peace prize world is off limits. Heroes of the people like Manning, Snowden will continue to be labeled traitors and excluded from all significant high profile peace prizes, Time Person of the Year, in large part due to the failure of our intellectuals [wikipedia.org] :

The article is an attack on the intellectual culture in the U.S., which Chomsky argues is largely subservient to power. He is particularly critical of social scientists and technocrats, who he believed were providing a pseudo-scientific justification for the crimes of the state

Intellectuals have betrayed us all before [ditext.com] and it will continue to happen until a groundswell of people start to shun, exclude and shine a bright constant light on these mostly unnamed behind the scenes policy setters who have corrupted their purpose blinding following the "party line" subservience to power.

Re:largely ignored by most leading intellectuals.. (-1, Offtopic)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44827741)

Re:largely ignored by most leading intellectuals.. (2)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#44827829)

The TL;DW version [chronicle.com] of Cold Fiord's video on Conservative policy think tank Hoover Institution intellectual Thomas Sowell and his book "Intellectuals and Society"... for those that are interested...

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (4, Interesting)

mendax (114116) | about a year ago | (#44827745)

He's done more for liberty in the USA than any politician has done in 50 years.

Except that what he has done is being largely ignored by most of "my fellow Americans", in the Nixon sense of the word.

I think you're referring to "Great Silent Majority". The Great Silent Majority is made up of morons whose stupidity is only exceeded by the ignorance of the politicians they elect to Congress, who live lives they believe that are so pathetically empty and unfulfilling that they must resort to television fantasy and reality shows to fill this perceived void.

I am now a part of the Slight Vocal Minority, many of which think Edward Snowden should be given a medal for revealing the illegal snooping the NSA has been doing on the American public and then put in prison for revealing what it is doing in the rest of the world.

So it's criminal to embarrass a government? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828131)

It's criminal to tell people the government committed crimes, if you then give people proof when others had said so and were asked "Proof, please!".

If there were no proof, it would be all "Here's some tinfoil for you!". And now we see if there's proof given, it's "GET TO FUCKING PRISON YOU CRIM!".

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827861)

I agree 100%. He's done more for liberty in the USA than any politician has done in 50 years. he's actually managed to push surveillance as a topic of conversation at the average american's dinner table. That alone is an excellent achievement, nevermind the rest he has done.

And yet, somehow I don't feel comforted over the fact that all we can do as citizens today is talk about it at the dinner table.

Would have been nice to have a Snowden event during a time when we actually could have done something about it.

Not going to beat myself up too bad about that though, the era I speak of is likely before we had a standing president warning us about the Military Industrial Complex. We lost control long ago.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827933)

We lost control long ago.

We never had it/any.

The irony is that we still don't, least of all the people in the NSA. But we are guaranteed to get even less, rapidly approaching zero.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828087)

The peace prize is not for liberty. The peace prize is for peace.

His has been nominated (4, Informative)

MrL0G1C (867445) | about a year ago | (#44827569)

"Bahnhof, a builder of futuristic-looking data centers" Has nominated Snowden [wired.com] for the peace prize.

I wouldn't expect those morally corrupt idiots to actually award him the prize. It would restore some of their credibility if they did though.

Re:His has been nominated (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828041)

I wouldn't expect those morally corrupt idiots to actually award him the prize. It would restore some of their credibility if they did though.

I wouldn't call them morally corrupt, they were just gullible and naive, and got caught up in the Obamamania. I believe they have acknowledged since, at least unofficially, that it was a mistake, an embarrassment, and harmed the reputation of the Peace Prize. Unfortunately, there is no process in place to revoke the prize once given.

But as a great American philosopher one said: "Fool me once, shame on... shame on you. Fool me... you can't get fooled again."

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (5, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about a year ago | (#44827697)

Obama won the prize for the achievement of not being Bush.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (0)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44827799)

To be fair, it wasn't just for not being Bush. Obama's prize was a Peace prize, so it was for not being Bush in specific ways regarding military conflict. I think there can be only one correct reply to that [youtube.com] .

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827867)

Obama won the prize for the achievement of not being Bush.

Really? I thought he won the prize for pulling the wool over 300 million people's eyes by convincing us he's not Bush...when he really is.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827909)

Obama won the prize for the achievement of not being Bush.

Looks like he can hand it on to Bush then for Bush's achievement not to be Obama.

With Bush it was at least plausible that he was believing his own statements. He was easily manipulated by cynics. They don't need to manipulate Obama, he's one of them.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828353)

Obama won the prize for the achievement of not being Bush.

Yeah, but he's still Obama.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827783)

I second that. Obama is clearly not the right recipient for a peace prize.

I think he must have used nsa's intercepts to blackmail the choosing committee's members ;)

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (2)

erroneus (253617) | about a year ago | (#44828263)

My thought exactly. I thought it was absurd to give him a Nobel for as yet unknown and certainly unmaterialized reasons. Meanwhile Snowden has changed the world in a very significant way.

Re:Lets give him Obama's Nobel Prize (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828285)

I never really understood how a president can come into power and get a nobel peace prize, when he's not really had a chance to do anything... I guess he had to take over and the 'war on terror' had been started by Bush.

FROM: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_did_Barack_Obama_win_the_Nobel_Peace_Prize

"This is a question that seems to call for opinions, but first, a few facts. Barack Obama was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize because the committee believed he had already demonstrated a willingness to engage in diplomacy, and to reach out to the world community, rather than just using "tough talk"-- the committee believed President Bush had been far too bellicose in his rhetoric, and they saw in Barack Obama a new era in communication between countries. As the committee stated in
their press release, he was given the award for his "extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples."
"

This seems to be a direct contradiction on what he was suggesting - to bomb Syria... So Maybe Putin should get the Nobel peace prize... and Edward gets the bravery award or whatever... I mean he's really got sum balls messing up the plans of the NSA and GCHQ. I can't say I would have done the same.

The other thing that made me cross was that Obama deliberately said about chemical weapons being a game changer... thus giving the rebels or Al-Qaeda the incentive to also use checmical weapons... doesn't he realise thats just irresponsible?

It wouldn't be a problem (4, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year ago | (#44827377)

It wouldn't be a problem to have the NSA spying and snooping if they never abused that power, but we know eventually they will. And indeed, thanks to Snowden we know that they already have.

That's why we don't want the NSA to have this power. Because as far as we can tell, the abuses have been more harmful than any benefits for catching terrorists (and really, the programs don't seem to have caught many terrorists).

Re:It wouldn't be a problem (5, Interesting)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year ago | (#44827389)

Interestingly, we have a similar tradeoff between monarchy and democracy. A monarchy would be clearly more efficient and all around better if we could guarantee we had a good king. And a good deal of the philosophy between the years 1000-1900 was about how society can guarantee to have a good king.

But since that can't be guaranteed, and the abuses caused by a bad king far outweigh the benefits, it is better to endure the inefficiency (and dare I say, stupidity of your neighbors?) of democracy and the checks and balances than to give all that power to one man.

Re:It wouldn't be a problem (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827573)

Monarchies usually are democracies. The king or queen is only head of state, but has no political power.

Re:It wouldn't be a problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827831)

GP was talking about monarchies between 1000 and 1900, those were absolute monarchies.

You talk about contemporary constitutional monarchies, which are democracies indeed. The nobility will wait until that is out of fashion again.

Re:It wouldn't be a problem (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828227)

Also the Kings and queens in these countries usually have .. how would I best describe it.. latent powers. Usually they have huge powers, that they in reality can't use, because if they use them they will be stripped away. The monarch is also pretty much always somewhat above the law, the king can't be prosecuted. It's kind of a gentlemans deal that they won't actually do anything that would lead to prosecution. Also the kings in many monarchies serve as a kind of persistent political figure, and as a link between countries. They often act as an advisor/mentor for the acting prime minister, or whatever the acting head of political power is. Kings offer stability, they won't be switched by elections, and they also offer some kind of last resort fallback in case the state becomes paralyzed for some reason. All in all, modern monarchs are mostly figureheads, and representatives of their respective countries, but they do have other uses as well.

Monarchies are the worst forms (0, Offtopic)

boorack (1345877) | about a year ago | (#44827941)

I don't know who created this bunk theory. Wanna see how monarchies work ? See Saudi Arabia. They sell almost as much oil as Russians do, or soviets did. Yet, soviets, with all their crappy, inefficient system, were able to finance huge social security, huge army and lots of other things with their oil money. Maybe not a good things to do, yet Saudis don't even do that. Their petrodolars are used to finance lavish lifestyles of their aristocracy (while rest of their society live in poverty), purchases of ultra-expensive military equipment, US bonds and so called "investments" - in other words, recycling earned petrodollars back into westen economies. Their feudalistic system is terribly inefficient, even compared to very inefficient soviet system, let alone to any other (relatively sane) economy in the world. You see, lack of progress in medieval Dark Ages are directly related to reign of absolute monarchies and feudalism. We've started getting out of medieval darkness mainly because in renesance, power of kings ceased to be absolute.

Re:Monarchies are the worst forms (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828239)

You are aware that you are agreeing with phantomfive, right?

Re:It wouldn't be a problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827705)

It wouldn't be a problem to have the NSA spying and snooping if they never abused that power, but we know eventually they will.

Wrong: if they never "abused" that power, they would be a waste of money. By its very nature, any secret intelligence operation directed against terrorism has to be accompanied by secret executive action, and that means depriving the targets of that action from due process in a public and unbiased court.

Re:It wouldn't be a problem (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827845)

The Bible is beautiful open source code, in any language.

Re:It wouldn't be a problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828259)

It wouldn't be a problem to have the NSA spying and snooping if they never abused that power, but we know eventually they will. And indeed, thanks to Snowden we know that they already have.

That's why we don't want the NSA to have this power. Because as far as we can tell, the abuses have been more harmful than any benefits for catching terrorists (and really, the programs don't seem to have caught many terrorists).

I'm sorry, but these "terrorists" you speak of...I don't seem to recall seeing that word on the justification or ROI line on the PRISM budget. Are you sure it was meant for that purpose...

Yes. And. But. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827379)

Something about the irony of these prizes:

They're awarded to the people who are still going to be destroyed for what they've done for humanity while the monsters perpetrating the obscenities against us all are going completely fucking unscathed. The villains are allowed to continue their gross abuses while we give the human equivalent of a gold star sticker to the guy who couldn't not scream.

Re:Yes. And. But. (0)

runeghost (2509522) | about a year ago | (#44827419)

Something about the irony of these prizes:

They're awarded to the people who are still going to be destroyed for what they've done for humanity while the monsters perpetrating the obscenities against us all are going completely fucking unscathed. The villains are allowed to continue their gross abuses while we give the human equivalent of a gold star sticker to the guy who couldn't not scream.

I'd mod parent up if I had points.

Re:Yes. And. But. (5, Insightful)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#44827651)

The real irony of this particular prize and nomination is that it's named after a Russian that wanted to flee to the West to escape the oppression in Russia, and this nomination is for someone who had to flee oppression in the West by escaping to Russia.

How times change.

Re:Yes. And. But. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827793)

That's what makes this prize all the more apt.

Re:Yes. And. But. (-1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44827819)

How times change.

Not really. There is a precedent [telegraph.co.uk] , in fact, more than one [wikipedia.org] . I'm sure I could find others.

.

Re:Yes. And. But. (5, Interesting)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#44827659)

Unfortunately it is nothing new [wikipedia.org] and we do not seem to have learned how to deal with it/prevent the rot. Intellectuals have betrayed us all many times [ditext.com] in similar ways throughout history.

"You don’t have any other society where the educated classes are so effectively indoctrinated and controlled by a subtle propaganda system – a private system including media, intellectual opinion forming magazines and the participation of the most highly educated sections of the population. Such people ought to be referred to as “Commissars” – for that is what their essential function is – to set up and maintain a system of doctrines and beliefs which will undermine independent thought and prevent a proper understanding and analysis of national and global institutions, issues, and policies." - From Language and Politics

Example:

A more difficult task is to shift the moral onus of the war to its victims. This seems a rather unpromising enterprise -- rather as if the Nazis had attempted to blame the Jews for the crematoria. But undaunted, American propagandists are pursuing this effort too, and with some success. Things have reached the point where an American President can appear on national television and state that we owe "no debt" to the Vietnamese, because "the destruction was mutual."28 And there is not a whisper of protest when this monstrous statement, worthy of Hitler or Stalin, is blandly produced in the midst of a discourse on human rights. Not only do we owe them no debt for having murdered and destroyed and ravaged their land, but we now may stand back and sanctimoniously blame them for dying of disease and malnutrition, deploring their cruelty when hundreds die trying to clear unexploded ordnance by hand from fields laid waste by the violence of the American state, wringing our hands in mock horror when those who were able to survive the American assault -- predictably, the toughest and harshest elements -- resort to oppression and sometimes massive violence, or fail to find solutions to material problems that have no analogue in Western history perhaps since the Black Death.

Re:Yes. And. But. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828151)

The main problem is not "intellectuals", its journalism. Or rather the lack of journalism.

Conflict of interest has destroyed journalism.

Irony? (4, Funny)

mschaffer (97223) | about a year ago | (#44827949)

I thought the prizes were goldy or bronzy---not irony.

Too clever! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827407)

I see your trick! Lure him into Europe with a free prize -- and then extradite him! He'll totally fall for it...

This surveillance stuff is nothing (3, Insightful)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#44827417)

I want to hear about the medical experiments being performed on prisoners, the serums and electrodes and soft pillows and comfortable chairs [wikimedia.org]

Asylum? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827441)

Superb, we like you and all, but if you come here we'll arrest you and send to the USA.

George W just got nominated (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827455)

for The Freedom from Thought Prize. He has to pick it up at the Hague. He gets three for two if he brings Cheney and Rumsfeld along.

I came (1)

ozduo (2043408) | about a year ago | (#44827475)

I thought, I got asylum

Re:I came (0)

Nutria (679911) | about a year ago | (#44827673)

I got asylum

I can't fathom how people can ignore Russia's complete thugocracy while heaping loads of scorn and abuse on what is -- all and all -- a pretty darned free and open society.

Re:I came (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827727)

Because we in the west are not supposed to behave like that. By behaving exactly like what we're always preaching against we give countries like russia a carte blanche to do as they please.

Re:I came (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827815)

I do not think you understand the ramifications of what has been done.

In your defence few do, even here on Slashdot. I saw someone begging for 1984 instead of what we now have which is both far more insidious and far more subtle as well as far more totalitarian. That person is on the right track of understanding; “we” have essentially doomed the future of humanity.

Nothing less. A fait accompli, a done deal, inescapable.

We have to fight it but we can never win because winning is now impossible no matter who your are or what one might believe or whatever one claims allegiance to.

It will never go away now. Widespread ability is too sophisticated to remove it and its seductive allure as a fantasy of control will only grow stronger.

This is what fate looks like. Fight it not in delusion about winning but to potentially be able to claim ownership of yourself. If nothing else out of pure defiance and spite or even enlightened self-loathing.

Everyone has already lost but will you choose to lose in style? That's the only real choice left for every human being.

I wonder... (4, Interesting)

wordsnyc (956034) | about a year ago | (#44827499)

how a prize named after Andrei Sakharov is gonna go over with Snowden's landlord, a veteran of the KGB that tormented Andrei Sakharov.

Re:I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827531)

clearly this is a conspiracy by pro-US euros who want putin to kick him out.

Re:I wonder... (1, Interesting)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44827589)

how a prize named after Andrei Sakharov is gonna go over with Snowden's landlord, a veteran of the KGB that tormented Andrei Sakharov.

He'll grin and bear it. Just the public revelations about the NSA, GCHQ, and other allied intelligence services and their operations has been priceless to the Russians, not to mention the Chinese, Iranians, and terrorist groups (that are already changing their communications methods). If they manage to get their hands on some of the other documents that he stole* the value would be astronomical. And that is just the documents themselves, the political turmoil, infighting, and disruption add a whole new layer.

* Snowden apparently stole at least 70,000 documents just covering the British, some on Australia, and who knows how many on the US?

Re:I wonder... (3, Insightful)

AHuxley (892839) | about a year ago | (#44827605)

Finding out global networking encryption is junk is not "political turmoil, infighting, and disruption".

Re:I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827887)

I wish you could take a step back and grasp at least a bit of the big picture because this is not some shitty LeCarre or Tom Clancy novel we're living through, and if you start to see the big picture I think you'll change your opinions quite radically.

You're arguing about national security issues for a nation that ripped its own constitution to shreds and died but which refused to lay in its grave and keeps dragging all of humanity with it into hell beyond imagination. Let's say you're right but so fucking what? Everyone has already lost no matter if you're right or not.

Re:I wonder... (4, Insightful)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year ago | (#44827617)

how a prize named after Andrei Sakharov is gonna go over with Snowden's landlord, a veteran of the KGB that tormented Andrei Sakharov.

The same way that landlord can live with an avenue in Moscow name after Sakharov [google.com] .
Or... you think that avenue is under risk of being tormented too?

Re:I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827637)

Probably just fine, since there is now a street, a museum, and an educational center named after him in Moscow as well as a Park with a monument to him in St. Petersburg

Re:I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827645)

I LOVE COMMAS

Re:I wonder... (2)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44827823)

You've a brave person. Not many people admit to being commanists.

Re:I wonder... (1)

lxs (131946) | about a year ago | (#44827849)

How about the US government? If Snowden is recognized as a dissident then the US government would be the equivalent of the Soviet Politburo.

European Parliament’s Sakharov Prize for Fre (2)

rvw (755107) | about a year ago | (#44827553)

For those who wonder what this prize is about, a quote from the linked article. The question is who proposed him and if he makes a real chance.

Members of the European Parliament are officially nominating fugitive US leaker Edward Snowden for a prize celebrating freedom of thought, a parliamentary representative said Wednesday.

Snowden is a candidate for the European Parliament’s Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, named after Soviet scientist and dissident Andrei Sakharov, which honors people or organizations for their work in the defense of human rights and freedom of thought.

More info about past winners on Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] .

Hypocrisy (5, Insightful)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#44827681)

European Parliament may be "officially nominating" - but their respective countries have all denied [euobserver.com] Snowdens asylum requests. Sure sounds like a consolation prize and even if he wins it, it does not let European countries off the hook for their crime. History will judge their actions very poorly - they have done the world a disservice and revealed their deep rooted hypocrisy.

Re:Hypocrisy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827723)

History will judge their actions very poorly - they have done the world a disservice and revealed their deep rooted hypocrisy.

History, my friend, is written by the victors.

Re:Hypocrisy (1)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#44827851)

History, my friend, is written by the victors.

That was before the Internet was invented. We would have to see a whole lot more totalitarian control over it before this old rule, the equivalent of blinding the independent scribes, cutting out their tongues could ever be applied again. At best all they can do now is use mass media to try and convince the majority of an alternative "truth" arguably effective in the short term I must admit.

Re:Hypocrisy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827977)

History, my friend, is written by the victors.

And this time there wont be any.

Re:Hypocrisy (1)

Livius (318358) | about a year ago | (#44828095)

Snowden might be better off without asylum in a country too friendly with the Americans. Even if they wanted to in good faith, none of they could actually keep him safe.

And thats why, my fellow americans (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827565)

We must liberate Europe of its harboring terrorists leaders

Re:And thats why, my fellow americans (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827905)

We must liberate Europe of its harboring terrorists leaders

The grass isn't any greener over here so yes please take all our politicians but don't you dare bring any of your own.

Traitor (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827593)

He might have confirmed what kind of surveillance is going on - but he knowingly broke the law and has caused untold disruption and damage to relationships for the agencies that help keep us secure. Intercepted communciations (from known baddies) help to keep you safe.
He's no hero - he's been foolish and misguided (by his wikileak chums). Lock him up!!

Re:Traitor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827677)

Riiiight, just goes to show you that you are really scared of some boogieman (like some 5 year old), than a govenrment organisation which won't do what the government and laws say. They can do pretty much anything and you have shitloads of less chance of being able to defend yourself than against some terrorist.

Also you seem to have double standards. NSA has been braking the law the whole time and you are whining about Snowden breaking the law? You are the traitor here.

Re:Traitor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827999)

So these agencies that are tasked with covert snooping are...snooping. Good.
No news.

Re:Traitor (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about a year ago | (#44828143)

Foreign snooping not domestic snooping.

Re:Traitor (4, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about a year ago | (#44827737)

Sometimes the law needs to be broken.

Wasn't the US founded by a bunch of rebels who violently rose up against the lawful authority of the time?

Re:Traitor (4, Insightful)

msobkow (48369) | about a year ago | (#44828187)

Sometimes a law being "broken" isn't a law at all, but spin by the thugs who run government.

If anyone is a traitor in this, it's the US Congress, the US Senate, the US President, the Canadian Prime Minister, the Canadian Senate, the Canadian House of Commons, the UK Parliament, and so on.

They're the ones who authorized the creation and growth of these abusive letter agencies in violation of the laws of their lands.

Re:Traitor (4, Insightful)

msobkow (48369) | about a year ago | (#44828195)

Whistle blowing is not a crime. It's a service.

And when the entire government you could report to is corrupt, one has no choice but to whistleblow to the media and the public who own the government.

Re:Traitor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828175)

All those people in america also broke the law when they started their war with britain.
Maybe we should demand you pay back for all the investment and income lost, or just declare every american a terrorist.

In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827653)

Soviet dissidents were seeking asylum into the USA and the USSR government was not particularly amused [nobelprize.org] when they got awards for reasons the USSR didn't like. Oh the ironies of life.

Voting system (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44827707)

The Foreign Affairs Committee and the Development Committee of the European Parliament will vote on a short list of three candidates. These committees are large, it looks like there will be well over 100 MEPs voting. The final decision is made by the Conference of Presidents, which consists of 11 people who are leaders of the main political blocks in the parliament. They are listed at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conference_of_Presidents_of_the_European_Parliament.

realities of life (2)

Max_W (812974) | about a year ago | (#44827809)

The price of life in Russia and especially in Moscow is very high. The government of RF does not assist E.S. in fear of further reprisals from the US government.

E.S. has to hire a protection from a private security company, an apartment, etc.

Re:realities of life (1)

Katatsumuri (1137173) | about a year ago | (#44828221)

Cost of living is high in Moscow. Price of life, not so much.

Re:realities of life (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44828277)

I'm pretty sure he could get a very lucrative book deal. He also had a tremendous salary before he blew the whistle, so if he was able to prevent his savings from being stolen by the US, he might have quite a bit of money saved up. Given the salary he could get before, he likely has excellent skills, and he might be able to find a regular well-paying job in Russia, either as a software developer or as a security consultant. In any case, I'm not so sure that the Russians wouldn't help him out financially.

The Kremlins new PR machine (1)

seoras (147590) | about a year ago | (#44828077)

With the recent PR coup over Obama on Syria I'm now starting to question Snowden's true motives.

Instead of flying from Hawaii directly to a S.American country that, later, offered him asylum he flies to Hong Kong and stays at the Russian Consulate.
Then flies to Moscow, slums it in the transit area for a month, staying in the press headlines (including causing the forced landing of Bolivian president Evo Morales due to a rumor that Snowden was onboard). Finally getting a 1 year visa to stay in Russia.

Now don't get me wrong, I think it's great that the NSA, and allies, illegal activities have been brought to light.

However I'm looking at Putin and the Kremlin and thinking - nice PR work guys, you're playing the West at its own, old, game and beating them at it.

The question this leaves for me is; was Snowden really a Russian spy and rather than being exposed in the old fashioned cold war way they chose instead to make Snowden and paymasters look like the good guys through a well staged PR stunt?

Re:The Kremlins new PR machine (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about a year ago | (#44828275)

If he was a spy he could have been left in place long term gaining ever more trust or escaped early during his Swiss work.
Longer term he could have seen how US crypto policy was shaped/formed rather than a moving out with a set selection of material from one generation of tech.
Why turn over the documents to journalists in a public way - the instant result for Russia is the US changes 'everything' very quickly.
Would you let slip about Enigma? Aspects of the VENONA decrypted documents? Knowing about the Berlin telco tunnel?
The KGB and GRU in the old days expected a few things from their human spies - insights into any crypto and the good possibility of moving up in their selected area of expertise.
Staying safe, getting more useful material or uncovering spies within the Soviet Union. They where very aware of getting junk or risking their own in the West as part of any larger trap - long or short term.

The CIA and NSA hunted for every trace of the computer files moving over a network or on a person - Moscow seems like the only safe option.
The nice PR work is in that Russia wins both ways. The press has the files. If it is a trap, Russia was just seen as having offered protection.
The sockpuppets have been hard at work. The data set from the 'internet' was too big, how can you store it all, brands would never risk their stock price, its was all 'legal', just outside the USA and now the spy aspect. Every new press story makes the sockpuppets have to fall back a bit more.

Why not? (0, Troll)

gelfling (6534) | about a year ago | (#44828223)

After all Sudan's President Omar al Bashir is an indicted war criminal and genocidist and the UN ferries him all over Africa to peace conferences by luxury jet in order, quote 'to ensure his safety' unquote.

Snowden? give the prize to Putin himself. He's only murders journalists he doesn't jail them.

Putin/Snowden 2016 The REAL Liberal alternative.

you mean (1)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | about a year ago | (#44828299)

Freedom to other people's thoughts right?

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