Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Boulder's Tech Workers Cope With Historic Flood

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the be-safe-out-there dept.

Businesses 85

dcblogs writes "Boulder Co. was recently ranked first in nation for its 'high-tech start-up density,' for cities of its size by the Kauffman Foundation. The ranking is based on a ratio of start-ups to population. But the tech community has left its downtown offices, some of which are flooded and others under threat. Normally there are 70 people working in Gnip's office, but Chris Moody, the CEO, in response to request from the city to get traffic off roads, closed the office. In another part of downtown, TeamSnap's building was flooding, and Dave DuPont, its CEO, said his only commute option was 'by boat.' The city's decision to ask businesses to close was a sign 'that the worse might still be in front us,' said Moody."

cancel ×

85 comments

Colleague there (4, Informative)

war4peace (1628283) | about a year ago | (#44842115)

I have a colleague working there, in the Oracle Campus, he said it's pretty bad. Broken roads, flash floods, people being rescued in the nick of time and such.

Re: Colleague there (2)

Niris (1443675) | about a year ago | (#44842157)

I worked there all summer and have been keeping up with people as well. Our office is on Pearl and it's closed because the 36 and the 7 are too dangerous / closed as well. I have been getting a lot of pictures from friends in the area and it's pretty crazy. The nice thing is a lot of the work can be done from home, and most of the guys I worked with live outside of boulder since housing is so expensive.

Re: Colleague there (1)

sribe (304414) | about a year ago | (#44843207)

The nice thing is a lot of the work can be done from home, and most of the guys I worked with live outside of boulder since housing is so expensive.

Well, all 5 canyons to west of Boulder are closed because of washed-out roads. There's flooding in Lafayette, Louisville, Broomfield, Erie, & Longmont to the east. Hell, even Aurora is flooded. I-25 closed to the Wyoming border. Parts of I-70 closed off and on. 93 closed from 64th to 128th...

Re: Colleague there (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about a year ago | (#44843395)

The nice thing is a lot of the work can be done from home, and most of the guys I worked with live outside of boulder since housing is so expensive.

Well, all 5 canyons to west of Boulder are closed because of washed-out roads. There's flooding in Lafayette, Louisville, Broomfield, Erie, & Longmont to the east. Hell, even Aurora is flooded. I-25 closed to the Wyoming border. Parts of I-70 closed off and on. 93 closed from 64th to 128th...

What makes this "Biblical" flood something of more than local concern is that Boulder/Ft. Collins is the site of the WWV/WWVB radio clocks and transmitters. Since the Maryland facilities closed down, the only other US time standard radio transmitters are located in Honolulu. Atomic wristwatches everywhere are in peril!

Re: Colleague there (1)

DadLeopard (1290796) | about a year ago | (#44843523)

Seems wwvb is still up and running at this time according to the readability status report! http://tf.nist.gov/tf-cgi/wwvbmonitor_e.cgi [nist.gov] So all we can do is keep our fingers crossed!

Re: Colleague there (1)

dex22 (239643) | about a year ago | (#44843857)

Well, it was until it got slashdotted!

Re: Colleague there (1)

sribe (304414) | about a year ago | (#44843219)

Oh, and I forgot, Lyons completely cut off so badly that the National Guard had trouble getting in to evacuate residents... Jamestown & Eldorado Springs evacuated. And so on.

Re: Colleague there (4, Informative)

pspahn (1175617) | about a year ago | (#44843293)

I was looking at USGS stream data last night and this morning. Colorado DOW [state.co.us]

Boulder Creek (the river running through Boulder) is normally running at 50-100 CFS (ft.3/sec) at this time of year. Last night it was flowing at over 5400 CFS, and this morning when I looked it was still over 5000.

For comparison's sake, that is about 30% more volume than is currently running down the Colorado River at the Utah state line.

Other streams in the Front Range are at similar biblical levels. Last measurement on the Cache La Poudre were nearing 6000. Data simply shows "E" at the moment (value exceeds maximum). Big Thompson was around 5000, but also currently shows no current data.

What we have right now are a handful of typically small streams that have transformed into Colorado River sized flows, all dumping into the same drainage system, the South Platte River.

Folks in Nebraska might want to start sandbagging.

Re: Colleague there (1)

sribe (304414) | about a year ago | (#44843423)

What we have right now are a handful of typically small streams that have transformed into Colorado River sized flows, all dumping into the same drainage system, the South Platte River.

There's a stream at the bottom of the gulch here that is normally so small that "high" means it's a big long step over it. I can hear it from a 1/2 mile away right now. As I said in another post, we're basically at the top here, so this is just one of who knows how many hundreds, or thousands, of little high-country streams feed into the creeks further down-canyon...

Re:Colleague there (2)

TechyImmigrant (175943) | about a year ago | (#44842521)

Oracle? That explains it.

Re:Colleague there (1)

rwyoder (759998) | about a year ago | (#44842853)

I have a colleague working there, in the Oracle Campus,...

He has my deepest sympathies.

Re:Colleague there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44843675)

Global warning to blame. . . . . . . Nahhhh . . . . .

Changing climate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44845485)

Do you think...?

Re:Colleague there (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about a year ago | (#44844663)

Boulder is a major disaster recovery site for multiple american corporations because it's supposed to be so safe.

If we have something go bad in Lexington now, then something impressive could happen.

From Someone Who Works in Boulder (4, Informative)

Scorpinox (479613) | about a year ago | (#44842151)

I work in Boulder, but the Sheriff's office said that everyone should stay home today. A lot of the roads are perfectly fine, but empty because everyone is staying home. A few spots are really flooded and impassable though. As far as I know, my office isn't flooded, but we did put all our computers on our desks as a precaution. I'm sort of nervous because I forgot to push my code before I left, so I might have to redo some work if something happens to my computer.

Re:From Someone Who Works in Boulder (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#44842207)

Can't you get to the machine via VPN?

Stay safe.

Re:From Someone Who Works in Boulder (1)

Scorpinox (479613) | about a year ago | (#44842243)

I'm not set-up to work from home :-\ Usually just bring my laptop home, but didn't think a little rain on Wednesday evening was going to be any big deal, so left it at work. I'm pretty lucky though, a lot of people are having a really tough time.

Re:From Someone Who Works in Boulder (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842229)

You should have been using Hadoop and big tables and/or nosql as well as a more synergistically scalable green cloud solution. Your core incompetency has directly contributed to global warming and you now reap what you have sown as the cows come home to roost. Your check has come due and the consequences will never be the same.

Re:From Someone Who Works in Boulder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842283)

Our office at Alteryx in Boulder was basically closed as well. I managed to get in by bicycle, but cars were challenging. This is MUCh more real than any of us expected.

Re:From Someone Who Works in Boulder (1)

am 2k (217885) | about a year ago | (#44843123)

My parents' house was flooded a few months ago and they did the same thing for the kitchen appliances, just to be safe. Then the flood reached a height of 2m (~6.5 feet) [dailymail.co.uk] ...

Re:From Someone Who Works in Boulder (1)

cdrudge (68377) | about a year ago | (#44843437)

I work in Boulder, but the Sheriff's office said that everyone should stay home today. A lot of the roads are perfectly fine, but empty because everyone is staying home. A few spots are really flooded and impassable though.

That sounds a lot like most midwest or northern cities and towns when they declare a winter weather emergency. Get a lot of snow in a short period of time, authorities ask people not to purposefully chance going out if they don't need to. It saves them having to drag someone out of a snow bank and they can focus on clearing the roads.

Re:From Someone Who Works in Boulder (1)

nickersonm (1646933) | about a year ago | (#44846149)

I was around on my bicycle yesterday and today; the flooding didn't seem too bad west of Broadway, except for the creek path, but there's more low-lying buildings east of there. Nothing of note on the main CU campus. Although it appears that Boulder Creek was quite a bit higher late last evening than it was when I was there. Very high debris marks and silt all over, including through a lot of the downtown streets. Also a mudslide early this morning at the opening of the canyon.

I have a number of pictures here [nickersonm.com] (somewhat low quality), and several [youtube.com] short videos [youtube.com] from the same [youtube.com] areas [youtube.com] .

What is Boulder Co.? (0)

P1h3r1e3d13 (1158845) | about a year ago | (#44842211)

What do they do? Sounds like maybe an ironic name for a cloud storage company....

Ohhhhhhh. “Boulder, CO” — not “Boulder Co.” Never mind.

Re:What is Boulder Co.? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842329)

What do they do?

Someone told me they were involved with a process for watering down Czech beer for American consumption.

Re:What is Boulder Co.? (3, Funny)

OhSoLaMeow (2536022) | about a year ago | (#44842727)

Someone told me they were involved with a process for watering down Czech beer for American consumption.

Nah, they're in Golden, CO - not Boulder.

Re:What is Boulder Co.? (1)

Ant2 (252143) | about a year ago | (#44843105)

It's more widespread than just the city of Boulder.
Most people realize Boulder Co. is Boulder County.

Re:What is Boulder Co.? (1)

P1h3r1e3d13 (1158845) | about a year ago | (#44843161)

Oh, is it not referring to the city of Boulder, CO? As a non-Coloradan, I had no idea there was a Boulder County. Now I'm really confused. Is “Co.” a common abbrev. for “County?”

Bolder does have a good number of startups (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842303)

What they don't have is a good number of SUCCESSFUL startups. Most of them are gone within 2 years.

Re:Bolder does have a good number of startups (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842455)

That goes for generally any startup though.

Re:Bolder does have a good number of startups (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | about a year ago | (#44842625)

What they don't have is a good number of SUCCESSFUL startups. Most of them are gone within 2 years.

Well, I suppose they could just move over into the medical marijuana business, that seems to be a real growth sector of the economy there.

:)

Not that bad (4, Informative)

n0ano (148272) | about a year ago | (#44842315)

When did this story get written, the worst is pretty much past. At 11:30AM local time I'm looking at blue sky, the streams around Boulder crested last night, we're now in restoration mode (I'm lucky, my basement flooded out such that the hallway carpeting is soaked but there's no standing water, unlike my neighbors who share a wall with me and had about 2 inches of standing water throughout their basement).

Things are bad but, at least in Boulder, they're not catastrophic. Some of the surrounding communities, especially up toward the mountains, got it worse, there are some serious evacuations going on up there, but Boulder is fine.

Re:Not that bad (3, Insightful)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year ago | (#44843149)

Video of water coming down the Big Thompson Canyon from Estes Park.

Usually water is a trickle this time of year.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWGK4CiWxeM [youtube.com]

Skip to the 7:00 mark to see what's left of the road.

Re:Not that bad (1)

pspahn (1175617) | about a year ago | (#44844607)

From what we just heard on the 3pm news conference, the road is "completely decimated". The sherriff described a few sections where "there was some road remaining", but the rest of it was "completely washed out down to the bedrock".

Twice in less than 40 years. I would not be surprised if they decided to simply NOT rebuild that road.

Re:Not that bad (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about a year ago | (#44844685)

Decimated would probably be more appropriate if about 10% of the road was gone.

I guess decimated is going to go the way of irregardless and loose.

Re:Not that bad (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 10 months ago | (#44848867)

Shut up. Decimated means several things. Just like lots of words.

You can feel free to be pedantic that the road was actually halfimated. As in 17 of 34 miles were destroyed.

Re:Not that bad (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 10 months ago | (#44850301)

Whoa! No need to loose your cool man.

Re:Not that bad (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 10 months ago | (#44850353)

Look, synonyms are not just words that mean the same thing.

There is a value in communicating precisely.

By overusing decimate, you are destroying the ability to actually talk about killing or destroying a tenth and losing the historical context as well.

Why not use "washed out" or "washed away" or even simply "destroyed"?

I understand that words drift and people come up with novel ways of using them.

My original post was polite and not and attack- merely a comment. I guess it pushed one of your buttons. Sorry.

OTH, shutting up is not going to happen. :-)

Re:Not that bad (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 10 months ago | (#44856169)

By overusing decimate, you are destroying the ability to actually talk about killing or destroying a tenth

Too bad that's not what it actually means anymore.

It changed in the 19th century. ie the 1800s.

Re:Not that bad (2)

pspahn (1175617) | about a year ago | (#44843419)

Saying "the worst is pretty much past" is awfully short-sighted, especially when you're claiming sunny skies at 11:30 am as your evidence.

Everyone around here knows that it is sunny in morning and thunderstorms brew in the afternoon. At this point, with how saturated everything is and the fact that there is more rain coming, you can't say for sure that the worst is past. Coloradoans need to remain aware of the situation, as additional localized downpours can still create flash-floods for the area.

Re:Not that bad (1)

taj (32429) | about a year ago | (#44846647)

I'm not in Colorado now but I was there in the 70's when they had the Big Thompson flood which oddly enough was the 'other' 100 year flood that took almost 150 lives not 4. They are starting to have quit a few 100 year floods :) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Thompson_River#Big_Thompson_Canyon_Flooding_of_1976 [wikipedia.org]

Mountains are neat to visit but if you don't respect them, they can take you out in many ways. It's not Disney world.

But the nature of the floods is much different than say the Mississippi or other areas away from the mountains. What happens is you get significant rainfall in a mountain valley that comes down the valley as a wall of liquid concrete taking out roads bridges, houses and anything else in the way with incredible force. Impressive and dangerous. But it passes in a couple days without more rain. The towns like Boulder, Colorado springs, Lyons and fort Collins just see high water levels for a short period of time. There is no drainage problem at 1 mile above the sea.

Idiots (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842323)

Cue the eurotrash telling us how we are so stupid for building so close to the coast, where floods are a problem.

Re:Idiots (5, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year ago | (#44842377)

Cue the eurotrash telling us how we are so stupid for building so close to the coast, where floods are a problem.

Boulder County has been in FEMA's 'disasters waiting to happen' for decades. One of the more entertaining factoids is that the major communication center, the Police Department is located, wait for it, in a flood plain, in a building that was supposed to be used for a hotel but the developer could not approval from the city to complete the structure.

So it was taken over by the City and County.

Strong work, there.....

Re:Idiots (2)

n1ywb (555767) | about a year ago | (#44842843)

Vermont's EOC is in a floodplane too and guess what happened when Hurricane Irene came through? All the IT infrastructure was in the (flooded) basement so basically we had no EOC. So after the storm, did the move the EOC? No, they moved the IT stuff up to the second floor. Brilliant!

Re:Idiots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44843033)

One of the more entertaining factoids is that the major communication center, the Police Department is located, wait for it, in a flood plain, in a building that was supposed to be used for a hotel but the developer could not approval from the city to complete the structure.

Ahh! A flood of commas!

Re:Idiots (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44845141)

If you're talking about the CJC building on Canyon, you're right: it was a bone-headed move to put a public safety facility where it would be the first to go. But that has changed. Boulder PD moved the 911 center to 33rd Street, and the Sheriff's office (county EOC) moved to the Boulder airport. These were moved specifically to get them out of the flood zone.

So you're saying you were smart doing it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842677)

Because if what you did was stupid, then surely europeans, americans, asians and everyone is correct in telling you you were stupid.

Oh, and it's extrememly stupid to say about global warming that if the sea levels rise "we'll just adapt" AND THEN insist that putting your new industry on the coast (where do you think the sea is?).

Isn't it.

But feel free to show how this was a cunning plan.

Re:So you're saying you were smart doing it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842739)

What does any of this have to do with the story? Colorado is landlocked in the middle of the country.

Re: So you're saying you were smart doing it? (1)

Mabhatter (126906) | about a year ago | (#44843157)

But being next to the mountains, its still subjet to rapid flash-flooding because of the thin rocky soil, low density of foliage to soak up rain it all wants to go DOWNHILL... Right through town.

OP said it was. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44845539)

"Cue the eurotrash telling us how we are so stupid for building so close to the coast"

Re:So you're saying you were smart doing it? (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year ago | (#44843163)

And the entire state is above 3,300' ASL.

Re:Idiots (1)

Smauler (915644) | about a year ago | (#44845467)

Why is this modded up? It's nothing to do with the story. In England, just about every single city is on the coast, so that's not relevant. We also know about flash floods [youtube.com] too, which, due to our climate, occur relatively regularly. Only last fortnight or so, we had flood warnings near where I live. If you find a house in the UK that's not at risk of flooding, it's on top of a hill.

Local Resident (4, Informative)

Bigbutt (65939) | about a year ago | (#44842335)

I live and work in Boulder County (Longmont). The St. Vrain is a pretty minor stream that runs through the center of Longmont however yesterday it had jumped the banks and split the town in half. I work in the south side but live on the north side. While I rode my motorcycle to work yesterday morning, my manager essentially told me to catch a ride with a coworker to get home. We went way over on the east side of town to get over the river and back to my place.

I've had a little water seepage at my place but I did learn that I had an outdoor sump pump that was keeping the basement mostly dry. A good thing.

I did have to break down my computer gear and bring it up stairs so I could continue to access the 'net. I also evacuated half the room and used a wetvac to suck up the water (about 10 gallons since yesterday).

There are a lot of people worse off than I am though and I'm hoping they get through it ok. I'm keeping up with friends and family via facebook (nyah) and working from home so keeping busy.

It's going to take a bit to get things back to normal though. Lots of places are washed out or inaccessible (Lyons is just a few miles away from me and Estes Park is about 20 miles up in the mountains) and of course lots of road and bridge damage.

Stay safe.

[John]

Re:Local Resident (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842463)

It takes a little of the chuckle out of Left Hand Brewery's slogan about being "brewed on the banks of the mighty St. Vrain"!

Hope you all recover quickly.

SB (from Littleton, SW denver area)

Re:Local Resident (1)

elistan (578864) | about a year ago | (#44842581)

Longmont resident here, too, but on the south side. I've read that due to the St Vrain to our north and Left Hand Creek to the south, we're essentially cut off from the rest of Colorado for the moment. It's actually sunny right now, but I've also read that dams in the mountains will be doing controlled releases to reduce the risk of catastrophic failure, so river levels on the flats will remain high for a while. In the meantime, my wife's offices in Boulder are shut down, but she can VPN in from home without issue today. Yesterday the access was more spotty - electricity didn't appear to be very reliable.

The Bad Astronomer, Phil Plait [slate.com] has some video he posted yesterday.

Here's how he put it regarding the "disaster waiting to happen" thing.

We've been suffering a long drought in my hometown of Boulder, Colo., including unusually hot weather for the past few summers. The ground has been pretty hard, and we've had fires, which reduce the vegetation. It's been worrisome for some time, because we knew if it rained hard, we could be in trouble.

We're in trouble.

Unfortunately, there have been three deaths I've heard of. And there appears to be a lot of transportation infrastructure damage, in addition to homes and offices flooded.

Re:Local Resident (1)

sribe (304414) | about a year ago | (#44843265)

Longmont resident here, too, but on the south side. I've read that due to the St Vrain to our north and Left Hand Creek to the south, we're essentially cut off from the rest of Colorado for the moment. It's actually sunny right now, but I've also read that dams in the mountains will be doing controlled releases to reduce the risk of catastrophic failure, so river levels on the flats will remain high for a while. In the meantime, my wife's offices in Boulder are shut down, but she can VPN in from home without issue today. Yesterday the access was more spotty - electricity didn't appear to be very reliable.

I'm in Coal Creek Canyon, up at the top, on the lip of a gulch. So in terms of the flooding I'm comfortably "above it all", but we're all trapped up here. Hwy 72 east and west, Gross Dam Road, and Gap Road are all washed out, severely. I'm really curious to see how long it takes before there is any way to get out of here. As long as we have power, we're fine for a good long while...

Re:Local Resident (1)

elistan (578864) | about a year ago | (#44843445)

Looks like your electricity and Internet are holding up. Got access to clean water and food? I just read a report that residents of Jamestown a bit north of you are being evacuated by air...

Re:Local Resident (1)

sribe (304414) | about a year ago | (#44843765)

Looks like your electricity and Internet are holding up. Got access to clean water and food? I just read a report that residents of Jamestown a bit north of you are being evacuated by air...

Yes, power, internet, water, food. If it weren't for watching the news (both TV & online), I'd literally have no idea that there's so much destruction and so many actual life-and-death emergencies in the area.

Of course, if I tried to go anywhere today, I'd get clued in pretty quickly. What with the missing roads and all :-(

It's a really bizarre feeling. I've been in some (minor) natural disasters before, but never surrounded by it while being untouched. (Well, OK, I do have some leaking windows, but that's nothing.)

Re:Local Resident (1)

godamntheman (989491) | about a year ago | (#44843863)

I live and work between the St. Vrain and Left Hand Creek and we'd been cut off pretty much as you say. I was turned away from my office near Oskar Blues by police this morning. The only way out of town from where I'm at was down the Diagonal, so I went to Boulder to pass the time. Boulder seemed like they had an even harder time of it with the Boulder Creek, but they were able to keep the town running as far as I could tell (the book store and coffee shops were open at least..). My comrades in Lyons had an even worse time of it, poor bastards.

Of course, with decent infrastructure... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44842481)

Office closings (for technology businesses) shouldn't be that bad.

Our infrastructure is all decentralized, so I've just been working from home.

Of course, plenty of people have had their homes flooded. That's a different story.

Referendum against diverting flood water (5, Insightful)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about a year ago | (#44842707)

In keeping with Boulder's progressive nature I have filed a request for referendum at city hall that would make it illegal to direct, divert, absorb, or otherwise disrupt the natural flow of flood water through the city. Unfortunately this will mean homes and businesses will be flooded beyond repair but someone must represent Mother Nature's interests.

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (1)

Bigbutt (65939) | about a year ago | (#44842731)

Did you see the guys from CU that redirected the flow with sandbags and plywood? The fire department told them to knock it off since they were increasing the speed of the flow and potentially destroying stuff that would be able to manage a more reduced flow.

I guess these guys don't play D&D (10 dice fireball in a 10x10 dungeon corridor anyone? :) )

[John]

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | about a year ago | (#44843479)

In keeping with Boulder's progressive nature I have filed a request for referendum at city hall that would make it illegal to direct, divert, absorb, or otherwise disrupt the natural flow of flood water through the city. Unfortunately this will mean homes and businesses will be flooded beyond repair but someone must represent Mother Nature's interests.

Yeah, it's called building where the river DOESN'T flood. Common sense is often bad for business, especially all those contractors ready for public dollars to build dams and sewers where they would not be needed except that some business decided that it's cheaper to build there.

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (2)

swillden (191260) | about a year ago | (#44843971)

Yeah, it's called building where the river DOESN'T flood.

To be fair, they're calling this a 500-year event. Just up the road from my house (Firestone, CO), the St. Vrain river, normally about 10 feet wide and three feet deep, is a half mile wide and has risen a good 8 feet above its normal high water mark. I talked with a farmer whose family has been farming the same fields for over 100 years and their fields have never flooded, until yesterday. Their fields are five feet under water.

So, yeah, not building on the regular flood plains is smart, but this is well beyond that. Much of what has been flooded this week has never flooded in recorded history.

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44844429)

To be fair, they're calling this a 500-year event.

We seem to be having a lot of those lately. The squirrels, buffalos, European settlers and Native Americans must have had a wild ride in 1513.

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (1)

pspahn (1175617) | about a year ago | (#44844665)

It is as much a part of the history [google.com] here as anything else.

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (1)

plopez (54068) | about a year ago | (#44845573)

Deforest an area, pave it, over graze and strip off vegetation, have long term droughts and poor forest management that guarantee huge fires that denude the hills, over log and what do you expect will happen?

Duh....

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (1)

adolf (21054) | about a year ago | (#44846471)

Deforest an area, pave it, over graze and strip off vegetation, have long term droughts and poor forest management that guarantee huge fires that denude the hills, over log and what do you expect will happen?

Ponies. I expect that ponies will happen.

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (1)

swillden (191260) | about 10 months ago | (#44869857)

Deforest an area, pave it, over graze and strip off vegetation, have long term droughts and poor forest management that guarantee huge fires that denude the hills, over log and what do you expect will happen?

Ponies. I expect that ponies will happen.

Nah, they're out in the desert, stripping the land bare, trampling what's left into mulch.

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (1)

adolf (21054) | about 10 months ago | (#44881085)

Mulch is good. Mulch turns to compost. Compost makes flowers.

And flowers lead to ponies.

OMG! PONIES!

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (1)

swillden (191260) | about 10 months ago | (#44869845)

Deforest an area, pave it, over graze and strip off vegetation, have long term droughts and poor forest management that guarantee huge fires that denude the hills, over log and what do you expect will happen?

Duh....

Deforest? You've never been to Colorado, have you.

Re:Referendum against diverting flood water (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44847043)

someone must represent Mother Nature's interests

Mother Nature has been taking a bad rap for storms madmen and their bad science toys have been creating. Just one for the record. Maybe this Boulder Colorado storm fell out of the ionosphere as well and its still getting called a natural disaster. WAY TO GO

Closing businesses should be a no-brainer (3, Insightful)

TheNastyInThePasty (2382648) | about a year ago | (#44843029)

The city must ask businesses to close because evidently putting your employees' lives in mortal danger isn't too big a risk when there's profit to be had!

Re:Closing businesses should be a no-brainer (1)

khallow (566160) | about a year ago | (#44844311)

Not everyone has bosses who live in the area. There's a difference between hearing that Colorado has some flooding (which is all that I had heard prior to reading this story) and hearing that there are currently a number of streams near or in Boulder with the flow rate of the Colorado river.

easiest industry to 'cope' (1)

globaljustin (574257) | about a year ago | (#44843267)

I used to live in the Goss/Grove area of Boulder and even taught at Boulder HS for a short time...I hope everyone is getting things sorted out...what a mess...

to the point, IMHO a web software type 'startup' is probably the easiest of all industries to 'cope' with this kind of thing...that's why working in it is awesome...

really for most 'web startups' you don't need offices at all, except to project an image

not all startups are 'web' and floods are an IT and t-com nightmare...that's a given...

my greater point relates to Marissa Meyer at Yahoo getting rid of telecommuting...I think the 'web startup' world does itself a tremendous disservice by forcing itself into the geographic boxes of old companies...

for comparison sake, I run a tshirt screen printing company...if my shop got flooded and I didn't have time to prepare I would be completely finished...you can't 'backup' inventory

At this time NSIDC is down. (1)

aoeu (532208) | about a year ago | (#44843493)

Water

More rain is on it's way (1)

millertym (1946872) | about a year ago | (#44843579)

I'm in Utah and it has been another heavy rain day - which means all that weather is also on its way to Colorado. Look for constant rain on and off in that already hard hit area all day tomorrow. Luckily for Utah so far the flooding has been lighter. Some, but nothing catastrophic. I think the storms intensify as they head out over Colorado and the landmass underneath them gain elevation.

Re:More rain is on it's way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44846715)

Too bad you can't send that rain into Kansas. Judging by the amounts of rain, one could fill up most of the cracks in the ground here. Seriously, we're not that far away.

Re:More rain is on it's way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44852677)

Too bad you can't send that rain into Kansas. Judging by the amounts of rain, one could fill up most of the cracks in the ground here. Seriously, we're not that far away.

The border with Kansas is about 180 miles due east of Boulder, CO. I don't know what the elevation at the border is, but at the town of Wray, CO near the border, the elevation is 3,566 feet. That's 1,864 feet lower than Bloulder's 5,430-foot elevation.

That's a drop of 10.3 feet elevation per mile, which is way more than the average drop of 2.3 feet per mile, for the Mississippi river. So I think water would flow ok in a canal from Boulder, CO into Kansas.

Maybe Colorado and Kansas can agree to a canal (helped by pumps where necessary) that transports water from flood-prone areas of Colorado into Kansas.

Not as bad as it looks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44843681)

Gnip's our downstairs neighbor. The building is right across the street from Boulder Creek and hasn't suffered any outages so far. We got notification yesterday the building manager was deploying flood gates in front of the building (and here I thought they were funny-looking sections of sidewalk). The office has been closed for two days now but I can still get into the servers at work -- most of us have been working from home, as funny as that sounds.

On a side note, I used to do IT for Boulder County and installed several systems at the Boulder EOC, which contrary to a comment above is actually on the top of a hill in the floodplain and conveniently situated directly adjacent to Boulder Airport. They are absurdly overprepared for this flood, and have been planning for it for decades. All homes within what they have determined through extensive USGS surveying is the "hundred-year floodplain" [denverpost.com] (statistical probability of a flood this size occurring once every hundred years -- last seen in 1919 -- this is how good their planning is) not only know they are in the floodplain they are also required to know evacuation routes and register with the county for reverse 911 purposes. I don't envy my former co-workers, they're probably camped out in the datacenter in the basement of the EOC running tech support for hundreds of emergency services personnel. At least they have bunks down there.

Re:Not as bad as it looks (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year ago | (#44844465)

On a side note, I used to do IT for Boulder County and installed several systems at the Boulder EOC, which contrary to a comment above is actually on the top of a hill in the floodplain and conveniently situated directly adjacent to Boulder Airport.

That's good to hear. It used to be at the PD which was spitting distance from the Creek. Communications used to have a bunch of school buses that they could hop into, drive up to the Betasso Water Treatment Plant (which overlooks Boulder) and set up stuff from there. Unless Boulder Canyon was flooded.

So it must have only taken them 20 years or so to move their butts, but progress is progress.

But even then, Boulder was really prepared for this sort of thing. They had flood gauges all over the mountains that linked to the EOC. I recall one lazy summer day when a couple of us in one of the local VFDs were hanging around a station (near one of the gauges) and idily wondered what they would think if we turned up one the 2 1/2 inch hoses and drenched the gauge..... We figured we had gotten into enough trouble that week so we let it lie.

Bad, But Things Could Be Worse (1)

SerenelyHotPest (2970223) | about a year ago | (#44844329)

The situation in Boulder is worrisome. As someone who goes to CU Boulder, I can tell you watching entire foundational linings in construction zones be swept away by the flooding is a surreal experience.

I often treat Boulder as a second hometown, and I can tell you I've often privately berated their "nuclear-free zone" policy: "oh yes, I'm sure the giant anti-nuclear forcefield channeling the powers of Mother Gaia will repel any maverick ICBMs that stray too close to Boulder county." Given the flooding and general trend to keep old plants open indefinitely, I can say that I'm genuinely relieved by it for the first time. I'm also relieved by the fact that government and administration seem closer to planet Earth than most leadership tends to be during even these (hopefully) small disasters.

How many idiots... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44845289)

...does it take to get "the worse might still be in front us" posted here? Some blogger, the story submitter, the /. "editor... anyone else?

I'd leave colorado if I could (1)

plopez (54068) | about a year ago | (#44845415)

Fires, floods, land slides, gun controls, and marijuana legalization. What's next, a swarm of locust?[*] Unfortunately I am sort of stuck here for personal reasons. To others I would just say, "Stay away and save yourselves! It's too late for me!".

[*] There has to be a "Hitler Discovers" episode in there somewhere....

Stram guages (1)

plopez (54068) | about a year ago | (#44845549)

In case you are interested here are three stream guages in the area:

http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?06752260 [usgs.gov]

http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?06741510 [usgs.gov]

http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?06730200 [usgs.gov]

Note the log scale on the discharge. 1 m^3/sec = 35.31 cfs for people with a civilized unit of measurement system.

yay for pre-emptive flood prep (1)

smellsofbikes (890263) | about a year ago | (#44845913)

I work in south Longmont. Where I cross the Boulder Creek, it's usually 3 meters wide and so shallow the rocks on the bottom emerge from the surface of the water. When I was hauling out yesterday after our workplace got an evacuation notice, the creek was a kilometer wide, backed up against the bridge, which is probably 15 meters wide by two meters deep.
Longmont spent eighteen months reworking the Lefthand Creek drainage, deepening it and tearing out all the trees beside it, through the middle of the city. At the time, local citizens were outraged at the expense, writing nasty letters to the newspaper and showing up at city council meetings yelling about what a waste of money it was and how debit spending was the devil. Lefthand filled right up to the top and moved like a freight train, but didn't overtop through much of the town. The place where they stopped the rework, and the creek returns to its shallow, cottonwood-tree-filled drainage, is where it spread out and started flooding basements, according to pictures my friends who live there are sending me. I'm hoping this experience will motivate the city of Boulder to do the same for Boulder Creek. One of my friends lived in a house across from Naropa University, right beside Boulder Creek, that had a big metal sign on the front warning the inhabitants that they lived in a flood zone. That should never happen. That should be parkland, not places where kids live. (She moved, thankfully, because that house had close to two meters of water in the main floor, from pictures I've seen, and I'd hate for her and her two toddlers to still be living there.)

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...