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Molecule In Corked Wine Plugs Up Your Nose

Unknown Lamer posted about a year ago | from the apply-clothespin-to-nose dept.

Wine 134

sciencehabit writes "Ever send a bottle of wine back at a restaurant? If you weren't just being a pretentious snob, then it was probably because the wine seemed 'corked' — had a musty odor and didn't taste quite right. Most likely, the wine was contaminated with a molecule called 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), the main cause of cork taint. But a new study by Japanese researchers concludes that you do not smell TCA directly; rather, TCA blocks up your sense of smell and distorts your ability to detect odors. The findings could help the food and beverage industry improve its products and lead to less embarrassment for both you and your waiter."

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first ever first (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44868837)

first

So stop using corks (4, Interesting)

geek (5680) | about a year ago | (#44868849)

Seriously, other than nostalgia why are they still using corks when much better methods have existed for decades?

Re:So stop using corks (4, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | about a year ago | (#44868881)

"Greetings sir, I've selected the finest cans of wine for your dining experience tonight. Would you like some pork rhines to help wash that merlot down?"

Re:So stop using corks (3, Funny)

Darinbob (1142669) | about a year ago | (#44868953)

Cans, pssh. What's wrong with boxes?

Re:So stop using corks (1)

slick7 (1703596) | about a year ago | (#44869035)

Cans, pssh. What's wrong with boxes?

What's wrong with bags and those pokey straw thingies?

Re:So stop using corks (4, Informative)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year ago | (#44869069)

In fact, a box is one of the best ways to store and distribute wine.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

hedleyroos (817147) | about a year ago | (#44870411)

Boxes are easy to transport and may be subject to different taxation. The downsides are quite bad: higher sulphur content, looks tacky and no flow of air to soften tannins once opened.

carafe (3, Informative)

SgtChaireBourne (457691) | about a year ago | (#44870933)

If you want to oxygenate the box wine before serving, just pour it into a carafe a little ahead of time. The wine remaining in the box stays as it is but the wine in the carafe gets the oxygen needed to take care of some of the tannins. Seriously, even with wine in a bottle, using a carafe is a good way to deal with tannins.

A nice carafe can also help show off the wine itself.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

pjt33 (739471) | about a year ago | (#44871029)

There's essentially no flow of air through a bottle neck either except when you're pouring.

Wine in boxes (3, Funny)

demon driver (1046738) | about a year ago | (#44870997)

In fact, a box is one of the best ways to store and distribute wine.

True! I, too, buy most of my wine in boxes. Usually containing six bottles each. Very convenient!

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869015)

Ahh, never seen a screw-on bottle cap before?

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44871473)

They are usually of a metal that also can leave a strange flavor to the wine. Plastic corks are better. (And requires no change to the bottle.)

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Main Gauche (881147) | about a year ago | (#44869471)

"some pork rhines to help wash that merlot down?"

Did you mean Riesling?

Re:So stop using corks (1)

ArhcAngel (247594) | about a year ago | (#44869587)

I'm still trying to figure out what pork rhines are. Perhaps he meant Chicharrón?

Re:So stop using corks (3, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | about a year ago | (#44869629)

They're pork rinds that are only made in the Rhine valley.

For true connoisseurs only.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869631)

Pork rinds, he just can't spell.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | about a year ago | (#44869657)

But you can spell.

You can spell all night long.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44870063)

Dude, you jest, but I think grape juice companies could make a killing in the low-income market by marketing identical-looking (from a distance) grape juice and wine containers.

p.s. Now I'm tempted to go buy some boxed wine and pour it into used grape juice cans/bottles so I can drink it in public.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44870247)

I'm tempted to go buy some boxed wine and pour it into used grape juice cans/bottles so I can drink it in public.

Drinking wine out of a can is conducive to my violent hand gestures when I speak.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44870525)

Holy shit this restaurant sounds amazing!

Re:So stop using corks (5, Interesting)

Nerdfest (867930) | about a year ago | (#44868907)

Very true. Stelvin closures, Plastic corks, glass stoppers, all superior. The really amazing part if all the labour that goes into each real cork. Cut, cleaned, bleached, sorted, the re-sorted, much of it by hand. It's actually amazing that they're so cheap. It really sucks when a bad $0.30 cork ruins a 60$ bottle of wine.

Re:So stop using corks (4, Funny)

horm (2802801) | about a year ago | (#44869155)

All that work creates jobs. Do you want to destroy American jobs?

Re: So stop using corks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44870115)

Portuguese jobs

Re: So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44870895)

You mean the CEO of Maçã?

He died a couple of years ago, and all of the euFones they've made since have been dull and listless.

Re:So stop using corks (5, Informative)

blueg3 (192743) | about a year ago | (#44869233)

Plastic corks, glass stoppers

No, no. Those things suck. Plastic corks are like regular corks, except they don't get moldy and they're a royal pain to get out of the bottle. Glass stoppers are easy to get out unless you break a bottle opener on it by accident. They're also vaguely resealable.

There are two modern methods that are amazing for wine. Screw caps are stupid easy to use, cheap, and resealable. Modern, pioneering winemakers that don't worry about what people think about the presentation use screw caps. (They also often make great wine at affordable prices.) The other method is the box (or rather, a bag inside a box). A box looks completely classless, but it's one of the best ways of storing wine because pouring wine doesn't expose any of the remaining wine to oxidation. This means you can make a (disturbingly compact) 3L box of wine and use it over the course of a week. Or two days. Or a month. The wine stays good. Mercifully, some people -- not all Australian -- are making good wine in boxes now.

Re:So stop using corks (4, Informative)

arth1 (260657) | about a year ago | (#44869359)

But sometimes you want the oxidation. A couple of my favourite wines need decanting before the flavour is right.

Re:So stop using corks (4, Informative)

aXis100 (690904) | about a year ago | (#44869443)

You can still decant the amount you'll be drinking that night (e.g. usign a fast breather) and leave the rest in the box for another day.

Seriously, was that so hard to figure out?

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44870701)

So the solution to stop it looking cheap is to always use a decanter. Problem solved! Unless your guests catch you in the kitchen in the act.

Re:So stop using corks (2)

blueg3 (192743) | about a year ago | (#44869775)

I'm not sure that effect is oxidation, but otherwise, yes. The good way to do that is with a decanter, though, rather than just opening the bottle. The bottle's small neck limits airflow. If you're going to expose it to air, might as well do it fast.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

tinkerton (199273) | about a year ago | (#44870705)

I've drunk my share of old wines and you want the oxidation especially when you're drinking a wine too early. But when a wine has aged and is peaking(ymmv actually), decanting easily ruins it. Then it is often enough to decant just to separate the wine from the dirt and to get the odd volatile odor out, and drink.
I'd even go further and say the same about many cheaper young reds: don't let it oxidise, it detracts from the taste,

Re:So stop using corks (5, Funny)

mrmeval (662166) | about a year ago | (#44869427)

Bag in a box wine review: The polyvinylchloride adds a particularly delightful emphasis to the cardboard while the shades of petroleum
byproducts are a welcome ablative to the virus stunted grapes musty
grandeur.
--mrmeval 2007

Re:So stop using corks (3, Informative)

troon (724114) | about a year ago | (#44870505)

Interestingly, polythene (e.g. cling film) neutralizes the TCA molecules in corked wine...

Re:So stop using corks (1)

tinkerton (199273) | about a year ago | (#44871177)

That is interesting and new to me. Of couse if it also sucks up everything else it may become less interesting.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44870201)

Plastic corks are like regular corks, except they don't get moldy and they're a royal pain to get out of the bottle.

How so? I've yet to have a plastic cork disintegrate like an actual cork. Because of that, I find them far easier to yank out.

Right on with boxes, though. The hell with class - there's nothing like de-cardboarding a box and carrying around a sack of cab.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44870695)

The best way to seal a bottle of wine is this [wikimedia.org] .

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about a year ago | (#44869249)

It's no coincidence that it's called "cork taint". All that trichloroanusol makes the wine taste like shit.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

sribe (304414) | about a year ago | (#44869975)

Very true. Stelvin closures, Plastic corks, glass stoppers, all superior.

For the short term. Not for any wine that is expected to be held for a decade or more. In other words: only superior for at least 95% of all wine sold, but not for everything.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

bickerdyke (670000) | about a year ago | (#44870829)

Who made up that myth with that old wine.... only the smallest fraction of wine (red, VERY tanin rich) has a chance to survive "decades" without spoiling at all.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44871045)

Maybe because some of us don't want plastic particles to enter our body and stay indefinitely...

Re:So stop using corks (0)

DoubleJ1024 (1287512) | about a year ago | (#44868913)

Because that is what rich, snooty wine snobs prefer. How else would they know good wine, it is not like they could actually read the wine list and recognize a wine that has been packaged in a nitrogen purged, sealed container and know that it is a good wine. I will state for the record I do know that you can store and seal wine in a bag/box and it taste just as good as a corked bottle. I have also found that the price of a bottle of wine means almost nothing in relation to how it tastes, my personal favorites are rather cheap compared to the more expensive varieties.

price vs. taste (2)

King_TJ (85913) | about a year ago | (#44868979)

Yeah, I'm not even a really big wine connoisseur, but I'd say the high priced wines have more to do with vintage than any other single factor. The idea that "The older, the better!" is only true in a very general sense and subject to so many exceptions and other mitigating factors, it's really not a good way to determine if a given bottle of wine will taste good to you.

At some point, I think it's more about showing off/snobbery, really.... That feeling of superiority one gets from cracking open a bottle that's sat, undisturbed, for so many years. People will pay for that experience.

Re:price vs. taste (1)

MickLinux (579158) | about a year ago | (#44869319)

Right now, my favorite is a dark red muscadine from Duplin, the North carolina winery. But then, I was walking in the rte 17 walking park in Chesapeake, and saw and tasted one of the red muscadines, and was extremely impressed with the skin.

French winemakers may like the muscadine for its hardy rootstock; I like it for its grapes.

Re:price vs. taste (1)

Moridineas (213502) | about a year ago | (#44869623)

If you don't mind my asking, could you point me to which Duplin wine you like? I live in NC and have tried just a few local wines (I tried some kind of uber sweet muscadine years ago). Thus far, I haven't found anything that jumped out at me.

Re:price vs. taste (1)

Kiraxa (1840002) | about a year ago | (#44870019)

I havn't tried Duplin's, but I've found the wines from Hinnant Family Vineyard are amazingly delicious. They're over in Pine Level, just off 70 or 95, depending on where you're coming from. They have a great selection, and a bar set up for tasting their selections before you choose a bottle. Or two. or three.

vintage vs.taste (1)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about a year ago | (#44870689)

Sorry, but wine does change taste once it's in the bottle and even more so before it is bottled. Beaujolais Primeur is a wine that is best very soon after it is made, it deteriorates rather fast and is ready for vinegar after a year or so. Other wines are the opposite, they require longer time in the cask and even longer time in the bottle to reach their best taste. The famous French Bordeaux region chateau wines are a good examples of this.

Wine price is a combination of rarity, popularity and taste. Once wines get "expensive" the price of production, packaging and storage isn't a major factor any more, but for most wine, it is. The prices you pay in fancy restaurants are often way more than the same wines would cost in trade or in a liquor store. I don't know about the USA, but in Europe, many restaurants only break even on the food and have to get their profits on the drinks you order while you are in the establishments. That means that if you and your dining partner are in the shop for an hour, your bottle of wine you share will basically have to get enough money out of you to pay for the wages of the people caring for you during your stay and the profit of the restaurant owner. Don't be surprised if there's a $30 or more markup on that single bottle...

Re:So stop using corks (2)

dosius (230542) | about a year ago | (#44869029)

Two Buck Chuck [wikipedia.org] , the cheap wine from Aldi Nord-owned Trader Joe's that won a taste test and made French wine connoisseurs' heads explode.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869065)

Yeah, that stuff isn't that great. It's not even "good", it's an acceptable table wine but that's about it. But for the price it can't be beat.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869309)

The Sauvignon Blanc is excellent, even at 4 times the $2.49 asking price. The rest are so-so.

Re:So stop using corks (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869039)

I agree that wine drinkers are usually guilty of pretension, but let's not pretend like taste and price have "almost nothing" in common. If you go buy 4 random bottles of $8 wine and 4 random bottles of $20 wine, you'll taste a substantial difference even in a blinded test. I'd guess that 1/2 of $20 bottles of wine are enjoyable as opposed to about 1/5 of $8 bottles.

That said, a good $8 bottle might be every bit as good as the good $20 bottles.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year ago | (#44869231)

If you go buy 4 random bottles of $8 wine and 4 random bottles of $20 wine,...

...I'd guess that 1/2 of $20 bottles of wine are enjoyable as opposed to about 1/5 of $8 bottles.

I'd say you've already drank too much if you enjoy 1/5 of four bottles of wine. ;-)

Re:So stop using corks (2)

arth1 (260657) | about a year ago | (#44869385)

I'd say you've already drank too much if you enjoy 1/5 of four bottles of wine. ;-)

I live in New England. Enjoying a fifth is tradition here.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

rsilvergun (571051) | about a year ago | (#44869853)

I live in upstate New York, enjoying a fifth is 5:30pm here.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about a year ago | (#44869873)

I'd guess that 1/2 of $20 bottles of wine are enjoyable as opposed to about 1/5 of $8 bottles.

From the expected value standpoint, you're breaking even (5*$8 = 2*$20). Less the sip or two you need for tasting purposes.

However -- and this is the important part -- after finishing the good bottle, you've got 4 cheap ones to go, vs. 1 moderately priced good one and an unfortunately overpriced clinker. And like the Bible says, you serve the good one first and save the rest for when you're all a little more mellow [biblegateway.com] .

(Obviously, you scale up the number of bottles if you're expecting company*. Jesus was working with amphorae, after all.)

*I know, this is Slashdot, but it can happen. We're talking statistics, after all.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44868923)

Tradition is very powerful in some areas. Wine is definitely one of those. I say this as am outsider, because I don't drink alcohol (I forget how fragile other people are when I drink and they tend to break, and I feel bad afterward).

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Konster (252488) | about a year ago | (#44868949)

Only corks make that cool popping sound when you pull them out, and this is why they are still used.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

cdrudge (68377) | about a year ago | (#44869149)

Synthetic corks also make a similar popping sound when they are removed.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

MickLinux (579158) | about a year ago | (#44869339)

With a Pic-16 and a speaker, boxes can make that cool popping noise when you unfold the top.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869031)

The other closures are not proven to age wine as effectively or with the same aging results. For people that buy wine to cellar and age, cork is the only true time proven closure. Granted you have to count on 5, sometimes 10% loss due to taint.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869033)

I'm no expert, but I think one of the main arguments is sustainability.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869037)

From the Muppet Movie:

"Would you like to sniff the bottlecap?"

Re:So stop using corks (5, Insightful)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about a year ago | (#44869051)

Seriously, other than nostalgia why are they still using corks when much better methods have existed for decades?

There's almost nothing rational in the entire wine economy.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869163)

Seriously, other than nostalgia why are they still using corks when much better methods have existed for decades?

There's almost nothing rational in the entire wine economy.

Very true. I have been homebrewing beer and wine for years, The "overtones of lavender and chocolate" are such bullshit. Grapes are very dependant on the environment and the weather they are grown in. They vary year to year from the same location. I would rather not attend any wine tasting that isnt conducted by the person that was responsible for making it. Even then, you may have to put on some all weather boots to wade to the bullshit, which doesnt go well with wine IMHO.

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869433)

you may have to put on some all weather boots to wade to the bullshit

So, its just like everything else?

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about a year ago | (#44870893)

Very true. I have been homebrewing beer and wine for years, The "overtones of lavender and chocolate" are such bullshit.

Ever notice the striking similarities between wine snobs and audiophiles?

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869447)

Just like coffee and gold, then?

Re:So stop using corks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869727)

Just like coffee and gold, then?

But, but, but, but, the intrinsic value of gold !!!!!!1!!!! Ron Paul!!

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year ago | (#44869113)

The problem has to due with a chemical contaminating the wine... it has nothing to do with the cork. That's just the common term people use to describe the problem. There are plenty of wines that use rubber stoppers or twist offs. You're welcome to buy them. It seems however, that when buying a $40 beverage people tend to expect artistic packaging.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

russotto (537200) | about a year ago | (#44869341)

The problem has to due with a chemical contaminating the wine... it has nothing to do with the cork.

Except that the main (but not only) source of the chemical is the cork.

Re:So stop using corks (2)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about a year ago | (#44869227)

Seriously, other than nostalgia why are they still using corks when much better methods have existed for decades?

Amen. I haven't drunk wine from a corked bottle in a decade. It's twist-off or nothing for this connoisseur.

Say, could you spare two dollars so I can get a little taste... uh, I mean, "something to eat"?

Re:So stop using corks (2)

breeze95 (880714) | about a year ago | (#44869581)

Seriously, other than nostalgia why are they still using corks when much better methods have existed for decades?

Do you know why the older wine gets the more expensive it is? Aging. As wine ages the taste becomes refined, and the aging process depends on oxidation. Corks are permeable which allows the oxidation process (aging) to continue. Using materials other that cork stops the oxidation process making the wine less desirable and reduces the price of the wine.

Re:So stop using corks (2)

Dahamma (304068) | about a year ago | (#44870167)

Corks are permeable which allows the oxidation process (aging) to continue. Using materials other that cork stops the oxidation process making the wine less desirable and reduces the price of the wine.

No, not really. Oenology research mostly says the oxygen that gets into the wine from the bottling is plenty enough to age for years, and extra oxygen is MUCH more likely to spoil the wine than improve it.

There may be a very VERY slight percentage of wine aged for a very long time that might improve with a perfect cork letting in just enough oxygen to keep the aging going without spoiling it, but for the VAST majority of wine current research says it's (and by "it's" that's the the Bordeauxs, cabs, etc) probably at its best in 25 years. And it's a crapshoot as to whether anything older will be any good at all. For the ABSOLUTELY OVERWHELMING majority of wines a synthetic cork will be as good if not better.

Ok, I'm not including citations because seriously why bother, but search this topic and the top 5 results will say the same thing...

Re:So stop using corks (1)

mvdwege (243851) | about a year ago | (#44870473)

There is also that aging is for snobs; it was mostly invented by the British upper classes, and the Americans took it over without thinking.

Most wines are meant to be drunk fairly young. Any amount of aging necessary to bring out the taste will happen, as you correctly point out, with the oxygen available during bottling.

It is precisely this reason why the younger French vintners are not afraid of synthetic corks and bottle caps. The French are notorious oenopaedophiles.

Re:So stop using corks (1)

Dahamma (304068) | about a year ago | (#44870595)

There is also that aging is for snobs; it was mostly invented by the British upper classes, and the Americans took it over without thinking.

Most wines are meant to be drunk fairly young. Any amount of aging necessary to bring out the taste will happen, as you correctly point out, with the oxygen available during bottling.

Not sure which Americans you are talking about (maybe American billionaires?) but for the garden variety wine snob (who believe yes, Two Buck Chuck is not close to a decent Napa/Sonoma wine - but it's honestly better than some 5x the price) I don't think there is a particular trend towards heavily aging wines. I've never been able to keep one more than a few years because I'm too eager to try it ;)

Though I have on occasion had some wines of 15-20+ years that were let age. Some of the best I have ever had in recent years have been from the 80's-90's i.e. aged 20+ years. Then again they may have been great wines after 5 years, guess I'll never know :) But they certainly weren't ruined...

Re:So stop using corks (1)

bickerdyke (670000) | about a year ago | (#44870863)

Seriously, other than nostalgia why are they still using corks when much better methods have existed for decades?

Do you know why the older wine gets the more expensive it is? Aging.

No. Older wine is so expensive because after 20 years, you need to throw away half of your stock cause it turned into vinegar or some cork tainted liquid waste. You need to pay for that, too, when buying one of the bottles that are still in drinking shape.

Granted, there are several wines that need a few years to mature, but that's only a small fraction and it is nowhere near several decades..

Cork taint. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44868867)

/eom

wrong person to blame... (3, Funny)

o_ferguson (836655) | about a year ago | (#44868997)

surely it's the sommelier who will be embarrassed, not the waiter...

seriously....taint? (1)

turkeydance (1266624) | about a year ago | (#44868999)

5th grade recess, and SHE will tell ya...

Am I the only one... (1)

Hork_Monkey (580728) | about a year ago | (#44869103)

that giggled at the phrase "cork taint"? Please don't tell me I'm the only one.

Re:Am I the only one... (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year ago | (#44869313)

that giggled at the phrase "cork taint"? Please don't tell me I'm the only one.

Nope. I was wondering why anyone would pay $20+ to drink something that smelled like taint.

Smell Blocker (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44869211)

If they are finding things that block smell, can I spray some of my coworkers with it?

Re:Smell Blocker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869389)

Why? Does your smell offend them?
Perhaps it would be better used on yourself?

Re:Smell Blocker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869423)

If they are finding things that block smell, can I spray some of my coworkers with it?

Anything to avoid taking a bath, eh?

wine snob - bs bs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869287)

like all acquired taste stuff - it's all BS. If gasoline did not kill you then we would have people talking about how exxon gas is so much tastier. Since it is an acquired tastes; what taste good is what we force ourselves to like by repetition.

Re:wine snob - bs bs (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about a year ago | (#44869377)

Just wait until it's too expensive to drive around. There will be con men who will sell crude oil that has been 'naturally aged for millions of years' to clueless folks with more money than sense. They'll use it lightly to dress their salads and to flaver their roasted entrees.

wine not Wine (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869381)

This was added to the Wine category even though it is about wine.

screw tops (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869405)

Seal the bottle of wine with a screw top. No spoilage by cork. And no, it does not cheapen the wine. That's how you get wine now a days in New Zealand and Australia.

Re:screw tops (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#44869787)

Guaranteed to open up the sluice gates at both ends...

Re:screw tops (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869851)

+1 MP

Reminds me of a prostitute I once knew (0)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about a year ago | (#44869627)

When we first met she was charging $300/night. But after her taint got corked a few hundred times it didn't seem quite as appealing anymore so she was forced to reduce her rate down to $75/night. I'll forward her a link to this article so she'll know the experience wasn't unique to her. I never got involved with her romantically but she helped me resolve my dyslexia.

So order the Mark West Pinot Noir (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44869691)

or the Columbia Crest Cab Sauv that sells in high volume instead of the $70 bottle that's been sitting around for a few months. That's for the Donald Trump types that have to impress their dates when they order, and then again when they send it back.

"cork taint" (3, Funny)

hduff (570443) | about a year ago | (#44869817)

Unintentionally funny.

Vinegar (1)

mbone (558574) | about a year ago | (#44869931)

When I send back wine, it's because it's turned to vinegar.

Why embarrassing? (1)

Anonymous Psychopath (18031) | about a year ago | (#44870135)

Sending back a corked bottle shouldn't embarrass anyone. It's fairly rare but does happen from time to time. The restaurant shouldn't even think twice about it.

And WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44870205)

If the wine is corked it is unacceptable for consumption. The cork will smell like walnuts and that is easily perceived. I was lucky enough to have had a good host at a tasting who rejected a bottle herself. I asked why, and she let me smell the cork. The "corked" smell is unmistakeable.

That is not the only reason for sending back wine. There are at least two bacterial afflictions related to poor winery cleanliness that merit a return: amertume and ropiness. Amertume makes the wine bitter and ropiness ruins the mouth-feel.

Sending back bad wine is not only sensible, it's a feedback mechanism for the winery that says they need to improve their cleanliness.

Re:And WTF? (1)

tinkerton (199273) | about a year ago | (#44870789)

The contamination covers a broad range and not everyone has the same sensitivity to it. That is why to some a wine may just not taste very good while to others it clearly has cork taint even if it still is drinkable. That is also a reason why estimates of the fraction of wines that's corked vary a lot, at least if they're based on experience. I'd put it at 5 to 10%, but then I'm sensitive to cork taint.

The Food Industry (1)

MLBs (2637825) | about a year ago | (#44870409)

The last paragraph gave me the following thought.
Given how much the food industry is "concerned" with providing us with the best quality,
is it potentially possible that they can use this molecule to block our ability to sense some bad stuff that is in their products?

Re:The Food Industry (1)

RDW (41497) | about a year ago | (#44871385)

Given how much the food industry is "concerned" with providing us with the best quality, is it potentially possible that they can use this molecule to block our ability to sense some bad stuff that is in their products?

You know the foil capsule that covers the cork on more expensive bottles? Take half a dozen of those and you can make a useful protective hat!

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