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Join the Efforts of a Manned Mission To Jovian Moon Europa

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the get-serious-about-emigration dept.

Space 212

Kristian vonBengtson writes "Objective Europa aims to send human beings to Jupiter's icy moon, Europa, on a one way mission in search of extraterrestrial life while expanding the borders of exploration and knowledge for all mankind. The starting point of Objective Europa is purely theoretical (Phase I) but will move into more advanced phases including prototyping, technology try-outs, and eventually a crewed launch. Objective Europa is a crowd-researched project made up of an international team of volunteers. Many people from a wide range of backgrounds have already joined and become a vital part of the mission. ... [Europa's] deep ocean and active geology provide a solid platform for extraterrestrial life, making Europa one of the most enticing locations to explore in the solar system. The 600-day flight required to reach Europa is manageable with today's technology, and the many challenges of such a mission pose a perfect starting point for new research and innovative thinking."

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Bye, bye boys! (-1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about a year ago | (#44887709)

Have fun storming the castle!

FFS (5, Insightful)

geek (5680) | about a year ago | (#44887729)

"Objective Europa aims to send human beings to Jupiter's icy moon, Europa, on a one way mission in search of extraterrestrial life"

Seriously, before you throw your lives away, at least get a minimal amount of evidence that life exists there. I'm sure lots of "special" people will apply for this but none of them will be the types we actually want going there.

Just send a fucking probe. Don't BE a probe.

Re: FFS (0)

techprophet (1281752) | about a year ago | (#44887825)

I guess you could say that they're signing people up to be... *glasses* ...probed! YEEEAAAAAA!

Re: FFS (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888019)

You only use the glasses if you are saying something clever. What you said is anything but clever. Please go away and let the adults talk now.

Re: FFS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888459)

(_) "Looks like techprophet"
(_)-- "is signing up to be..."
(-_) "...probed." YEEAAAAAAA!

Re:FFS (1, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#44887857)

well it would still be an adventure.

but I guess the real reason for this is the success a similar thing for going to mars had. I mean success in getting money from suckers.

Re:FFS (4, Insightful)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year ago | (#44888889)

Yep, $25 application fee, get 100k applications, screen out all but 100 applicants, make them do some impossible tasks until they flunk, then oh well, you all fail.

Thanks for the moneeies.

Re:FFS (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | about a year ago | (#44889513)

Which is the reason i didn't pay money to the mars Mission. I think 99.99 % of those who did pay wont be going. i haven't seen any criteria of who should go, as apposed to those who are going no matter what. But then what do we expect for 40 bucks lol.

skeleton in an space suit (1)

themushroom (197365) | about a year ago | (#44887875)

Game Over. You and all of your friends are dead.

Re:skeleton in an space suit (2)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | about a year ago | (#44887965)

Exactly. I'd rather stay here, and live forever. Don't those morons know GTA5 just came out?

Re:FFS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887879)

One way trips and probing (oh my)? I'm IN!

How is it throwing your life away? (3, Insightful)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | about a year ago | (#44888039)

You can die in pain in dirty diapers in a nursing home, or you can die of radiation-induced cancer doing something that's never been done before and making historic discoveries. Either way is an equal level of deadness.

Re:How is it throwing your life away? (1)

Gareth Iwan Fairclough (2831535) | about a year ago | (#44888185)

Cancer? Maybe, but it would be more likely that they'd die of radiation poisoning long before a cancer had time to spread. With that said however, dead is dead no matter how it happened.

Re:How is it throwing your life away? (2)

mi (197448) | about a year ago | (#44888363)

With that said however, dead is dead no matter how it happened.

If it is the same to you, sir, I'd like my deadness to a) set as late as possible; b) be as painless as possible.

Neither objective is particularly achievable via a one-way travel to an icy rock.

Re:How is it throwing your life away? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888417)

It sounds cool, but it is not evolutionarily selected for, as it is one-way, without the ability to establish a lasting colony. Anyway, I'm all for space exploration, but people do not seem to understand how many orders of magnitude there are in distance between low-earth orbit (which is becoming routine, but still not "easy") and a moon of a planet that is halfway across the Solar system. This is like "we invented the wheel... next step, warp drive!"... how about we work some on the intermediate steps, hm?

Re:How is it throwing your life away? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44889465)

You can die in pain in dirty diapers in a nursing home, or you can die of radiation-induced cancer doing something that's never been done before and making historic discoveries. Either way is an equal level of deadness.

You seem to lack a decent imagination, sonny boy.

I plan to die in bed with five world-class hookers, and an ounce of cocaine.

Re:FFS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888075)

The volunteers don't really care about finding evidence of life.

They want to be the Neil Armstrong of Europa--the _dead_ Neil Armstrong of Europa.

And if they can be on camera in front of the entire world, then mission accomplished.
BE a probe, be a very famous probe.

Re:FFS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888085)

i love how everyone assumes we're just going to jump on a rocket and head over there, you don't think probes will be sent initially? should we not plan beyond that?
they're starting "phase 1" which is research and determining what tech we can use and what we still need to invent. seems to me that's pretty damn reasonable.

Re:FFS (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year ago | (#44888377)

i love how everyone assumes we're just going to jump on a rocket and head over there, you don't think probes will be sent initially? should we not plan beyond that?

Then why even bother sending people? If the probe doesn't find life are the people still going to go? What is the plan beyond sending some people to be cooked by Jupiter?

they're starting "phase 1" which is research and determining what tech we can use and what we still need to invent. seems to me that's pretty damn reasonable.

What the fuck is reasonable about it? What if a probe does find life. We're going to send a bunch of bacteria/virus laden meat-bags to contaminate the Europan (or is it European, damn that's going to be confusing) biosphere...

To die there. Just how much thought has been given to how this will affect any life that may be there? Part of me thinks the idea of going there would be pretty damn cool. But it's nothing but a childish way to get into the history books at best. At least go somewhere where there is some possibility of surviving.

The goal here seems to be go, plant flag, possibly destroy ecosystem, get in history books and die.

Re:FFS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888609)

get in history books and die

Automatic Darwin of the year award?

Re:FFS (1)

elysiuan (762931) | about a year ago | (#44889157)

If we go by Arthur C Clarke (and really, why shouldn't we?) it would be Europan which has a nice ring to it.

Re:FFS (2)

Dr. Spork (142693) | about a year ago | (#44888105)

Yeah. By the time this mission could launch, our robots will actually be a lot more capable of doing useful research on Europa than the human settlers, especially when you control for all the mass that needs to be launched in order to keep people alive (and not crazy) for as long as this would take. Instead of people, why not send a nuclear submarine that could use its reactor to melt through all the ice and then navigate the sea beneath? If we have a chance of finding something cool, it will be down there.

Re:FFS (1)

Teancum (67324) | about a year ago | (#44889301)

Yeah. By the time this mission could launch, our robots will actually be a lot more capable of doing useful research on Europa than the human settlers, especially when you control for all the mass that needs to be launched in order to keep people alive (and not crazy) for as long as this would take. Instead of people, why not send a nuclear submarine that could use its reactor to melt through all the ice and then navigate the sea beneath? If we have a chance of finding something cool, it will be down there.

I doubt it. While I will agree that there is considerable "low hanging fruit" in terms of very legitimate science that can be done by sending robotic probes, there will reach a point in that research where having actual people physically there will make a whole lot of sense. With the distances involved, bandwidth for sending data can be a considerable problem. Some local synthesis of the data (like was done with the Kepler mission... which had terabytes of data to sift through) can take place in an automated fashion, eventually even that will eventually need to have somebody physically there to evaluate all of that data.

There is a reason why automated probes don't go running around Antarctica, even though sending people there happens at considerable expense. Even with people there in Antarctica at the various research stations, there still is a huge amount of bandwidth sending that research data back to the various countries involved... and even that bandwidth is seen as very limited.

The question isn't if people should go to Europa, but rather when. A good argument could be made that there is no need for human researchers to go for at least a century or more as there is definitely plenty of research that can be done in the meantime with robotic probes including spacecraft dedicated explicitly to Europa.... including the nuclear submarine you have described. Such a vehicle was even described in this TED talk:

http://www.ted.com/talks/bill_stone_explores_the_earth_and_space.html [ted.com]

Re:FFS (1)

Agent0013 (828350) | about a year ago | (#44888167)

Well we could send all the telephone sanitisers, hairdressers, and advertising account executives. I would throw in the politicians and lawyers also, but that's just me.

Re:FFS (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year ago | (#44888419)

Well we could send all the telephone sanitisers, hairdressers, and advertising account executives. I would throw in the politicians and lawyers also, but that's just me.

I'd send the politicians and lawyers first. Advertising account executives and MBA's would be next. If that doesn't kill all life on Europa, then we should surrender to our new Jovian overlords.

Re:FFS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888249)

This is just a viral marketing ploy to boost DVD sales of the movie Europa Report. Suicide space missions are the new cool.

Re:FFS (4, Informative)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year ago | (#44888375)

There are conditions on Europa very similar to the conditions in certain places on earth that contain life. There are large chunks of shit that have been flying back and forth between there and here for billions of years. They've retrieved man made objects that have been in space for decades with bacteria on it that survived and re-animated after being thawed on earth. It would be more astonishing if there we didn't find life on Europa... and pretty much every other planetary body in our system.

Re:FFS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888401)

I'm just picturing that scene in South Park: Free Willyzyx where -- at the end of the day, after Worf's said his lines, the police chase and commotion, the rocket is launched for its noble mission -- what's left? There's a dead whale carcass lying exposed on the barren moon.

Re:FFS (1)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | about a year ago | (#44888493)

It looks to me like assisted suicide in the disguise of scientific research

Re:FFS (1)

rasmusbr (2186518) | about a year ago | (#44889101)

It looks to me like a student thesis project in art or sociology or whatever. I mean the website...

I don't think anyone is actually planning to do this.

Re:FFS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44889577)

Just send a fucking probe. Don't BE a probe.

That was surely once said in a porn shoot.

Don't they know (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887743)

All these worlds are yours EXCEPT Europa.

Re:Don't they know (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | about a year ago | (#44888063)

Humans. So predictable.

So what this really is: (1)

jbeaupre (752124) | about a year ago | (#44887745)

It is a role playing game at this point. Tabletop exploration of Europa.

Re:So what this really is: (1)

moteyalpha (1228680) | about a year ago | (#44889123)

How does "I want to do something and don't know how" take precedence over things that actually start the right way.
I have wanted space technology since I was a child and wanting is not a project. First you study and then you design and then you test something that will serve to do the job and -then- you decide how to apply it. I have worked on this for decades and found a technology that I am reasonably certain will allow cheap travel in and out of the gravity well. All I was ever interested in was getting more technical people to help develop it and to make the first prototype like Copenhagen Suborbital.
I agree with many of the other comments , that this is just somebody trying to make money by exploiting people's gullibility.
I registered a site and have been working to put content on the various projects that would allow completing a sytem that would make space travel a reality. When ridiculous fantasy like this gets more attention than science, it makes me wonder.

Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887747)

I've always wanted to go to Hoth. This is the next-best thing!

Attempt No Landing There! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887751)

All These Worlds Are Yours Except
Europa
Attempt No
Landing There
Use Them Together
Use Them In Peace

Re:Attempt No Landing There! (1)

Teancum (67324) | about a year ago | (#44889307)

Why should anybody care about what some kind of god-like being said in a work of pure fiction?

If I wanted to live in an icy wasteland... (1)

harvestsun (2948641) | about a year ago | (#44887757)

... I'd just move to Greenland. Probably wouldn't even take me 600 days or millions of dollars to get there.

Re:If I wanted to live in an icy wasteland... (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#44888269)

Apparently, you do not live in the USA.

Re:If I wanted to live in an icy wasteland... (2)

SteveFoerster (136027) | about a year ago | (#44889545)

Nah, it just wouldn't be the same. Greenland doesn't have enough radioactivity and it has way too much air.

Obligatory Reference (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887759)

"I'm afraid I can't do that, Dave..."

DAMN HIPPIES !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887801)

It is Jupiter so it is a moon of Jupiter.

Whyd do we need to send humans? (3)

TsuruchiBrian (2731979) | about a year ago | (#44887851)

"Objective Europa aims to send human beings to Jupiter's icy moon, Europa, on a one way mission in search of extraterrestrial life while expanding the borders of exploration and knowledge for all mankind.

If you think it would be fun to go to Europa even if it means you will die there, that's totally something you should try to do. As for science and exploration, there is really nothing that a human being is going to be able to see or do, beyond what can be done by a robot.

Adding humans to a space mission just makes everything harder, because now you need to bring a whole bunch of shit like water, food, waste treatment machines, CO2 scrubbers, radiation protection, space suits, and extra rocket fuel to propel all this extra mass and even more rocket fuel to propel the extra rocket fuel. The only time when sending humans on a space trip would be beneficial to the human race at this point would be if the earth became full, and we needed to lower the population without killing people or sterilizing them.

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (3, Informative)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | about a year ago | (#44887905)

Because they are orders of magnitude more productive.

The principal investigator for the Mars rovers said that if he were on Mars he could do in 45 seconds what the rovers do in a day.

Besides, visiting a foreign country is different from looking at it through a webcam. A robot probe is just an improvement over a telescope. Humans want to go to places.

What worries me is that the site has only one passing mention of radiation, for a mission to Jupiter orbit. Aren't humans in that region going to be almost literally fried?

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (5, Insightful)

Dr. Spork (142693) | about a year ago | (#44888373)

So what's a human supposed to do on Europa? Operate a hammer and icepick? That doesn't sound very productive. That 45-second figure on Mars sounds hyperbolic, since on good days, the rovers can actually go pretty far and take lots of pictures.

But here's what I don't get about people who make comments like yours: Instead of looking at current missions and wishing that humans were there to do it better, why not instead ask what humans would do in space, and wish for (and design) machines that could do it as well. I mean, be concrete. For all the mission specific objectives (beyond: what happens to a person there?) that manned missions have - whether it's reconnaissance, construction, experimentation, etc. - I am pretty sure that it would be less expensive and less risky to make robots that could preform them equally well, less expensively and more safely. I think that's been the case since basically the Apollo era, when human lives were cheap and autonomous systems were miserable. That's the good reason why the Apollo era ended in 1972. The NASA home run of the 70's was the Voyager program. Then we pissed away the 80's shuttling people to LEO for no very good reason.

And if you compare the primitive rovers of today to manned missions, keep in mind also that the latter would be several orders of magnitude more expensive, and what amazing advances we could make if those budgets were going to robotics and autonomous systems. Maybe those robots really could do in 45 seconds what yesterday's rovers take a day to do. I mean, for fuck's sake. We have cars that can drive better than my mom.

Some examples (1)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | about a year ago | (#44889509)

Being able to fix a stuck wheel has some value, as does being able to make new instruments on the scene from parts in the lab.

But that line of thought presupposes that gathering data is the only thing humans care about.

Re:Why do we need to send humans? (2)

Grog6 (85859) | about a year ago | (#44888563)

Jupiter's radiation belts are pretty extreme; there's some info in the Galileo data. :)

We can't possibly carry enough shielding for the x-rays alone... and get there in a reasonable time.

A Jupiter mission will have to launch from Mars orbit, IMHO; unless we learn a new engine technology.

Although;
I still think we should send as many people to Mars as will go; I'm sure when the postcards about the Ham Bushes and Blanket trees come rolling in from Mars, and how we were completely mistaken on the whole there not being an Atmosphere thing, ticket sales will skyrocket!

Of course, we'll need lots of Security people and Politicians to go; we could build them special ships. :)

Who knew the actual Problem isn't popprob, it's PolProb.
.

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (2)

butalearner (1235200) | about a year ago | (#44888629)

What worries me is that the site has only one passing mention of radiation, for a mission to Jupiter orbit. Aren't humans in that region going to be almost literally fried?

Wikipedia says there is enough radiation on the surface of Europa to kill a human in a single day (it's tidally locked with Jupiter, but I'm not sure if that helps the far side or not). I imagine they're headed to the subsurface ocean, if it exists, so they won't have to worry about it after they melt/drill their way through as many meters of ice as it takes (the Mars One site claims that five meters of Martian soil provides the same protection as Earth's atmosphere). But yeah, they'd definitely need to do something far more drastic than Mars One to protect the astronauts as they approach Europa until they land and get to a safe depth.

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (2)

TsuruchiBrian (2731979) | about a year ago | (#44888957)

Because they are orders of magnitude more productive.

They also are orders of magnitude more difficult to get to mars or Europa healthy and stay that way for any length of time. If you could spend the same amount of money that a manned mission would cost on an unmanned mission, you could afford an order of magnitude more and better robots as well.

Besides, visiting a foreign country is different from looking at it through a webcam. A robot probe is just an improvement over a telescope. Humans want to go to places.

As I said, it's fine if you want to go to Europa and see it for yourself before dying. This doesn't help science at all. Having one person there doesn't magically make everyone else able to experience Europa. All the human can do is send back pictures and data just like a robot would. A robot isn't just a better telescope. A robot can use any instrument that a human could use.

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887925)

harder isn't a reason to not do something

its planning a mission its not going on a mission yet, we should put every effort forward to advance space travel and exploration our worlds resources are finite at some point if we cant master space we will cease to exist.

I believe these to be the most important types of research man can ever do.

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#44888027)

If you think it would be fun to go to Europa even if it means you will die there, that's totally something you should try to do.

What about people who - at the moment of selecting the flight crew for such a mission - suffer from conditions that would kill them or debilitate them before an otherwise normal lifespan elapses for them? If you're bright and physically apt and you know that at 25, you'll be fine for a few more years, but after 30, there's a 50% chance every year that you'll get Huntington's and by 40, you'll be dead, perhaps dying a bit sooner after benefiting mankind in this way is not such a crazy idea.

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (2)

TsuruchiBrian (2731979) | about a year ago | (#44888825)

Of all the reasons I stated for why it was bad to send humans to Europa, the humans dying on Europa was not one of them. I don't even care if we send healthy people to Europa to die, if that's what they want to do.

What I am against, is pretending that this is necessary for scientific discovery or exploration. We can actually fit more and better scientific instruments on the spacecraft if we don't need to take any meat sacks and all the stuff required to have the survive the journey.

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (1)

Agent0013 (828350) | about a year ago | (#44888207)

If you think it would be fun to go to Europa even if it means you will die there, that's totally something you should try to do. As for science and exploration, there is really nothing that a human being is going to be able to see or do, beyond what can be done by a robot.

I can think of one thing a human can do that a robot will not be able to do. That is get infected with the European bacteria and come down with the first interplanetary cold or flu. That would be some exciting TV there!

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (1)

hedwards (940851) | about a year ago | (#44888407)

You seriously think that a robot can't become contaminated? Anyways, that's what quarantine is for. In the extremely unlikely case that there's something on a planet with no lifeforms similar to humans, there is a virus or bacteria that's harmful to us, what do you think the odds of us picking it up is?

Pretty much zero. Even with the flu, if you stay 10 feet away from other people and don't put your hands to your face the likelihood of catching it is minimal. And that a virus that's adapted to spreading easily amongst humans, can you imagine one that's never encountered humans before? It's unlikely to even be capable of infecting human DNA.

Re:Whyd do we need to send humans? (1)

TsuruchiBrian (2731979) | about a year ago | (#44888993)

Bacteria don't need to have evolved with humans to be able to infect them (e.g. like viruses). All that is needed is for bacteria to be able to survive inside a human and for whatever they produce to be toxic to humans. This doesn't seem like such a stretch considering some bacteria can live in harsh environments like volcanoes and that most things are toxic to humans.

I think a bigger danger is humans contaminating Europa. You can kind of sterilize a robot. You can't sterilize a human. Humans contain entire ecosystems in their bodies.

Re:Why do we need to send humans? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888443)

Radiation protection is key. The recent NASA stab at a Europa orbiter (not lander) was canceled after the cost estimate ballooned to $4 Billion. The main reason the cost went so high was radiation protection. Something on the order of 200-1000 krad exposure was expected after a year, assuming everything in the probe lived behind 3 mm of aluminum. The high cost was necessary to develop better flight-proven rad-hard electronics, research mass-effective shielding, and accurately model the effects of secondaries caused by the shielding and spacecraft structure.

I honestly have no idea how anyone can expect to send humans to Europa with anything resembling today's technology.

Copyright (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887853)

The soundtrack is riding the razor's edge not to infringe on Gyorgi Ligeti's "Requiem for Two Choirs".

Stop the planet, I want to get off this ride.... (1)

rts008 (812749) | about a year ago | (#44887863)

Wow, the second voluntary exodus plan to emerge recently.

It seems to make a statement about Earth, when thousands seem eager to make a one way trip to their probable deaths, to leave this planet.

Now, what that statement actually means is open to interpretation...

Re:Stop the planet, I want to get off this ride... (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about a year ago | (#44887895)

Why not just sign up to a UFO Death Cult like Heaven's Gate?

Re:Stop the planet, I want to get off this ride... (1)

rts008 (812749) | about a year ago | (#44888317)

Hmmmm...I give up.

Why, or why not?

Wait, is this a trick question?

Re:Stop the planet, I want to get off this ride... (1)

narcc (412956) | about a year ago | (#44888549)

It's it obvious? Hale-Bopp brought closure to Heavens gate! We missed our chance.

Re:Stop the planet, I want to get off this ride... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44889303)

We do, every single time we vote.

Re:Stop the planet, I want to get off this ride... (1)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | about a year ago | (#44888059)

Do explorers flee their home, or rush toward their destination?

Re:Stop the planet, I want to get off this ride... (1)

rts008 (812749) | about a year ago | (#44888345)

I well and truly understand that.

I'm just not convinced that's a universal motive in these things.

Re:Stop the planet, I want to get off this ride... (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | about a year ago | (#44889323)

95% of adults living on this planet firmly believe in an afterlife.

It says there's still hope for humanity (1)

amaurea (2900163) | about a year ago | (#44888089)

While I think this particular project (and the one to mars) are unrealistic due to not being robustly funded and planned, I think the concept that some humans may be willing to greatly shorten their lives in order to go off and explore something new shows that there is still hope for humanity. Isn't it nice to hear that some are curious enough and adventurous enough to do this, instead of simply being focused on entertainment and producing more humans?

I would not be brave enough to do this myself, even if I actually believed these projects were serious, but I wouldn't belittle those who are willing to sacrifice themselves like this. It seems to be implicit in your post that people only have one objective: to be as comfortable as possible, and so the only reason they might have to leave the Earth is if it is too uncomfortable here. I.e. no nobler motives exist. That seems like a pretty depressing world view, and I am glad to see indications that it might be false, such as this story.

taking advantage... (0)

globaljustin (574257) | about a year ago | (#44888255)

Isn't it nice to hear that some are curious enough and adventurous enough to do this, instead of simply being focused on entertainment and producing more humans?

no

put it this way, "isn't it nice to hear that some mothers care so much about providing for their kids they will engage in something as dangerous as prostitution?"

yeah, really life affirming...

people are desperate for 'meaning'...it's one of the defining characteristics of modern humans

using that desperation and reframing it as a 'win-win' is total bullshit marketing language tricks

this crap is dumb and wrong and actually hurts the cause of real manned space exploration by putting false ideas into the public's head about what is really possible

Re:It says there's still hope for humanity (1)

rts008 (812749) | about a year ago | (#44888291)

Thanks for the reply. :-)

What my motive was....stirring up the mud puddle in order to start some interesting debate/comments.

If I had a realistic chance to go to Europa or Mars, I would probably jump on it.

I've always been one of those that just HAD to see what was over the next hill.

Re:Stop the planet, I want to get off this ride... (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about a year ago | (#44888379)

Plenty of explorers and experimenters have died too. For example, how did we learn certain plants are poisonous? (just think, at least one dead human for every major type of plant in the "nightshade" family, that's quite the body count). There are worse ways to die and more useless ways to die than after exploring in space. In the time it took you to read my post some people choked to death on tough food, some were run over by cars, some were gunned down by street punks, some fell into a hole and died, some died of flu, etc. etc. etc.

Been there... (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | about a year ago | (#44887867)

...done that. Interesting, but went badly for the crew [wikipedia.org] ...

Re:Been there... (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | about a year ago | (#44888077)

It's not like we weren't warned...

Jovian radiation belt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887877)

will fry any human without proper shielding, like a meter thick sphere of Pb?

Think of the moons! (1)

stewsters (1406737) | about a year ago | (#44887887)

Send a probe. If the moon really is able to harbor life, sending humans risks contamination.

Re:Think of the moons! (0)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#44888275)

Send a probe. If the moon really is able to harbor life, sending humans risks contamination.

If your forefathers had thought the same way, then this whole planet would be devoid of life...

All these worlds are yours... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44887959)

...except Europa. Attempt no landing there.

Why are they sending humans? (1)

Plazmid (1132467) | about a year ago | (#44887977)

Humans are messy and carrying a bunch of biosphere from Earth to support them could potentially end up disrupting Europa's biosphere if it has one.

One can easily sterilize an unmanned space probe, but preventing even the slightest smallest leak of sewage, spacesuit leak, or the one little bit of plant waste that gets accidentally vented from a greenhouse is probably more challenging than actually sending humans to Europa.

Re:Why are they sending humans? (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about a year ago | (#44888087)

Exactly. Send an imperial probe droid to look for life on all the planets and moons. Seriously, doesn't anyone watch Star Wars?

Someone's Trying to Make Money Here (1)

BoRegardless (721219) | about a year ago | (#44888067)

Can't think of any other reason to put out this sort of wacko mission. Let's see, if it costs 20 Billion and I take just a 1% cut in salary and bennies ... my retirement is guaranteed.

Re:Someone's Trying to Make Money Here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888201)

My thought was along the lines of; this sounds rather like the paid application process for the suicide mission to Mars. A project with no hope of getting off the ground(pun intended) that makes its organizers millions of dollars for simply taking applications. I was musing about such a scheme only a couple of nights ago, but I gave up thinking, who's going to fall for that again...

Suddenly there's a Slashvertisement for just such a scheme and I'm making nothing!

I hope this fails (1)

Nethead (1563) | about a year ago | (#44888193)

The last thing we need is a bunch of humans spewing bacteria on a planet/moon that we're trying to examine for extraterrestrial life. One small slip and they could fuck things up for the rest of time.

Clarke had it right. Attempt no landings.

Re:I hope this fails (2)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about a year ago | (#44888489)

It'll be fine, they'll be dead before the ship lands, so no one is going to open the door.

NASA knew there were radiation belts around Jupiter.
The Pioneer probes they sent were designed to handle a fair bit of radiation.
Pioneer 11 didn't directly pass through one, but lost most of the pictures it took of Io.

20 years later when they sent Galileo, it still suffered the effects of radiation, losing data.

NASA has already ruled out any possibility of a manned mission to Europa, because the radiation on that moon is impossible for a human to survive with current technology. Io, Europa and Ganymede are all too close.

Everyone wants to go to Europa though, because it has oxygen in its atmosphere and (frozen) water on its surface.

Okay, this is even dumber.... (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year ago | (#44888237)

... than the plans for a one way mission to mars.

At least the one-way trip to mars has the merit of *SOME* sort of contingency for actually surviving there (not that I think it will be effective... I still believe that such manned missions to mars are merely a drawn-out way to commit suicide, and I don't expect anyone will live more than 2 years after launch).

But what the hell are their contingencies for surviving on Europa?

Re:Okay, this is even dumber.... (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about a year ago | (#44888289)

what contingency what that be, neither place can support multicellular earth life and quick death is certain without oxygen, warmth, food, water, and adequate radiation shielding.

With today's technology? (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about a year ago | (#44888245)

Didn't someone figure out that the one-way trip to Mars would be one-way for more than logistical reasons? The other being, with today's technology, the radiation exposure would give you cancer on your 9 month journey.

The folks on the IIS are within Earth's protective magnetosphere.
The folks who went to the moon didn't go for 9 months.

Re:With today's technology? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888303)

The folks on the IIS are within Earth's protective magnetosphere.

That must be uncomfortable. How many people can you even fit into a webserver?

Re:With today's technology? (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about a year ago | (#44888323)

cancer not an issue, the radiation levels are lethal by the outright mass death of cells. Anyway, there are methods for shielding, I'd say the main objection to a "crowd-sourced" space trip to anywhere would be the lack of billions of dollars and experience that only a few space agencies on earth possess.

Re:With today's technology? (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about a year ago | (#44889321)

The problem is there is no current method of shielding that is effective enough that you can put on a space craft.
You've got to either carry something huge and heavy, like a a bunch of lead to absorb the radiation, or generate your own magnetosphere, which requires more energy than we can generate on earth, let along in a space craft (the Earth has current flows in the order of a billion amps)

No, no, no, that's the wrong music! (1)

RevWaldo (1186281) | about a year ago | (#44888315)

None of this wannabe Solaris soundtrack jazz. Here ya go:

http://youtubedoubler.com/a7Kj [youtubedoubler.com]

.

Radiation Issues? Let's call TEPCO (1)

Gman2725 (2947573) | about a year ago | (#44888365)

[humor attempt] It's my understanding Jupiter has some seriously intense radiation issues even for shielded space probes. Oh wait nevermind, we can just use the TEPCO method. Only bring devices capable of registering the maximum reading we want to admit. [/humor attempt] Otherwise you still have to get through the asteroid belt, then somehow avoid the debris orbiting the planet itself in the rings. Then there's the magnetic field the size and strength of Donald Trump's ego to contend with. All to go to a planet to drill down through ice of unknown thickness in the hopes of finding liquid water that may or may not contain anything from living organisms to non water liquids. We don't even know how stable the ice crust is to know if we could land anything on it as it could have thin spots caused by heating and currents from below or be subject to instability from tidal forces from Jupiter's gravity. That being said, I'd gladly volunteer all of the U. S. legislature as crew since it's a one way trip.

We probably shouldn't (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888403)

All these worlds are yours except Europa ATTEMPT NO LANDING THERE.

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44888479)

All these worlds are yours, except Europa. Attempt no landing there.

You can't go home again (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | about a year ago | (#44888575)

Wolfe didn't mean it literally, but these guys do.

(actually... Wolfe wrote it in a book so isn't it literal? whatever)

One way mission? (1)

wjcofkc (964165) | about a year ago | (#44888617)

Don't mod me anywhere. I just want to join the voices pointing out that this makes no sense. A one way mission? That at least halfway makes sense with a Mars mission, but we know a whole hell of a lot less about what it would take to survive in orbit around Jupiter and we have no idea if there is even life to be found. What are they going to live on? How long a they planning on living? It would take a multi-trillion dollar space station to even make an attempt at a renewable, sustainable environment - and it still may not work. If they don't find life, what...let their air run out and die? Commit suicide? We don't have the technology for this. We may be able to pull off a return mission, no entity private or government is going to spend that kind of money when a probe can do the same work at a fraction of the cost. I am all for manned spaceflight, believe me when I say I am a huge nerd about it - the kind that crusades about our need to spread out among the stars to ensure survival of species. But this is something we are not ready for.

I suspect this effort equates to one of two things: Either it's literally a joke and we will be getting the punchline at some point, or someone has a plan to walk away from this with a lot of money after it fails to go anywhere.

Re:One way mission? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44889203)

I suspect this effort equates to one of two things: Either it's literally a joke and we will be getting the punchline at some point, or someone has a plan to walk away from this with a lot of money after it fails to go anywhere.

I think the idea is that on this first ship we send the hairdressers, tired TV producers, insurance salesmen, personnel officers, security guards, public relations executives, management consultants...

Someone just watched Europa Report (3, Funny)

BobjoB (321819) | about a year ago | (#44888643)

So basically someone just saw Europa Report and decided to copy the entire movie premise. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2051879/ [imdb.com]

is this a joke? (3, Insightful)

binarstu (720435) | about a year ago | (#44888753)

I looked around on the site a bit and watched the introductory video, and underneath the shiny veneer, there really is not much there. The video, for example, certainly looks pretty, but contains no useful information. Instead, it has a few amusing text bites, such as, "FAREWELL CREW... BEFORE YOU DIE... YOU MAY SHOW US LIFE". The whole thing seems a bit tongue-in-cheek. After seeing the site, I really wonder if it is a joke intended to point out how ridiculous the "one-way trip to Mars" plans are. I suspect the site is intended to drum up a lot of interest and volunteers (much like the call for Mars trip volunteers), so that the punchline can be delivered later when it is revealed that the whole thing is based on a completely silly proposition.

Or, perhaps I just hope that this is a joke and not for real...

Arthur C. Clark had something to say about this... (2)

techdavis (939834) | about a year ago | (#44889133)

"All these worlds are yours except Europa. Attempt no landings there." (2010: Odyssey Two). Do we really want to tempt fate that way? Next thing you know, we'll have computers killing astronauts, Jupiter turning into a star... just too risky ;)

Why Europa? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44889333)

Why, apart from Io Europa has got to be the hardest moon to get to and back out of.

1) Its deep in the Jupiter gravity well
2) Its got a deep gravity well of its own
3) Its right in the Jupiter radiation hot spot where everything is going to get cooked.
4) Its relatively boring. (except life may exist 300km under the surface)

Why not pick any of the numerous other moons.

  Himalia would be a great one. Easy to get to (outer sat, and back out of (low escape, much further out of Jupiter's well), out of the peak radiation zone, big enough to be worthwhile, small enough to be interesting. We know nearly nothing about it. It is approximately the same size as Enceladus, in a similar system so may have cryovolcanisim. We have the technology now to do it and come back. While there you could send out probes to the other moons and control them in near real time making work much faster. Or you could actually visit in person a few other outer moons. Elara?

  I don't know, ten billion dollars? The main craft would be re-useable for other manned missions to the moon or other moons or planets. VASPIR engines, ISS style life support with greater recycling, 3 person crew. Supplies could be sent immediately so ready in orbit around the moon. It would be one of the easiest bodies in the solar system to move water ice from. Becoming a a refuelling resupply point for out solar system adventures, robotic or manned.

Isn't there too much radiation (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | about a year ago | (#44889541)

Isn't there too much radiation emitted from Jupiter for any kinda human survival on any of its moons?. No i didn't duckduckgo it :}
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