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New App Aims To Track Your Dreams

timothy posted about 7 months ago | from the best-entertainment-in-the-world dept.

Software 112

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "Liz Stinson reports that 'Shadow,' a new app recently launched on Kickstarter, will make recording and remembering your dreams simple. 'There's a lot going on in the subconscious mind that if you can start to pull out little details, you start to get a wider picture of yourself,' says designer Hunter Lee Soik. Most of the time, alarm clocks abruptly blast through your consciousness, ripping you from the depths of sleep. In contrast, Shadow's alarm system gradually transitions users through their hypnopompic state, that not-quite-asleep, not-quite-awake phase, which has be proven to help you better remember your dreams. Once you deactivate the alarm, users are prompted to record their dreams either via voice or typing text. The app then transcribes your dreams and stores them in an ever-growing digital dream journal that keeps track of your long-term dream and sleep patterns and helps you visualize patterns and make connections between your sleep patterns, daily life, and what you dream about. 'We're socialized to think of sleep as inactivity, but certain parts of our brain — the parts that handle things like problem solving and memory — are most active while we're sleeping,' says Soik. 'That's a huge amount of potential data we're forgetting each morning.'" I prefer a notebook on the nightstand, myself.

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112 comments

And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with that (3, Interesting)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 7 months ago | (#44893597)

data?

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 7 months ago | (#44893627)

I say, if the NSA wants half coherent snatches of the population's dreams, let'em have it.

This is definitely a Do Not Want for me. Think about it. Look at everyone here. How much of their subconcious do you really want to know about? Doritos lazily floating in a sea of Dvorak keyboard caps? Belly button lint black holes?

Not a fucking chance, guys.

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893717)

Well, re-staging one's dreams and nightmares is a very powerful way to manipulate them.

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44897765)

You mean not waking up when I looks like I will finally "get some"?

I get so miffed when I finally have my hands on my fantasy woman and she suddenly vanishes right as my clock radio goes off and I am greeted with another opportunity to spend the whole day doing someone else's paperwork.

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 7 months ago | (#44893809)

I say, if the NSA wants half coherent snatches of the population's dreams, let'em have it.

I gather you haven't seen what teens text to each other.

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (1)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 7 months ago | (#44893881)

If anyone wants to go into my dreams, be my guest. But expect to come out like those vegetables in Dreamscape [wikipedia.org] .

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893783)

Is EVERYTHING on slashdot about the frikkin NSA? Here's a picture of a kitten : OMG its an NSA spy!!!

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894073)

Is EVERYTHING on slashdot about the frikkin NSA? Here's a picture of a kitten : OMG its an NSA spy!!!

You are obviously an NSA shill.

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (1)

QilessQi (2044624) | about 7 months ago | (#44894127)

Accusing someone of being an NSA shill means you must be the NSA shill. We are SO onto you.

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44895761)

You must be FBI.

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894317)

Doesn't matter. If they buy into a load of pseudoscientific Freudian crap about dreams revealing your "unconscious mind", let them waste their time on that instead of doing something that could cause real harm.

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 7 months ago | (#44895849)

Alternately, what will YOU do with that data? Dreams are entertaining uselessness (though they might have some physiological purpose), as far as I can tell, like cartoons.........

Re:And what will the CIA, NSA and others do with t (1)

TripleE78 (883800) | about 7 months ago | (#44896999)

Screw that, I'm waiting until this turns into Futurama style blasting commercials into your dreams.

Because you know that's next.

dreamboard.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893607)

Already done. You're welcome.

Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (3, Informative)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 7 months ago | (#44893659)

There is one simple, proven, way to help remember your dreams.

When you wake up, don't move. Recall your dreams then write them down.

With practice you can easily recall 3 or more dreams.

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893723)

How do you write them down without moving?

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 7 months ago | (#44893877)

...recall THEN write ...

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | about 7 months ago | (#44894217)

Problem this is, I often awake in the middle of the night (usually have to take a piss); I can remember dreams best right after I've had one,so I started immediately writing them down (kept a weak flashlight and journal by the bed for this) at like 3am for while but found that by the time I was done writing it all down, I was pretty much wide awake and had trouble going back to sleep.
That got old fast so I stopped doing that. I do, however, have some cool doosies written down. Especially the dream where I was flying around at treetop level like superman. God I love those dreams, but they're so rare. Or the one with the super red electrical storm and volcanoes blowing up all around me. My subconscious rocks.

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (2)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 7 months ago | (#44895423)

Especially the dream where I was flying around at treetop level like superman. God I love those dreams

God, yes, the flying dreams are great!

Not so great are the "omygawd, I forgot to go to a class all semester, and the final is TOMORROW!!!", which I still have moderately regularly (usually around Christmas and late spring) in spite of being out of college for 30-odd years...;-)

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44897503)

Yes sir. That sound exactly like my nightmare. We must have being to the same fluid mechanic courses.

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 7 months ago | (#44895897)

The bathroom problem can be solved by:

* Don't drink or eat anything for at least a few hours before bedtime.
* Use the bathroom right before bed.

The problem of going back to sleep can be a difficult one. You'll have to try different things to see what works for you. i.e. Pink noise, meditative music, TV, etc.

Looks like you had some great dreams already! Keep dreaming!

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (1)

Black LED (1957016) | about 7 months ago | (#44896121)

My favourites are when I have funny dreams where I actually wake up laughing. It's a good feeling. That happened to me this morning, but I can't remember what the dream was about now.

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44895387)

How do you manage to actively recall a dream without chasing it away? I know I can't. Much less if I had to write it down. The only way to remember shreds of a dream is to remain in limbo for a while without engaging the daytime mind. The only device that could possibly work to record memories of my dreams would be an auto-activated microphone. Certainly not an alarm clock app, however "gentle"!

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893729)

aww but I want a machine to do it for me!

I mean c'mon who has time to make a serious connection with their own emotions. There's important work to be done!

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893981)

Tesla had proposed an idea around recording and playing back ones dreams.

at least he didn't electrocute circus animals (1)

Thud457 (234763) | about 7 months ago | (#44894133)

Tesla thought he talked to Martians.
just sayin'


I'd be more interested in an app that could guide me into lucid dreaming. Maybe that'd need some sort of bluetooth dongle like a fitbit.

Re:at least he didn't electrocute circus animals (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894197)

Build one! I bet a rasberry pi could do it. I used to have a sleep mask that monitored eye movements and flashed LEDs in your eye when you're in rem. Worked for me. When the whole sky starts flashing red, it made me remember I was in a dream. I lost and it and I don't think they make them anymore.

Re:at least he didn't electrocute circus animals (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44895327)

That you TOM?

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894041)

I mean c'mon who has time to make a serious connection with their own emotions

In what way are you suggesting using a computer instead of a notebook forgoes this element?

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (1)

jmrives (1019046) | about 7 months ago | (#44894151)

Back when I used to record my dreams, I found that if I recalled them in reverse chronological order, I was able to go further back into my dream. By this, I mean you start by what happened last, then try to remember what happened before that and so forth.

Re:Typical high-tech over-engineered solution ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894551)

write it down... without moving!

Dream Recorder (4, Informative)

Udo Schmitz (738216) | about 7 months ago | (#44893663)

I have this on my Mac:

http://web.archive.org/web/20070602172914/http://www.dream-recorder.com/ [archive.org]

That was from 2007. There were newer versions:

http://web.archive.org/web/20080704183437/http://www.dream-recorder.com/ [archive.org]

Never tested it seriously. And I remember reading about an iOS-App in the last year or so ...

Re:Dream Recorder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894065)

Don't worry, I've had a patent on recording your dreams on a computer device since 2003. I'm just waiting for someone to make some big money off the idea before I hit them up for a "licensing deal".

Enough is Never Enough (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893681)

"The only privacy that's left is the inside of your head. Maybe that's enough."
-1998 Enemy of the State

Enough is never enough with these kind of people.

Re:Enough is Never Enough (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 7 months ago | (#44894215)

Enough is never enough with these kind of people.

Several tools are being developed that can look inside your brain while you are being interrogated. These include EEG [wikipedia.org] to measure your brains electrical activity, and fMRI [wikipedia.org] to measure metabolism. So far these are too bulky to be used surreptitiously, but "they" are working on that. Invest in tinfoil.

There's an app for that ALREADY. (1)

gridzilla (778890) | about 7 months ago | (#44893703)

https://sites.google.com/site/sleepasandroid/

Lucid Dreaming

Thank me later.

Re:There's an app for that ALREADY. (1)

Megahard (1053072) | about 7 months ago | (#44893821)

Thanks, that's great. But what about tracking the Android? I want to know when it's dreaming about those electric sheep.

Re:There's an app for that ALREADY. (1)

sjwt (161428) | about 7 months ago | (#44894299)

Looks awesome, installing now.. and its 2am, guess I'll be finding out how well it works in 4-5 hours.

Re:There's an app for that ALREADY. (1)

Windwraith (932426) | about 7 months ago | (#44894971)

I use it myself, great alarm and white noise (my street is really noisy), and binaural beats help me avoid thinking about things while falling asleep.
However the lucid dreaming mode always sounds a bit too late for me, when I am actually awake. I am narcoleptic and perhaps that influences the measurements, but, alas, I could never it to work...

Hope (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893711)

Let's hope this leads to another generation of Mary Shelleys and HP Lovecrafts.

Re:Hope (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893773)

More likely, a generation who will flock to social networking sites to say "LOL I had a crazy dream guys..."

Slashvertisement (1)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about 7 months ago | (#44893815)

There are only about a million dream tracking apps in the Google Play store already.

Re:Slashvertisement (1)

mythosaz (572040) | about 7 months ago | (#44894609)

Leela: Didn't you have ads in the 21st century?"

Fry: Well sure, but not in our dreams. Only on TV and radio, and in magazines, and movies, and at ball games... and on buses and milk cartons and t-shirts, and bananas and written on the sky. But not in dreams, no siree.

Why? (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 7 months ago | (#44893871)

Of what use is recording your dreams?

Re:Why? (4, Informative)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 7 months ago | (#44893901)

Because dreams provide an insight into your superconsciousness (subconscious has been mislabeled)

Because you can Lucid Dream.

Because you explore higher realities and learn about yourself.

Re:Why? (2)

Hatta (162192) | about 7 months ago | (#44894069)

Because dreams provide an insight into your superconsciousness

How has this assertion been demonstrated empirically?

Because you can Lucid Dream.

And what's the benefit of that?

Because you explore higher realities and learn about yourself.

What reason is there to believe that "higher realities" exist? What reason is there to believe that dreams help you "learn about yourself" any more than reading tea leaves?

Re:Why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894237)

Forget all that existential bullshit. Lucid dreaming is FUN. :)

Re:Why? (1)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | about 7 months ago | (#44896267)

Fuck yes. I lost the ability to lucid dream, but when I was in my early twenties, I'd be able to realise I was in a dream and use superpowers I'd had in previous dreams. Imagine all the best videos games you've ever played, then smoosh them together however you want!

Re:Why? (2)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about 7 months ago | (#44894323)

It has been speculated (by this fellow [wikipedia.org] , before you start getting cranky and waving around questions about credibility) that the whole sleeping and dreaming process might actually be a maintenance procedure. A certain type of artificial neural network, called a restricted Boltzmann machine [wikipedia.org] , undergoes a process where it back-calculates fake input data based on what it's seen (much like human dreams) and then uses that fake data as a guide to correct errors in its weights (i.e. to remove and correct false correlations.) If true or even approximately true, this would provide a much more coherent explanation than the idea of a wildly unreliable sub- or superconscious, and explain why people who don't sleep or dream at all experience hallucinations, neurosis, and other impairments consistent with bad neural net bookkeeping.

Under this proposal, the dreams we remember might actually be a bad thing, because it suggests they invoked something too powerful to sleep through. This could explain why nightmares recur: our brains are trying to forget, but we keep remembering them consciously. It's not a shut book, though, as I don't know how lucid dreaming would fit into the model. (Maybe the part you have control over is only very minor?)

Re:Why? (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 7 months ago | (#44894811)

But what happens if you like a lot of the dreams that you remember?

Am I broken or something?

Re:Why? (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about 7 months ago | (#44896891)

Not necessarily; it just means that you're undergoing the same thing in the opposite direction; you like what's happening too much to let go; any strong emotion can probably cause dream-remembering. A particular dream may not actually contain very much content your brain's trying to forget, either; for example, if you have dreams that just consist of your daily routine with nothing unusual happening, then there's not much to change. That being said, though, it could be a sign that you're holding onto a hope you think is unrealistic. (Ironically, it seems possible that our dreams don't actually have much faith in our dreams.)

Re:Why? (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 7 months ago | (#44895685)

> the dreams we remember might actually be a bad thing, because it suggests they invoked something too powerful to sleep through. This could explain why nightmares recur: our brains are trying to forget, but we keep remembering them consciously.

You will never overcome something by running away from it.

Re:Why? (1)

chihowa (366380) | about 7 months ago | (#44894847)

How has this assertion been demonstrated empirically?

How can you empirically demonstrate something if you don't collect data to test the assertion? Science is fun and there's no reason to avoid amateur science, especially if there's no expensive equipment to buy!

Reading tea leaves may be bunk, but dreams often/sometimes appear to deal with a lot of personally important information. If analysis of them doesn't prove informative, it's at least entertaining. You understand the benefits of entertainment, right?

Which leads me to lucid dreaming. Holy shit is that fun! You should seriously give it a try before you discount it entirely. The easiest way to controllably lucidly dream is to recall your normal dreams. If you can't reliably recall your dreams, you can't reliably recall you lucid dreams, which diminishes their utility.

Re:Why? (1)

shadowofwind (1209890) | about 7 months ago | (#44895097)

Because dreams provide an insight into your superconsciousness

How has this assertion been demonstrated empirically?

It is difficult to demonstrate empirically because there are many uncontrolled variables. And the methodologies that have been developed for other applications such as clinical trials aren't ideally suited here. By way of analogy, progress in physics in the 19th and 20th centuries required development of statistical tools to deal with measurement uncertainty. Here there's uncertainty also, but its of a different type, where the parameters of the study itself are difficult to control. It is possible to get real, objective information, but difficult to do it in a way that will attract funding, will be easy for other researchers to reproduce, and will be understood by people who are quick to misapply assumptions gained in other fields.

Because you can Lucid Dream.

And what's the benefit of that?

There are a wide variety of motives for lucid dreaming, but its often possible to become aware of things about yourself and the way your mind works that are difficult or impossible to discover in a normal waking state. You can have more conscious access to processes that are typically subconscious for instance. I agree that this is not of interest or benefit for everyone, but it is for some people.

Because you explore higher realities and learn about yourself.

What reason is there to believe that "higher realities" exist? What reason is there to believe that dreams help you "learn about yourself" any more than reading tea leaves?

Much of what a person can experience while lucid dreaming is difficult to interpret and understand, and people tend to describe things to themselves in a way that may not be very accurate or objective. For example, many people believe they interact with some kind of exotic 'astral matter', but I've had those same experiences and I'm not convinced that idea is valid. One reads a lot of bullshit on these topics, both from enthusiasts and skeptics. Its a very poorly understood subject area, maybe comparable to the study of electromagnetics in the middle ages. Sorting out the reality from the bullshit will take a lot of time and effort.

I think you're a smart guy Hatta, one of the best /. contributors. But I think you're a bit out of your element here, like someone who has merely used a computer forming strong opinions about kernel development. It would take many hours of discussion with someone who studies dreaming as a serious hobby before you even understand what the major issues are and how words are being used. I'm not suggesting that you didn't ask good questions, just that you're not going to get good answers to them unless you have a fair amount of time and interest to explore those questions and consider the responses with a critical but open mind.

Re:Why? (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 7 months ago | (#44895597)

It is difficult to demonstrate empirically because there are many uncontrolled variables.

Which is one of the reasons it stinks of woo.

Much of what a person can experience while lucid dreaming is difficult to interpret and understand, and people tend to describe things to themselves in a way that may not be very accurate or objective.

And that's another reason.

But I think you're a bit out of your element here, like someone who has merely used a computer forming strong opinions about kernel development.

I think even a novice would be able to accurately form a strong opinion that kernel development is a worthwhile endeavor. Certainly an expert in the field would be able to convey why it is a worthwhile endeavor. Can anyone offer me a shred of evidence that there is signal in the noise of dreams?

Re:Why? (1)

shadowofwind (1209890) | about 7 months ago | (#44897287)

Certainly an expert in the field would be able to convey why it is a worthwhile endeavor. Can anyone offer me a shred of evidence that there is signal in the noise of dreams?

I can do that if you tell me what sort of information you would regard as evidence, provided of course that you haven't decided the outcome already.

I don't claim though that there is signal in the noise of your dreams, or that dream recall is worthwhile for you personally. Some people dream vividly for much of their time asleep, and its an important part of their problem solving process. Other people do more of the same kind of thinking while awake, or they don't do much of it at all. Personally I don't have much of a "mind's eye" while awake: my visual imagination is dominated by processing sensory information, and my intuition is remarkably restricted by my conscious thought process. I dream vividly every night though, and get insights that don't come as easily while awake.

If you're skeptical primarily on the grounds that my experience is different than yours, and on the belief that your experience is a more reliable measure of my activities than my experience is, then I'm not going to convince you.

Similarly, I probably won't be able to convince you if you are one of those people who insist that peer reviewed studies are the only valid evidence, as if everything under the sun has already been studied to conclusion. Or as if it was impossible to use objective evidence to inform one's understanding before there were panels of credentialed experts for everything.

But if you're as free-thinking as your sig seems to imply, then I think it shouldn't be a problem.

Re:Why? (1)

Half-pint HAL (718102) | about 7 months ago | (#44896921)

I think you're a smart guy Hatta, one of the best /. contributors. But I think you're a bit out of your element here, like someone who has merely used a computer forming strong opinions about kernel development.

That analogy seems to imply that people who waffle new-agey platitudes are somehow experts. I can't say they're wrong, but I wouldn't defer to their judgement anyway. When people talk about "higher realities" and "deeper truths" and the like, they're forcing the assumption that these unmeasurable subjective experiences are more fundamental to the universe than the laws of physics, and anyone is within their rights to call bullshit on that.

Re:Why? (1)

shadowofwind (1209890) | about 7 months ago | (#44898939)

That analogy seems to imply that people who waffle new-agey platitudes are somehow experts. I can't say they're wrong, but I wouldn't defer to their judgement anyway. When people talk about "higher realities" and "deeper truths" and the like, they're forcing the assumption that these unmeasurable subjective experiences are more fundamental to the universe than the laws of physics, and anyone is within their rights to call bullshit on that.

People who waffle new-agey platitudes may or may not understand much of anything, and I wouldn't defer to their judgment in any case.

But if you want to know what you're talking about when calling bullshit, you need an adequate understanding of the ostensibly "unmeasurable subjective experiences" in question. How unmeasurable and subjective are they really? Are they in agreement with the remarkably successful model commonly thought of as "laws of physics", or do they contradict it, or do they fall outside of that scope? You're guessing that your knowledge is adequate to make a reasonably informed judgment that the new-agey claims are all bullshit. My assertion, based on my experience with a subject I've devoted much of my life to studying, is that your knowledge is not adequate.

You're right that the new-agey claims are mostly bullshit. But there's stuff that's true and that can be understood to matter mixed in with the bullshit. If you don't want to hassle with trying to separate the two, and just want to ignore all of it, that's a reasonable stance in my view. Not everyone has time for this stuff. But then if you make strong assertions about other people's beliefs and experiences, very often you'll just be wrong.

Many scientific subjects require a lot of effort to understand to more than a superficial degree also. The physics of physics journalism, for instance, or even undergraduate physics, is typically a sketchy caricature of real physics. Most of what seems "counter-intuitive" to people about 20th century physics seems that way because its described in a way that's actually wrong. Understanding dreaming doesn't require the same type of kind of logical rigor as physics, and the abstractions are different, but takes a lot of work to sort out what's real from what's not.

When I first had astral projection experiences in the mid 90's, I messed around with it, figured out what I was doing with my senses, and dismissed it as meaningless. It took me ten years to discover that there was more going on than the more superficial aspects of the experience, even though I was mostly right about the part that I thought I understood. And if I'd put less effort into it, or my luck had been a bit different, I never would have figured that out. I'm not claiming intellectual superiority, I'm just sharing what I can see from where I am now, that if you put a fair degree of effort into understanding dreaming, you find that there's a lot there that's not what it seemed at the outset. I'm not even expecting you to take my word for it: I don't think that putting that kind of faith in other people's claims is a good idea. But I think if you relax your judgment a little bit, leaving the door open a little wider to the possibility that people like myself are not just blowing smoke, then you'll be 'forcing assumptions' a bit less yourself.

Re:Why? (2)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 7 months ago | (#44895851)

You're like a blind man asking "What's so important about sight?"

How can you understand the answer if you don't have a frame of reference?

> What reason is there to believe that "higher realities" exist?
They do whether _you_ believe them or not.

Lucid Dreaming and the Out-of-Body experiences provide an option to face your fears, to learn about yourself, to understand your Higher Self. Now if you don't wish to understand yourself that is your choice if you wish to remain ignorant. I'm just telling you have a choice. No one can prove anything to you except by your own experiences. They may prove beneficial. But you will never know unless you try. I suggest reddit.com/r/LucidDreaming

Who knows, maybe tea leaves will work better for you. How do you know unless you TRY it?

The more important question for you is: Why do dreams use symbols to communicate?

If you would actually make the time to understand your own dreams you would eventually learn they are a form of communication. They have the potential to teach you IF you allow them.

Or you can remain arrogant and dismiss what the universe is trying to tell you. Your choice.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44896397)

Or you can remain arrogant and dismiss what the universe is trying to tell you. Your choice.

If you're going to accuse someone else of arrogance, you should take care not to simultaneously imply that the unimaginably vast whole of reality somehow not only notices you, and not only cares about you, but also considers you so important that it feels compelled to whisper secret knowledge in your ear.

Because the reality is that "the universe" isn't even capable of giving a fuck about you.

Re:Why? (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 7 months ago | (#44896405)

You're like a blind man asking "What's so important about sight?"

Do you really think any blind person doesn't realize how important sight is? It's pretty easy to explain, and trivial to demonstrate abilities that sight provides that the sightless do not have. Any blind person can be easily convinced that sight exists by performing experiments. Can you do the same with dream analysis?

> What reason is there to believe that "higher realities" exist?
They do whether _you_ believe them or not.

Sure, just like the Earth is round, whether someone believes or not. The difference is that if I doubt that the Earth is round, you can provide evidence for that assertion. Where is the evidence for your assertion?

Lucid Dreaming and the Out-of-Body experiences provide an option to face your fears, to learn about yourself, to understand your Higher Self.

Or they provide an opportunity to indulge in confirmation bias, wishful thinking, and numerous other self-delusional fallacies, which humans are extremely prone to.

Who knows, maybe tea leaves will work better for you. How do you know unless you TRY it?

Even if you try it, you don't really know. You have to perform properly designed experiments, or you're just fooling yourself.

The more important question for you is: Why do dreams use symbols to communicate?

How do you know dreams use anything at all? How do you know dreams communicate anything at all? We know that symbols are a part of dreams, but your language suggests an intentionality for which there is no evidence.

To answer your question in the way it should have been asked without presupposing intentionality: Symbols are a part of dreams because the brain is a symbol manipulating computer, and dreaming is an activity of the brain.

The presence of symbols doesn't necessarily mean anything. For example, open up any random binary with a hex editor. There will be ASCII characters in there. Does it follow that the binary has some deeper meaning? Not at all.

Or you can remain arrogant and dismiss what the universe is trying to tell you.

If I wanted to dismiss the idea out of hand, I never would have asked for evidence. The one being arrogant here is the one claiming something about reality without providing any evidence.

Re:Why? (1)

narcc (412956) | about 7 months ago | (#44898281)

Do you really think any blind person doesn't realize how important sight is? It's pretty easy to explain,

Cool, can you help me out? I'm having an awful time understanding color. What's it like to experience that?

and trivial to demonstrate abilities that sight provides that the sightless do not have. Any blind person can be easily convinced that sight exists by performing experiments. Can you do the same with dream analysis?

Total Nonsense.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44896895)

What a bunch of hokey psuedo-religious bullshit.

At best its a bunch of self hypnosis crap - at worst you could save yourself a lot of time and trouble by just smoking a doobie or even better taking a hit of acid.

Re:Why? (1)

narcc (412956) | about 7 months ago | (#44897519)

How has this assertion been demonstrated empirically?

Hell, dreams haven't been demonstrated empirically.

Don't they teach you kids anything about epistemology these days?

First Post! Yeah baby! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893873)

At least it would have been if my alarm clock didn't take so long gradually transitioning me through my hypnopompic state.

Increasing volume alarm? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893893)

My 7 year old phone can do that.

So what's the Kickstarter for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893895)

More and more I see these projects appearing on Kickstarter that, imo, don't warrant any startup money:
Seriously, asking money for making a clock/alarm application/note-taking application?
There is a multitude of tutorials around on how to create exactly these kinds of apps for both iOS as well as Android. Even someone with limited knowledge of programming should be able to build what this guy is trying to 'sell'...
So why the Kickstarter? Easy monies... riiiight.

Re: So what's the Kickstarter for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894365)

I don't think "app ideas" are allowed on Kickstarter.. at least that's how I've read their terms.

Re:So what's the Kickstarter for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44895263)

Kickstarter is a place where people come to pitch ideas about to how to sell snake oil and snake oil accessories. Since snake oil is in such high demand, projects that focus on this market are quickly funded.

I personally take baths in snake oil to cure my ails. However, I have yet to receive shipment of said snake oil.

Maybe we shouldn't be remembering dreams (2)

Prune (557140) | about 7 months ago | (#44893951)

Have any of the people that push dream diaries, including this modern version, thought that perhaps there's an evolutionary reason that we don't often remember our dreams, and most of us, rarely in great detail?

Re:Maybe we shouldn't be remembering dreams (2)

TheCarp (96830) | about 7 months ago | (#44894347)

Wouldn't the only way to answer such a question be to, in fact, record dreams?
How else would you determine if there is an evolutionary advantage to not remembering them?

Re:Maybe we shouldn't be remembering dreams (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894523)

It's pretty useful to remember them for therapy, at least, but I never could remember much.

Re:Maybe we shouldn't be remembering dreams (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44895063)

I've never recorded my dreams in a diary, since I've never had a problem remembering dreams. I don't remember everything but it doesn't all vanish once I wake up like most people describe.

Re:Maybe we shouldn't be remembering dreams (1)

umafuckit (2980809) | about 7 months ago | (#44895121)

Have any of the people that push dream diaries, including this modern version, thought that perhaps there's an evolutionary reason that we don't often remember our dreams, and most of us, rarely in great detail?

Perhaps there's an evolutionary reason, perhaps not. But does it matter? With a little practice you can get pretty good at remembering your dreams. Keeping a diary helps a lot: I've tried it and definitely saw a difference in both volume and detail of recalled dreams. Pen and paper works just fine.

Re:Maybe we shouldn't be remembering dreams (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44895503)

Why do you single out dreams? I believe everyone remembers things they wouldn't want to and don't remember other things as clearly as they wish. In studies, it has been shown that we automatically forget certain things that we don't need to remember (such as where you parked the car last time you were at the mall since it would interfere with your recollection of where you parked it this time).

However, our brains do a lot of useful processing when we sleep - e.g. enhance memorization and understanding of what we've studied during the day or let us think of a problem from a new perspective when we wake up. Dreams are a consequence of that and thus correlate with a certain evolutionary advantage (better learning). Furthermore, e.g. Formula 1 technical genius Adrian Newey has said that he always keeps a notebook next to his bed since he gets his best design ideas in his sleep.

Dreams are of course not unambiguously a good thing since waking up after some dreams leave you in an emotionally very disturbed state for much longer than it takes to realize that it was just a dream. I'm currently taking antidepressants and whilst they have been a great benefit for me, a side-effect is much crazier dreams than I've ever had before and quite a lot of talking in my sleep but only my girlfriend suffers from it since I usually don't wake up even though I might yell loudly when I have a normal dream. Some of the crazy ones are such comedy gold, though, that at least she gets to laugh in the morning when I tell why I was yelling.

Re:Maybe we shouldn't be remembering dreams (1)

GuB-42 (2483988) | about 7 months ago | (#44896127)

If there is an evolutionary reason it may be simply because the brain have things more important to do than recording the incoherent mess that our dreams are made of. Especially if we consider that dreams are the result of various thoughts and memories that may be available in other, much more coherent forms.

Share location? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44893957)

So.... will it have an option to share your dream location with Google?

Same as previous nights (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 7 months ago | (#44894005)

> "users are prompted to record their dreams either via voice"

*BZZZZZT* PLEASE STATE DREAM FOR RECORDING

I dreamt I was hitting on Victoria Justice, and she was gonna take her pants off, but then she ran over to Debby Ryan and that Zhendaya chick and they pointed at my crotch and started laughing then they started making put but pulled down a wicker shade so I couldn't see, so I was gonna try to peek through it but my mom was there so I just kinda stood next to it waiting for her to leave but she was talking at me saying you r a good boy, she said it "r", not sure how I knew that but I did, and I'm thinking go the hell away dammit but she comes up and hugs me and has no intention and sets down a little plastic Target table and chairs and pounds fencing into the ground and ya know what cancel recording and erase. No dreams last night.

Re:Same as previous nights (1)

PPH (736903) | about 7 months ago | (#44894075)

"I dreamt I was hitting on Victoria Justice, and she was gonna take her pants off,....

That's as far as I got when my wife woke up and slugged me. I'll be dictating tomorrow night's dreams from the sofa in the den.

Re:Same as previous nights (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about 7 months ago | (#44894729)

> not sure how I knew that but I did

Reminds me of a weird one I had where I was talking to a friend of mine. Of course, the thing was, I knew who I was talking to, and I knew that the person in question was white and over 300 lbs, and not a skinny little asian girl, like the person I was talking to....but... I "knew" it was her; there was no question, in the moment, it was as natural as could be.

Maybe there is a good reason (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894235)

Maybe there is a good reason we forget our dreams.

Spirits Within (1)

jader3rd (2222716) | about 7 months ago | (#44894245)

Having watched Final Fantasy: Spirits Within I'll let you know what people will do with this data: they'll convict you for sympathizing with the enemy.
Go Privacy!

"Zen" Alarm Clock (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about 7 months ago | (#44894329)

http://www.now-zen.com/ [now-zen.com]

That is what this reminds me of. A friend of mine bought me one many years back. It was just a normal lock, but with a metal bar strapped on the front and the alarm mechanism was a striker that would make a gentle "ding".

It starts out with one ding, then another 3 minutes later, and increases in frequency over the next 10 minutes until it is making a ding every 3 seconds.

I really liked it until it made for a very gentle wake up....that is...it did until it fell off a table and broke. Oddly my cell phone has taken a lot more drops, maybe this isn't such a bad development?

Really? (1)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 7 months ago | (#44894377)

Once you deactivate the alarm, users are prompted to record their dreams either via voice or typing text.

Haha, too funny. I can barely type on those damn little touchscreens with a relatively low rate of autocorrect goof-ups when I'm wide awake, good luck getting anything coherent out of me right after waking from a deep sleep...and voice would wake up my spouse.

I guess there's always pen and paper, but again, my handwriting is guaranteed to be illegible if I'm still half asleep. Legibility and/or coherency is simply not achievable for me until after my second or third cup of coffee.

Useful for lucid dreaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44894455)

To me the most annoying part of achieving lucid dreams is having to keep a dream journal, sounds like this could make the process a lot easier and more effective.

This actually could be useful (2)

hAckz0r (989977) | about 7 months ago | (#44894697)

I have known about the ability to work out problems in your sleep for many years. In my younger life I would write entire programs in my sleep that solved intractable problems, and all I had to do was drive into work and type them in. When I went to sleep all I had to do was to keep going over the issues in my head to keep the ideas available for when my mind started being more creative, and let it work out the design issues with timing interrupts, multi-threading issues, etc. The technique worked out a lot of the complexity and tended to find solutions to very difficult problems. I have even logically debugged real-time issues in my sleep just by thinking thing over in my sleep.

.
Fast forward, I'm a lot older now and have moved on to other problems, in a more scientific environment. For the last 13 years I applied this same technique to all the unanswered logical paradox in physics and have worked through all these issues as well. The answer is rather simple physical model that naturally gives rise to gravity through quantum processes, describes entanglement, double-slit, etc, but now I am left with the hard core mathematics of trying to actually prove the resulting theory. Unfortunately, I have found that this sleep/problem-solving technique apparently hits a proverbial brick wall when you get into an area where you are not properly schooled to work things out completely in your head.

Are there any physics oriented mathematicians out there who love GR, SR, QM, and thermodynamics and could do this kind of stuff in their head? Thought not, but I had to ask! Tried to hire one last week, but couldn't find one who knew this stuff _and_ was willing to be associated with a non-mainstream theory. So I guess I just need to retire, go back to school, and to learn all the math that I need. If I'm lucky enough to even live that long. Writing scientific papers doesn't work in my sleep either. Boring... My sleeping hours are so much more fun these days, if I can remember what I was doing. I'm now spending way to many hours up at night trying to pick up the math I need instead of 'sleeping on it'.

Re:This actually could be useful (1)

transporter_ii (986545) | about 7 months ago | (#44898059)

> In my younger life I would write entire programs in my sleep that solved intractable problems

I've done this too, several times. I can't tell you how many times I spent all afternoon on something and got nothing but errors, and the next morning I have it done and working 30 minutes after I get to work. I don't recall what I dreamed those times though. It could have just been a good night's sleep that helped.

One time, however, I remember very clearly figuring out how to loop through some data and get the results I was looking for. I wrote the code and debugged it in a dream, and the next day I just typed it all in and had it working in no time.

Now there is a good employee. Work all day and all night.

There's an app out thats way better (2)

SinisterEVIL (2661381) | about 7 months ago | (#44894791)

It's called "sleep as android". It not only has that same alarm feature, but also uses phones built in motion sensors to graph your deep sleep. Why does this need a kick start? it's a very simple app

Weirdest Dream (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 7 months ago | (#44894983)

"Shadow, take a note; I just had the weirdest dream. I was dreaming I was eating a large candy bar but it tasted terrible and it was really, really hard. Why is my mouth bleeding? Hey, are you getting any of this? Wait... where's my phone?"

Re:Weirdest Dream (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44896013)

Mine would be more like: "I had a dream where I cured cancer, AIDS, and every other disease affecting humanity. All it required was for everyone to wear hats made of fried bologna on their heads and do the hokey pokey while wearing lederhosen. It made perfect sense at the time."

Really - kickstarter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#44895825)

Seriously guys?

You are writing an app, you don't need to raise money to do that.

Maybe trying to determine demand? (1)

reluctantjoiner (2486248) | about 7 months ago | (#44897091)

In marketing, you're apparently supposed to determine how much of a market exists for your product (ie will anyone buy it) before you start designing and building. Something I wish I'd learnt before I built my app, but there's always next time.

In the case of this app, the point might be market research instead of raising capital. And now it's on slashdot, it looks like they're getting a two-fer.

Advertising for subconscious (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | about 7 months ago | (#44898693)

Next step is to collect dream information, leaving the door open to advertising for the subconscious: you do not know you want to buy this product, but we know it is your dream!
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