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Intel Rolls Out Raspberry Pi Competitor

Soulskill posted about 10 months ago | from the minnows-are-a-pie's-natural-predator dept.

Intel 214

Rambo Tribble writes "As detailed by Ars Technica, Intel has introduced the Minnowboard, an SBC touted as more powerful and more open than the Raspberry Pi. At $199, it is also more expensive. Using an Atom processor, the new SBC boasts more capacity and x86-compatibility. 'It's notable that the MinnowBoard is an open hardware platform, a distinction that Arduino and BeagleBone can claim but Raspberry Pi cannot. Users could create their own MinnowBoards by buying the items on the bill of materials—all the design information is published, and CircuitCo chose components that can be purchased individually rather than in the bulk quantities hardware manufacturers are accustomed to, Anders said. Users can also buy a pre-made MinnowBoard and make customizations or create their own accessory boards to expand its capability. And being an open hardware platform means that the source code of (almost) all the software required to run the platform is open.'" Update: 09/20 22:31 GMT by T : Look soon for a video introduction to the MinnowBoard, and — hopefully not too long from now — a visit to their Dallas-area production facility.

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GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (5, Informative)

jandrese (485) | about 10 months ago | (#44903985)

Why is this thing priced like a modern board when it has all out of date components on it? Wake me up when they do the Bay Trail version or slash $100 off of the asking price.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (4, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#44904013)

yeah it certainly isn't a raspberry pi competitor. why buy this when you can buy a netbook for almost the same price??

and check this out, 8 gpio pins. whee... no idea if any da/ad pins.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (4, Informative)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 10 months ago | (#44904047)

They're trying to do to the Raspberry Pi what Microsoft did to the netbook, and for the same reasons.

Re: GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904193)

And what both did to the OLPC.

Re: GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (2)

hedwards (940851) | about 10 months ago | (#44904437)

Not really, OLPC was never intended to be for sale in the developed world. Which always seemed to be a mistake. Offering a portion of the production for a bit of a mark up could have been good for everybody increased volume and the extra funds could have been used to subsidize units for the developing world.. The closes they did was that buy 2 get one deal. Which was stupid.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (4, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 10 months ago | (#44904395)

yeah it certainly isn't a raspberry pi competitor. why buy this when you can buy a netbook for almost the same price??

Also, this thing is huge. Several times the size of a Raspberry Pi. It appears to require a wall wart, whereas a RPI can be powered from USB.

and check this out, 8 gpio pins. whee... no idea if any da/ad pins.

... and none of the GPIO pins can do hardware PWM. So this board is not much use for robotics.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (2)

dugancent (2616577) | about 10 months ago | (#44904617)

USB powered, typically, by a wall wart.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44905081)

Rpi needs 700 mA USB 2.0 can typically only supply 500 mA.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

Jae686 (1203100) | about 10 months ago | (#44904715)

If I had mod Points...... :)

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (2)

bobbied (2522392) | about 10 months ago | (#44904033)

Hey, engineers to spin up this board got to eat you know. Their hours don't come cheap these days. I'm guessing this *won't* have much impact on PI sales. There are a bunch of hobbyist cards out there, and many existed before the PI. PI's claim to fame is that it is CHEAP.... And it lives up to that goal..

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904137)

Hey, engineers to spin up this board got to eat you know.

Yes, but not that much.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 10 months ago | (#44904187)

Hey, engineers to spin up this board got to eat you know.

Yes, but not that much.

Donut + coffee OR Mountain Dew + Doritos

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904759)

Hey, engineers to spin up this board got to eat you know.

Yes, but not that much.

Donut + coffee OR Mountain Dew + Doritos

Fried rice + kim chee

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (2)

Ghostworks (991012) | about 10 months ago | (#44904083)

It's basically an MCU eval board: low PCB runs, low quantity orders for every part in the BOM, very generic capabilities. EVBs are expensive. Sure, the engineering time that goes into it is pricey, but on a per-unit basis it's the fact that these are very general-use, quasi-custom toys that increases the cost.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (2)

Ghostworks (991012) | about 10 months ago | (#44904143)

..and I just looked in earnest at the capabilities. It's basically a caseless computer. Which is ALSO an eval board. Which means that $200 seems pretty reasonable, really.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (3, Insightful)

jedidiah (1196) | about 10 months ago | (#44904235)

pppppffft!

For $200 I can get a ready made Atom with an Nvidia GPU.

This board is worse than useless. It's insulting.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 10 months ago | (#44904337)

pppppffft!

For $200 I can get a ready made Atom with an Nvidia GPU.

This board is worse than useless. It's insulting.

Yeah, I know, this reply x1,000. It's almost like they held a secret meeting with Ballmer up in Redmond and agreed they could nudge the Wintel syndicate in on Raspberry Pi turf.

It will have its niche. Someone will find a use for it somewhere.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 10 months ago | (#44904733)

It costs more then a Celeron NUC, which actually has cool features like full virtualization support.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (3, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 10 months ago | (#44904433)

The one thing that might prove interesting is that it is allegedly fullly open (aside from the PowerVR GPU drivers) which (assuming Intel isn't lying or using "'Open' as in a block of magic numbers" definitions, this board, although based on UEFI, might actually be the first Intel product in quite a while to be well documented enough to be a Coreboot/LinuxBIOS target. Even better, it might provide insight into some other products using the same chipsets.

Actually that just puts it at the SAME level.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904823)

of openness.

Isn't the only major component that doesn't have open source drivers the GPU on the Pi?

Regardless RK3188 boards are the ideal equivalent of these and they can reach much more competitive pricing in line with the Pi at minimum and half the Atom board at maximum, including 2 gigs of ram and 8+ gigs of flash.

And that's not including all the other really awesome Quad-ARM SoCs available in similiarly cheap packaging.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 10 months ago | (#44905051)

So. . .you're not imagining a Beowulf Cluster of those. . .

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 10 months ago | (#44904401)

Why is this thing priced like a modern board when it has all out of date components on it? Wake me up when they do the Bay Trail version or slash $100 off of the asking price.

The GMA600 is a real shit sandwich (Oh, sure, I really really want to fuck around with a PowerVR SGX545 and it's utterly shit proprietary driver on my 'open' dev board); but $200 is a steal by the standards of x86 boards designed for embedded purposes (I suspect that there are a bunch of PC/104-format users looking enviously at this board right now, and wondering why Intel didn't answer their prayers instead).

Now, given the prices of Intel's own faster, better, comes-with-case, consumer offerings (their 'Next Unit of Computing' boxes being a good example), this is a poor consumer offering; but it's pretty damn cheap by the standards of similar products.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

fnj (64210) | about 10 months ago | (#44904755)

$200 is a steal by the standards of x86 boards designed for embedded purposes

Maybe that is why Arm boards are cleaning up. Who the fuck cares about x86; you're going to program it in C anyway. Let's face it, the price of this piece of shit is mortally insulting in any context.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904523)

I would gladly pay $300 if they made it with Bay Trail (or atleast an Atom chip with integrated GPU that works with Inel's GPL drivers) and added a second GigE port.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

fnj (64210) | about 10 months ago | (#44904789)

I would gladly pay $300 if they made it with Bay Trail (or atleast an Atom chip with integrated GPU that works with Inel's GPL drivers) and added a second GigE port.

You're on the right track, but WAY too undemanding. I'd pay MAYBE up to $100 for that. Tops.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#44904527)

It also gave me cold shivers when I saw the GPU spec. According to Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] the GMA600 really is just that old stupid PowerVR core with the clock cranked to 2x speed. At least it supports programmable shaders, hooray. But I think I'm done torturing myself with the old world GMA crap-chips. No thanks.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

dresgarcia (251585) | about 10 months ago | (#44904599)

Have fun getting PCIE, msata, and gig-e in your raspi buddy. FTFA "with I/O performance being one of the MinnowBoard's standout capabilities. PCIe, SATA disk support, and Gigabit Ethernet make it suitable for file servers and network appliances. . ."

Last time I checked the raspi didn't have any of those.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (5, Insightful)

dbc (135354) | about 10 months ago | (#44904669)

So, do you guys have multiple Beagle Boards, Beagle Bones, Ras Pi's, and other sitting on your bench right now? And you have experience using them? I do.

You haven't looked closely at the Minnow. The I/O is much easier to use and much richer than you find on a 'bone or a raspi. The CPU has more horsepower, and yon don't have porting headaches to get reasonable things running on it. $200 seems like a good value to me. You can't compare a raspi to a minnow until you try to hook up a CAN bus and a camera and start doing vision processing and motor control like you need for a robotics application. The pi will be straining. I have hopes for the minnow.

First, post your benchmarks, and BOM for all the add-on you needed to make it work. Then you can grouse about the price.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about 10 months ago | (#44904709)

it should be at almost 10 times the price

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (3, Insightful)

pla (258480) | about 10 months ago | (#44904747)

Why is this thing priced like a modern board when it has all out of date components on it? Wake me up when they do the Bay Trail version or slash $100 off of the asking price.

Intel seems to have totally missed the mark on this one. People don't buy the Raspberry Pi because they want a desktop PC in an awkward form factor. They buy the RPi because they want a tiny general purpose computing device that sips power and costs so little as to consider it disposable.

The Minnow completely fails on all but one of those criteria - It costs 8x as much, has a 60% larger footprint (almost the size of a NanoITX board!), the CPU alone draws up to 4W (not even counting everything else on the board) vs the Pi's 2.5W total...

If anything, I would have to suspect Intel means to target this as a semi-embedded Epia/Jetway/ECS killer - Though even there, it costs more, still has a larger footprint than readily-available Pico-ITX boards, and lacks the standardized mechanical aspects (ie, mounting holes) you get with the ITX family.

DOA. Simple as that. You can already get more computer for less money, and less computer for a LOT less money.

Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (2)

frovingslosh (582462) | about 10 months ago | (#44905141)

Slash $150 off it before I even consider it.

More slashvertisement (-1, Flamebait)

Khyber (864651) | about 10 months ago | (#44903999)

I challenge slashdot to go a full month without shilling some fucking product or another.

Re:More slashvertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904045)

Yeah, let's only hear about the things YOU want to hear about.

Re:More slashvertisement (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 10 months ago | (#44904257)

Yeah, let's only hear about the things YOU want to hear about.

Well, from Khyber's comment history, I would say that's hardware. He's pontificated over Monitors, both AMD and Intel CPUs & GPUs, some stuff about hydroponics, LEDs, etc.

Seems like Khyber just woke up on the hypocritical side of the bed today.

Re:More slashvertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904867)

>some stuff about hydroponics, LEDs And now the DEA is knocking on Khyber's door.

Re:More slashvertisement (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#44904549)

I challenge slashdot to go a full month without shilling some fucking product or another.

I challenge Slashdot to go a full month without calling every another person a shill all the time!

Re:More slashvertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44905113)

Of course you do, shill.

RESPBERRY PIE FOREVER !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904019)

Hmmm !!

Skipper! (5, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 10 months ago | (#44904035)

Just sit right back and you'll hear a tale,
a tale of a fateful trip.
They started with a project board,
using Intel's tiny chip.

Re:Skipper! (1)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | about 10 months ago | (#44904145)

I'm pretty sure this one ends with Gilligan's hat floating on a pool of quicksand.

Re:Skipper! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904343)

or with the skipper finishing his dinner of the final castaway.

Serious question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904349)

How did Gilligan, Skipper, and the professor stay so clean-shaven during their entire stay on the island. Did they happen to pack a unlimited supply of razors? Can you really get that clean of a shave with a sharpened rock?

Re:Serious question (2)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about 10 months ago | (#44904457)

No, sharpened rocks would be absurd. They used razors made out of coconuts.

Re:Serious question (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 10 months ago | (#44904567)

Given all the other contraptions the Professor managed to put together - do you really think a bicycle-powered electric razor was out of the question?

Re:Skipper! (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 10 months ago | (#44904417)

Ooh! I know how this one turns out... Hint: IBM -1 char each = HAL

Re:Skipper! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44905049)

if you'd said "small" instead of "tiny" you could have kept the cadence. Just sayin'.

Nice Try but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904043)

TI has the BeagleBoard for just $10 more than a Pi. My personal opinion is that the price point is $50 and under.

Open? (3, Informative)

DogGuts (658827) | about 10 months ago | (#44904049)

> ...There's just one exception: with the graphics processing unit, only the binary files required to drive the GPU are available, as the source code remains closed...
nuf said...

Re:Open? (2)

bobbied (2522392) | about 10 months ago | (#44904135)

Same situation with the PI if I remember correctly...

Re:Open? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904221)

Someone please tell me what the problem is with these GPUs and the source code always being locked up...

Re:Open? (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 10 months ago | (#44904273)

It creates a single platform product. It's like having only drivers for Windows.

Re:Open? (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 10 months ago | (#44904773)

They saw what happened to audio so video has taken drastic steps to lock it all up.

Re: Open? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904225)

But oddly stupid since Intel have open drivers for their own GPUs

Re: Open? (3, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 10 months ago | (#44904479)

But oddly stupid since Intel have open drivers for their own GPUs

It's an ugly story. In their quest to hit lower TDPs a few years back, Intel puked out a bunch of Atoms that are based on SGX540(maybe 545, I forget, doesn't matter from a driver standpoint) GPUs licensed from PowerVR. The 'GMA500', 'GMA600', 'GMA3600', and 'GMA3650' are all of this cursed race. Any of the other GMAs are Intel GPUs, which do indeed have decent drivers.

I have no idea why they went with the horribly shit Atoms for their 'open' board; but they did.

Re:Open? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904543)

You remember incorrectly [raspberrypi.org] .

Re:Open? (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 10 months ago | (#44904623)

Yes, the Pi is not open hardware either. As it stands, there is no actual open hardware.

Re:Open? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904721)

How can a machine that is built specifically to run Linux not be open?

Re:Open? (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 10 months ago | (#44904799)

Arduino

Re:Open? (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 10 months ago | (#44904957)

Well... True in a way, but I thought we where discussing Linux based platforms..

I don't think you are going to install Linux on an Arduino, even the Due is going to be pretty limited given the memory available is measured in Kilo Bytes...

Re:Open? (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 10 months ago | (#44905019)

Its the only ACTUAL open hardware i own or have seen.

Re:Open? (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 10 months ago | (#44904451)

Strange because the open driver for Intel GPU stuff on Linux stuff is pretty good... at least it works well, I mean.

Re:Open? (1)

kthreadd (1558445) | about 10 months ago | (#44904679)

It could be that it's based on PowerVR.

Re:Open? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904619)

Not only that. By being x86 it will be possible to use non-free operating systems on the computer such as Microsoft Windows. This should not be possible with free hardware which should only run free operating system. I say free instead of open because it's important to point out that the user should have freedom.

Ferarri rolls out Kia competitor (3, Insightful)

raymorris (2726007) | about 10 months ago | (#44904161)

It just costs ten times as much and lacks the same capabilities.
Other than the fact that it's a completely different class of product ...

For that price I'll wait for the PS4. :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904175)

For that price I'll wait for the PS4. :)

Competitor? How? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904191)

6 times the price, way fewer GPIO pins, the processor isn't much faster (Raspberry Pi is typically overclocked to a matching speed), it's way bigger, and so on. How does this thing compete with the RPi? About the only real advantage it has is the SATAII port, but why even bother with that instead of just having USB 3 ports? USB3 would be faster, cheaper, require fewer components on the board (no need for USB2+SATA2 when you can just have USB3), and support more devices.

Intel, what in the actual fuck are you doing?

Re:Competitor? How? (1)

Amouth (879122) | about 10 months ago | (#44904361)

For a first release out of nowhere, and available to the public not just a demo, its not bad. Give intel 2 years then lets revisit their efforts, if they haven't changed then yes it s a "what the hell" situation. But time shows that when intel puts forth effort on something very few can beat them at it.

Not really notable at all (4, Insightful)

wiredlogic (135348) | about 10 months ago | (#44904215)

It's notable that the MinnowBoard is an open hardware platform, a distinction that Arduino and BeagleBone can claim but Raspberry Pi cannot.

There's nothing exotic about a Pi. It could be recreated with sufficient motivation. The schematics are available so it wouldn't be a major challenge to reproduce them and generate a compatible board layout.

Also, the average homebrew builder targeted by these products isn't going to have the resources to assemble a board with high density surface mount packages so the value of being able to reproduce them is dubious. At $35 it is far cheaper to buy an assembled Pi and not have to worry about the time involved in acquiring parts, assembly, and verification. Even for those that have the tools to build one it would be a phenomenal waste of time at that price point. If your production volume is high enough to beat $35 then you may as well do a custom design anyway that has exactly the hardware and interfaces you need.

Re:Not really notable at all (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about 10 months ago | (#44904503)

"Open hardware" means that other people can quickly produce a fully compatible board. That's really useful for end users even if they are never going to make the board themselves.

Re:Not really notable at all (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 10 months ago | (#44904533)

I don't know if Intel would be any different; but my understanding is that the 'openness' complaints about the Pi have something to do with the fact that BCM usually won't even spit on you without an NDA and an order for a zillion trays of parts, so it's nigh-impossible to recreate the system without either a massive minimum order quantity or a special relationship with them.

As you say, production costs, for things like multilayer boards, tend to make having the PCB layout files less practically relevant to most; but you can at least buy small quantity PCB fabrication, though it'll cost you.

Re:Not really notable at all (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 10 months ago | (#44904819)

Lets not forget that the guy running the Pi is a employee of Broadcom.

"Almost" is an interesting word (1)

sehlat (180760) | about 10 months ago | (#44904247)

As in "...(almost) all the software required to run the platform is open."

That's like saying "We can stop almost all of the incoming nuclear warheads."

Re:"Almost" is an interesting word (1)

Improv (2467) | about 10 months ago | (#44904595)

Imperfect doesn't mean worthless. If someone were to create a treatment that would cure almost all the people suffering from deafness, that'd be pretty great. Doesn't mean we should stop caring about the rest, of course.

That's a misleading title if I've ever seen one. (5, Insightful)

doctor woot (2779597) | about 10 months ago | (#44904261)

The most likely use cases today aren't hobbyist applications but industrial uses, Anders said. "The BeagleBone is a very small, low-power device, and it's targeted for some very specific applications for hobbying. You know, developing small proof-of-concept designs," Anders said. "Our initial offer for the MinnowBoard is actually more targeted toward industrial automation, industrial controls. What you'll find is a lot of manufacturers, companies creating products, if they want to create an x86 design, they have to buy a third-party reference platform which is closed. They have to buy large software support packages, support contracts, and they generally don't get the right to use the existing design as it is. They have to buy additional licenses and things to create the product."

In other words, this is aimed at a completely different market than the ones looking for a raspberry pi or a beaglebone. From Rpi's own FAQ: "We want to see it being used by kids all over the world to learn programming." David Anders says it may reach price point similar to the Rpi or Beaglebone in the near future, but there's no promises. I know this sounds like nitpicking, but framing the discussion improperly with a misleading title is something Slashdot desperately needs to stop.

Re:That's a misleading title if I've ever seen one (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904383)

If they really intended for it to be used by industry for automation and industrial controls, then why does it have *fewer* GPIO pins? You would get more out of just about any other board if that's your goal.

Re:That's a misleading title if I've ever seen one (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904951)

The most likely use cases today aren't hobbyist applications but industrial uses, Anders said. "The BeagleBone is a very small, low-power device, and it's targeted for some very specific applications for hobbying. You know, developing small proof-of-concept designs," Anders said. "Our initial offer for the MinnowBoard is actually more targeted toward industrial automation, industrial controls. What you'll find is a lot of manufacturers, companies creating products, if they want to create an x86 design, they have to buy a third-party reference platform which is closed. They have to buy large software support packages, support contracts, and they generally don't get the right to use the existing design as it is. They have to buy additional licenses and things to create the product."

In other words, this is aimed at a completely different market than the ones looking for a raspberry pi or a beaglebone. From Rpi's own FAQ: "We want to see it being used by kids all over the world to learn programming." David Anders says it may reach price point similar to the Rpi or Beaglebone in the near future, but there's no promises. I know this sounds like nitpicking, but framing the discussion improperly with a misleading title is something Slashdot desperately needs to stop.

Stopping the use of misleading titles and properly framing the discussion would take all the fun and revune out of /.

The style of misleading titles and improperly framing the discussion was made very popular in "scandal rags" of the past to generate sales at the checkout counter. Now it's used by "online rags" to generate "unique views", "click-throughs", and assorted other stuff that generates revenue.

The past: /. == reasonable news
Now: /. == sensationalism

Dead in the water (1)

Millennium (2451) | about 10 months ago | (#44904315)

The open hardware is nice, but Intel totally blew it on the reasons why the RPi is popular: it's "powerful enough" while being very small and very cheap. Minnowboard's extra power isn't by enough to justify that kind of a price jump, and the rest falls squarely under YAGNI, therefore making no difference.

This is something of a pity. I'd like to see an RPi with more expandability, but I was thinking more along the lines of a single Thunderbolt port. You could do that without increasing the price or size by all that much, and it's an option Intel could have gone with. But instead they got the RPi market mixed up with the build-your-own-gaming-rig market, and that's just plain not going to end well.

Re:Dead in the water (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 10 months ago | (#44904973)

RPi is cheap, and has all the I/O you'll ever want (for moderate values of "all"). Do not forget about the I/O, because it looks like that most board manufacturers do forget.

Need Bay Trail to have advantages (3, Interesting)

bagofbeans (567926) | about 10 months ago | (#44904367)

TFA mentioned next gen will use Bay Trail core (Atom Z3770), which is available with AES-NI. Now that is suddenly very useful for servers, because the encryption is fast (but still passes through the processor).

Wow, $199 - the same price as a full laptop (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904377)

What is the benefit of Intel's offering?

http://www.zdnet.com/acers-199-c710-2856-chromebook-laptop-includes-ssd-will-be-sold-at-walmart-7000017015/

Not so long ago, Acer relied on traditional hard drives as storage for its C7 Chromebook line, even if Google emphasized that the Chrome OS and systems running it didn't require huge amounts of local storage. But the company recently released the $199 C710-2833 Chromebook at Best Buy with a 16GB solid-state drive, and now it has released the C710-2856 Chromebook with the same storage and price, and has extended its retailer footprint to Walmart.

Aside from the 16GB SSD replacing a 320GB hard drive, the C710-2856 has similar specs to an Acer Chromebook released late last year, using an Intel Celeron 847 processor, 2GB of RAM, and an 11.6-inch LED-backlit screen. The 3.05-pound system also includes a webcam and built-in 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi and features four hours of battery life. By using flash storage instead of a traditional hard drive, the C710-2856 can boot up in just 8 seconds, according to Acer.

I know the editors have to eat.. (3, Insightful)

xtal (49134) | about 10 months ago | (#44904389)

Look, I am an EE, this is not the same thing as the Pi.

It's an order of magnitude more expensive, it's complicated, it has a part count from hell, it's bigger, in fact, it's different in just about every way imaginable.

Catchpa is "pretend". Giggle.

Try harder, Intel. ARM is coming for you..

Re:I know the editors have to eat.. (1, Troll)

doctor woot (2779597) | about 10 months ago | (#44904597)

Look, I am an EE, this is not the same thing as the Pi.

Oh yeah, well I'm head of marketing, and I say whatever mouth breathing basement dwellers think is cool, well then that's what this thing is!

Intel doesn't "get it" (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904443)

$200? They miss the point.

Nope... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904445)

Way too expensive. Maybe if this was $100 I would consider getting one, just not worth it when I can get a PI for $35.

Binary blobs? (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 10 months ago | (#44904481)

Are there binary blobs? If not, I'll buy one. If so, are the hardware specifications detailed enough for people to replace the binary blobs with open source drivers? If so, I'll buy one when that happens.

Re:Binary blobs? (1)

John Bokma (834313) | about 10 months ago | (#44904869)

Yes, there are binary blobs (GMA -> PowerVR -> closed source).

Different markets (1)

advantis (622471) | about 10 months ago | (#44904515)

The Raspberry Pi's main mission is education. I have no idea where they're at with that, but the commercial aspect of selling boards to the masses is a very slick way to raise funds. Would you give them money just because you like their cause? Not so readily. Intel isn't competing in this market and most likely won't do so any time soon.

If this board had an Nvidia card that did VDPAU, instead of that GMA cruft, I may have been interested - because I need VDPAU, and it works awesomely well with an Atom CPU and 1080p H.264 video on the ION platform. Not an ION? Not interested. (to Nvidia: wink, wink)

If people actually do switch to Intel's "competitor" board in the detriment of the Raspberry Pi, it's going to hurt Raspberry Pi Foundation's goals, the people who buy Intel's stuff will be a lot more out of pocket for not much in return (can you get the same or more power if you give the $200 to Raspberry Pi and build a cluster with their boards?) I somehow don't see that happening though...

Bottom line is that if you want a Raspberry Pi you get a Raspberry Pi, and if you want a crap x86 computer - just because it is small - you get the "competing" board from Intel.

Well (1, Flamebait)

bhcompy (1877290) | about 10 months ago | (#44904525)

At least it doesn't have a ridiculous name like Raspberry Pi

Re:Well (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 10 months ago | (#44904847)

O look, someone who knows nothing about computer naming history.

interesting idea, wrong price point (3, Insightful)

ffflala (793437) | about 10 months ago | (#44904611)

$200 is simply too far out of range of the $35/$50 Pi for it to be considered a competitor.

Datedness and relative power of components aside, the open hardware platform aspect is a good selling point. Hopefully this lends an economy of scale to the product that ultimately gets it into the same ballpark.

Re:interesting idea, wrong price point (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 10 months ago | (#44904999)

It's $25/$35.

What. (2)

mewsenews (251487) | about 10 months ago | (#44904639)

How is a $200 board a raspberry pi competitor?

crapberry pi (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904645)

Why would anyone want this crapberry pi pos. F that crappy thing hahaha.

NUC (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#44904665)

Actually, this isn't even a new product category for Intel. They already have the NUC (Next Unit of Computing), remember? The DCCP847DYE [computeruniverse.net] barebone box sells for €160. Sure, you have to add RAM and mass media storage, but it's still a nicer deal. Especially when it comes with a dual-core Celeron and an Intel HD Graphics GPU.

Already done (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904705)

2009 called, they want their roboard back.

Intel, your attempt is bad and you should feel bad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904961)

Seriously, was this some birthday gift from an exec to a pee on that went something like this:

Pee on: *ahem* sir? ...uh well... you know my birthday's comin' up and I've been workin' real hard on that Raspber-uh I mean Intel Minnow, and I really think that if you gimme a chance, we cou--

Boss: *without lifting his eyes* "That'll be fine, Jackson, please shut the door on your way out."

Pee on: *whispers happy birthday to me under his breath*

Done years ago... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904969)

Intel is about 3 years late:

http://fitpc.com/ [fitpc.com]

Has it been backdoored by the NSA? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44904979)

I'll stick with the Pi.

Anything from a major US company can't help but be suspect.

Th eMinnowboard has many issues (1)

Turmoyl (958221) | about 10 months ago | (#44905145)

We were just playing with freshly unboxed Minnowboards at LinuxCon, and it was not a pleasant experience. Here are he issues we uncovered as a group:

1) The boards do not boot consistently. It sometimes requires reseating power and/or the SD card multiple times.

2) The included parts kit has a 3 Ohm resistor instead of 3k Ohm, so the included LED will not light up with what's in the box.

3) The Atom chip runs quite hot, enough for the other side of the board to be uncomfortable to touch. This is despite the huge heatsink on it. I cannot imagine this processor ever being used in a mobile, battery-powered device.

4) The GPIO ports are as flaky as they come. High one moment and low the next despite no input and no touching.

When you add in that this unit costs more than 6x what the high end Raspberry Pi does, or twice with Adafruit's whole Pi kit does, I cannot find a reason to like the Minnowboard.
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