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183 comments

It works! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44917921)

Posted from new Ubuntu.

Re:It works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918015)

So it works for you Cheltenham spooks. Yeah, unfortunately.

Here the REAL UPDATE: http://www.openbsd.org

Re:It works! (3, Funny)

turgid (580780) | about 10 months ago | (#44918051)

Too convenient. Must be a trap...

Re:It works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918103)

Here the REAL UPDATE: http://www.openbsd.org/ [openbsd.org]

"Our improved and secured version of Apache 1.3"

Yeah, that's an update.

Re:It works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918169)

What's wrong with "old", but correct code ? That you NSA&GCHQ guys cannot sneak in your latest and greatest exploits ?

I have been a strong antagonist of Windows and a supporter of Linux. But all the code "churn" of the Linux kernel is one BIG FAT OPPORTUNITY for improper understanding of the kernel and thereby for sneaking in bugs that can be used later on.

"Code stability and conservation" (so to speak) is very important from a correctness and thereby TRUST point of view. Changing code all the time means all the review work on the changed code sections has been effectively destroyed.

Re:It works! (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 10 months ago | (#44918733)

It's not shiny and has a higher number. Remember most fake computer "professionals" like higher version numbers for no real reason other than it makes them feel good.

I don't get it (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44917939)

So anonymity != privacy? Would someone care to elaborate what's going on?

Re:I don't get it (5, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | about 10 months ago | (#44917987)

The difference is that anonymity means they can still collect all your information, just not your identity. So, you're just one breech away from having all of your information spilled to them. What's more, when it comes to online services and such, the name isn't usually that important, they don't really know that my name is Sir Dragon King of the 4th order of New Castle.

Just because one is anonymous, does not mean that one has privacy, when I go out in public, I'm anonymous, but people can see everything that I do.

Re:I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918119)

More over, you will probably use your name/address/whatever in those searches which can reveal your identity. If all your data is marked by one "anonymous" ID then it is just one little step, like filter interesting IDs and save their IP addresses next time they show up. Or save them always and don't tell, there is no way others can find it out, effectively no control. "Trust us" sounds very familiar. No Ubuntu for me, thanks.

Re:I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918923)

Why would you user your name/address when searching for applications on your computer?

Ubuntu is a has-been. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918135)

I used to run 40+ Ubuntu clients. Unfortunately, Cannonical has added so many new features: Zeitgeist, Mono, Amazon monitoring, Unity, UEFI, MIR, etc. that most of the community left. Their Distrowatch ratings have been plummeting since the glory days of 10.4.

Although the desktop flavor of the month is Mint (an Ubuntu fork) right now, a lot of the crapware is removed, and much of the progress is going back to Debian. I am grateful for the investment by the Benevolent Dictator for Life (Mark Shuttleworth), and the progress that Linux has made because of Cannonical's work. That being said, there is an adage in the Linux user space:

"How do you become a millionaire selling open source software? Start out as a billionaire."

The profit model is broken for Cannonical. It is sad to see it wither.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918209)

How do you exactly know ? Maybe he sold us to the intel service of Buttfuckistan, Israel and NSA.

Maybe he is now worth 5 billions instead of 1 billion.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918219)

Umm...yeah...if you base your opinions on Distrowatch you'll notice that Mint is currently the community "favourite" and it's so heavily reliant upon Ubuntu that if were Canonical were to disappear tomorrow, I would be willing to bet the couple of Irish has-beens behind it would disappear just as quickly. As for Debian, well, when Debian decides to join the 21st century I'll be more than happy to give them a look.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (1)

Bengie (1121981) | about 10 months ago | (#44918319)

As for Debian, well, when Debian decides to join the 21st century I'll be more than happy to give them a look.

Debian Stable isn't the only version of Debian.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (1)

ssam (2723487) | about 10 months ago | (#44918367)

its the only version that get security updates.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (2, Insightful)

Mike Frett (2811077) | about 10 months ago | (#44918585)

Exactly, it's totally laughable all the fanboys telling Ubuntu users to switch to Mint. And when they get there, they have no Software Center (to Buy apps) and a truck load of Bugs added from hacking Ubuntu code. AC: Ubuntu is #3 on Distrowatch, that shows how much Minty FUD you spew. With Debian at #2 and rising. But DW isn't a real Survey, it's a click counter.

There is nothing wrong with Ubuntu, they have done more to put Linux on radar as a real alternative to Windows than any other distro. For me personally, I don't like or dislike Unity since I never tried it; I use Xubuntu. Instead of going to Mint, try the other official distros 1st, people seem to conveniently forget they can have the full Ubuntu experience without Unity. Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Kubuntu etc. Canonical isn't Microsoft, they don't force you to use one GUI.

Don't take it the wrong way, but I feel Debian is for those who don't care to ride the current Desktop/Gaming Linux wave we are in. It's for the old hats who like living in the Stone Age of yesterday. But, if you know what you're doing you can add repos to bring it up to Ubuntu standards with all that proprietary goodness. Now OpenSuse is something Ubuntu fans should keep their eye on. Great community and one-click App installs, with a possible future involving a real App store where one could actually buy things like the Ubuntu Software Center.

Now, it's just my opinion, but I think Xubuntu is the best thing since Sliced Bread. As far as something a newbie or former Windows user (like myself) can feel right at home with, Xubuntu is very popular and probably second to regular Ubuntu. If something actually happened to Xubuntu, I'd probably roll a Debian/XFCE for my usage.

Not to mention, if you want to use Steam or any new game for that matter, Developers have pretty much chosen Ubuntu as the officially supported platform. So good luck trying to convince people of your opinion that Ubuntu sucks. But people of Slashdot, please don't forget about Desura. Desura not only has more games than Steam for Linux, but the ability to download them Stand-alone and they have a few AAA titles like Freespace 2 (with FS2 Open) and Fallout along with a few others. Desura also has a good lot of free games for download, something Steam is lacking and IMO, needs to add. Again, just my opinion, but who's to say that Valve doesn't have some sinister plan to go all Android on us with Steambox; and simply using Desktop Linux (and our faces) as a stepping stone?.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 10 months ago | (#44918703)

Nothing wrong with Ubuntu, except that the people running it don't understand the concept of production code. They may have fixed a lot of the problems that they introduced with Unity, but I won't be installing another copy any time soon. I just don't trust them to refrain from shipping known broken code. I have a pair of large monitors and that unity shit just does not take large monitors into consideration. Hopefully they've fixed that in the mean time.

As far as Mint goes, it just works. I rarely have any problems with it and the distro has taken some effort to insulate itself from the stupidity that has been coming out recently. Cinammon and Mate didn't happen without cause or reason.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918945)

And yet, millions apparently can use it daily without any breakage, strange... We use Ubuntu on all our corporate desktops and servers, and I personally use it at home and on my kids laptops and have no breakage so if that is "not understanding the conecpt of production code" then I dont know what is.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44919349)

Slipping alpha code into a release is not understanding production code. Or are you too fucking stupid to understand that. Every time I upgraded Ubuntu there would be something that they broke, and usually it wouldn't show up in the release notes because nobody cared enough to do any QA.

So yes, they don't understand the concept of production code. Production code means that by the time you release a stable version, that it's actually stable. Or at least clear of obvious showstopper bugs like that mess that was Unity.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (2)

water-and-sewer (612923) | about 10 months ago | (#44919485)

As far as I'm concerned, Ubuntu's only purpose is to create the (very fine) basis for Bodhi, which is the Ubuntu platform with E17 Enlightenment instead of Gnome3 and none of that other, special, Canonical weirdness. Damn it's a great distro.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918951)

switch to Mint. And when they get there, they have no Software Center (to Buy apps)

Who wants to buy an app for a Linux desktop? You're drunk, shuttleworth. Go home.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918263)

The Glory Days were 6.06 Dapper Drake it was the only one that actually had a reasonable amount of quality control. (Of course they proceeded to totally trash it with updates / security fixes and didn't backport necessary hardware support / fixes / improvements).

They only value marketing not engineering.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (2)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#44918495)

I agree with this. From quality assurance perspective, Ubuntu has a long way to go to even touch Windows or Mac.

This means:
1) high performance
2) applications which do not crash
3) features which are fully functional
4) consistent and stable APIs

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (5, Insightful)

elashish14 (1302231) | about 10 months ago | (#44919091)

You're right on 3, but

1) Many applications run faster on Ubuntu (and Linux in general), Steam for example. I've noticed Linux on my personal machine to be much faster than the Windows machines I've had to fix.
2) I've consistently seen Windows gag on many routine operations. I/O responsiveness on Linux is far more robust than on Windows. Flash causes the entire system to grind to a halt on Windows whereas Linux is still responsive enough to execute a killall plugin-container. Libreoffice on Linux just loads, whereas on Windows it causes the system to hang for several seconds while the libraries are loaded.
4) You may be right on this one as well, but Linux has several APIs and toolkits for all sorts of things - window toolkits, networking, and so on.... The only area where you're probably right on this one is stability in the graphics space.

Don't get me wrong, I doubt that desktop GNU/Linux will ever dominate the marketplace, but it's definitely not because of the technical merits of either platform - Linux is lightyears ahead of Windows, and always will be. Linux developers focus on making a good product; Microsoft is more of a marketing/legal company in the tech industry (a la Apple, Oracle), and they focus more of their efforts on licensing, lock-in/out, and general marketing than developing their core product. People don't have to choose Windows (from a technical standpoint) generally don't but Microsoft rarely gives them a choice.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (2)

gmuslera (3436) | about 10 months ago | (#44918349)

The profit model is still adapting to the new realities. They are playing as a redhat competitor (support, server versions), in the smartphone/tablet arena (Android? Sailfish? Samsung? Those cover different areas), a market for commercial linux programs, and other services (music, cloud storage, the company is not US based so could distance itself from the NSA monitored crowd, at least not aware that GCHQ is forcing companies to put backdoors... yet) . Redhat took years to be profitable,

Several areas changed a lot this year, and they are in the right spot to take advantage of the Windows 8x debacle, countries wanting to run from anything that that have strong US influence, and the mobile explosion. Just need to have a strong position in all those arenas.

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918393)

Has been?, In some circles, it was always a never been.

Cards up front, on the Linux front I'm a Slackware man, have been for a long time, however as I've previously looked after the occasional Debian system or two, and I'm currently supporting a number of Debian servers, I've been running Debian on a couple of my own machines for several years, I never could quite see the point of Ubuntu (organ grinder, monkey?)

As part of a 'what-the-fuck-do-we-do-with-these-old-pcs-we-have-for-disposal' exercise, the boss suggested installing Ubuntu on them (they were all volume licensed XP boxes, so we had to scrub the OS) and giving them away to people free as basic internet access machines, as Ubuntu was the hyped Linux-de-jour at the time, I duly grabbed one of the machines from the pile, wiped the disk, installed whatever the current stable Ubuntu was, marvelled at all that didn't work..(borked sound, network, flaky graphics, kernel oops) ended up having that machine dual boot Debian and Ubuntu, and lo, everything worked fine under Debian.

Long story cut short, Ubuntu was dropped from consideration. The several times I've had the misfortune to use it since, in various incarnations, I've been still rather unimpressed with it (alas, unfortunately, for convenience in the short term I'll have to brave its vagaries again as I'm about to set up a LinuxCNC system..joy joy)

Re:Ubuntu is a has-been. (1)

n1ywb (555767) | about 10 months ago | (#44918851)

Wow, swap the words "ubuntu" and "debian" from that post and it would reflect the reality that _I_ live in. I'm a software engineer with a pretty extensive sys admin background. I have the technical skills to dive into the code at any level to fix any problem. What I don't have is the TIME to fsck around with rinky dink BS that doesn't pay my bills or feed my kids. I work on advancing MY part of society (scientific applications) and let the desktop developers advance theirs. Which is exactly the reason I switched to Ubuntu and later Mint. It WORKS. Out of the box. Usually mostly. I can't say I've NEVER had to dink around with it. But a LOT less than any other distro I've ever used, including but not limited to Debian, RH/Centos, Fedora, Gentoo, or any of the various BSDs, or for that matter OpenSolaris. Granted I'm talking about DESKTOP use here. For servers I still usually deploy centos.

Re:I don't get it (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 10 months ago | (#44918257)

But what do they define as "identity"?
Can they collect your address, or at least guess at it? What about your first or last name, your credit card, your SSN, your IP address. At what point do they have to stop, because one inch more is your "identity".

I imagine their stopping point is long after it would be easy to compute your identity from the information they have already gathered.

Re:I don't get it (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#44918529)

well nsa sure as fuck can match you to it.

for some reason shuttleworth just likes pretending that he isn't after the data stats on what is popular and what is not.

I mean, if they just wanted to help people, they could easily just have an extra search result sitting there that was a link to "Search this term on the internet".

but yeah, then they wouldn't be getting on stats.

And this whole debacle makes me second guess the reasoning why they made the UI in such a fashion that you're likely to need to use the quicksearch/launch/whatever a lot.

Re:I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918265)

There also is a problem with anonomity. With enough data mining, it might be possible (probably likely) that your name and other personally identifiable data will be combinded with that "anonymous" data. Voila, more of your privacy is lost.

Re:I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918373)

If there is tracking from one search query to another, you can easily out yourself by making some set of unique queries: the set of queries themselves is the (lossy) identifier.

Re:I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918437)

...right, and that's exactly how Bugzilla, abrt and many other bug reporting addons for Linux distro's work. Hell, many of them even send in a core dump, up until recently in Fedora's case not even warning that the information contained within could be "sensitive." Try as I might, I can't remember you complaining about that on Slashdot. Selective memory, perhaps?

If you actually knew as much about security as you purport, then you'd have shut your face right around speaking aloud the laugh-inducing, "one [BREACH] away from having all your information spilled to them." Oh, but I'm sure you'll say something along the lines of real security being like an "onion," with multiple layers that one has to "peel away" before they can get at what they really want. What you don't seem to understand is to the professional hacker, your onion skins are about as thin and as fragile as the real ones. EVERYONE is "one [BREACH] away" from a serious security problem because every system out there can, and will, eventually be compromised, through a so-called "zero-day exploit," through sabotage via backdoors, the list goes on.

By the way, you really ought not use the same nickname everywhere you go. For more insight into the psyche of this Slashdot troll, I suggest using a search engine and taking a look at the following:

http://forums.freebsd.org/showthread.php?t=9612 [freebsd.org]

Same gross spelling mistakes, same Linux bashing, no change whatsoever. Looks like when you're acting stupid you're neither anonymous nor private...and it gets preserved for future generations, no less. Leave a trail of stupidity all over the internet and it'll eventually lead back to your doorstep.

Re:I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918575)

What makes you think that's the GP? Plus, there wasn't anything wrong with the spelling in the post you referenced. That's an internet forum post, not a submission to a newspaper. Considering how bad the spelling is in general on the internet, I don't think that's something that draws attention.

Also considering that you're too stupid to understand what the post you replied to says, I can only imagine what you consider to be "insightful." People with an IQ over 70 realize just how precarious it is to make an OS that requires a 3rd party userland to function. Anybody who has used Red Hat in the past, knows how broken things get when the distro maintainer doesn't give a fuck about providing a proper package management system that can track dependencies.

Anybody who has used Ubuntu lately, knows how dangerous it can be when 3rd party apps get swapped in and out without thought.

Re:I don't get it (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 10 months ago | (#44918619)

Considering that your post is full of various logical fallacies and general shit, I'll take that advice with a grain of salt.

As far as that handle goes, do you really think that there aren't a ton of people that have the name H. Edwards out there? Edwards is a common name, as the AC pointed out, there were no typos of note in that particular post. There was a more conversational tone to the posting, but considering that grammar wasn't taught during the '90s, there are tons of folks out there that don't bother grammar checking their posts.

As far as trolling goes, just because you don't like what I have to say, does not mean that I'm a troll. I know the conservatives on here don't like the fact that I call bullshit and don't bother to be nice about it. But, the fact of the matter is that they rarely, if ever, have a decent response. Most of the time it's appeals to "common sense" which mysteriously involve regurgitating talking points out of place.

Re:I don't get it (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 10 months ago | (#44918551)

when I go out in public, I'm anonymous

You keep on believing that. And be sure to smile to the automated facial recognition system attached to that camera on the ( every ) street corner. ( and building, ATM, cash counter, police car, 2/3 of the people around you posting pictures on facebook..... )

Re:I don't get it (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 10 months ago | (#44918721)

I don't let people take my picture. And I used to work security, so I know how to dodge cameras without having to act suspiciously. Hint, it's not that hard.

What's more, none of those cameras are hooked into anything. In most cases the tapes are deleted within a month as it's just too expensive to have somebody sitting there recording every time that somebody comes into frame. What's more, the cameras are low resolution and designed to be on 24/7, not for high fidelity HDTV.

Yes, it's something to be concerned about, but considering how few crimes are caught on tape or solved via tape in the UK, I think we can dial back the paranoia a bit. Remember the UK has more cameras than the US does. Mostly focus on preventing it from getting that bad.

Re:I don't get it (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 10 months ago | (#44918761)

That's funny, i also have worked in that field and ours was hooked up.

I also know that all the ones on the street corner are active and being record. Not long ago we used it to identify ( using drivers record images ) of some moron that was shooting people on the sidewalk during a rather large event one evening. ( wasn't even daylight )

But if you want to think you know something and can 'dodge cameras', feel free.

Re:I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918035)

They still collect and sell your information. They just don't attach your name to it (at the current pricing level).

Re:I don't get it (4, Interesting)

Virtucon (127420) | about 10 months ago | (#44918121)

Anonymity != Privacy because we're in the age of big data [post-gazette.com] where large data sets can be cross-correlated to profile an individual. From stores that track your cell phone [foxbusiness.com] while you're shopping to big chain stores figuring out you're pregnant [nytimes.com] , big data techniques are invading your privacy in more and more ways. If you think that anonymous data collection is safe, it's still data collection and despite people's best efforts, we are of course creatures of habit and your repetitive habits allow people to build fingerprints about you. If you have enough data points, even anonymous data points, you can build a profile of an individual, their habits, their likes, their dislikes and where they go on the Internet. If you can take that profile and match it against an individual using other correlating data you've been identified. This has been proven for example in the 2007 Netflix prize competition where anonymous movie reviewers were tracked down. [utexas.edu] There's lots of examples on this and over the past few years, techniques have become much better at picking individuals out of anonymous data sets. [wired.com]
  More chilling is a study released this year [mit.edu] showed that using in analyzing anonymous cell phone tracking data, 95% of 1.5 million individuals could be identified.

What this means that as long as companies are able to collect data about you, whether tagged or anonymous, you're still being tracked somewhere and that is no guarantee that your privacy is protected. What has to happen to provide privacy is to stop all of the tracking and I don't see companies nor governments giving up that mechanism anytime soon.

Re:I don't get it (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about 10 months ago | (#44919523)

How to minimize your tracking footprint:

  • Do not do any of the following:
  • Use a cell phone
  • Use a credit card
  • Pay by check
  • Connect to the internet through any device you own
  • Have any online account of any kind (includes Slashdot)
  • Have any children
  • Hire anyone
    • And if you're extremely cautious don't do these either
    • Own a home
    • Rent a home (under your own name)
    • Have a job
    • Cash a check
    • Get married
    • Get divorced

What I'm illustrating here is in modern society people want to have it both ways. They want to be constantly connected to everyone they know and millions of people they don't through a device they carry on their person, be able to purchase anything anywhere without carrying cash, have every convenience of modern life and communications and not be tracked by anybody.

You can have it one way or the other. You can't have it every way you want it if all those ways aren't consistent.

No more privacy? (1)

codl (1703578) | about 10 months ago | (#44917947)

“No more privacy”? I think this headline is missing a word.

Re:No more privacy? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44917981)

Missing word has "issues" :)

>>Submission: The Dash is now anonymized in Ubuntu 13.10, no more privacy issues

Re:No more privacy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44919335)

It's more accurate without "issues". Ubuntu is still sending your local searches to Amazon by default. And what is it with

Probably,

Probably,

They can't tell? I thought Ubuntu was open source?

Re:No more privacy? (1)

a_n_d_e_r_s (136412) | about 10 months ago | (#44917991)

or maybe just one word to many - remove "No"

Re:No more privacy? (1)

Richy_T (111409) | about 10 months ago | (#44918005)

Or a comma?

Re:No more privacy? (1)

Nutria (679911) | about 10 months ago | (#44918053)

Or a missing letter. "Now more privacy"

And then I got my eyes tested. (5, Insightful)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | about 10 months ago | (#44917949)

typing a word in the Dash, pushes the word against (along with the locally-installed scopes) the Canonical servers, the Canonical servers decide the best results, the results are then anonymized and finally landed in the Dash.

The fuck? If you can't see any privacy implications here, you're a dilettante.

And anonymisation of results - what? If I search for "loli president bomb" then that's what's going to get me in trouble, not the results I receive.

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44917993)

The fuck? If you can't see any privacy implications here, you're a dilettante.

This statement might carry a bit more weight if your standard garden-variety Slashdot reader didn't see privacy implications in bowls of alphabet soup.

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (4, Insightful)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | about 10 months ago | (#44918029)

Can you give an example of where a standard garden-variety Slashdot reader has incorrectly read privacy implications into something?

Ignore anyone who uses either the term "New World Order" or "reptilian".

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918649)

Ignore anyone who uses either the term "New World Order" or "reptilian"

So, that would leave you in the clear then ? *ducks*

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (5, Funny)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 10 months ago | (#44918105)

Loli President Bomb is my new band name.

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918129)

If I search for "loli president bomb" then that's what's going to get me in trouble, not the results I receive

I wonder if any of the stores ubuntu's hooked up to carries My Girlfriend is the President [wikipedia.org] .

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (1)

kermidge (2221646) | about 10 months ago | (#44918201)

I think that I'll hold off on a verdict until I read something written by someone who understands the steps involved and has the English to describe them.

Whatever the case I would expect that sending a search out from one's machine can be turned off, just as can be done now. If one is truly exercised or doesn't trust his favorite network monitoring tool, that bit of scope can be blocked or removed.

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (1, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 10 months ago | (#44918277)

If I search for "loli president bomb" then that's what's going to get me in trouble, not the results I receive.

As if the user-agent string wouldn't land you on the watchlist. That wasn't a joke [prisonplanet.com] by the way. And as far as the results you receive, you probably shouldn't trust those either [techdirt.com] . But let's set aside your awesome new indy band name Loli: President Bomb and focus on the real issue here: The gullibility of free software consumers. They are exactly as gullible as Windows and Macintosh users, it would seem: They're trusting an abstract organization that is continuing to collect personally-identifiable information, simply because said organization upon being caught doing so, has said "oops! Our bad. We'll anonymize the data now." And these people should know better [arstechnica.com] than to believe such claims.

Perhaps it is a sign of how far Linux has come into the mainstream then: It's become the microbrew of the IT world. All these new distributions, the promise of being trendy, geeky, and cool... and yet, suspiciously lacking in all of the things that made "Free as in freedom, not free as in beer" so appealing to the much smaller community of non-hipsters that was here before. Linux has finally made it to the big time: It's become "hip". And no surprise...Ubuntu, like many other major distributions, sees the chance at monetization and is taking it. Oh, I know... I'll get modbombed again for suggesting that the pure and noble Linux isn't like all the other operating systems out there... but then, wasn't that the goal all along? To create an alternative to closed source? Mission: Accomplished. Too bad success isn't what they thought it would look like.

Re: And then I got my eyes tested. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918453)

Um, that is in fact a joke. It's a satirical, not a factual article. Dumbass

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918611)

If I search for "loli president bomb" then that's what's going to get me in trouble, not the results I receive.

As if the user-agent string wouldn't land you on the watchlist. That wasn't a joke [prisonplanet.com] by the way.

No, it wasn't a "joke" as such. Emphasis added for your convenience:

wvoutlaw2002:
http://darthchaosofrspw.wordpress.com/2009/06/28/satire-aftermath-of-false-flag-cyberattack-gives-rise-to-new-dhs-memo-which-adds-linux-users-free-software-advocates-to-expanding-list-of-extremists/

Now satire's not quite the same as a joke, to be sure, but your use of the "not a joke" idiom to suggest it's factual shows you're either really stupid (and believe it to be a factual account) or really disingenuous (and are trying to induce others to believe it is a factual account); either way, GTFO my /., ok?

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (2)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 10 months ago | (#44918717)

Now satire's not quite the same as a joke, to be sure, but your use of the "not a joke" idiom to suggest it's factual shows you're either really stupid (and believe it to be a factual account) or really disingenuous (and are trying to induce others to believe it is a factual account); either way, GTFO my /., ok?

Well, it's not your slashdot. You're an AC. And no, I'm not trying to induce others to believe anything... they probably believe things far weirder than anything I could come up with, so what's the point? :)

But that said, it is well-known that Linux developers tend to be more marxist in their thinking and entertain peculiar or idiosyncratic political beliefs. Those genuinely are things that the FBI puts people on watch lists for. And there is a visible minority of programmers that collect guns, go hiking, and engage in other recreational activities viewed with suspicion by the government. It's not a stretch to say that running Linux could score you points on some whack government algorithm; They've done more to people for less.

The problem with dealing with political or religious extremism is that it is very hard to tell the difference between satire and factual accounts because extremist thinking is so very often irrational and aggressive. And people who claim to fight extremists very often fall into the same trap: "If they're willing to do anything for their cause, we have to too!"

So... feel like logging in and finding out what people here really think of your opinions, or is it that you already know and that's why you post as AC?

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (1)

xatr0z (633279) | about 10 months ago | (#44918283)

Context: This only happens if you type in a word in the textbox "SEARCH YOUR COMPUTER AND ONLINE SOURCES". So yes, then it is going to search online sources. If you don't want this at all then you can disable it, or just remove amazon etc.
I think that this possibility to configure your own online and local sources is an huge improvement compared to what people otherwise would do (search google if you want a recipe, something on wikipedia, name of an artist or do an calculation).

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (1)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | about 10 months ago | (#44918405)

As long as it's disabled by default, brings no revenue to the developer (so there's no conflict of interest), and can only be enabled by explicit installation of client software and acknowledgement of an enumeration of clearly worded warnings, it might be ok.

Re:And then I got my eyes tested. (1)

Arker (91948) | about 10 months ago | (#44918535)

Yeah, this is nonsense, they're still pushing local searches out across the internet without so much as a by-your-leave. No one with a clue will be mollified by it. But I guess no one with a clue would be caught dead using Ubuntu either, so maybe they dont care.

No more privacy = anonymous?? (3, Insightful)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 10 months ago | (#44917965)

Care to rephrase that, smitty?

And this is why we don't use Ubuntu (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44917973)

Sell our data without out permission--even anonymously--and you'll never be used again. Try gNewSense, it's FSF supported.

Re:And this is why we don't use Ubuntu (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 10 months ago | (#44918979)

and have no hardware support, no codex's, and only fsf approved code I think debian or mint would be a better choice if your going to jump ditros. I personally just rip out all of the unity crap out of ubuntu (all of the privacy leacking bloats that goes with it.) and install either a mate or cinnamon DE.

Canonical Probably a GCHQ Front (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918003)

How does the guy make money while employing dozens of people ? Easy, he sells us, his users to GCHQ/NSA.

I will now remove Ubuntu from my computer and install OpenBSD. Sorry, but I don't trust you Mr Shuttleworth. Neither do I trust Linus Torvalds who loves the moneyz of Merika so much he voluntarily exposes himself to lawless intel agencies.

Re:Canonical Probably a GCHQ Front (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918215)

Hi, Theo!

Piss Poor Submission (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918019)

There may, or may not, be a story here. But, the submission is from someone who seems to not have mastered the English language, in which it is written, and therefore it makes little or no sense at all. The submisison is completely worthless.

Whether or not Ubuntu has restored any semblance of privacy to the desktop search remains an exercise for the reader. But, I can't be bothered. Ubuntu has broken my trust and I won't be arsed enough to see if they have chosen to change, a little bit, for now. There are still several Linux distributions that still lack the phone home and spyware trojans that Ubuntu has chosen to use.

Re:Piss Poor Submission (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918677)

I agree-what a load of rubbish. This "article" and Ubuntu as well.

Don't be a goddamn victim, you can decide to stop the abuse. Vote with your feet. There are plenty of distros. Ubuntu is dead.

Looking forward (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918023)

...to the day Ubuntu withers away and dies.

No respect for the user base. I don't like playing cattle to a dictator for some reason, I know I should see someone about that... I hate apple for the same reason.

It's funny MS is the least invasive in this but not by their choice of course.

Anyone know a polished linux distribution that could hold the candle after Ubuntu croaks in a weird accident involving barbed sex toys (fingers crossed)?

Yes, I am bitter.

Re:Looking forward (0)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 10 months ago | (#44918071)

"Anyone know a polished linux distribution that could hold the candle after Ubuntu croaks "

I don't know a comparable one, but I do know at least two that are far [mandriva.com] , far [mageia.org] better.

Re:Looking forward (2)

0123456 (636235) | about 10 months ago | (#44918079)

Anyone know a polished linux distribution that could hold the candle after Ubuntu croaks in a weird accident involving barbed sex toys (fingers crossed)?

Mint seems the best option at the moment, but since it's basically Ubuntu with the suck removed, it will probably go away if Ubuntu does.

Re:Looking forward (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918261)

Debian is Ubuntu before the suck is added in. Mint should base itself on the original instead.

Re:Looking forward (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 10 months ago | (#44918281)

Debian is Ubuntu before the suck is added in. Mint should base itself on the original instead.

Yeah, that's probably a good option if they have the manpower to switch Mint over.

Re:Looking forward (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918537)

You mean like Linux Mint Debian Edition? http://www.linuxmint.com/download_lmde.php

Re:Looking forward (1)

shellster_dude (1261444) | about 10 months ago | (#44918525)

Um...Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE)???

Re:Looking forward (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44919375)

By "the suck" you mean upgradability?

Chose Something ELSE (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918037)

Here is a starting point:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Free_software_operating_systems

We have to distrust Linus Torvalds and certainly Mr Shuttleworth. Why didn't Linus sternly condemn the NSA shite ? Because deep down he's OK with it or he shits bricks. Why did he move to America ? To get into a golden cage ?

I am from Nigeria and I will use anything not made in America.

Re:Chose Something ELSE (2)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#44918087)

Why did he move to America ? To get into a golden cage ?

Look man. You know whats Helsinki like in the winter? http://www.nieppi.com/n/wp-content/gallery/viikonkuvat-2006/orig_2006_04.jpg [nieppi.com]

and taxes, of course.

have fun trying to find products that have nothing made in america or designed in america..

Re:Chose Something ELSE (4, Funny)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 10 months ago | (#44918229)

I am from Nigeria and I will use anything not made in America.

Except for Slashdot?

Re:Chose Something ELSE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918445)

I am from Nigeria and I will use anything not made in America.

Do you spend all week-end in a frenetic pentecostal church, whipped up into a deluded frenzy of adrenaline and endorphins by a charismatic and manipulative pastor, giving away all your money?

You probably think the earth is 6000 years old and that Adam and Eve were made of spare ribs. You're every bit as bad as the Islamo-facists. Hey, why don't you go and pick a fight with them? Then you'll all kill each other and the rest of us can have our world back.

Cretin.

Re:Chose Something ELSE (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44919509)

That's an awful lot of words to call the guy a nigger man...

Secure? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918165)

Its good to know their system now protects the origin of request via Tor, and protects you from identifying your self based on the search content by searching and encrypted copy of their data with your encrypted query using Homomorphic encryption. Its too bad that its still vulnerable though, due to traffic pattern analysis, and measurement of result volumes. Its would just wreck the user experience if they employed proper packet ageing like I2P is planning.

Who thought it was a good idea to pipe all your local searches out to a third party? Informing Google about all my web searches can be easily avoided when I care (than you Tor and other search engines). This is like letting Google know what you are searching for in your email or something. Its horrible (oh shit....). Actually, what Ubuntu is doing here is almost a Chrome OS level of bad privacy. As long as people are aware of this, and use it accordingly, thats fine, I guess.

Next time I update my linux install, I'm going from Ubuntu 12.4 -> something thats not spyware (Aka, not Ubuntu 12.10+). I wish Genode was ready for general users. For now, I have my Tails install for when I care.

Click-biting (1)

dugancent (2616577) | about 10 months ago | (#44918221)

This is good news on it's own without adding the troll Richard Stallman to summary, but clicks=money I suppose.

Re:Click-biting (1)

dugancent (2616577) | about 10 months ago | (#44918285)

Correction: baiting, not biting

Re:Click-biting (1)

Tranzistors (1180307) | about 10 months ago | (#44918507)

Since when is RMS considered a troll?

It's anonymising for third-party images only (2)

KNicolson (147698) | about 10 months ago | (#44918247)

It's a bit of a non-story in my opinion, as I think most people worry about Ubuntu and their direct partners slurping all their search info, whereas this "news" is that they now insert an anonymiser into image URLs [google.com] so that random web site Z doesn't pick up your IP address when your computer tries to render an image.

Re:It's anonymising for third-party images only (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918685)

It's a bit of a non-story in my opinion, as I think most people worry about Ubuntu and their direct partners slurping all their search info, whereas this "news" is that they now insert an anonymiser into image URLs [google.com] so that random web site Z doesn't pick up your IP address when your computer tries to render an image.

Well, if that's what it is, I'd say it's actually a good thing, because people with their brains on are already concerned about "Ubuntu [or rather, Canonical] and their direct partners slurping all their search info", because that's obviously possible; people get to make a semi-informed decision on that. But people who've made the decision to trust Ubuntu, including trusting them to vet their partners on the user's behalf (hah!), might not realize that any images in the results, even results they don't click on, are sending their IP address to the server hosting the image, so blocking that information leak (with an image proxy provided by the people who you're already implicitly trusting) is preventing people from unknowing privacy exposure, and that's always a good thing.

LMDE and prism-break. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918369)

I switched to Linux Mint Debian Edition. I had to learn how to partition my hard drive, so it takes a bit more effort, but it's great. I recommend looking at eff.org's prism-break site; it has some great suggestions on secure alternatives. Duckduckgo is now my default search engine.

Re:LMDE and prism-break. (4, Funny)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#44918607)

I switched to Linux Mint Debian Edition.

It's like the vegetarian joke...

Q: How do you know if there is a Linux Mint user at a dinner table?
A: Don't worry, he will tell you about it

Hey, you can turn this off (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918423)

Hit the super (Windows) key. Type "privacy". Choose the component from settings. Turn off the online results.

HTH.

Can it be eliminated? (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 10 months ago | (#44918429)

I'm not familiar with this "Dash" thing. Can't it just be taken out when you install the new Ubuntu?

If it's something that you have to install when you install Ubuntu, then Canonical has made a big mistake.

Re:Can it be eliminated? (1)

geminidomino (614729) | about 10 months ago | (#44918509)

Yeah.

That's part of the reason I stopped using Ubuntu. Now every install has me spending more time removing bullshit than it took me to do the install itself. resolvconf (especially on servers? WTF), dash, social networking shit, some kind of file indexer that wants net access for some reason...

Re:Can it be eliminated? (3, Informative)

iggymanz (596061) | about 10 months ago | (#44918519)

Yes, use Linux Mint, it's Ubuntu without the suck

Re:Can it be eliminated? (2)

Urkki (668283) | about 10 months ago | (#44918565)

I'm not familiar with this "Dash" thing. Can't it just be taken out when you install the new Ubuntu?

Easiest is to install Kubuntu, Xubuntu or Lubuntu instead of the "main" distro.

is it that fucking hard... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918545)

to TURN OFF THE FEATURES by default? and not harass people at install time to turn 'em on, either.... better yet, just get rid of the whole fucking thing. who the fuck wanted that shit in the first place? certainly not us *users*.

sticking with the real debian.. highly recommend everyone else do the same.

Eh... (2, Interesting)

Lumpy (12016) | about 10 months ago | (#44918715)

Smart users rip it out ASAP. Smarter users dont use ubuntu and use Mint or another version where they actually care about the user.

Re:Eh... (1)

doubletalk (3009215) | about 10 months ago | (#44919145)

First, I would choose Ubuntu over any other desktop "out-of-the-box" distributions because Canonical with Ubuntu is the only one that is trying a new design. I just don't understand how come Microsoft came out with Metro but all Linux distributions are sticking with the old desktop metaphor, pathetic.

Second, Canonical is a small company compared to Microsoft and Google. Still, it is playing their game on the same field. They need to find ways to add value to their "product" so other companies notice them and want to partner with them. Good things about partnership is that more and more hardware will come with Ubuntu pre-installed and we as users, could get a free amazon gift card if we use Ubuntu, things like that (these are examples).

Re:Eh... (1)

msobkow (48369) | about 10 months ago | (#44919279)

You mean all the people who use a desktop other than Unity.

Which, from what I've seen, is 99% of the population.

fris7 stop (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44918849)

a r3lativelY

its not anonymous (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44919003)

simply put, its not anonymous. http://nathanheafner.com/home/2013/09/22/ubuntu-dash-search-is-not-anonymous/

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