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Boot To Zork

Unknown Lamer posted about 10 months ago | from the you-have-been-eaten-by-a-grue dept.

Classic Games (Games) 106

Seemingly to inflict more suffering upon himself, Matthew Garrett (lord of getting things to boot using EFI) decided that booting directly into Zork would be cool. Quoting his weblog entry: "So, Frotz seemed like the natural choice when this happened. But despite having a set of functionality that makes it look much more like an OS than a boot environment, UEFI doesn't actually expose a standard C library. The EFI Application Development Kit solves this particular design decision. Porting Frotz ended up involving far more fixing up of Frotz bugs that tripped up -Werror than anything else. One note, though - make sure you include DevShell in the list of required packages at build time, otherwise file i/o will mysteriously fail." Grab the code, assuming you have a copy of Zork (or any other Z-machine game, as long as you name it ZORK1.DAT, I think).

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Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932401)

What is this word salad?

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932471)

I thought I would understand it when I went to read the tweet linked in the summary. I failed.

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932907)

You RTFA and paid the price. Now get out.

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (4, Funny)

Lumpy (12016) | about 10 months ago | (#44934431)

And he was eaten by a Grue.

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (1)

turgid (580780) | about 10 months ago | (#44940519)

I thought I would understand it when I went to read the tweet linked in the summary.

Tweets contain information?

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (1)

St.Creed (853824) | about 10 months ago | (#44940535)

Black Holes contain information. So I'm sure tweets do too.

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (1)

asylumx (881307) | about 10 months ago | (#44932757)

I don't know, but if this same guy wrote the hack instructions then nobody will ever figure it out.

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44933517)

Is it really that difficult? Zork is a text adventure game, where it says "You are in a room with an open door to the west. There is a ball here." and you type "go west" or "get ball." Booting is what happens when a computer starts up. So, boot to Zork is starting a computer and have it start playing a text adventure game instead of Windows or Linux.

there, GIANT FUCKING MYSTERY SOLVED. jesus

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (2)

TWX (665546) | about 10 months ago | (#44933601)

Heh. I'm waiting for someone to compile it for the Cisco platform... I'd love to play Zork via 9600 baud serial connection on a $100,000 core router... to the exclusion of doing any actual routing, of course...

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44933843)

Yeah, I don't get why GP had problems understanding it, either. I'm tired, sick, and at work (the worst of the three) and I still had no problems understanding it.

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (0)

fast turtle (1118037) | about 10 months ago | (#44934377)

We Know Jesus hung on the cross for several days - he was then interned into a grave - when people went to check the grave, his body was missing. Is Jesus Alive or Dead? Schrodinger's Jesus is the Question.

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44935895)

We Know Jesus hung on the cross for several days

no, less than a day

he was then interned into a grave

not a grave, a tomb

Schrodinger's Jesus is the Question.

You're drunk, troll. Go home. The only inconsistent unknown is whether he was in there 3 days, or whether he left on the 3rd day. Jesus died, and though the body is resurrected, identities can change. The Bible isn't so much what the haters say it is... in fact, they couldn't be more wrong. Its a puzzle, and its solvable. I'm wondering why cryptologists haven't figured it out yet, when fools and the norms have no problem with its endless reiteration.

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44936453)

Jesus died, and though the body is resurrected, identities can change.

Are you saying that Jesus was a Timelord?

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 10 months ago | (#44937815)

Shh... don't give the plot away for next season!

Although a big difference is that witnesses attested to seeing scars on him inflicted prior to regeneration. Others stated that he said that he shouldn't be touched until regeneration was complete, and that they didn't recognize him at first, until they heard his voice (so outward appearance changed, but vocal chords stayed the same?).

The other bit that's debated of course, is how much, if any, of the "bible" (assuming KJV-style or derivatives here) was written by who it says it's written by, how much of it was written later, how much is literal, and what the actual purpose was for each of the "books" to be written in the first place, as well as the intention for grouping those specific works together as they were. You'll find as many conclusions as you will possibilities, some founded in research, some in faith, some in lore, and some in knee-jerk "common sense" reaction.

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44935075)

Would it have been that difficult to include that in the summary?

there, GIANT FUCKING MYSTERY AVOIDED. jesus

Re:Anyone else feel like they're having a stroke? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 10 months ago | (#44940275)

Back in them good old days before Hard Drives were common, people used software via Floppy Disk.

Common on the Apple PC was to put your program disk in, turn on your computer and the program will Run.
Common for the IBM PC was you put in your DOS Disk in. You booted DOS, take that disk out and put in your program disk and typed in the exe program to run. Once the program was done it would bring you to the DOS prompt (however if the program used too much memory, you may need to put your DOS disk back in to get to the prompt)
Common for the Commodore it would bring you to a Basic prompt you would put your floppy disk in and do a LOAD "*",8,1 then a RUN

Zork was odd that it didn't need an OS. so for the PC you just put the disk in and it booted and ran the program. For the most part your drive sounded like you had bad sectors.

Not the grue! (5, Funny)

dreamchaser (49529) | about 10 months ago | (#44932407)

It is pitch black. You are likely to be eaten by a grue.

Re:Not the grue! (5, Funny)

RivenAleem (1590553) | about 10 months ago | (#44932515)

Grue Screen of Death

Re:Not the grue! (1)

SQLGuru (980662) | about 10 months ago | (#44933411)

I have mod points, but you're already at +5 Funny. But this comment is deserving of a +6 Funnier.

Re:Not the grue! (1)

ferrisoxide.com (1935296) | about 10 months ago | (#44934387)

I second this. You sir, are deserving of many fine beverages.

Re:Not the grue! (1)

mrbester (200927) | about 10 months ago | (#44932587)

Would that be when you have no background processes running?

Re:Not the grue! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932923)

You are likely to be eaten by a GRUB.

Re:Not the grue! (1)

fast turtle (1118037) | about 10 months ago | (#44934403)

Well Played AC

now have to clean my screen

Re:Not the grue! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44935333)

===ZorkOS v.1.0===
You are in a filesystem of twisty symbolic links:#>_

Re:Not the grue! (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 10 months ago | (#44937573)

Only if you're a woman; I ain't gay.

Question (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932411)

So fucking what.

Re:Question (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932569)

So fucking what.

Should be voted 5, Insightful

Re:Question (5, Funny)

mwvdlee (775178) | about 10 months ago | (#44932617)

Because he can.
And, more importantly, because you can't.

Re:Question (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932787)

Funny? No, not really. And the question stands, so what? And fuck you too, by the way.

Re:Question (-1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 10 months ago | (#44933141)

No seriously.
This is basically just putting Zork in your start-up directory in window.

Re:Question (1)

omnichad (1198475) | about 10 months ago | (#44934019)

Not really. It's running entirely sans-OS.

Re:Question (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 10 months ago | (#44936443)

You cannot run without a OS, something has to manage the hardware and execute programs. And that thing that does that (here is a hint, Zork is not doing this) is the OS.

Re:Question (1)

omnichad (1198475) | about 10 months ago | (#44936677)

And those functions not provided by EFI are being added to the binary. EFI is not an OS, it's more like a BIOS. Unless you're going to be extremely loose with definitions.

Re:Question (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 10 months ago | (#44939253)

By any and all definitions, as far as I am aware.
"Noun
The software that supports a computer's basic functions, such as scheduling tasks, executing applications, and controlling peripherals."
The the BIOS executes at least one program (normally THE OS, in this instance Zork), and controls a computers basic functions and peripherals (input/output), as well as abstracting and standardizing the use of the hardware.

Re:Question (1)

omnichad (1198475) | about 10 months ago | (#44939545)

It seems like you're saying in your definition that Zork takes the role of the OS. That's what I said.

Re:Question (1)

khellendros1984 (792761) | about 10 months ago | (#44939581)

You *can* run without an OS. For example, consider older computers where the software is usually run directly on the hardware. "Drivers" for the hardware aren't always separate enough to be identified (register manipulations being directly coded in the binary), there isn't necessarily a file system implemented, there's no process scheduling, no memory management beyond directly accessing areas of the memory map, etc. Basically, you can run a program that doesn't have any of the common features of an OS. Granted, I don't know the details of this specific program, but the possibility exists that it's just running on the bare hardware.

As an example, this [uiuc.edu] "OS" just prints out "Hello world" by writing directly to the video hardware on a PC. I wouldn't really call it an "OS", though, even though it can run as the sole software on a modern computer.

Re:Question (2)

dns_server (696283) | about 10 months ago | (#44934577)

This is not running an operating system, this is in efi the replacement to your bios.
EFI can do a lot of stuff, there is a text editor, interactive shell and python interpreter so it is something that you can write programs in not just operating system boot loaders.

I have installed this as a boot entry on my laptop and it does boot directly to zork in no time

Re:Question (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 10 months ago | (#44936431)

So the EFI in this case is an OS.
Zork cannot manage hardware, nor execute programs, and since the EFI is doing this is is just a slimmed down OS.

Re:Question (1)

Fantasio (800086) | about 10 months ago | (#44933881)

Because he can. And, more importantly, because you can't.

I'd like to mod up the parent +5 Funny and +5 Insightful !

It's Garrett (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932417)

You only had to copy-paste correctly, not even type it.

Text based adventure as a boot option? (2, Insightful)

bejiitas_wrath (825021) | about 10 months ago | (#44932419)

Someone do this, I loved playing the text-based adventure games as a kid. Someone should bring these back. They had amazing graphics as you saw the world in your head. Nothing like the 1080p games they make now. But Zork is a classic and the ability to play it now is incredible. Pity that graphics now is the selling point instead of gameplay and story development.

Interactive Fiction is very alive (4, Informative)

dwheeler (321049) | about 10 months ago | (#44932491)

These games are now typically called "Interactive Fiction"; there are LOTS of them, and they are still being developed. It's a small community, but active. Two good post-Infocom games are Bronze (by Emily Short) and Anchorhead (by Michael Gentry).

More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interactive_fiction [wikipedia.org]

A gentle intro: http://emshort.wordpress.com/how-to-play/ [wordpress.com]

Re:Interactive Fiction is very alive (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932765)

Also, Spider and Web by Andrew Plotkin. ifdb.tads.org is a good site to browse for IF. I'd suggest the Gargoyle interpretor, as it runs fine on Windows and Linux, looks quite nice, and is skinnable.
And try out Olivia's Orphanorium. Not quite straight IF, but it's hilarious and quite an interesting blend of IF and time-management sim.

Re:Interactive Fiction is very alive (1)

DarkTempes (822722) | about 10 months ago | (#44936691)

I've always enjoyed that rockpapershotgun (game review/news site) has an error page http://rockpapershotgun.com/503test that is an interactive fiction game made using https://code.google.com/p/parchment/

Re:Text based adventure as a boot option? (2)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#44932499)

there's plenty of "interactive fiction" nowadays.

pretty much nobody gives a shit about it though. and then there's plenty of indie games and jap rgp's where the graphics are just a sideline.

Re:Text based adventure as a boot option? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932651)

"there's plenty of "interactive fiction" nowadays."

The economy, for one.

Re:Text based adventure as a boot option? (3, Interesting)

mendax (114116) | about 10 months ago | (#44932501)

I agree. The text-based adventure games are much more fun. The cyberspace equivalent of the Theater of the Mind.

I loved the Fortran-based MIT Adventure. I still have the source code of the version ported to Control Data Cyber mainframes that was floating around the lower-tier (not UC) California state universities, all of whom had Cybers, in the 1980's. I'll probably port it to C one of these days for shits and giggles one of these days so I can relive my undergrad days a bit.

Re:Text based adventure as a boot option? (4, Funny)

Joce640k (829181) | about 10 months ago | (#44932589)

Someone do this, I loved playing the text-based adventure games as a kid. Someone should bring these back.

If only there was a way to search for things like that on the Internet...

Re:Text based adventure as a boot option? (4, Funny)

hawkinspeter (831501) | about 10 months ago | (#44932657)

If you type 'bing' into the google, you get taken to a site that can search for things like that.

The synonym problem (1)

tepples (727027) | about 10 months ago | (#44933073)

The problem with searching the web for existence (or lack thereof) of a subject is that if the community has changed to a different synonym for the topic, you might end up misled by the dearth of recent results from searching on the term that is no longer in fashion. What used to be "Doom clones" are now first-person shooters, "DOTA clones" are now MOBAs, and "text adventures" are now interactive fiction. The synonym problem [academia.edu] is the web's version of guess the verb [tvtropes.org] .

Re:The synonym problem (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 10 months ago | (#44934315)

I defy you to type the name of any game you used to enjoy into the search box and come up blank...

Re:The synonym problem (1)

davewoods (2450314) | about 10 months ago | (#44938591)

Dang it, a TVTropes link. I should have checked before I clicked... Now i am 8 tabs deep into world-ending monsters and Eldritch Horrors.

Re:Text based adventure as a boot option? (1)

ferrisoxide.com (1935296) | about 10 months ago | (#44934069)

1080p will never match the resolution of your imagination.

Re:Text based adventure as a boot option? (1)

Belial6 (794905) | about 10 months ago | (#44936971)

It is a poor imagination that cannot imagine 1080p, which would be a perfect match.

Re:Text based adventure as a boot option? (2)

badboy_tw2002 (524611) | about 10 months ago | (#44937951)

"Pity that graphics now is the selling point instead of gameplay and story development."

Oh that old chestnut, whheeeeeeee... Here's some facts:

#1) Things weren't as great as you remember them
#2) There were always shit products that focused on graphics. There were always fantastic games that focused on graphics. Here's one that people love: Doom. Yet its one of the all time best ever games, and an immediate classic. Why? Graphics.
#3) There are many many games that have great stories, intriguing gameplay, etc. You don't play any of them. You haven't even looked for them. Your contact with gaming is most likely commercials or occasionally glancing at what your kids are playing.

True story: when the second computer game ever was completed, it was shown to the one guy that played the first game, and he complained about the focus on graphics and the lack of story.

Like in the old days. (5, Informative)

cheetah_spottycat (106624) | about 10 months ago | (#44932427)

I think it's only fitting, keeping in mind, that in the old Amiga/Atari days, booting directly into your games was an absolutely normal thing to do - hardware resources were scarce, and the last thing you wanted was sharing RAM and precious CPU cycles with an OS running in the background.

Re:Like in the old days. (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | about 10 months ago | (#44932513)

It helped that you had VERY limited set of possible configurations.

Re:Like in the old days. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44933699)

Yes, the Amiga hardware was fairly standard and games generally "hit the hardware" directly (rather than through the OS and drivers). This improved performance, back when even the relatively powerful (compared to its 8-bit predecessors) Amiga didn't have processor cycles to burn. Unfortunately, it meant that even minor changes to the spec, like the small improvements to the original chip set in the A500 Plus (which I owned) broke a number of games.

Re:Like in the old days. (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 10 months ago | (#44932745)

I think it's only fitting, keeping in mind, that in the old Amiga/Atari days, booting directly into your games was an absolutely normal thing to do - hardware resources were scarce, and the last thing you wanted was sharing RAM and precious CPU cycles with an OS running in the background.

Actually it was because of copy protection we booted from floppies.

Re:Like in the old days. (1)

i.r.id10t (595143) | about 10 months ago | (#44932829)

Or a total lack of a hard drive.....

Re:Like in the old days. (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 10 months ago | (#44933125)

Or a total lack of a hard drive.....

Even with harddrives there were few games that let you install and run from it. Granted there was hacks to get around that for a lot of games, it wasn't built into games until the end side of the Amiga's life. and even then usually only for games that came on a large amount of disks.

Re:Like in the old days. (2)

Big Hairy Ian (1155547) | about 10 months ago | (#44932847)

And even booting from floppy most of the OS was still there it just didn't execute the presentation layer for instance on the Atari ST TOS was available as were all the other OS level API's.

Re:Like in the old days. (0)

qubezz (520511) | about 10 months ago | (#44938611)

And even booting from floppy most of the OS was still there it just didn't execute the presentation layer for instance on the Atari ST TOS was available as were all the other OS level API's.

Star Trek: The Original Series was available on the Atari, as were all the other OS-level APIs? Wow!

Re:Like in the old days. (3, Informative)

operagost (62405) | about 10 months ago | (#44935821)

Heck, we had to do this with PCs in the late 80s through the mid 90s before OS/2 and Windows 95. People had DOS boot menus in autoexec.bat so they could choose to boot up with maximum conventional memory, or to emulate EMS in XMS for Lucasarts games. I loved OS/2 because, while the Windows 3.x people had to exit and maybe reboot to play a game, I could fire it up from my desktop for a quick break of X-Wing and quit right back to the paper I was working on. That was amazing back then... unless you had an Amiga. But then, Amigas didn't have memory protection, so you'd better remember to save the paper first.

An argument as to whether UEFI is a good idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932457)

Sounds like over-design yet having to patch around under-utility to me. As in, "we herd u liek OSes..." etc.

I still think something like OpenBOOT would've saved a lot of masochism here. Opinions? Discuss.

Actually, not too terrible... (1)

Junta (36770) | about 10 months ago | (#44932527)

Of those actually mucking about in implementations, the most common complaint I've heard is that vendor implementation are too inconsistent. I cannot imagine the same people making that call have had experience dealing with x86 BIOS, which is a landmine of inconsistency vendor to vendor. Should an option rom hookn int18? will hooking int19 be catastrophic? Does the vendor implement BBS or not? How should you leave the stack on exit to assure that subsequent boot devices are not hosed?

I'm not happy with everything in UEFI (mostly because it follows a lot of microsoft design guidance (executable format, ucs-2, microsoft function calling conventions), but the ability to associate functions with existing devices is exceptionally handy. For example in network device world, in BIOS the network card vendor would have to provide the full PXE implementation up to dhcp and tftp. In UEFI, the network card vendor is best off publishing only the low level interface, and then code from other people can hook ip stacks that are independent of the network hardware. It means that switching network vendors leads to less inconsistency in network boot behavior.

Another thing that's nice is the standardized interface between OS and firmware. The EFI variable space is nice. It falls short though of adequately supporting configuration, meaning it retains proprietary tools to configure firmware from OS that vary vendor to vendor.

Re:Actually, not too terrible... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44933089)

So you're saying this is a slightly better BIOS, with lots of gratuitous redmondian bikeshedding thrown in.

How is that better than using something existing like, uhm, whatwasitagain, oh yes, something with an actual working-as-in-tested-and-deployed standard like OpenBOOT? Did redmond really have to reinvent the wheel, only slightly better than the previous take? Which, as you note, was pretty freakin' bad. Why go for having all those not-veryinteroperable vendors implement an all-singing-all-dancing minor improvement instead of adapting the boring working existing codebase with matching existing standard out there? Just because of NIH and teh shiny!!1!!eleventy!, maybe?

Because it's the pc, and peecees are expected to be inferior? Is that what you're saying?

Man, where's the coreboot bunch when you need'em? Where's the "innovation" dollars and euros to give us a working interoperable grassroots boot environment? For the big companies clearly cannot be trusted. Again.

Never mind the Steambox ... (2)

SirGarlon (845873) | about 10 months ago | (#44932469)

Never mind the Steambox, here comes the Zorkbox!

For bonus points, someone do this on a Raspberry Pi. :-)

Re:Never mind the Steambox ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932625)

RPi doesn't have EFI, so it would be rather trivial..

Re:Never mind the Steambox ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932879)

Imagine a Beowulf cluster of these!

Re:Never mind the Steambox ... (1)

BobNET (119675) | about 10 months ago | (#44933269)

For bonus points, someone do this on a Raspberry Pi. :-)

One of the first things I did with my Pi was hook it up to a VT101 terminal and run Colossal Cave Adventure and Dungeon (the free version of Zork) on it. But there was still a modern Linux (or at least as modern as SlackwareARM gets) running underneath of them, so it's nowhere near as interesting as booting directly into the game. :-P

Re:Never mind the Steambox ... (1)

SirGarlon (845873) | about 10 months ago | (#44934109)

I think the fact that you have a working VT101 is cooler than the fact that you have a Raspberry Pi. :-)

Re:Never mind the Steambox ... (1)

operagost (62405) | about 10 months ago | (#44935853)

I think I still have a VT-420 somewhere, but an inferior VT-101 is way cooler now with its heavy spring keyboard and robust beeps.

Re:Never mind the Steambox ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44935977)

VT101? screw that johnny come lately garbage.... vt100 forever!

NANU !! NANU !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932523)

Mork !! from !! Ork !!

Jump the shark Fonzie !!

Take (whatever happened to) Suzi Quatro with you !!

That's not his name (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932529)

What is it with people and mjg59's name? It's Matthew Garrett. It has a hew and an extra t.

Hello (1)

JockTroll (996521) | about 10 months ago | (#44932655)

Sailor.

HHGTTG Anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44932705)

I had the Zork games, never could finish them even with the paperback book cheat guides, damn they were just hard. Long load times on the Commodore 64 made it even more of a pain. Had much more success with the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy text game. The surprise humor in them made me want to play it, Zork was rather dull and drab in comparison.

Re: HHGTTG Anyone? (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 10 months ago | (#44932819)

With Zork hack the Z-interpreter to print off your room id and the 6 possible movement directions then the map you make will be correct and the game should almost trivial then.

Note: You might have more fun learning how the game is implemented then actual playing it but that is probably a good thing. :)

There are worse nerds that me (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 10 months ago | (#44932755)

I thought it was pretty dorky already when I had a communal PXE boot into Arkanoid - simply loads a 1440KB MS-DOS 7.10 .img with the game and an autoexec.bat that launches the cutemouse driver, the game, and then a REBOOT.COM program. You had to type 'arkanoid' at the : prompt though, else the default was to boot as a LTSP thin client.
But you could run it from any thin client, regular computer and even dead computers (unstable, dead hard drive, dead controller etc.)

That was a script kiddie job though (down to donwloading REBOOT.COM rather than making it myself but duh, it's not like typing a one-liner with COPY CON and feeding it to a program called MASM or FASM would have made me smarter. I did fail at booting DOS from iSCSI though, so I must suck. I wanted to run networked doom2 that way, with a universal packet driver.

Dunno why booting Zork from UEFI is so awesome, when UEFI setup program have mouse and graphics support. But it's cool. I don't understand the bitching about C library though, why not just write a DOS clone in less than 4096 bytes and run the DOS version of Zork?, or boot CP/M 86 and run Zork in that.

Dunno what UEFI can do either. With BIOS, PXE, iPXE, VGA or VESA you can already do universal high res graphics and networking, but sorely missing is sound, barring PC speaker or an automatic passthrough of PC speaker sound through the mobo's jack. The worst thing ever is when Sound Blaster emulation was "trusted" by Creative Labs, who bought Ensoniq ONLY so that sound blaster emulation under DOS could stay proprietary to them under threat of lawsuit. (even then I think you would get general midi but not adlib). If a workaround can be written I will be SO much grateful (other that buying a socket 1155 motherboard with ISA slot)

Re:There are worse nerds that me (1)

neo-mkrey (948389) | about 10 months ago | (#44933343)

I just dunno.

Transcript (5, Funny)

jabberw0k (62554) | about 10 months ago | (#44932771)

> BOOT
Your way is blocked by a tall, bald pirate.
> KILL PIRATE
With what, your bare hands?
> INVENTORY
You have:
One hard disk drive, /dev/hda
One CDROM drive, /dev/cd0
One USB drive, /dev/sda
A rather large magnet
A DVD containing LinuxMint
> EXAMINE HARD DRIVE
The disk appears to contain a bootable copy of Windows 8.
> ATTACK PIRATE WITH MAGNET
The pirate parries, and your magnet hits the hard disk drive.
READ ERROR, SECTOR 0
>

Re:Transcript (2)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 10 months ago | (#44932807)

Your disk actually had a Windows bootloader with an entry for Windows 8 and an entry for a linux partition, your CDROM drive has either died or can't read the LinuxMint DVD-R, and your USB isn't bootable.
You're dead!

Re:Transcript (1)

LordWabbit2 (2440804) | about 10 months ago | (#44933005)

> Attack pirate with harddrive
BSOD
Pirate dies

Re:Transcript (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44936471)

>Attack pirate with Windows8.
Windows8 dies, bootable dual partition of Win7 and Mint springs forth from ashes.
Pirate walks away laughing.
GAME OVER. YOU WIN!

Re:Transcript (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44936499)

>Attack pirate with harddrive
BOFH
Pirate dies

FTFY.

Re:Transcript (3, Funny)

sandman_eh (620148) | about 10 months ago | (#44933103)

Well the pirate doesn't have the usual avian on his shoulder, so it not a PARROTY ERROR

Re:Transcript (1)

Ralph Ostrander (2846785) | about 10 months ago | (#44941271)

That is exactly what it is as the avian is missing.

Re: Transcript (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44933119)

I would *so* buy that bootloader.

Re:Transcript (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about 10 months ago | (#44940789)

This is probably the funniest thing I have ever read on /. Well done.

Next Step (2)

securityfolk (906041) | about 10 months ago | (#44933127)

Boot to CircleMUD?

Thanks for that summary (4, Insightful)

Brucelet (1857158) | about 10 months ago | (#44933883)

This is going to sound sarcastic, but in all sincerity, thanks, Slashdot, for posting a geeky story full or technical jargon. You used to be able to come here and find tons of stuff like this: obscure notes with enough confusing details to inspire you to go look something up and maybe even learn a thing or two. Good to know that News for Nerds still does occasionally happen.

Re:Thanks for that summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44937955)

+1

"This is going to sound sarcastic, but in all sincerity, thanks, Slashdot, for posting a geeky story full or technical jargon. You used to be able to come here and find tons of stuff like this: obscure notes with enough confusing details to inspire you to go look something up and maybe even learn a thing or two. Good to know that News for Nerds still does occasionally happen."

I can't praise this comment enough. This was a great article to find. More like this, please!

The weakness of UIs (2)

ferrisoxide.com (1935296) | about 10 months ago | (#44934279)

I asked a colleague for a connection to a database. He gave me a login to a MS Windows remote desktop.

I asked again. And he gave me a port and an IP address. I followed this down to where I wanted to go.. I could see where I needed to be. Open this door, unlock this puzzle. In my mind's eye I knew the path because I'd drawn the map.

I didn't need the visual metaphors that someone else had made. They were mere fantasies, imagined by minds that saw things the same way. Distractions. Illusions.

Give me the command line and my metaphors are my own.

It's dark down here.. and my sword is glowing blue.

Obama (0)

jeff13 (255285) | about 10 months ago | (#44935661)

Well, yea but, how can we make this Obama's fault?

pi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44937651)

Would this image work on a raspberry pi?

Achievement unlocked (1)

MrL0G1C (867445) | about 10 months ago | (#44938431)

I understood the title without having to read TFS, where's my trophy?

quote and movie (1)

slothman32 (629113) | about 10 months ago | (#44938693)

I like the quote I saw on someones sig.
"It's pitch black, you are likely to be shot by Vin Diesel."
Combining the Zork statement of the VD movie.

I always think a movie should be made out of Zork.
I don't know how it would be done but it sounds cool.
Even though it is based on a game I might like it.
Ominous red eyes staring out from darkness just waiting for the light on your torch to flicker out.
Plus it wouldn't need much action, more cerebral.

Re:quote and movie (1)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | about 10 months ago | (#44939373)

I see a black screen with green text. Only a black screen with green text. :)
It would be much better than the Doom movie.
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