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Tech In the Hot Seat For Oct. 1st Obamacare Launch

Soulskill posted 1 year,4 days | from the is-there-tech-that-can-mute-the-rhetoric dept.

Government 326

bednarz writes "In four days, the health insurance marketplaces mandated by the Obama administration's Affordable Care Act are scheduled to open for business. Yet even before the sites launch, problems are emerging. Final security testing of the federal data hub isn't slated to happen until Sept. 30, one day before the rollout. Lawmakers have raised significant concerns about the ability of the system to protect personal health records and other private information. 'Lots and lots of late nights and weekends as people get ready for go-live,' says Patrick Howard, who leads Deloitte Consulting's public sector state health care practice."

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Is there really any point to this? (-1, Offtopic)

mark-t (151149) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974819)

I was under the impression that "Obamacare" is one of the first things that's going to be axed as soon as the USA gets its next Republican president... which is inevitable at some point in the future, given a two-party system.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (-1, Troll)

Mashiki (184564) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974843)

One can only hope it'll be axed. Even up in socialist canada, the federal government is fully hands-off with healthcare(except in the cases of territories, natives, and the military).

Re:Is there really any point to this? (3, Informative)

MightyMartian (840721) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974911)

Um, no, it's not fully hands off. The Medicare act is Federal legislation that sets certain criteria for how the Provinces run their healthcare systems. The Provinces are given some latitude, but key aspects must be respected by the Provinces.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (2, Insightful)

Mashiki (184564) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975037)

The healthcare act sets out "how" the system should be. And what min. level of care should be. Provinces decide "how" to do it. In the US, the ACA determines "how" states should do it, and even "how" to implement it. See the difference now?

Re:Is there really any point to this? (4, Informative)

MightyMartian (840721) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975235)

Yes, the Provinces decide how, but the parameters are not all that wide, and because the system is in considerable aspects Federally proscribed, you don't see that much variance between Provinces. And, in fact, the Feds have on occasion flexed their muscle and have sent warning shots to provinces who have traveled too far off the line.

Here's the facts. I am a resident of British Columbia. I pay about $127 per month in Medical Services Premiums. For that I won't be given a bill at any hospital or any doctor if I have a medical issue. If I need a scan or some other diagnostic test, I will not be billed. Furthermore, if I end up needing healthcare in Prince Edward Island, I will still be protected.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975281)

Here's the facts. I am a resident of British Columbia. I pay about $127 per month in Medical Services Premiums. For that I won't be given a bill at any hospital or any doctor if I have a medical issue. If I need a scan or some other diagnostic test, I will not be billed. Furthermore, if I end up needing healthcare in Prince Edward Island, I will still be protected.

Shoot, that sounds fantastic! Why can't we get something like that here in the U.S.?

Re:Is there really any point to this? (4, Insightful)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975415)

Here's the facts. I am a resident of British Columbia. I pay about $127 per month in Medical Services Premiums. For that I won't be given a bill at any hospital or any doctor if I have a medical issue. If I need a scan or some other diagnostic test, I will not be billed. Furthermore, if I end up needing healthcare in Prince Edward Island, I will still be protected.

Shoot, that sounds fantastic! Why can't we get something like that here in the U.S.?

Because we got FREEDOMS!!!!

Re:Is there really any point to this? (3, Funny)

besalope (1186101) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975503)

Here's the facts. I am a resident of British Columbia. I pay about $127 per month in Medical Services Premiums. For that I won't be given a bill at any hospital or any doctor if I have a medical issue. If I need a scan or some other diagnostic test, I will not be billed. Furthermore, if I end up needing healthcare in Prince Edward Island, I will still be protected.

Shoot, that sounds fantastic! Why can't we get something like that here in the U.S.?

Because we got FREEDOMS!!!!

Especially the freedom to bend over and take it...

Re:Freeeeedumb! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975637)

I hear ya there, man! We need

-Freedom from medical-induced bankruptcy.
-Freedom from high premiums.
-Freedom to start companies without worrying about medical insurance.
-Freedom to take a job at small companies that don't offer insurance.

I can't help but think of the movie Braveheart though with Mel Gibson (or was it Mel Brooks?) at the end yelling "freedom!" The movie was and is so bad that my wife and I giggled all the way through and burst out laughing when it got to that scene. Talk about schmaltzy! I can't believe that dreck won best picture.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (3, Interesting)

Mashiki (184564) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975289)

Actually they're quite wide. Go and read the healthcare act then look at the provinces. In fact those "warning shots" have been at Quebec most of the time, because they simply dump the money direct into general revenue, then take it back out. In order to claim that the money came directly from their own general fund. Aka useless BS Quebec type stuff.

And to highlight difference, in Ontario I pay nothing. I don't pay for any tests or diagnostics out of pocket. I pay for notes from my doctor, and that's it. And if I end up in another province, I still won't be billed--because OHIP will cover it.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

SeattleGameboy (641456) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975391)

For Chrissy's Sakes!!! I will take either of your systems!

Re:Is there really any point to this? (0, Flamebait)

Mashiki (184564) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975437)

Then I'm sure you're ready and waiting to die for "healthcare" up here too. The last time I had a serious injury where I broke my back, it was oh two hours or so before I got in for an x-ray. And 7 days for a CT. As a helpful point, even though my back was broken I was sent home, because there were no beds available.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

SeattleGameboy (641456) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975603)

You do realize that what you have is INFINITELY better than not having that access at all or breaking your back and going bankrupt because you cannot work and your insurance drops you, right?

Re:Is there really any point to this? (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974935)

Since it would be replaced with the option to die in the gutter I think axing is a bad move.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975029)

The option to die in the gutter has always existed and always will.
The Democrats wouldn't dare interfere with this unalienable right.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

Mashiki (184564) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975325)

We have that option in Canada too, but at least you're usually in an ambulance.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (2)

bvdp (1517349) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974937)

Considering that the feds in Canada fund the majority of our health care I'd suggest that they are very far from being "hands off". Just look at the legislation concerning the delivery of health care in Canada and you see what a dumb comment Mashiki is making.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1, Interesting)

Mashiki (184564) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975057)

So said, funding = telling provinces how to do it. Gotcha, can you tell me when the last time the federal government dictated where to build a hospital in Ontario, Alberta, or even Quebec? Right. How about the number of doctors that need to be hired in each specific province. Right. And let me know when you get around to reading the federal healthcare act again, which should take you all of about 8 minutes. I'll see you sometime next year when you're done reading the ACA.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

SeattleGameboy (641456) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975397)

That is because ACA is not a single payer system...

Re:Is there really any point to this? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44974973)

Troll.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975005)

You're obviously not in a position where you're unable to buy health insurance at any price due to a minor health condition. People like you are crying a river over a potential $92 per year tax, while thousands of your fellow human beings -- even those with money to buy insurance -- are forced to risk death from future treatable health conditions (or bankruptcy at best), as a result of what can only be described as complete and utter market failure.

The ACA isn't best practices -- that'd be a single-payer system -- but it sure as hell patches some of the more egregious holes in the current system.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975229)

It is shitty bill, but not for any ideological sake...hell its a right wing bill through and through, that's the very reason why its a shitty bill, it caters to the insurance companys and mandates that we must buy private insurance. Now a public option would of made this bill much more likable.

It does patch holes that needed to be patched and its great at least we are trying something else, but i am not optimistic it is going to solve what the real problem is; hospitals, insurance company's and big pharama all realizing that they can extort anyone who is in pain or on a death bed.

In the end i am comforted in knowing that these corrupt individuals will get there day.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

Nadaka (224565) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975307)

Exactly, its a shitty handout to the insurance industry. Government mandated spending on for profit industry. A right wing corporatist bill through and through.

What we really needed is nationalized single payer healthcare. But right wing Obama and his conservative democrats bowed down before the crazy wing tea party leadership and their regressive republicans.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975255)

you obviously don't know what you're talking about. $92 a year? Bullshit. For me it will cost an addition $8,000 dollars for health insurance, PLUS the cost of my diabetic wife's insulin, needle, test strips, etc have all doubled in price. For a grand total of almost $14,000 a year. I don't know where you got your $92 quote but it's WAAAAAAAY off. btw, I make less than 100k a year.

As for the second part, people in this country don't get turned away because they're poor, they get medicare or medicaid (depending on age).

Alternative, you can just die (3, Informative)

Geoffrey.landis (926948) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975409)

As for the second part, people in this country don't get turned away because they're poor, they get medicare or medicaid (depending on age).

Some do. Some don't. Some have too much money for medicaid, but not enough to pay for a big hospital bill. Some charge hospital bills on their credit cards, and then go bankrupt when they can't pay them (sticking you and me with the bill). Some can't get credit cards, and use the Emergency Room for health care. Some just die.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/09/17/us-usa-healthcare-deaths-idUSTRE58G6W520090917 [reuters.com]

"Reuters) - Nearly 45,000 people die in the United States each year -- one every 12 minutes -- in large part because they lack health insurance and can not get good care, Harvard Medical School researchers found in an analysis released on Thursday."

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

mark-t (151149) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975495)

As far as I know, there is no province in Canada where you spend more than about $80 per person per month on public health care... which is less than $1k per year. However, public health care does not cover the costs of medication, which I know can get pretty expensive if you have certain medical issues.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (5, Insightful)

crow (16139) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974847)

Yes, there is a point to this.

It may well be a long time before the Republicans have enough votes to get a repeal through the Senate. The way Demographics are headed, the Republican party of today will have to evolve significantly to stay relevant beyond this decade. And what Republicans fear about Obamacare more than anything else is that once it's implemented, people will decide that they like it, making it impossible for them to repeal it (much like Medicare and Social Security).

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (2)

intermodal (534361) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974889)

if by "evolve" you mean "lean further libertarian instead of continuing to be basically the laziest Democrats ever", I agree with that part.

As far as the "decide that they like it" part, I'd say it will be more along the lines of "dislike it but fear the disappearance of what few scraps it throws them"

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974959)

Laziest democrats? Nixon was a socialist compared to todays republicans. If they leaned any further right they would fall over.

Barry Goldwater was a prophet. The religious right now owns the Republican party.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (2)

intermodal (534361) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975013)

I'm neither going to defend Nixon nor today's GOP. Neither deserves the defence. The few that deserve defence are the ones the GOP "leadership" (if you want to call it that) already hate.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (3, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975451)

Religious right most definitely does not own the Republican party. It has moved more to the right fiscally, but it has become less religious.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (2, Insightful)

turkeyfish (950384) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975017)

The idea of having affordable health care as opposed to being told sorry but you must just go die someplace as quietly as possible does tend to make it more than likely it will succeed. In year's time this will be old news and the GOPTP will be whining about something else, looking for another hostage to take to get their agenda passed.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (1)

ncc74656 (45571) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975385)

The idea of having affordable health care as opposed to being told sorry but you must just go die someplace as quietly as possible does tend to make it more than likely it will succeed.

Too bad for you 0bamacare's shaping up to be anything but affordable [forbes.com] . Even that is assuming they can crunch the numbers, which isn't a valid assumption [jammiewf.com] either.

On an anecdotal note, my employer switched from a PPO plan to an HMO plan to keep its costs somewhat under control. You have the option to stay in a PPOish plan, but it now costs about 4x what we had previously been paying. I switched to this plan to keep access to its better network in case my wife had to quit working and go onto my plan; her oncologist is available through the PPOish plan, but not the HMO. (She's since passed away. :-( Now that it's just me, I might suck it up and switch to the HMO to save some money. So much for "if you like your insurance, you can keep your insurance.")

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (2, Interesting)

dcherryholmes (1322535) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975623)

Before clicking on any health care related article in Forbes, you need to ask yourself "am I about to read something written by Avik Roy?" If so, just stop. He spews crap. Now, I have not actually clicked on your link yet, but I am about to. And we will see if my powers of prediction are at all accurate.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (2, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975425)

So you think because it has "affordable" in the name, that it actually is affordable. Don't you know of the tradition of that bills in congress are given names that are exactly opposite of the bill's effects?

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975127)

voting for freeshit over freedom.

congrats liberals. your communist takeover is almost complete.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (0)

DigiShaman (671371) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975269)

And what Republicans fear about Obamacare more than anything else is that once it's implemented, people will become dependent on it, making it impossible for them to repeal it (much like Medicare and Social Security).

There, fixed that for you!

And remember. The more you depend on government, the more control they have over your life. Soon, we will all be enslaved to the "machine".

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975645)

And remember. The more you depend on other people, the more control other people have over your life. Soon, we will all be more dependent on each other.

FTFY. Government by the people, for the people, right?

I didn't catch the fish I ate at lunch, which was gotten commercially, but I didn't have to wonder if it was safe to eat, which the government inspectors deal with. And I took the metro, which the government runs. And when I walked home late at night in the dark I didn't have to worry about getting robbed or worse, because of the police being around. God, it really sucks to have to deal with other people, huh?

Re:Is there really any point to this? (Yes) (3, Informative)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975357)

What do you mean by demographics? The Us population is getting older, which is traditionally more Republican demographics. Oh, you mean the huge influx of Latinos. Right, I understand now. Only, in their own countries Latinos tend to elect fairly conservative governments so once the Democrat deception regarding the immigration issue stops working, things might change.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (4, Insightful)

Cyberax (705495) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974853)

Nope. In a few years you'll see Tea Party demonstrations with placards like "Don't let government get its hands into my Obamacare!".

Re: Is there really any point to this? (2)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975011)

"Don't judge a philosophy by those who misapply it."

I'm sure that's a quote, but of whom I don't know.

Re: Is there really any point to this? (2, Insightful)

Lendrick (314723) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975331)

The "tea party" isn't a philosophy. It's a bunch of idiots and corporate patsies. At one point it had an underlying philosophy which, while fundamentally flawed, was at least consistent. Now it's just a bunch of reactionary Obama haters.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

vux984 (928602) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975025)

In hindsight letting it be called obamacare is probably the only mistake the democrats made.

The teapartiers will never carry a placard with a pro-statement next to a democrat president's name.

Obama should have named the Reagan Memorial Health Care Act, shortended to ReaganCare... now that's something tea partiers can get behind 5 years from now.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975047)

People did try to call it Romneycare, but maybe the magic underwear made it less convincing.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

Cyberax (705495) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975097)

Actually, the name "Obamacare" was invented by Republicans and was used as a derisive name for ACA at first.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (2)

vux984 (928602) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975175)

I know, but Obama approved and took ownership of the name, so it is often reported as obamacare even by neutral and pro-democrat sources now, planting the name much more firmly.

Had it been left only as the term used by the extreme right-wing mouth breathers as a term of derision it would be more likely to fade away, especially if the act itself gains popularity in the future.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

Cyberax (705495) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975549)

Well, I thought that it was quite a coup. Now Obama will be associated with decent medical care (ACA is going to work vastly better than the current mess) for a looong time. The current Tea Partiers are generally beyond help, but future generations might remember that their healthcare was the result of government program fiercely opposed by Republicans.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975169)

The teapartiers will never carry a placard with a pro-statement next to a democrat president's name.

You underestimate our educational system. How many freshly minted high school graduates can even name the last president? If the name sticks, in 10 years most of them won't even know what it's called that.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

Lendrick (314723) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975343)

In hindsight letting it be called obamacare is probably the only mistake the democrats made.

That remains to be seen. After the law has been in place for a year or two, it may turn out to be a very good decision.

Cartoon (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975089)

Relevant cartoon [twimg.com]

Re:Cartoon (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975273)

Better cartoon [investors.com] .

Sure, people might like parts of Obamacare, but the thing as a whole is killing our economy. Just ask the workers who are now part time because their employers can't afford Obamacare.

Re:Cartoon (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975427)

but the thing as a whole is killing our economy. Just ask the workers who are now part time because their employers can't afford Obamacare.

You forgot to enclose your whole post inside of <PROPAGANDA> . . . </PROPAGANDA> tags.

Re:Cartoon (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975555)

the workers who are now part time because their employers can't afford Obamacare.

Dishonest bullshit.

More like, employers who want to use Obamacare as an excuse for their cheapness, or their incompetence, or whatever, so they can lay off employees and/or lower their salaries. There are plenty of employers out there (almost all of them, actually) who aren't whining about Obamacare and have no problems with it. It's just a few dishonest partisans who are screaming.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975389)

Tea Party is in favor of reforming SS, Medicare etc. It is typical of the deceptive way liberals operate to take the placard held by some idiot to represent an entire movement. Do you also take everything every junkie wrote on a cardboard during the occupy protests as representative of the liberal policies?

Re:Is there really any point to this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975441)

Not likely. Considering "Obamacare" is going to collapse under it's own weight, lack of support, and poor implementation.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975567)

Nope, we'll see more bills amending Obummercare and passed by Senators who say something like "We have to pass the bill so that we can see what's in it", then passing the bill in the middle of the night by the corrupt Senate majority, disallowing an appropriate review of the bill due to such little time allowed. At least Romneycare had a lot of voter/political support, unlike Obama's clusterfuck which is very unpopular and divisive which is why it was rammed down the throats of US citizens.

Only if unsuccessful (4, Interesting)

ranton (36917) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974855)

The Republicans can only get rid of it if it is unsuccessful, which is why they tried so hard to get rid of it before it was enacted. Even so, repealing it would take a Republican president and simple majority in both the house and senate, which is much harder.

Luckily for the Republicans they will always be able to find some metrics that show that it was a failure. Health care premiums will continue to rise no matter what until we serious talk about rationing care, so any health care plan written by either party will always leave room for complaints.

Re:Only if unsuccessful (4, Interesting)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975143)

The reason we pay so much for health care is because the recipient doesn't know and/or doesn't care how much it costs, namely because they don't pay for it. Likewise, they don't shop around. So even though it is all privatized, there isn't really much of a free market system.

Every doctor I've known (which admittedly isn't many) who has worked in a country with a nationalized health care system always talks about how it is problematic because as the end of the year approaches they have to stop caring for their patients because the money has run out. In addition to that, the pay is crap compared to here, which results in a brain drain (notice how when a foreign country needs the *best* care for a particular patient, they pay to have them shipped here for their operation. Always here. In the US resides the world's top centers for cancer, neurology, cardio, and numerous other medical disciplines, and this didn't happen by accident.)

Rationing is a horrible idea because it just reproduces that problem, in addition to putting you on long ass waiting lists for even basic operations, and making the medical field less attractive as a career choice. It's already bad enough that we have waiting lists for organ transplants (Which by the way this problem is very solvable - have a look at how Iran does transplants. With as much shit as that country gets wrong, they shockingly nailed that one better than anybody else.)

Anyways, find a way to get the patient to actually care about the cost of their medical services, and you'll see the prices go down. This socialized medicine shit is absolutely NOT without its set of problems, and price ceilings and rationing have always resulted in more problems than they solve, especially for products with inelastic demand (in the 70's we did both for gasoline, and the result was shitty. And that's just for gasoline - the notion that people want to try it with health care - basically playing with people's lives - is stupid.)

Re:Only if unsuccessful (3, Insightful)

ranton (36917) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975407)

Rationing is a horrible idea because it just reproduces that problem, in addition to putting you on long ass waiting lists for even basic operations, and making the medical field less attractive as a career choice. It's already bad enough that we have waiting lists for organ transplants (Which by the way this problem is very solvable - have a look at how Iran does transplants. With as much shit as that country gets wrong, they shockingly nailed that one better than anybody else.)

That is only if you have a central body such as the government doing the rationing. You could also ration care the free market way by making poor people unable to pay for certain care. Regardless of the method, we need to understand that as we continue to make new medical breakthroughs we simply cannot spend all of our resources on keeping people alive forever.

If we finally start making breakthroughs that increase our healthy age (the age where you can work) then it isn't as much of a problem. But currently all we are doing is keeping people barely alive and spending a fortune to do it.

Re:Only if unsuccessful (4, Insightful)

artor3 (1344997) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975477)

Anyways, find a way to get the patient to actually care about the cost of their medical services, and you'll see the prices go down.

No, you won't. In fact, you'll see prices rise.

There are two cases in which someone would seek medical help -- life-threatening situations, and non-life-threatening.

In the vast majority of life threatening situations, people aren't going to care about the cost. You've heard about the stages of grief, right? Well bargaining's a big one. Most people will do ANYTHING to get just a few more years, or months, or days. They'll throw money away on homeopathic crap and colloidal silver and psychic voodoo. People don't generally go gently into that good night, and shifting more of the cost on to them won't change that.

But in non-life-threatening situations, people will look at the price tag, and decide that they don't need to see the doctor so bad after all. And so curable illnesses go untreated, and become far more dangerous. They might be contagious and spread their illness. They might lose a limb and end up unable to work and on the public dole. They might die. That might reduce costs in the short term, but in the long run the cost to society is far higher.

Re:Only if unsuccessful (1)

CauseBy (3029989) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975561)

"Rationing is a horrible idea"

Up to now we have rationed health care by price. Is that a horrible idea? or is it only a horrible idea to let poor people get a little bit of medical care?

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

intermodal (534361) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974867)

We can only hope. I've looked at this whole mess and clearly the politicians supporting it have absolutely no clue what they're doing. Only that it's someone else's mess to fix.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975019)

Yup, it's a mess. Perhaps if you Americans would finally just introduce a proper universal health care system, instead of these constants half-measures, you could stop spending such an enormous portion of your GDP on health care.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

intermodal (534361) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975119)

I don't know that I'd call it "proper", but it would be cheaper and more effective. What would really help though would be taking health insurance and government healthcare entirely off the table. The long-term damage of insulating the cost of healthcare from the market is what we're really up against. Just like anything you subsidize, prices always rise to match the subsidy.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975523)

Universal health system = rationing = substandard care, waiting lists and corruption. I have lived under the NHS and under the US system and I will take the US system any day. for the 86% that have insurance in the US, the care they receive overall is superior to any major country (please don't start throwing in countries with 4 mil population and unlimited oil resources like Norway as a fair comparison to the US) with a single payer system .

Re:Is there really any point to this? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975583)

Allow me to explain something to you. The United States is a federation of 50 "Sovereign" states. We don't like it when the federal government decides to universally apply laws that usurp the power of those states. Imagine if tomorrow the people of Germany woke up and found out that they too were now included in the ACA. They're not in North America, but let's just say the U.N. decided the ACA was such a great idea that all members of the UN were now required to follow the ACA. I suspect the great people of Germany would be just a tad bit upset about it. What about the people in France? Do you think they'd let the U.N. force ACA down their throats? Not likely. It's the same thing here. The people of my state think D.C. shouldn't be involved because IT IS NOT THEIR PLACE! Just like the people in France and Germany would be upset if the U.N. forced ACA upon them. This law has nothing to do with providing health care and everything to do with padding the pockets of the insurance companies.

Re: Is there really any point to this? (4, Informative)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975033)

Not their fault. They had to pass the legislation before they could know what was in it.

Re: Is there really any point to this? (1)

intermodal (534361) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975081)

And these, folks, were the best politicians we could muster as a nation?

If that's the case, maybe if we beg really nice, we can get Queen Elizabeth II to take us back and end this silliness.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44974875)

I was under the impression that "Obamacare" is one of the first things that's going to be axed as soon as the USA gets its next Republican president... which is inevitable at some point in the future, given a two-party system.

I was under the impression there was just one party with people wanting power.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

aardvarkjoe (156801) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974907)

I would tell you that it doesn't matter if a Republican president gets elected, he still has to implement the laws that Congress has passed.

Although if the current presidency is any indication, I guess that's no longer true.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974999)

What are you on about?
That statement has been true at least since Andrew Jackson defied the Supreme Court.

Re: Is there really any point to this? (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975043)

I wept bitter tears at your post.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44974923)

Yeah, I mean, Ted Cruz is practically a shoe-in in 2016 [theonion.com] .

Re:Is there really any point to this? (2)

turkeyfish (950384) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975059)

The problem for Ted Cruz in 2016 is that on his present course he looks as if he will be so successful in dismantling the US government that its unclear if there will even be a presidency in 2016. However, I'm sure in that case, he will probably just appoint himself as the rest of the country just stand back helplessly in horror.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975347)

Ted Cruz the superpatriot Canadian-born Cuban?
The one who reads "Green Eggs and Ham" but fails to understand the core message of not saying you don't like something till you've tried it?

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

Chalnoth (1334923) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975111)

I don't think this is possible. Once it goes into effect, people will pretty much love it. Already a strong majority of Americans either like the legislation or wish it were stronger, and many of the remainder will come on board the second the legislation goes live. Even more support the individual parts of the legislation. The actual implementation of the healthcare exchanges will be differently-named in many states, so that a lot of its details will not carry the stigma of "Obamacare". Very soon, we'll have Republicans standing up and saying, "Keep the government's hands off my Obamacare!" Well, they won't say Obamacare, but they'll name a part of the legislation that they probably don't realize is a part of it.

then some should do a sick kids sick out on the ca (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975139)

and then then some should do a sick kids sick out on the capitol steps and tell the kids don't get and in jail under cruel and unusual punishment and others laws they must give you medical care or you can just go to the ER.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (2, Insightful)

gtall (79522) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975149)

Assuming a Republican could even get elected after the party trashes the economy (yet again), it wouldn't be easy to unwind ACA. For one thing, they have time to fix the technical glitches. They'd have a shot at fixing the programmatic glitches if the Republicans would stop acting like spoiled brats. Every entitlement has always required programmatic fixes, this will be no different. And those fixes would happen were the Republicans not hell bent on screwing Obama. I don't recall the Republicans being so worried about the economy or the health care system before the ACA. Now all of a sudden they've had a come to Jesus meeting.

And their budget objections have nothing to do with the budget. They simply do not like what the Federal government does...especially supporting Science. Science prevents them from making shit up and spewing it out over the media...ok, so it doesn't stop them, but at least it clear they are full of shit.

Re:Is there really any point to this? (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975581)

Actually, I long ago got the impression that the sole reason for the existence of the post-2008 Republican party is to ensure that every thing Obama ever did is completely and permanently erased forever as though they had never been.

Obama certainly has a lot to answer for and no few things that richly deserve erasing, but they started even before he took the oath of office.

Politics [Re:Is there really any point to this?] (2)

Geoffrey.landis (926948) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975351)

I was under the impression that "Obamacare" is one of the first things that's going to be axed as soon as the USA gets its next Republican president... which is inevitable at some point in the future, given a two-party system.

Not at all clear-- the president can neither pass nor repeal legislation. Even a Republican president would have to work through Congress to do so, and unless both chambers are also Republican, this may be difficult.

In any case, though, the reason that Republicans are trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act so urgently is that they believe that once it is in place, people will like it so much that it will be impossible to repeal. So if this is true, then no.

Re:Politics [Re:Is there really any point to this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975457)

Republicans are divided on that point.....half (like Ted Cruz) think it is crucial to get rid of it before it starts. The other half thinks it's so bad that they should just let it happen and people will see how bad it is.

There is reason to believe that there is truth in both points of view.

Testing Starts Day Before Go-Live (2)

ranton (36917) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974823)

How many times have you guys been told by a project manager that QA testing starts on Wednesday and Go-Live is on Friday? I had a meeting once where a manager said we needed to improve our planning so we weren't constantly doing bug fixing on Thursday and Friday morning, and was willing to put in place so many new procedures, workflows, and documentation but never give more time between the start of QA and product roll-out.

Re:Testing Starts Day Before Go-Live (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974863)

When you computerize chaos,

you get computerized chaos.

Re:Testing Starts Day Before Go-Live (1)

cygtoad (619016) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974981)

I would say that I wouldn't want to be one of the first signing up, but that doesn't even matter. They already have everyone's data from the IRS, Homeland Security, etc available to them. This is an identity theft cracker's wet dream. I am glad they are giving so much attention to QA: One day. What a joke.

Re:Testing Starts Day Before Go-Live (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975531)

I am glad they are giving so much attention to QA: One day. What a joke.

The best part is am sure a bug and security flaws list a mile long will be written. The programers will solve the most pressing bugs that they can in the time allotted. But the fixes won't be able to go live because they don't have time to test the fixes.

Well tell that PM that new procedures are more tim (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975179)

Well tell that PM that new procedures are more time over all and more man power if you are getting done / ready for finale / RC QA testing just days before go live.

Re:Well tell that PM that new procedures are more (1)

ranton (36917) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975513)

Well tell that PM that new procedures are more time over all and more man power if you are getting done / ready for finale / RC QA testing just days before go live.

Oh that is cute, thinking that a PM with such ridiculous opinions can be reasoned with. Many people did try, but eventually it was only fixed when higher level management got fed up and fired the PMs in question.

But now that I work as a consultant, I find these kinds of PMs all over the place. Luckily now it is easier to just not work with these kinds of people, or at least keep racking up billable hours fixing the problems caused by their ridiculousness.

It's ok, just use Pelosi Logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44974829)

First you have to just adopt the technology, before we can see if it will work...

Sad pandas to you if you are unaware of the tragic quote that spawned this.

Re:It's ok, just use Pelosi Logic (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44974985)

Pelosi logic? Isn't it how we get all our laws? Give them cute names like PATRIOT ACT so nobody will want to get bad press for voting against the Cuddly Puppies Act. It's not like anyone bothers to read these things anyway. Faster to just slap as much pork amendments on as you can and head out for some jack and strippers at 2pm after putting in a hard day's work.

Let's just hope (0)

djupedal (584558) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974913)

. . . the same wonks that gave us so many failed DMV systems haven't found work in this sector too.

Re:Let's just hope (2, Interesting)

EmperorArthur (1113223) | 1 year,4 days | (#44974993)

. . . the same wonks that gave us so many failed DMV systems haven't found work in this sector too.

You're joking right? It's the exact same people.

SAIC is already in on the action. [seekingalpha.com]
That's the company that scammed New York out of all that money.

Re:Let's just hope (1)

turkeyfish (950384) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975067)

Somehow it hasn't stopped people from driving. I suspect that the few glitches that do show up will get fixed and people will get health care.

lulsy (1, Flamebait)

girlintraining (1395911) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975009)

. Lawmakers have raised significant concerns about the ability of the system to protect personal health records and other private information.

Would that be the same lawmakers that authorized the handling of our sensitive personal health records by people making pennies on the dollar in foreign countries... because hospitals asked them to disregard HIPPA safeguards to save a few bucks?

'Lots and lots of late nights and weekends as people get ready for go-live,' says Patrick Howard, who leads Deloitte Consulting's public sector state health care practice."

Wait, rolling out national access to one of the most complex databases ever designed, with multi-tiered access controls, and peering with tens of thousands of providers, in realtime... isn't easy? Shit, why not just hire some more 14 year old kids? They seem to know how these computer whatcha-things work. Can't be any harder than Youtubing the Facebooks.

Let's be serious for a minute -- the launch can't possibly go as badly as the Republican's last major foray into IT -- Romney's campaign. I mean, their competitor to Obama's data analytics software didn't just explode on the launchpad, it actually fired itself into the ground as it did so. So the idea that Obama might pull off another big data project while they're still trying to figure out where the off button is on the internet, is probably a bit frightening to them. And that's really all it's about. Have you seen the scare advertisements on TV? I mean, creepy guys dressed as Uncle Sam putting on lubed blue gloves and making a mockery of what is undeniably the best medicine in the world (once you're sick, that is, and as long as you can afford it)... they're going all out on this.

So yeah, big surprise they're predicting the end of life as we know it, asteroid smashing into Earth, total extinction of the human race kind of doomsday predictions over the launch. But truthfully, here's what's going to happen; It's going to work. Sortof. There's going to be spotty and random problems, many caused by humans, because whenever you launch a new, complex piece of software, the interaction of so many untrained people in an uncontrolled environment (read: "It worked fine in the lab!") is going to cause unmitigated stress and support headaches until people get used to the software... and the software gets used to them. And by used to them, I mean patched. Probably quite a bit. It's the classic support bathtub curve: High initial support costs, followed by a rapid falloff, a long period of stability, and then rising costs again as the product ages and reaches EOL.

This is IT Management 101. Nobody should be surprised when things go haywire... but it'll be haywire in the "Y2K" sort of way: A few newsworthy problems (that'll inevitably be blown well out of proportion), but mostly... it'll work. It'll be lagged, and people will be frustrated, but it'll work.

And no matter how badly it goes... it's still better than the alternative, which is for some people literally dying in place, due to a lack of access to health care. Even if it set every 20,000th's applicant on fire, it'd be better than what we have now.

Federal IT contracting also has the kickbacks (2)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975079)

Federal IT contracting also has the kickbacks and other BS that put's lot's of PHB's in the way of getting work done.

Let us opt out. (0, Troll)

Karmashock (2415832) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975243)

The democrats really have no idea how mad they've made some people. This thing is intolerable. And I and those I support in politics will go for pretty much whatever option is open to frustrate or destroy it.

Understand... this will not be worth it for the democrats. They've stuck their foot into something that has grown larger and more involved and enflamed more passions then they could comprehend.

Their reactions throughout have been "so what" "what's the big deal"... they don't get it.

Every trick in the book is on the table with this thing. By hook, crook, nail, and claw... this thing is going down or it will be so horribly scrambled that the democrats will wish it did die.

Politically, the republicans were completely sidelined for this thing. Utterly emasculated. To survive as a political organization, the republicans need to so thoroughly annihilate this move that the democrats for generations to come remember it.

Anything less and we transition to a one party system.

Let me opt out and we have peace. That's all we've ever wanted in this venture. Let people vote with their feet. If its such a great program you wont' need to force people to join it. If you do need to force people then its not actually a great program you irredeemable lying aholes.

Doubtless I'm going to get some snarky replies from some democrats. That's fine. Game on, stooges.

Re:Let us opt out (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,4 days | (#44975511)

Why would you even want to opt out? You'll have to explain that to me as it sounds like a really dumb idea.

Re:Let us opt out. (2)

CauseBy (3029989) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975617)

Yeah, totally, just like the entire progressive movement died after that total failure of government largesse, Social Security. People old enough to remember Social Security all agree on how terrible it was. Nobody liked it because it was a government takeover of medicine, just like the conservatives said when it was passed. Nobody ever again got to see the doctor of their choice, just like the conservatives said when it was passed. It was unaffordable and bankrupted the country, just like conservatives said when it was passed. It was very unpopular, was never expanded, and people cheered when it finally died a short time later.

Yeah, totally.

Let's be real... (4, Informative)

GerryGilmore (663905) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975287)

For all of those if us concerned about the privacy/sanctity of our medical information, it doesn't exist *now*. If you are treated under any private health insurance plan, all of the diagnoses and treatments are fed into a database (http://www.mib.com/facts_about_mib.html) that all the insurance companies share to protect themselves against people applying for insurance and "forgetting" about a pre-existing condition. Next time you have a few minutes, pull out the mice-type on your health insurance plan and read up on how they can collect and share that information.

Translation... (2)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975379)

>> Lots and lots of late nights and weekends as people get ready for go-live

Translation: "We've been sandbagging hours with folks in India and newbies right out of college for months. Now we may need to actually pull some of our senior guys off sales and deep-end pissed-off customer calls and see if they remember how to program again."

One day, or ongoing? (1)

Kaenneth (82978) | 1 year,4 days | (#44975481)

The security testing mentioned, do you think they will stop just because it goes live?

Or will they have a constant, dedicated intrusion detection/prevention team?

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