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Dead Drops P2P File Sharing Spreads Around Globe

Soulskill posted 1 year,21 days | from the will-someday-enable-a-revolution-in-dystopia dept.

Data Storage 174

Lucas123 writes "After beginning as an art project 3 years ago in Manhattan to thwart government online spying and offer a physical depiction of our digitally-connected society, a trend of embedding USB thumb drives in walls has caught on and spread to every continent but Antarctica. Dead Drops, as the anonymous P2P files sharing network is called, now has more than 1,200 locations worldwide and has morphed as participants have become more creative in not only where they place the drives, but how they share files, including creating WiFi locations. The thumb drives, which range in size from a few megabytes to 60GB, have allowed people to share music, video, personal photos, poetry, political discourse, or artwork anonymously. Dead Drops creator, German artist Aram Bartholl, said the project is a way to 'un-cloud' file sharing."

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Why yes! (5, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018361)

I'd be happy to plug my netbook / phone / multimedia device into this unknown thumb drive. Why not? I've got anti-virus...

Re:Why yes! (2)

stewsters (1406737) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018453)

I prefer to plug in random firewire [breaknenter.org] cables that i find hanging out of walls.

Re:Why yes! (1)

Bengie (1121981) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018873)

That's why you want a modern computer that has an IOMMU, which forces the device to first ask the OS for permission to memory. It's like protected memory, for DMA. It only sees what the OS allows it to see.

Re:Why yes! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018467)

don't mount the drive as root...
or better yet, use a livecd boot and only mount a small partition you set aside for this.

Re:Why yes! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018665)

You don't know anything about computers, do you?

Re:Why yes! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018771)

Not a thing. I have no idea how I am even making this post.

Re:Why yes! (1)

AK Marc (707885) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019011)

If you used a CD boot, with your hard drive only mounting a "P2P" partition, the OS and user partitions not even mounted, would that not prevent nearly all attack vectors? anything going after the OS would find it on a read-only drive, and the data disc could be compromised with no ill effects, given proper precautions.

Re:Why yes! (1)

slashdime (818069) | 1 year,21 days | (#45020111)

You're morely correct, but it would not prevent all attack vectors. If the boot cd auto mounts the usb key, and nautilus auto opens the mount point with preview on, the files could use vulnerabilities in various file formats (pdf comes first to mind) to run as nautilus (as root, or as a user that can escalate to root).

At that point, it has access to all partitions and devices connected to the system, mounted or not.

Re:Why yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018475)

How good is the ESD protection on USB ports? Can it handle a thumb drive filled with capacitors?

(but with an cheap USB hub as a buffer and a safe OS why not)

Re:Why yes! (1)

blueg3 (192743) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018733)

It's not good.

Re:Why yes! (1)

fnj (64210) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019479)

How good is the ESD protection on USB ports? Can it handle a thumb drive filled with capacitors?

It's not good.

Oh I dunno, if you get a half decent motherboard it can be pretty good.

Gigabyte GA-Z87X-D3H [gigabyte.com]
At Newegg [newegg.com]

"GIGABYTE Ultra Durable 5 Plus debuts on GIGABYTE 8 Series motherboards, with a range of features and component choices that provide record-breaking performance, cool and efficient operation and extended motherboard lifespan."

"GIGABYTE 8 Series motherboards raise the bar in terms of protecting your system, providing advanced electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection for both your Ethernet LAN and USB ports, both common sources of ESD-related failures. Each LAN and USB port is paired with a dedicated protection filter that can withstand high electrostatic discharges, protecting your system from common electrical surges and even direct lighting strikes."

"On GIGABYTE 8 Series motherboards each USB port has its own dedicated power fuse that prevents unwanted USB port failure, helping to safe guard your important data during transfer."

The board is not out of reach financially at all.

Re:Why yes! (1)

Richy_T (111409) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019597)

I want to see it take a direct lightning strike.

Re:Why yes! (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019811)

Oh I dunno, if you get a half decent motherboard it can be pretty good.

Gigabyte GA-Z87X-D3H
At Newegg

"GIGABYTE Ultra Durable 5 Plus debuts on GIGABYTE 8 Series motherboards, with a range of features and component choices that provide record-breaking performance, cool and efficient operation and extended motherboard lifespan."

"GIGABYTE 8 Series motherboards raise the bar in terms of protecting your system, providing advanced electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection for both your Ethernet LAN and USB ports, both common sources of ESD-related failures. Each LAN and USB port is paired with a dedicated protection filter that can withstand high electrostatic discharges, protecting your system from common electrical surges and even direct lighting strikes."

"On GIGABYTE 8 Series motherboards each USB port has its own dedicated power fuse that prevents unwanted USB port failure, helping to safe guard your important data during transfer."

The board is not out of reach financially at all.

ESD protection devices protect against ESD. That's it'. Sure it may be 50,000V, but the current is absolutely tiny, so the device doesn't heat up much. However, if the device is connected to a live 110V/220V mains, those ESD protection diodes will blow pretty damn quick, and the creepage distances generally mean the AC would couple beyond the protection devices.

I like how they say it can protect against direct lightning strikes - what BS. Even the lightning rod on your house cannot protect against that - they'd vaporize. (The lightning rod is designed instead to cause dielectric breakdown of the air and conduct heavy current in an attempt to reduce the charge buildup. But if lightning hits it, it's generally a goner).

Even worse, if the AC couples the wrong way in said laptop, you could put a rather nasty voltage across the battery of your laptop...

Actually, maybe skip the AC. Put in DC - say 30V or so. That is enough to blow the protection diodes and possibly raise the bus lines to damage further components (ESD diodes prevent the USB power rails from exceeding ground and Vbus by excessive amounts by coupling them to a nearby power or ground rail at similar voltages. A driven voltage could easily cause the voltage to rise and destroy many components due to overvoltage stress - perhaps that rail was never meant to handle sustained 30V potential difference).

Re:Why yes! (0)

jez9999 (618189) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018511)

You're already wearing a pretty effective condom, it's called not running anything. There's absolutely no reason that the insertion of a storage device should cause your machine to run any of its code. If your OS is doing so it's a lousy OS.

Re:Why yes! (4, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018561)

Yes, windows blows, but a smart operating system doesn't protect you. A known flaw in the drivers for a USB drive could still allow execution of arbitrary code.

Re:Why yes! (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018635)

Yes, windows blows

It blows in many ways, but it's pretty easy to disable this autorun 'feature.'

Re:Why yes! (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | 1 year,21 days | (#45020031)

A known flaw in the drivers for a USB drive could still allow execution of arbitrary code.

Why hasn't the known flaw been fixed yet if it's a known flaw?

Re:Why yes! (1)

geekoid (135745) | 1 year,21 days | (#45020469)

Time, risk, and value.

Re:Why yes! (5, Interesting)

Hobadee (787558) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018781)

You are making a pretty big assumption there that what you are plugging in is actually a storage device. It could easily be a device which shows up as an HID device and plays back a macro. "Alt-F2, 'xterm', Enter, 'rm -rf /', Enter" would be pretty devastating on your secure Linux box which doesn't run anything from removable media.

Just because it looks like a thumb drive, doesn't mean it is one!

Re:Why yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018837)

That would be sweet. Someone should start a Kickstarter to make devices that do just that and leave them everywhere.

Re:Why yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019137)

No need for a Kickstarter project. There are already several implementations of the concept, some small enough to look like a USB memory stick.

Re:Why yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019345)

Such devices already exist, are cheap, and easy to program. You don't even need to solder:
https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11190
http://www.adafruit.com/products/199

Re:Why yes! (1)

QRDeNameland (873957) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019497)

It could easily be a device which shows up as an HID device and plays back a macro.

Could you use an HID device to steal PIN numbers from an ATM machine?

/pedant

Re:Why yes! (1)

fnj (64210) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019505)

Yeah, that would be real bad. If you ran the GUI as root like an idiot.

Re:Why yes! (1)

Culture20 (968837) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019595)

s@rm -rf /@/bin/rm -rf ~/@
would be devastating enough to most folk (and wouldn't require root privs)
There are other things that could happen too: setting up a cronjob/scheduled task for a secure tunnel to a dynamic address or a daemon that regularly downloads new exploit code and attempts to get root/administrator

Re:Why yes! (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | 1 year,21 days | (#45020505)

You are making a pretty big assumption there that what you are plugging in is actually a storage device. It could easily be a device which shows up as an HID device and plays back a macro. "Alt-F2, 'xterm', Enter, 'rm -rf /', Enter" would be pretty devastating on your secure Linux box which doesn't run anything from removable media.

Just because it looks like a thumb drive, doesn't mean it is one!

You don't an xterm to enter commands in unix/linux. You actually don't even need a shell, but it makes things a little easier.

Re:Why yes! (5, Informative)

jkflying (2190798) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018785)

You're thinking software. Try thinking hardware.

I bet by hooking the other end of the USB up to 220V I could do some pretty nasty things to your computer.

Re:Why yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018949)

Wow, that's a good point.

Re:Why yes! (1)

blueg3 (192743) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018789)

How do you know it's a storage device? It's just something with a USB port that happens to look vaguely like a storage device. But with USB, it's pretty trivial to do something like have that USB device present itself to the system as a storage device, mouse, and keyboard.

There's also no shortage of vulnerabilities in the USB stack. A buffer overflow in a USB driver, for example. This is all handled during enumeration, when (with any operating system), the user has little control over the OS's behavior.

Re:Why yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018859)

As long as you have auto-run turned off, then sure. "Auto-run," the dumbest feature to ever come to Windows.

Re:Why yes! (1)

geekoid (135745) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018979)

Every Major OS has the capability.

Re:Why yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019561)

What if it looks like a thumbdrive, but in reality is a thumb-drive plugged into a usb hub along with say a soft keyboard... that keeps on typing to open a file, dump a binary into it, and run it.. the same scheme would work on either windows or linux, bypassing whatever security you have setup.... (since as far as the computer is concerned, YOU just typed up that binary and ran it). It's not like you'd notice something like that (since keyboards/mice "just work" when you plug them in).

All along... it would also behave like a thumb-drive to keep you from getting suspicious.

Better idea (4, Informative)

MrEricSir (398214) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018403)

While it requires power, something like the PirateBox [daviddarts.com] seems like a safer alternative. It relies on wifi, which means you don't have to be in one physical spot to use it, and you don't run the risk of pluggin your computer into something you can't see. You never know, it could be a 240 volt power line attached to that USB plug.

Re:Better idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018601)

Why not run a file sharing app on your mobile that works over ad hoc local connections? Share all your media or anything else with passers by.

Surely such a thing exists for Android.

Re:Better idea (2)

CastrTroy (595695) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018761)

I was just thinking of doing something similar with a Raspberry Pi (or other similar cheap computer, Beaglebone etc.) Add a wireless dongle, create a network that people can connect to, and allow them to add files. It would be pretty easy to set up a firewall, so they couldn't do much damage. I'm not sure what the best software would be though. It would be nice if you could allow people to upload, but not delete files, and set up some kind of quota system so that someone doesn't just fill it with junk.

Re:Better idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018957)

Wow, someone that can say "Raspberry Pi" but can't google "file permissions on linux" or umask.

Re:Better idea (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018809)

If only there were some sort of pocket-sized device one could use to test for voltage.

Alternative solution: build the thing with the flash drive protruding from a transparent acrylic box/panel.

Re:Better idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019033)

If I were inclined I could build a drop that meet all of your design requirements, yet delivered 480 volts at the right time.

Re:Better idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019709)

You never know, it could be a 240 volt power line attached to that USB plug.

Welp, I know what I'm doing this Halloween.

What a great idea! (5, Funny)

Russ1642 (1087959) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018421)

The technological equivalent of having unprotected sex through a glory hole at a Quebec truckstop.

Re:What a great idea! (1)

Rinikusu (28164) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018457)

Without the excitement and swab down the dick later... Yeah, I think I'll pass...

Re:What a great idea! (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018481)

If you're running a system that is vulnerable to infected USB devices or media files, that's pretty much on you.

Re:What a great idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018559)

I know USB ports are protected from electrical damage with a fuse. But I don't know if they'd survive 480 volts down both the data and charge lines.

Re:What a great idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018563)

How do you know the USB connector isn't going to burn your device?

Re:What a great idea! (4, Insightful)

Rockoon (1252108) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018681)

If you're running a system that is vulnerable to infected USB devices or media files, that's pretty much on you.

Sigh.. there is no technical reason why a untrusted USB device couldnt present itself as a Human Interface Device (HID - keyboard, mouse, both, ..) and then open up a shell on your *nix box and run arbitrary shell commands.

There is in fact concern that future USB drives will be manufactured to "phone home" using such techniques.

Re:What a great idea! (1)

AK Marc (707885) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019075)

So you assert that there are no driver vulnerabilities that can cause issues, or physical attacks that could work over USB?

Re:What a great idea! (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018483)

Is there a reason truckstop glory holes in Quebec are more dangerous than those in other locations?

Re:What a great idea! (4, Funny)

Russ1642 (1087959) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018523)

When trying to depict something as seedy make it French. I didn't make up the rules.

Re:What a great idea! (1)

Gibgezr (2025238) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018599)

In this particular instance, having seen the state of many roadside toilets along the highway in Quebec over the years, I agree with the choice. Many are fine, but the filthiest/most run down bathrooms I have ever seen have all been in Quebec (and not just along the highway; the worst hotel bathroom was in Quebec as well...although, to be fair, so was the nicest).

Re:What a great idea! (1)

intangible (252848) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019307)

Was it the same hotel bathroom perchance?

Re:What a great idea! (1)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018541)

Wait...you're saying that's a bad idea?

Re:What a great idea! (2)

cjb658 (1235986) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018565)

What if the government is doing this to get us to install their spyware?

by analogy - use a dildo (1)

schlachter (862210) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018627)

use an offline, disposable computer to read these drives if you want to play the game.

Re:by analogy - use a dildo (1)

sconeu (64226) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019003)

Booted from a LiveCD.

Do you think this is safe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018427)

Well, do you?

If so, XWhInhE6emE

Re:Do you think this is safe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018567)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWhInhE6emE&feature=youtu.be

I used an ARDUINO to load one of these... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018447)

I used an ARDUINO to load one of these with BITCOINS and BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE.

OH BOY (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018449)

I hope there is some delicious Cheese Pizza recipes and nude beach photos on them.

Ah... Sneakernet. (4, Informative)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018459)

Sneakernet [wikipedia.org] , for you youngsters, is like the Internet [wikipedia.org] , but with more walking [wikipedia.org] .

[ Links make things "Informative"... :-) ]

Re:Ah... Sneakernet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018813)

PigeonNet [wikipedia.org] , for you [insert group here], is like the ethernet [wikipedia.org] , but with more flying [wikipedia.org] .

[ Replacing links makes things "Funny"... :-) ]

Re:Ah... Sneakernet. (1)

geekoid (135745) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018965)

The latency is hell.

Re:Ah... Sneakernet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019295)

What is the bandwidth of a pickup truck full of thumb-drives? What you have here is a HIGH-bandwidth high-latency network using a protocol similar to UDP (ie: without acknowledgements). A different take on store-and-forward.

Re:Ah... Sneakernet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019329)

instead of moving the data, you move the computers... this will probably scale up brilliantly!

How is this different from sneakernet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018507)

How is this different from sneakernet? Other than having a centralized database of locations (which I would imagine undermines the whole secrecy/privacy goal), isn't this what we've been doing since before the internet began?

Soviet sneakernet (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018573)

In a sneakernet you move the media to the computer, with dead drops you move the computer to the media.

Re:How is this different from sneakernet? (2)

Gibgezr (2025238) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018623)

This is sneakernet with anonymous strangers. I don't know about you, but that is a new one on me. It used to be I knew who I was getting the floppy disk from.

Re:How is this different from sneakernet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019433)

Don't copy that floppy!

Re:How is this different from sneakernet? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019079)

With sneaker-net you knew who you were dealing with, and you took it to them personally. You didn't just lay a grocery bag of anonymous floppies under a park bench.

Re:How is this different from sneakernet? (1)

geekoid (135745) | 1 year,21 days | (#45020487)

anon sneakernet is still sneakernet

Interesting, but... (2)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018521)

I don't see how this thwarts government spying. A catalog must be online somewhere, and anything the government is interested in, well, bonus, set up a cam opposite and write down whoever visits. Hell, it makes foreign spying even easier -- just another tourist visiting your country.

Re:Interesting, but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019371)

I don't see how this thwarts government spying. A catalog must be online somewhere, and anything the government is interested in, well, bonus, set up a cam opposite and write down whoever visits. Hell, it makes foreign spying even easier -- just another tourist visiting your country.

Resources. The government can come into your house and look in your computer (with an apparently all-too-easy-to-get warrant), but they don't have enough people to do that to all houses everywhere. The same is somewhat true here, they can't physically monitor all dead drops. And we could conceivably put in our own surveillance measures to detect if they physically come to the dead drop location, so we have a chance at knowing if we've been compromised. It's not a cure, it's just returning a little more control back to us. Or maybe it's just the illusion of control. We humans have a hard time telling the difference.

And it never occured to anyone ... (1)

johnlcallaway (165670) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018545)

... that the government can find and plug into these as easily as anyone else?? And then load software to track who is downloading??

Another creative ideas from people from children living in their mom's basements who really don't have a clue.

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (1)

Gibgezr (2025238) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018699)

How do they "load software to track who is downloading"? Do thumb drives now have the capability to execute software on their own? Can that software access your files and ID you over a USB port?

Methinks you don't understand the technologies involved here. Everything to do with computers isn't a computer; specifically, USB flash drives are not computers.

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (1)

geekoid (135745) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018935)

His point is someone could put software on it, and then when it gets copied to your computer it could report a location.

But the would require someone clicking on an unknown executable or link, and no one would every do that, right?

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019185)

I don't think that was his point at all. He thinks it's going to magically run when you use the USB.

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (1)

Gibgezr (2025238) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019283)

OK, so the only people who need to be scared are people that would download a file named "RunMeToMakeFacebookFaster.exe" and execute it...but those folks are already boned by every Nigerian Prince on teh internetz, so I don't worry about them. The government already knows the state of every bit on their computers.

I might be wrong, lord knows who actually uses these things, but it sounded like it was aimed at the sort of paranoid people who worry about the government tracking their files, and wouldn't be silly enough to run software they found laying in the street. It could be that they are actually used exclusively by cool hipsters with Macbooks though.

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019907)

Or it could show up as a HID and do a windows key+R, ping tracker144323334554.example.com. They could do all sorts of bad things with them because a USB device could be just about anything.

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (1)

geekoid (135745) | 1 year,21 days | (#45020519)

Or and hacked word doc, or an image with an exploit, or a file with a virus.

It's like your knowledge of attack vectors stopped in 1994

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019087)

Try reading other comments. Several people have explained how a USB device can do interesting things to a computer, even without a USB-related exploit.

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019419)

The other "interesting" things have nothing to do with what that guy is saying. Those have to do with heavily modified or fake ports. This idiot is trying to say that the software will magically run by itself.

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (4, Informative)

blueg3 (192743) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019599)

How do they "load software to track who is downloading"? Do thumb drives now have the capability to execute software on their own?

Sometimes! But let's use an easier attack. Put a thumb drive plus some custom hardware into a thumb drive case. Easy to do. The hardware enumerates as both a thumb drive and, say, a USB audio-device driver that is present on most stock Linux distributions and has a particular buffer overflow vulnerability that allows arbitrary code execution. That sort of vulnerability is reasonably common and has happened in the past. Engineering that hardware is not hard. When the system enumerates the USB audio device, it loads that driver and the driver performs setup by talking to the USB device and requesting information. The evil device sends back responses to the driver that trigger the buffer overflow and execute device-provided code.

You could make this fairly system-independent by putting a number of fake devices in there that exercise different vulnerabilities. Or you could determine what the connecting operating system is (and what drivers it has available) by looking at how it enumerates. You can even have your device use soft reconnects to try out different vulnerable drivers. (You would have the computer-facing port actually connect to a hub. Also easy to engineer up.)

Can that software access your files and ID you over a USB port?

So, yes.

Don't assume that because something looks like a flash drive, it actually is. And don't connect unknown peripherals to your computer -- they talk directly to drivers.

Re:And it never occured to anyone ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018749)

Pray tell, how are they going to load software to track who's downloading? You think it's going to magically run just because I plug into it? Only if you are stupid enough to use Windows AND have auto-run turned on. Other than that, you really think the government gives a crap about this? Another stupid idea from some Slashdot idiot who doesn't understand how computers work.

plus 3, T8oll) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018687)

anothe8 cuNting [goat.cx]

What will the Jews do... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018745)

... to stop the general public from spreading 'hate' about them - i.e. 'the truth'.

The truth is 'hate' to those who hate the truth...

i.e. the Eternal Jew...

www.zioncrimefactory.com

The Jews didn't predict the rise of computing power, the ability of the man in the street to make professional looking videos (or 'good enough' ones) and spread them on the internet, and incredibly cheap mass storage, both USB drives and DVDRs...

Oy vey!

Re:What will the Jews do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45018907)

Mod up.

Re:What will the Jews do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019013)

Oh, look a sock puppet.

Re:What will the Jews do... (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019173)

Dear incoherent racist troll:

When you die, you'll have accomplished nothing but making life for others slightly less wonderful than it otherwise would have been. You will have created nothing of lasting beauty, and wasted the only opportunity you'll ever have to do something great. You get one chance at this game of life, and you are losing at it. Badly.

but it is a could (1)

geekoid (135745) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018899)

it's just a particularly slow one.

Antarctica doesn't need dead drops... (3, Interesting)

babymac (312364) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018905)

As a six month veteran of the US Antarctic Program, I can tell you McMurdo Station doesn't need dead drops. There's plenty of file sharing going on pretty much in the open. I attended meetings in the library that would pretty much devolve into file sharing swap meets. I suppose it must have been like the mid-1990s on college campuses. Fun stuff!

Blast that federal shutdown! (1)

Austrian Anarchy (3010653) | 1 year,21 days | (#45018909)

http://deaddrops.com/dead-drops/db-map/ [deaddrops.com]
Service Temporarily Unavailable

The server is temporarily unable to service your request due to maintenance downtime or capacity problems. Please try again later.

Additionally, a 503 Service Temporarily Unavailable error was encountered while trying to use an ErrorDocument to handle the request.

No thanks (1)

nurb432 (527695) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019043)

1 - God only knows what virus is on that device or if its not just wired to 220 and fry your machine on contact.
2 - Who is watching? It wouldn't be considered entrapment if its the government.

hey INTERNET! (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019047)

we are looking for people who would be interested to bring the deaddrops.com project fwd. things were slow but caught up now again in post snowden era ;) if you know php and are interested to support please get in touch! dev at deaddrops.com
thx!
ARAM (i m the guy in the video ;)

I will create a dead drop wifi somewhere. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019127)

Sounds cool.
Harbor freight solar disguise it as a sat antenna, thumb drive, wifi and some computer on a stick near a busy location.
I could upload and down load new files from the busy location once in awhile.

It sounds cool.

Time to do more in Seattle (1)

jetcityorange (666232) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019147)

I've placed a couple of dead drops here in Seattle (the gum wall @ Pike Place Market & the Fremont Bridge) but both are long gone. Looks like it's an idea whose time has come. Time to plant some more all over town... http://jetcityorange.com/dead-drops/ [jetcityorange.com]

wifi drops (1)

nurb432 (527695) | 1 year,21 days | (#45019199)

Those *might* be ok to use. at least then you can scan what you are getting, plus it wouldn't be obvious you are doing it.

1 hidden comment (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019213)

This comment is hidden.

Re:1 hidden comment (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019509)

Not very well.

Re:1 hidden comment (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45019795)

1 hidden comment [slashdot.org]

Sounds like geocaching with a spare netbook. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,21 days | (#45020497)

Cause who gives a shit about netbooks anyway?

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