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Voyager 1 May Be Caught Inside an Interstellar Flux Transfer Event

Soulskill posted about 9 months ago | from the at-least-it's-not-stuck-in-the-delta-quadrant dept.

Space 120

KentuckyFC writes "Last month, NASA declared that Earth's most distant probe had finally left the Solar System. But the announcement may now turn out to be premature. It was prompted by a dramatic increase in the density of plasma in the region of space the spacecraft is now in. However, there has been no change in the local magnetic field, which is what astrophysicists would expect if Voyager had entered interstellar space. Instead, space scientists think the probe may be caught inside a magnetic portal known as an interstellar flux transfer event. This occurs when the magnetic fields from two different objects briefly become connected through a tube-like magnetic structure. This process happens between the Earth and Sun's magnetic field about every eight minutes, so similar events are expected between the Sun's field and the interstellar field. This magnetic tube would allow particles in from outside the Solar System, increasing the density of plasma, while maintaining the same magnetic field. If so, Voyager 1 hasn't yet left the Solar System after all."

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Obligatory XKCD (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45018587)

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

Austrian Anarchy (3010653) | about 9 months ago | (#45018807)

Re:Obligatory XKCD (2)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 9 months ago | (#45018841)

I've always wondered if that comic is a static image, or if it actually accurately represents the number of times Voyager 1 has left the solar system, and gets updated.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | about 9 months ago | (#45019037)

Static image, most likely. You tend to know when it isn't because it's either obvious or on the news.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (5, Funny)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 9 months ago | (#45018875)

Doc: Bye, Marty! Yaaa hoooo! It worked! It worked! I sent him out of the solar system!

Marty McVoyager in a different shirt runs up behind him: Doc! I'm back.

Doc: Guuuuuuuuuhhhhhh!!!!!

Marty: I'm back. I'm back from interstellar space!

Doc: Great Scott! It must be the interstellar flux transit event capacitor!

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about 9 months ago | (#45019155)

If you know the exact distance where the solar system ends, please inform the people working on the Voyager program and save them the trouble. The fact that a human-made object is actively exploring the edges of our solar system and returning data to Earth is amazing.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

Austrian Anarchy (3010653) | about 9 months ago | (#45019583)

It used to be the long axis of Pluto's orbit, in my book. And since Pluto is still a planet, in my book, then there you have it.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45020503)

What if there's a planetoid of slightly larger mass than Pluto, about a third of the distance out again? Is that in interstellar space? Good job.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

turbidostato (878842) | about 10 months ago | (#45021181)

What if, what if...

There's no damn planet out of Pluto's orbit! ...on his book, that is.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (2)

drkim (1559875) | about 10 months ago | (#45022417)

If you know the exact distance where the solar system ends, please inform the people working on the Voyager program and save them the trouble...

This is all so arbitrary and semantic.

All we have to do is declare Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune to no longer be planets, and then we can say that Voyager left the Solar System when it passed the orbit apogee of Mars.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (3, Funny)

bondsbw (888959) | about 9 months ago | (#45019457)

Voyager has simply entered the quantum superposition layer of our solar system, where it is inside the solar system, in interstellar space, maybe somewhere between, a dead cat, and a live mega-spaceship, all at the same time.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

Jade_Wayfarer (1741180) | about 10 months ago | (#45022703)

So if we, say, point a Hubble telescope at it, will it collapse into one of these states?

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

nightsky30 (3348843) | about 9 months ago | (#45020525)

*Sigh* Now he's got to update it again...

Re:Obligatory XKCD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45021003)

It behaves just like a cat. It can't decide whether to stay in or out of our solar system.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

hobarrera (2008506) | about 10 months ago | (#45021547)

Funny and quite accurate as well. I was just thinking "This means that we'll see yet another new regarding Voyager I leaving the solar system"!

Re:Obligatory XKCD (5, Funny)

Bite The Pillow (3087109) | about 10 months ago | (#45022307)

We keep discovering NEW SHIT. There's new shit out there, and we keep finding it. We don't know what it means because we haven't left the fucking SOLAR SYSTEM before. It's kind of a big deal.

Science is pretty much built on being wrong, and looking at the data again, and fixing whatever was wrong. One team studies something and one signal is gone, so we left the solar system. But another team looks at different data and we haven't.

Imagine coming across from China, seeing Hawaii, and seeing an island. The new world! Oops, that was just an island, next one is new world. Oops, next one. Oops, next one. Wait, where did the land go? LAND! Oh crap, it's a bay. There's land! FINALLY!

It's like playing the old game "is this my ass or another roll of fat?" Or the relatively new game "is that a hot chick or Fabio?" or "is this movie going to be any good?" or "is this story a dupe?" or "where does the pee pee go for sexy time?"

You are going to lose plenty of times before winning. That's how we find completely new shit about the universe. Is that a human like species, or a chimpanzee that will rip my face off? I don't know it's fucking new! It might eat me and digest me and shit me out and throw my turd corpse at zoo visitors, because the other visitors laugh and I think it's what I should be doing. Someone has to die for science, I'd rather be behind someone, applauding and pushing them into certain death.

But when that guy dies, I'm going to write down how he died, so that the next poor fucker doesn't die exactly the same way. More information, more new shit that we didn't know before. Go for it, die for science, and let's all LEARN SHIT.

Hah... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45018595)

I knew it.

It sounds like they have a problem with their flux (1)

adjwilli (530933) | about 9 months ago | (#45018613)

It sounds like they have a problem with their flux capacitor.

Re:It sounds like they have a problem with their f (2)

Steve Woolley (3364025) | about 9 months ago | (#45018675)

The only need to accelerate to 88 miles per hour (141.6 km/h) to escape.

Re:It sounds like they have a problem with their f (2)

TyFoN (12980) | about 9 months ago | (#45018835)

Now the real question is 88 mph in relation to what? :)

Re:It sounds like they have a problem with their f (5, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | about 9 months ago | (#45019545)

0 mph

Re:It sounds like they have a problem with their f (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45021727)

In relation to what?

Re:It sounds like they have a problem with their f (3, Informative)

lgw (121541) | about 9 months ago | (#45018845)

Reverse the polarity of the neutron flux!

That was the only bit of technobabble that Jon Pertwee would memorize, because is has meter. :)

Re:It sounds like they have a problem with their f (1)

tinkerton (199273) | about 9 months ago | (#45019429)

It sounds like they have a problem with their flux capacitor.

I got to give it to them, it's a nice title.

Well of course not. (4, Funny)

rubmytummy (677080) | about 9 months ago | (#45018617)

Raise your hand if you fell for it this time.

I have to raise my hand. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45019473)

'cause NASA said so!

Re:Well of course not. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45020751)

Raise your hand if you fell for it this time.

Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me 8 or 9 times, shame on me ;-)

Relevant xkcd (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45018639)

For flux sake (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45018661)

dem jokers dun no shit bout nothin

Oh nos! (2)

fredrated (639554) | about 9 months ago | (#45018667)

Does this mean we have to go through another 'Voyager has now left the solar system' again?

How will it end? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45019263)

Boy, this is a real page turner. I mean, each chapter is different. In chapter 17, we were leaving the Solar System. Then, in a twist no one saw coming, chapter 18 reveals that we are still in the Solar System, just hiding behind JLo's butt. I can't wait for next installment. I mean it. Exclamation marks and the number one mixed together, randomly.

Re:Oh nos! (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 9 months ago | (#45019969)

Consolidate all such stories to make the hype more efficient: "Voyager has found dark water on Mars beyond the solar system".

Re:Oh nos! (1)

wallsg (58203) | about 9 months ago | (#45020533)

Does this mean we have to go through another 'Voyager has now left the solar system' again?

At least it's not on its way back in the middle of a giant energy cloud.

Re:Oh nos! (2)

Horshu (2754893) | about 10 months ago | (#45021945)

And again in 30,000 years when Voyager gets past the Oort Cloud and *really* leaves the solar system.

Tachyon beam (1)

scsirob (246572) | about 9 months ago | (#45018683)

It's simple. Time to whip out the Tachyon beam, remodulate the shield frequency and it's on its way again! Just what are they thinking..

Re:Tachyon beam (2)

geekoid (135745) | about 9 months ago | (#45018819)

That can't work, you reversed nothing!

Re:Tachyon beam (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 9 months ago | (#45019539)

That can't work, you reversed nothing!

Nor was it rerouted through the main deflector.

Re:Tachyon beam (1)

barlevg (2111272) | about 9 months ago | (#45018843)

You forgot to calibrate the Heisenberg compensators.

Yeah, the summary really did sound like technobabble right out of Star Trek.

Re:Tachyon beam (2)

bobbied (2522392) | about 9 months ago | (#45019055)

Are you certain that will fix it?

Re:Tachyon beam (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 9 months ago | (#45019557)

You forgot to calibrate the Heisenberg compensators.

That only works on transporters.

Re:Tachyon beam (1)

barlevg (2111272) | about 9 months ago | (#45019581)

Goddamn it, Grim. I'm a doctor, not an engineer.

Let's Do The Time Warp to the 1960s: (1)

Hartree (191324) | about 9 months ago | (#45019877)

Scotty: Captain! We're caught in an interstellar flux transfer event!"

Kirk: Is that worse than the heartbreak of psoriasis?

Re:Tachyon beam (1)

runeghost (2509522) | about 10 months ago | (#45022675)

Yeah, they've been breaking badly lately.

An interstellar flux transfer event?? (2)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | about 9 months ago | (#45018695)

Holy shit, that could cause a resonance cascade! We should reverse the polarity of the neutron flow* immediately!

* [wikipedia.org]

Re:An interstellar flux transfer event?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45018855)

Neutron flow?

Clearly you mean "bio-neural gel packs" "bio-neural gel packs" [memory-alpha.org]

Easy fix... (4, Funny)

superdave80 (1226592) | about 9 months ago | (#45018723)

Just reverse the polarity, and all should be well.

Shit always worked on Star Trek...

Re:Easy fix... (1)

cervesaebraciator (2352888) | about 9 months ago | (#45018799)

Isn't this how the thing ended up in the Delta quadrant in the first place?

Re:Easy fix... (1)

barlevg (2111272) | about 9 months ago | (#45018881)

No, getting caught in a flux transfer is how you get your light ship all the way to Cardassia. [memory-alpha.org]

Re:Easy fix... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45019751)

Now now. Leave Kim, Kourtney and Khloe out of this.

Re:Easy fix... (2)

dubbayu_d_40 (622643) | about 9 months ago | (#45019129)

Wait, did Darth Vader came down from Planet Vulcan and tell you that?

OMG XKCD did something about voyager! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45018737)

Gotta post it!

http://xkcd.com/1189/ [xkcd.com]

I'm so original!

Series of Tubes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45018739)

Voyager 1 is not on a truck. It's in a series of tubes.

Re:Series of Tubes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45019995)

Voyager 1 is not on a truck. It's in a series of tubes.

You mean like intertubes?

This is the part in the Truman Show where the boat (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45018795)

hits the wall.

Realizes Kanye West is a genis.

MIND

BLOWN

Magnetic tubes (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45018869)

Re: "Exactly this process happens between the Earth and Sun’s magnetic field every eight minutes or so."

I am endlessly entertained watching the Slashdot community discuss magnetic fields without any mention of the electrical currents which tend to be their cause down here on Earth. It's a fascinating cultural contradiction that just keeps on giving, for on one hand we have these empirically-challenged disciplines of science -- but respected scientists nonetheless -- essentially suggesting that we live in a magnetic universe ... and on the other hand, we have the Slashdot community's general familiarity with electronics, for which electric currents are absolutely expected as the general cause where magnetic fields are observed.

Re:Magnetic tubes (3, Funny)

I'm New Around Here (1154723) | about 9 months ago | (#45019053)

Uhhh, ... I think we've all been insulted. But I'm honestly not sure how.

Re:Magnetic tubes (1)

khallow (566160) | about 9 months ago | (#45019623)

I am endlessly entertained watching the Slashdot community discuss magnetic fields without any mention of the electrical currents which tend to be their cause down here on Earth.

Why would that be relevant? You can have strong magnetic fields in the presence of microscopic electric currents such as permanent magnets. And they're discussing this in the context of plasma, both from the Sun and from the interstellar environment. I understand there is some current in the Solar Wind, but one can easily explain magnetic fields on interstellar scales without requiring similar scale electrical fields or currents.

Re: Magnetic tubes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45021437)

Eleeeeeectriiic Uuuuuuuuniveeerrrse!

trolling /. since 1952

NASA PR machine (3, Insightful)

Animats (122034) | about 9 months ago | (#45018959)

I thought the NASA PR machine was turned off due to the Government shutdown.

Re:NASA PR machine (1)

Jeremy Erwin (2054) | about 9 months ago | (#45020325)

Forget PR. It's the data collection and analysis that really cost money. The Government is closed people-- that means shut off your computers and stop doing any work. I don't care if you miss a "once in a lifetime" scientific opportunity--it's against the law [wikipedia.org] to put your scientific interests ahead of partisan political squabbling.

Re:NASA PR machine (3, Funny)

hobarrera (2008506) | about 10 months ago | (#45021565)

This is just part of a cron script that send a news "Voyager I just left the solar system" once a month to the media. No human intervention required.

Re:NASA PR machine (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | about 10 months ago | (#45022433)

The paper's authors aren't federal government employees, and were working with data pulled down from Voyager previously.

Voyager's Still Going (1)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | about 9 months ago | (#45018985)

I thought that it was stopped for the government shutdown?

Serious question, are projects like Voyager, the Mars Rovers and all that still being actively monitored, or are they just being left to fend for themselves during the shutdown?

Re:Voyager's Still Going (1)

I'm New Around Here (1154723) | about 9 months ago | (#45019091)

I thought that it was stopped for the government shutdown?

Serious question, are projects like Voyager, the Mars Rovers and all that still being actively monitored, or are they just being left to fend for themselves during the shutdown?

NASA has Howard Wolowitz and Raj Koothrappali monitoring the Mars rovers. But Voyager is on it's own.

Re:Voyager's Still Going (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45019573)

" But Voyager is on it's own."

I wish that extraneous apostrophe would leave the Solar System.

Re:Voyager's Still Going (1)

nightsky30 (3348843) | about 9 months ago | (#45020589)

BAZINGA!!!

Re:Voyager's Still Going (1)

I'm New Around Here (1154723) | about 10 months ago | (#45022421)

Not gonna happen. It is ingrained in our culture.

Re:Voyager's Still Going (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45019365)

Yes, I believe the rovers are currently sitting still for now.
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ "Due to the lapse in federal government funding, this website is not being updated. We also cannot respond to comments/questions."

Why can't people be 'normal' and take their work home with them? Answering questions on e-mail and twitter is the new standard but maybe they are legally not really allowed to do even do this?

Re:Voyager's Still Going (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45019925)

The antideficiency act prevents them from doing volunteer work/taking work home

Re:Voyager's Still Going (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 9 months ago | (#45020043)

it's illegal for the buro's to accept voluntary work from them. that's why Smithsonian is closed.

seriously though, what the fuck is up with USA? you can't fucking keep even your museums open...

why the fuck don't these departments get their budget for the year? why the fuck do you even have two houses, if the point is to just fuck things up all the time?

Re:Voyager's Still Going (1)

Jeremy Erwin (2054) | about 9 months ago | (#45020669)

the founders (blessings and peace be upon them) designed our government to be dysfunctional, so that the governed will learn not to place their trust in politicians. We can't have an efficient government because that would corrupt our souls.

Re:Voyager's Still Going (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45021185)

The founders were dicks. Sadly, I'm serious. They failed to make adequate provision for change. (Sure, there's a lot of mitigation - I wouldn't seriously expect them to foresee the amount of change that has taken place. But they could have foreseen that the degree of change would be unforeseeable, and caveated their documentation accordingly.

Re:Voyager's Still Going (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45022515)

You clearly aren't in the tech industry.

We hate change.

97% of NASA is furloughed. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45019511)

I can't find any information on exactly who that is, but considering the importance of some projects I imagine those other 3% are there for a reason.

Are we there yet? (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 9 months ago | (#45019045)

I hope that Voyager finished to leave the solar system by the time it reaches Andromeda.

Re:Are we there yet? (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 10 months ago | (#45021875)

"I hope that Voyager finished to leave the solar system by the time it reaches Andromeda."

I think that Andromeda will reach voyager first (Its due to collide with the milky way in a billion years or so)

I blame the shutdown (0)

Coeurderoy (717228) | about 9 months ago | (#45019049)

See, they didn't vote the budget, and shutdown the government, and not the voyager 1 probe can't leave the solar system !

It's a conspiracy !!!

Why does this sound like the precursor to V'Ger? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45019089)

I think this is the part of Star Trek: The Motion Picture that we never knew...

The martians! (1)

Tanman (90298) | about 9 months ago | (#45019569)

Right now, there is a space alien laughing its ass off while it pulls voyager back into our solar system with a magnetic tractor beam.

HUR HUR HUR! EARTHLINGS FUNNY!!!!

It's aliens I tell you (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 9 months ago | (#45019591)

They think reversing the connectors on Voyager's sensors is a big joke.

Earth-Sun magnetic connection (2)

petsounds (593538) | about 9 months ago | (#45019731)

Honestly, I'm more fascinated by this. What effects does this have on the Earth's magnetic field?

I'd be disappointed if ... (1)

Evil Pete (73279) | about 9 months ago | (#45019861)

... I still cared about the status of Voyager 1. Perhaps it still hasn't left the nest, probably all set up in the basement playing GTA V.

Personally, I am delighted at the name of this phenomenon, whoever made up that phrase was clearly watching too much science fiction that week, or more likely not enough. "Interstellar flux transfer event" ... can you not see that in a future SF script? "Captain, we are caught in an interstellar flux transfer event, if we don't break free we will [go back in time | be transferred to a remote part of the universe | be transferred to another universe | nothing]"

can we launch a faster probe to catch up to it? (1)

electrosoccertux (874415) | about 9 months ago | (#45019915)

Can we launch a faster probe to catch up to and pass by Voyager? One with up to date instrumentation. Would that tell us anything?

Re:can we launch a faster probe to catch up to it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45020635)

XKCD 'What if [xkcd.com] ' to the rescue!
Short answer, yes we could but it will take a long time to catch up. Voyager has a 35 year head start.

Re:can we launch a faster probe to catch up to it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45020729)

True. But is somehow it became important to do so, the technology we have today using ion engines and solar sails and such could make it possible to launch a costly vehicle that accelerated far longer. It could accelerate for years actually, and develop a much faster rate of acceleration. The original Voyager, and most subsequent deep space vehicles, are designed to be the most economical possible and get the job done. If the job was to catch up and pass it, and the budget were sufficient, that could be done in far fewer than 32 years. It would pass Voyager moving perhaps an order of magnitude faster. Often the original design restrictions (time and budget) dictate what we do more than intrinsic limits.

Interstellar Flux Transfer Event (1)

Stormy Dragon (800799) | about 9 months ago | (#45019977)

We witnessed a space-sponge spontaneously move more than six feet!

Kirk: (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 9 months ago | (#45019991)

Khaaaaaaan!

Oh, wait.

Suuuure, it is. (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 9 months ago | (#45020009)

"Flux Transfer Event"? Yeah right. Caused by a failing Flux Capacitor, no doubt.

V'GER (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45020269)

The creator has not answered!

CRON (1)

dk20 (914954) | about 9 months ago | (#45020297)

Can the slashdot guys put together some sort of scheduled job to post a "Voyager has left the solar system" every few days? Might save the editors a few minutes posting the article. Don't forget to include a number of AC's posting the "Obligatory XKCD" link

Giggitty! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45020455)

On first reading the headline Quagmire says "Giggitty Giggitty" but then on second reading says "Wut?"

Of Course... (0)

Zamphatta (1760346) | about 9 months ago | (#45020797)

It can't go any further 'cause the government shutdown.

We have it wrong.. (1)

brxndxn (461473) | about 10 months ago | (#45021141)

We're all going to find out there's some still-unexplained phenomenon where every object outside the solar system is actually much closer than it appears to us do to this flux event that distorts everything. We are told by the world's brightest scientists that everything is goddamn far away. Voyager 1 is going to go out and prove that all wrong. We used to think the Earth is flat.

Re:We have it wrong.. (1)

turbidostato (878842) | about 10 months ago | (#45021299)

"We're all going to find out there's some still-unexplained phenomenon where every object outside the solar system is actually much closer than it appears to us"

And then, a bit later, we'll recieve a deep WOOOOONNNNNK! as Voyager hits the Celestial Sphere.

So the universe is a series of tubes? (1)

davidwr (791652) | about 10 months ago | (#45021409)

Who knew? I mean besides Ted Stevens of course.

Incorrect Premise (1)

ks*nut (985334) | about 10 months ago | (#45021539)

The claim that Voyager 1 has left the Solar System is incorrect. Voyager 1 was thought to have entered the interstellar medium, but it may be another 30,000 years before it crosses out of the Oort Cloud and finally leaves the Solar System.

Not "Caught" (1)

Bruce Perens (3872) | about 10 months ago | (#45021621)

"Caught" would imply that it can't exit the area or phenomenon. In fact it seems to be traveling through the phenomenon. It would be really interesting if its vector chaged, and I thought that was what the headline meant.

Back on the magnetic highway (1)

orion205 (1130561) | about 10 months ago | (#45022201)

So, it seems Voyager is still on the "magnetic highway" after all. I seem to recall during the discussion of the "magnetic highway" that some scientists were waiting for a change in the magnetic field [slashdot.org] before they claimed to have left the solar system. Somehow that got ignored when the plasma density data came out.

Re:Back on the magnetic highway (1)

deviated_prevert (1146403) | about 10 months ago | (#45022597)

So, it seems Voyager is still on the "magnetic highway" after all. I seem to recall during the discussion of the "magnetic highway" that some scientists were waiting for a change in the magnetic field [slashdot.org] before they claimed to have left the solar system. Somehow that got ignored when the plasma density data came out.

Wouldn't it be magnificent if beyond the gravitational and magnetic bounds of our solar system there existed galactic plasma winds driven on lines of magnetic fields. Perhaps interstellar travel is truly sailing within the confines of the galaxy. It would be wonderfully poetic if our first interstellar explorations were actually somewhat akin to our first intercontinental ones.

There is poetry in science and nature and oft times there is rhyme, as witness the beauty of a Fibonacci sequence in math or the wonders of the double helix, or the marvels of fractals. As long as we do not close our minds the universe will unfold for those who seek it's truths.

Why light would not be diffracted and time shifted in some way by these theoretical currents in galactic interstellar space would need to be investigated. Perhaps it is but only in terms of space time and not vector so everything in the movement of the stars in galactic terms looks static but the time of the light and other emr is shifted by galactic interstellar plasma winds but not the intensity.

Being in ignorance of the actual make up of galactic systems is a beautiful thing because it spurs the mind into wonderment and from that wonderment comes the investigation of science. Those who seek it do hear the music of the stars, never tell a child that you know anything for an absolute only tell them that one can surmise truth from what one observes and never be afraid of being proved wrong about a supposition or belittle others for making one. We are all students of our universe and it is beautiful.

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  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>