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Sorm: Russia Intends To Monitor "All Communications" At Sochi Olympics

timothy posted about a year ago | from the step-lively-comrade dept.

Privacy 193

dryriver writes with this excerpt from The Guardian: "Athletes and spectators attending the Winter Olympics in Sochi in February will face some of the most invasive and systematic spying and surveillance in the history of the Games, documents shared with the Guardian show. Russia's powerful FSB security service plans to ensure that no communication by competitors or spectators goes unmonitored during the event, according to a dossier compiled by a team of Russian investigative journalists looking into preparations for the 2014 Games. The journalists ... found that major amendments have been made to telephone and Wi-Fi networks in the Black Sea resort to ensure extensive and all-permeating monitoring and filtering of all traffic, using Sorm, Russia's system for intercepting phone and internet communications. Ron Deibert, a professor at the University of Toronto and director of Citizen Lab, which co-operated with the Sochi research, describes the Sorm amendments as "Prism on steroids", referring to the programme used by the NSA in the US and revealed to the Guardian by the whistleblower Edward Snowden."

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Monitoring (5, Insightful)

EuclideanSilence (1968630) | about a year ago | (#45051345)

That's just what oppressive governments do. They have to monitor everything to stay in power.

Re:Monitoring (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051431)

That's just what oppressive governments do. They have to monitor everything to stay in power.

Just like the US of A. Old foe, meet new tyrant. Old foe copies new tyrant. Old foe and new tyrant are now buddies.

Re:Monitoring (4, Interesting)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about a year ago | (#45051671)

>> That's just what oppressive governments do. They have to monitor everything to stay in power.

> Just like the US of A.

So if the USA is able to 'monitor everything to stay in power,' why is the government stalemated at the moment? Why does the President have no power? Why, unlike in Russia, are people currently able to publicly oppose their leader with zero consquences?

Curious Canadian wants to know...

Re:Monitoring (5, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | about a year ago | (#45051757)

That's just the theater. The real power never appears on television.

Re:Monitoring (2)

homey of my owney (975234) | about a year ago | (#45051775)

You're right. It's in the bureaucracy.

Re:Monitoring (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052147)

The lizard people bureaucracy.

Re:Monitoring (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052021)

Did you post this video?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2mjs_gdMAI

Re:Monitoring (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051939)

Ah, but that is an internal fight between the Democan and Republicrat wings of The Party, no plebs need apply.

Re:Monitoring (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052103)

President of US has no absolute power over everything, the same is true for Putin. If you think Putin is some absolutist czar and can do whatever he wants, you are watching western propaganda too much. The difference is that right now the two faction that hold power in US are in fight, while in Russia they are mostly playing along. Putin and Obama are figureheads.

Tell that joke about zero consequences to Snowden or to people from Occupy, to name just two examples. I would grant you that Russia government is more thinly-skinned, but even in Russia you can voice opposition to various degrees, and even in US if you try to mount too effective opposition, you will be whacked hard.

Re:Monitoring (1)

u16084 (832406) | about a year ago | (#45052281)

zero consquences... never to be heard from again....

Re:Monitoring (4, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45052327)

why is the government stalemated at the moment?

What stalemate? The the one side of the party is bickering with the other one? C'mon, that's the sideshow for when there's nothing important to do. Or rather, when there is a lot of important stuff to be done, but nothing that they actually want to do because doing anything would be against their interest. Don't think of it as a stalemate, think of it as the half time show to keep the spectators entertained while there's nothing really going on that they want to do.

Why does the President have no power?

Erh... why should he have any power? You nuts? That muppet is elected by the plebs, why the fuck should he get any real power?

Why, unlike in Russia, are people currently able to publicly oppose their leader with zero consquences?

Because we learned that governments are stable as long as people talk, protest, march, complain, make jokes or smear crap on internet boards. It gives them a place to vent their anger at government while not really having any impact on it. Think of it as some way to vent some steam. It's actually the sensible thing to do, not only does it give the people the illusion that they can voice their concerns (well, that's not really an illusion, they can actually do that, the illusion is that anyone gives a shit), it's a way to vent. If you keep the lid on the pot too long and too tightly, the pot won't whistle, it will explode.

So they let 'em whistle instead. It's maybe annoying, but it doesn't really cause any harm.

Re:Monitoring (4, Insightful)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about a year ago | (#45052487)

Because at just below the top of the slope the view is different?

Fascism will come wrapped in a flag and carrying a Bible. ~ Sinclair Lewis 1935

If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy. -- James Madison

patriotism is the last refuge of scoundrels. - Samuel Johnson

let me know if any of those seem to describe the current US political climate...

Re:Monitoring (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051491)

Thank you NSA for revitalizing your enemy and recreating the glory days of the cold war. Old school job security permanently returns.

Boycott (1)

zoomshorts (137587) | about a year ago | (#45051833)

Simply Boycott these games. Save your money.

Re: Boycott (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051913)

Yes. But most people are too stupid. They only care about being entertained.

Panem et circensem.
As the Romans said.

Bread and games.
To keep the plebs happy and docile.

Re: Boycott (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45052341)

Well, if history taught us anything, then that Rome didn't outlast that phase of its existence for more than a few hundred years before the barbarians steamrolled all over them.

And given the speed of development these days, I'd be surprised if this goes on another decade or two before the steamroller comes down on us.

Re:Monitoring (3, Informative)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#45051679)

I wonder what Snowden has to say about this? Since The Moscow Times says that Spying Is a Sovereign Right [themoscowtimes.com] , and a key spokesman for Snowden in Russia [businessinsider.com] is the head of public council for the Federal Security Service (FSB), I would guess not much. Just as well: NSA Is No Match for the FSB [themoscowtimes.com]

Re:Monitoring (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051803)

I wonder why you didn't care about russian human right violations till they granted asylum to Snowden.

Re:Monitoring (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#45051921)

LOL. You are either trolling, or practically never read what I write.

Re:Monitoring (1)

I'm New Around Here (1154723) | about a year ago | (#45051993)

Actually, no one reads what you write. We can't figure out how your last name is supposed to be pronounced, and move on to post from people with easier pseudonyms. ;^)

Re:Monitoring (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#45052149)

This might help [youtube.com] . ;)

Re:Monitoring (-1, Troll)

Stan92057 (737634) | about a year ago | (#45051731)

Not saying i disagree with what you say but. What if there was no monitoring in this day and age where Muslims kill for religious reasons? How many more planes do you think would have been flown into building or the ground? How many more truck bombs would be planted to take out whole buildings. We focus"Spy" on everyone when we should be focusing on the nationalities,governments that are terrorist friendly watch all Muslims. Lets not be politically correct then we can focus on those who will kill us because we are not the same religion the rest of us are. On a side note this isn't news Russia spy's on everyone who go to there country. They been doing it for a 100 years If you go to Russia and are surprised you are watched you need a brain transplant lol.

Re:Monitoring (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052179)

Not saying i disagree with what you say but. What if there was no monitoring in this day and age where Muslims kill for religious reasons?

The problem is it is not just this "AGE", religious nuts have ALWAYS been killing people. Let me amend that "NUTS" have been killing people for ever.
This is not a NEW problem. Why should we destroy democracy & privacy for the sake of the nuts.

Re:Monitoring (2)

obarthelemy (160321) | about a year ago | (#45051945)

I'm guessing the same thing happened at previous olympics, only the gov did not brag about it ?

Re:Monitoring (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052089)

London Olympics provided free Wi-Fi for all! (and if you don't value our generousness and try to turn on a private WiFi hotspot we'll find you and ban you). Given what we now know about GCHQ, do you believe they didn't monitor that?

PS: And as a side note, 1 CCTV camera per every 14 visitors with automatic face ID and all is the other definition of "mass surveillance"

Re:Monitoring (1)

asmkm22 (1902712) | about a year ago | (#45052119)

Pretty much every government needs to do it, which is the harsh reality that people don't want to accept. We have large swaths of people over here (U.S.) that are so fucked-up-crazy with the religious and ideological bullshit, that they are essentially domestic terrorists. We have a portion of the government holding the country hostage because they don't like a bill that was passed years ago, and are still throwing a hissy fit over it. And worse yet, we have a (very) vocal minority of people that support these actions.

Any government would be stupid not to monitor anything and everything possible. Society has made its bed, and now we are sleeping in it.

Re:Monitoring (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052431)

At least Russia tells you they're monitoring you in advance. In US, you're monitored 24/7 all year round and you only find out about it through evil "traitors" like Snowden.

SLOP syndrome (0, Troll)

benjfowler (239527) | about a year ago | (#45051367)

Anybody heard of SLOP (Severe Loss of Perspective Syndrome?)

The techno-libertarian community seemed to get a big dose of it when we saw those leaks from Snowden and friends. All of a sudden, we were the Devil incarnate, despite:

1) surveillance being subject to judicial and legislative oversight
2) not being anywhere near as far-reaching as SORM or the Chinese systems, or
3) anybody being hauled away in the dead of night for offending the sensibilities of anybody in power.

I suggest that some people need to grow up, and realise that the West is the absolute paragon of virtue compared to what Russia, China and Muslim countries are doing.

I shudder to think what will happen to the world when the baton of world domination is handed to these despots. I know the techno-libertarian crowd will be celebrating.

Re:SLOP syndrome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051403)

If the despots took over the US might have half as many people in prison.
It's ok because our prisons are nicer.

Re:SLOP syndrome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051563)

Were nicer. Now they are not only secret, but hold people who have no idea why they are there, or for how long.

Oh, and torture is legal. Insert the world's definition of "torure" here, not the US' one.

Re:SLOP syndrome (4, Insightful)

Ragzouken (943900) | about a year ago | (#45051425)

"surveillance being subject to judicial and legislative oversight" I guess you missed all the leaks which revealed that oversight is utterly useless?

The NSA does surveillance the correct way. (4, Interesting)

mozumder (178398) | about a year ago | (#45051643)

I guess you missed all the leaks which revealed that oversight worked?

I'm amazed at how little snooping of American citizens were going on. There was a number in the press that about 50,000 emails of US citizens were mistakenly collected.

I have 50,000 unread emails in my inbox alone.

So, the NSA's surveillance program is robust enough that, out of 300 million people, they had an oversight margin-of-error of 1 person.

That's it.

This is how a proper government surveillance programs are SUPPOSED to work - filled with both technical and legal checks and balances.

And remember, government surveillance is a good thing. We need to make sure libertarians understand that. Government surveillance enables a stronger government, which is always a good, since a big government is better than a small government.

NOBODY wants a small government. A small government results in Somalia. Everybody wants a strong, socialist government, instead.

A strong, socialist government produces much better results, resulting in a stronger, richer population.

Just look at how Reaganomics destroyed America. It is these Republican principles that caused such economic disparity in America, because they weakened government.

We need to make sure we undo all the work that the Reagan Republicans did.

Re:The NSA does surveillance the correct way. (-1, Redundant)

thrich81 (1357561) | about a year ago | (#45051791)

Hey mods -- agree or disagree, what possible legitimate reason is the parent to this post now at -1? The Slashdot moderation system has completely failed due to idiots with mod points and political one-sightedness.

Re:The NSA does surveillance the correct way. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052067)

I'm amazed at how little snooping of American citizens were going on. There was a number in the press that about 50,000 emails of US citizens were mistakenly collected.

And you *believe* these numbers? Why? They've lied pretty consistently about everything else.

Re:SLOP syndrome (4, Insightful)

dmbasso (1052166) | about a year ago | (#45051445)

I suggest that some people need to grow up, and realise that the West is the absolute paragon of virtue compared to what Russia, China and Muslim countries are doing.

I suggest that some people need to wake up, and realise that while the West is currently the absolute paragon of virtue (compared to what Russia, China and Muslim countries are doing) we must not take that condition for granted.

FTFY.

I shudder to think what will happen to the world when the baton of world domination is handed to these despots.

Yep, me too. That's exactly the reason I don't want "the West" to become them.

Re:SLOP syndrome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051463)

I find it interesting that so many people know how far reaching or how limited, depending on their political beliefs, a secret program is.

Re:SLOP syndrome (4, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#45051569)

..but just couple of articles back there's an article of going for foreign soil and shooting guns. with russia you're pretty much free to do anything(few isolated incidents not counting) as long as you stay out of russia(or their oil drilling operations). I'm not aware of any cases of russians even asking extradition of hackers, dissidents or what have you. however usa does that regularly and not only asks other countries to do it - they and their ally have regularly gone abroad to outright kidnap (locally)illegally persons they for some reason or another want out of the picture. that's scary. I can stay out of russia easy and not sweat even if I fly over it.

I could even plan a hypothetical russian revolution plan without worrying about getting whacked! now if I did the same thing using some cloud service but only for USA instead of russia I would be risking a black ops visit or extradition to usa for threatening security in usa.

there's plenty of reasons to boycott sochi. but all that was lost already to olympic movement when china had their games. they only care about money and for most athletes making it to olympics is about money too - to keep a "pro" status they have to get there and pro status means having enough sponsorship(private or state) to keep competing on pro level. of course the right thing to do is to not watch the games.

a big thing about the leaks is that judical and legislative oversight.. is that it isn't. it's closed doors. there's TWO parallel processes - the old one that went through courts and ended up as evidence on regular cases and then there's the mystery NSA-secret court and secret oversight one - but why would there be a need for that ? and I don't know how really much more far reaching you can get than re-routing connections and inserting tagging via js holes to people who you don't know even where they're from. you really shouldn't use russia or china as the benchmarks for freedom! as soon as you do that you're thoroughly fucked!

And you forgot the biggest difference to russian spying vs. american spying if one is from neither of the countries! american spying is targeting among other people me, whilst russian spying is targeting (mainly) russians and foreigners _on_russian_soil_ - in their country, according to their laws. they don't publicly pretend that they don't need to follow our laws while doing operations in our country but the leaders of the american intelligence apparatus have made time and time again comments that they don't need to give jack shit about our laws.

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051623)

You risk extradition but at least you will be alive, unlike Litvinenko or Markov -- the Russians just don't bother with formal prosecution.

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

lxs (131946) | about a year ago | (#45051661)

You risk extradition but at least you will be alive

Unless you end up on the list of the Dronemaster General.

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#45051701)

You have to work to get there, it isn't bestowed freely.

Re:SLOP syndrome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051761)

Hahahahahahaha. Extradition? Russia doesn't extradite anybody. They execute you where you are. Extradition is so much messier, and takes longer.

Re:SLOP syndrome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052343)

There is no death penalty in Russia. You can't be executed.

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year ago | (#45051947)

Wow. You miss a lot of things that are happening in the world. Russia is very active both overtly and covertly in many parts of the world. Just exactly who do you think is propping up Assad? Who has been messing around in Georgia, Chechnya, the international portion of the Arctic?

Maybe they don't have quite the reach that the US does. That's not be design - they basically can't afford all the stuff we can. If they could, they would.

Re:SLOP syndrome (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052367)

Chechnya is part of Russian Federation. It's like saying "USA is messing around Texas". Also, Chechnya is the most supporting region in Russia for Putin. He got 99% or even 100% of votes there during last vote for presidency. Besides, the "messing around" happened 15 years ago. Hardly recent activity.

We have become despots (5, Informative)

sjbe (173966) | about a year ago | (#45051633)

1) surveillance being subject to judicial and legislative oversight

You mean the secret surveillance conducted by a secret agency under secret orders with secret legal justification, "overseen" by a secret rubber stamp court with secret findings? Exactly how do you propose oversight works when there is no accountability to the electorate whatsoever?

2) not being anywhere near as far-reaching as SORM or the Chinese systems,

Got proof to back that up? I didn't think so.

3) anybody being hauled away in the dead of night for offending the sensibilities of anybody in power.

So you are claiming the US government has never engaged in extraordinary rendition [wikipedia.org] and does not operate a prison camp without any due process [wikipedia.org] ?

I suggest that some people need to grow up, and realise that the West is the absolute paragon of virtue compared to what Russia, China and Muslim countries are doing.

Not it the last 10 years, particularly in the US. The US has engaged in kidnapping, torture, secret and illegal surveillance, political assassinations, gag orders without any warrant or due process, and started two unjustified wars which are still going on over a decade later, and you want to claim that we are a "paragon of virtue"? Maybe we are better but it certainly isn't by much these days. Hell we had a president who was awarded the Nobel peace prize and used the opportunity to argue why war is sometimes necessary. Talk about hypocritical.

Re:We have become despots (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#45051951)

If these were the Nixon years, would a G. Gordon Liddy type of agent walk in and listen to conversations? With little or no technological barriers or even uncorruptible logging with review, then what?

It's not about the honest agent. IT's about power grabs. Powerful people only need one, and if he can get lost in the woodwork...

Re:SLOP syndrome (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#45051655)

What "oversight" prevented snowden from reaching far beyond his granted permissions?

"LOVEINT" ...

Are you fucking serious? Protip: being dropped on your head shouldn't be habit forming. Get help.

Re:SLOP syndrome (2)

grumpy_old_grandpa (2634187) | about a year ago | (#45051683)

Two wrongs doesn't make a right. So in terms of growing up, the "they also did it" excuse is as mature as a six-year old who gets caught red-handed, and tries to justify his wrong-doing because the other kids also stole from the cookie-jar.

Regarding perspective, I think it would help if more people would read Bruce Schneier's "Beyond Fear". There he gives a very straight forward, for they layman, introduction to analysing risks and appropriate security measure response. In that light, it becomes clear that neither NSA's nor FSB's programs have anything to do with mitigating risks. It's not even about the pretence and security theatre any more (after all NSA's programs were mostly secret).

It's pure corruption based cocaine induced money-making and dick-swinging: "Look, our data center has a gazillion coca-bytes!"; "We'll monitor you so thoroughly, we'll know when your wife is PMS'ing"; "I want a Star Trek Command Center! Wabu-wabu!!!" See Keith Alexander's ego trip [theguardian.com] for the last one - talk about being out of touch and lacking perspective.

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

kruach aum (1934852) | about a year ago | (#45051719)

What the US has done should be judged against rights and laws, not the practices of other countries who may or may not be worse violators in similar respects.

Re:SLOP syndrome (4, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | about a year ago | (#45051807)

The courts have thrown up their hands and stated PUBLICLY that they can no longer reign this in. So much for judicial oversight. The NSA blatantly lied to Congress and has faced no consequences for it. So much for legislative oversight.

As for 2 or three, you maintain that it's fine to beat someone into a coma and as long as someone somewhere was killed outright the coma victim and family have no right to complain?

Sorry, I would prefer not to set the bar as low as Russia or China. Not the worst is not much of an aspiration.

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051837)

3) anybody being hauled away in the dead of night for offending the sensibilities of anybody in power.

Sure about that?
 
  Terrance Yeakey [tytruth.com]

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#45051889)

There's more than that. Just building the infrastructure that can be abused later is not a light step to take.

Oh they will only use it for terrorism...until they take down Silk Road. And after that...?

With hundreds of agents having access and the ability to listen in on phone calls without warrants or detection (the warrant is apparently on the honor system) it will be abused to spy on political opponents to counteract and discredit, and there goes freedom.

Re:SLOP syndrome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051963)

1) surveillance being subject to judicial and legislative oversight

The oversight you mentioned is through a secretive and hidden court system whose decisions are final and cannot be publicly challenged. This is not the basis for good government.

2) not being anywhere near as far-reaching as SORM or the Chinese systems

Every system of tyranny has to start somewhere. Give it time, and it will be just as bad if not worse. Especially if there are further successful terrorist attacks. Liberty is dying in the US, and can easily be extinguished.

3) anybody being hauled away in the dead of night for offending the sensibilities of anybody in power.

Jose Padilla, who was not tried for any crime until after he was tortured and rotted in prison for five years. Anwar Al-Awlaki was accused of aiding and abetting terrorists, but was summarily executed even though evidence of his crimes has never been released. His 16 year old son was subsequently murdered in a drone strike two weeks later (the feds just shrugged and said "ooops!"). Several prisoners still in lockup at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, who were never tried for any crime.

There are many more to add to this list. You are taking it on faith that the federal government is telling you the truth in these matters, but again the evidence is rarely released publicly, because they are hoping you'll just forget about it and start watching Miley Cyrus again, or something.

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

b4upoo (166390) | about a year ago | (#45052045)

China and Russia both have a huge history of insane lack of regard for human rights. The Muslim states, with one or two exceptions, have been driven back into the dark ages by lack of education and fanatical, twisted versions of their religion. Russia remains so broken that crime seems to be the major industry with getting drunk as the national activity. The Muslim states are pretty much lost to civilization or even hope of civilization. China has put away much of their negative behavior and is advancing in many ways.

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about a year ago | (#45052187)

Your post reminds me of a comic strip of Bush and Cheney at Gitmo, with the punchline of "Certified not as bad as an actual Soviet GULAG".

Re:SLOP syndrome (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45052423)

Just because the "western" lethal injection is less painful than the "muslim" stoning doesn't mean that I'd really like to get either.

Yes, there are places that are worse than what we have here. But when did "being better" become "being less awful"?

But the USA will still get the Gold Medal . . . (4, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about a year ago | (#45051369)

Nothing can beat the NSA in the surveillance event competition!

Re:But the USA will still get the Gold Medal . . . (0)

girlintraining (1395911) | about a year ago | (#45051741)

Nothing can beat the NSA in the surveillance event competition!

They're merely afraid that someone will put up pictures of Putin in a tutu, or barebacking it with a horse, or any of the hundreds of other highly suggestive photos of the man who has decided gays are full of evil. There have been lots of protests and arrests in Russia over this lately, and demands both domestically and abroad that the Olympics be boycotted over this gross human rights violation.

Nonetheless, the international community seems to be taking the view that entertainment exceeds human rights, and largely considers this an "internal" affair in Russia. All that said... guess what the response has been? "We're not going to have a problem here. We're going to surveil the shit out of everyone and everything. No protester will make it past the perimeter. Putin's horse-loving pictures will not make it into THIS facility!"

Re:But the USA will still get the Gold Medal . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051901)

Nothing can beat the NSA in the surveillance event competition!

USA! USA! USA!

Re:But the USA will still get the Gold Medal . . . (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#45052457)

Nothing can beat the NSA in the surveillance event competition!

I don't know man, the Jamaicans are always tough [youtube.com] and the Russians are not to be dismissed [themoscowtimes.com] . Not sure how China's team is this year.... but I hear they are big [bbc.co.uk] .

Boycott that shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051375)

Another reason to boycott the event.

US/Russia/China/Iran vs the people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051379)

This is is nothing short of a war between powerful governments and the people of the world.

The trouble is that only one side is fighting the war. The people are cheerfully thinking about nothing more than whether Facebook works, taking no steps to guard themselves, while the other side for decades has systematically been destroying their privacy and anonymity.

It was clear from the outset who would win a war one side is too stupid to realize they are fighting. Now, here we are... no privacy left.

Re:US/Russia/China/Iran vs the people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051493)

This is is nothing short of a war between powerful governments and the people of the world.

I know what... maybe you should organize a boycott!

Russia intends to monitor all UNENCRYPTED comms (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051387)

Nobody is going to stop you from encrypting your data, they just want to read the
data you're too lazy to encrypt.. and so they will.

Re:Russia intends to monitor all UNENCRYPTED comms (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051449)

Virtually everybody is too lazy to encrypt their communications.

Look at the USA/NSA debacle. The next day after the leaks, how many people started to encrypt their emails and texts? 99%? No. 50%? No. 1%? No. A tenth of a percent? Probably not even that many.

People don't care about guarding their privacy, so they won't do what you suggest. You can argue that this means they get what they deserve, and maybe that's true, but it's going to be true for virtually every single person there.

In soviet Russia (1)

kruach aum (1934852) | about a year ago | (#45051391)

Records break you!

Why are you surprized? (3, Insightful)

tipo33 (2558663) | about a year ago | (#45051393)

This news doesn't come as a shock to me. Actually, I halfway respect the fact that they admit it flat out.

Re:Why are you surprized? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051621)

Irregardless, everyone should stay away in protest. And every business that tracks their customers should go out of business for lack of customers. Unfortunately people fail to honor their honor and as long as their is a market for sadomasochism in governance and shopping, it will be provided. Meat for the plate, prisoners and slaves get tracked. Free people turn on anyone that attempts to track them, just like any other wild animal when you corner them. A slave bows down and begs forgiveness taking whatever comes next. Isn't it better not to be cornered? Even better to never be tracked.

Re:Why are you surprized? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051865)

This is the world we live in. All the shocking stories regarding Snowden shouldn't have been a surprise to anyone. Every major government is doing it and so are many of the biggest corporations in the world. Ever hear of Big Data, MapReduce, Hadoop, NoSQL, MongoDB, Cassandra? How much money have you paid directly over the past five years to Google, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, Linkedin, or any of the news (including tech focused) sites?

Re:Why are you surprized? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052159)

What we need is the equivalent of the EFF to rate websites/services based on their privacy/cooperation with govt surveillance, so we could pick the least intrusive and give an economic incentive to companies to not 'over-cooperate' with repressive (i.e. most) governments.

Re:Why are you surprized? (0)

girlintraining (1395911) | about a year ago | (#45052227)

This news doesn't come as a shock to me. Actually, I halfway respect the fact that they admit it flat out.

Yeah, but would you still feel that way once you knew the reasons for it?

They're concerned that people might try that "free speech" thing, which has been a problem ever since Putin decided to wage a private war on gay people... and many are calling for a boycott of the olympics or protesting at the scene to raise awareness of the problem. That surveillance, which includes filtering technology and location awareness on cell phones, as well as deep state inspection, exists for but one purpose:

To make sure everything looks just peachy for the press cameras, while the 10,000 other cameras hunt for anything that could spoil that rosey worldview... like protesters.

Off-topic discussion about USA in 3.. 2... 1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051405)

Already too late.

In America you watch the Olympics (5, Funny)

HeavenlyWhistler (716762) | about a year ago | (#45051409)

but in Soviet Russia, Olympics watch YOU!

Pot, Kettle... (4, Insightful)

Diddlbiker (1022703) | about a year ago | (#45051411)

It'll be hard for the US government to file a formal complaint without getting laughed at, as they've been doing the same (although not limited to Olympic Games) in their own country.

Photos (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | about a year ago | (#45051419)

Just send lots of photos, png format of course, home attached to your emails. That way you can say anything you want by using undetectable steganography.

Re:Photos (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051479)

You want noisy jpg format so that you encrypted data can hide in the noise.

Re:Photos (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | about a year ago | (#45052199)

No you want to subtly adjust the rgb values of a loss less data format so without access to the original image file there is no evidence what so ever of the overlayed information. And because it is just a normal picture not even advanced data analysis can detect the overlayed information. The only way to extract it is via brute force and well depending on the size of the image the sun may die first.

Think of it as Gmail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051459)

with no alternative service available, and FSB doing the compilation and analysis instead of Google.

This is new? (5, Insightful)

reemul (1554) | about a year ago | (#45051529)

Face it, the IOC is perfectly OK with corruption, oppression, censorship, and spying, as long as committee members get their payoffs, a pleasant facade is maintained while cameras are rolling, and nobody but Jews get killed. Russia wishes they could have the all encompassing monitoring that Beijing had, but they just don't currently have the resources. Keeping the athletes in segregated housing simply makes it easier to ensure that every single area is bugged, and each and every person there that the participants can possibly come in contact with is engaged in intelligence collecting.

Re:This is new? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052253)

I am pretty sure that the IOC actually forced Russia to monitor all communications.

You may have noticed the last few times of the Olympics the IOC are really trying to limit the amount of information leaving the Olympic games. Athletes who aren't allowed to make pictures and videos, etc. The IOC aren't the only sport organisations who are this way.

I am pretty sure the Russians are simply protecting the "copyright" of the Olympic games as ordered by the IOC to be able for Russia to host the games.

Re:This is new? (-1, Flamebait)

girlintraining (1395911) | about a year ago | (#45052287)

Face it, the IOC is perfectly OK with corruption, oppression, censorship, and spying, as long as committee members get their payoffs, a pleasant facade is maintained while cameras are rolling, and nobody but Jews get killed.

You know, Slashdot really has taken a dive lately. We've got an anti-semetic comment hiding in plain sight, and yet this racist asshole got upmodded not once, but twice so far. And the kicker is there's no evidence presented that the IOC is anti-semetic. Of course, there's plenty of evidence about corruption and censorship, and committee members getting paid off. That's all legit; And the rest is on the level with them being an accomplice to it.

But the conclusion is also bogus. Russia doesn't "wish" they could have the "all encompassing monitoring that Beijing" had. They're allies with China. China produces tons of telecom; And I'm sure they'd be only too happy to help their ally to the west with that problem if Russia really was putting that on a 'wish list'.

Small problem though -- Russia does have the money. And they are building that surveillance network [theguardian.com] right now. Without help. Worse, while your tin foil hat "They're monitoring all the things!" might be somewhat accurate... you're utterly lacking in a good conclusion as to why. I mean, besides being evil for the sake of being evil, because it's, you know, fun and shit.

The real reason why Russia is building this network up is because historically Russia has been hyper-paranoid about foreigners. You know, that whole business with Stalin, and the USSR, and the cold war... it had a small effect on their psyche. But also, Russia doesn't have free speech; And right now it's dealing with large numbers of people protesting over Putin's one man crusade against the gay community, and the Olympics has been named as a primary target for these protesters to get the word out about Russia's oppression of these people.

So they're preparing the nets, setting the traps, and building nearby warehouses that will become jails with the flip of a switch, in anticipation of having to move a groundswell of its own citizens trying to ram their way into public view at the event. And Putin... oooh, he doesn't like that. Not. One. Bit.

So cool it with the anti-semetic crap -- this isn't about the jews, it's about the gays, and while the IOC may be a morally corrupt piece of shit for an organization, they haven't yet turned terrorist, and there is no evidence they're planning on crossing that line anytime soon. If nothing else, it would hurt their profits.

Re:This is new? (1)

drfuchs (599179) | about a year ago | (#45052465)

You missed the point. Reemul is making an oblique reference to the 1972 Olympics where 11 Jewish athletes were murdered; look up "Munich massacre" on wikipedia.

Re:This is new? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052495)

Just go fuck yourself, or a Jew.

Re:This is related? (1)

Bite The Pillow (3087109) | about a year ago | (#45052455)

In what way is this related in any way to corruption? The IOC did not go forward in time, read this news, and then go back and approve Russia. I have no doubt that payoffs happen, and as demonstrated by the China games' focus on minimizing pollution to be just under the obviousness threshold, the facade has to be maintained even when the problem is well known. But how is this one of those "face it" times that demonstrates whatever point you failed to make?

On the international stage, if we limit the selection committee to only those places where there is no corruption or oppression, there would be no Olympics - because every country is seen as corrupt in some fashion to at least a few other countries. So everyone is off the list.

Not sure what your point is re: keeping athletes in segregated housing. Almost like only athletes could be suspect, and anyone who wants to talk to them would go to athlete housing, and they can't leave at all, which is clearly not true.

If you take this at face value "will face some of the most invasive and systematic spying and surveillance in the history of the Games" as well as the "all communications" part of the article's headline, your comment about the Russian vs. Chinese resources falls apart.

And... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051547)

I love how americans love to throw up their arms at these FUD about China and Russia, all while having not reports, but PROOF that their country is doing stuff that is much worse.

At least Russia and China are not invading countries and killing hundreds of thousands of people so they can loot them and then pass them a bill for the "reconstruction".

And how do they plan to deal with.. (1)

ltning (143862) | about a year ago | (#45051613)

...gnupg? ...tor? ...ssl+pfs? ...ssh? ...ipsec? ...openvpn? ...voip? .....<insert your favorite encryption/privacy tool here>?

Block everything? That would probably kick up more dust than the anti-gay legislation.

Re:And how do they plan to deal with.. (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#45051709)

Simple. When your device downloads any data over the network it will be infected with malware and all the encryption in the world is useless if your machine is compromised. Later, when you return home, your machine makes you into a Russian Spy.

I mean, that's how the NSA gets around Tor...

Re:And how do they plan to deal with.. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051809)

. When your device downloads any data over the network it will be infected with malware and all the encryption in the world is useless

The NSA attack depended on people being dumb enough to run the javascript in the attack payload. If you're dumb enough to do that, you deserve what you get. Furthermore, it used an exploit targeting the Windows version of Firefox.

You seem somewhat confused. "Downloading data over the network" doesn't automatically infect your machine with malware unless your download app is buggy, or you go running scripts or executables that you downloaded. You have to be pretty damned ignorant to do that in a situation where you are trying to preserve your security and privacy from organizations like the FSB or NSA.

Sandbox your browser in a VM, don't use Windows, don't run scripts served to you by random pages you have no reason to trust, and that will improve your security by about 99.99%. Yes, I know, it isn't 100%, and therefore a bunch of slashdotters will say, "but it's useless, because it's not absolutely PERFECT", but in fact the NSAs attack you allude to and virtually every other malware distribution mechanism would not succeed.

If you go running malware payloads, you will get infected: news at 11.

Didn't the NSA attack take advanage of a bug? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052275)

Wasn't there a vulnerability that allowed them to turn javascript back on?

Re:And how do they plan to deal with.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052355)

Later, when you return home, your machine makes you into a Russian Spy.

I'm guessing any country that can afford it will give their athletes temporary laptops and phones that will be incinerated upon conclusion of the games: no silicon comes home.

Re:And how do they plan to deal with.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052437)

I'm sure you're right, and not just athletes. Imagine all the journalists, telecoms, and security services the Russians could potentially compromise once they get home with infected silicon.

Re:And how do they plan to deal with.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051953)

They will release ... the WDU (Wrench-decryption-unit): http://xkcd.com/538/

In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45051855)

The medal is YOU! =)

Russia has Middle East enemies over Syria (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45052013)

Russia has enemies in Chechnya. Some financing of Chech rebels has been traced to the middle East. More recently, it was rumored that Prince Bandar suggested to Putin that there would be no trouble at the Olympics if Assad received less support. Islamists fighting in Syria are mad, because of Russia's extensive support to Syria. The 2014 Olympics would be a great way for terrorists to strike at Russia. If I was Russia, I'd be spying on the 2014 Olympics up the wazoo.

Secret Agent Man (1)

slowdeath (2836529) | about a year ago | (#45052127)

Ever consider that maybe Edward Snowden is a double agent, planted by the NSA to infiltrate the Russian security service and spill their most secret documents to the web? Me neither.

NBC will use this to say why can't have it live (2)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#45052209)

NBC will use this to say why can't have it shown live even if it's not delaying the broadcast

in soviet russia (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#45052225)

we monitor you!

Re:in soviet russia (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45052477)

You misspelled USA.

A second reason (1)

Linzer (753270) | about a year ago | (#45052257)

The notion of human rights seems quite foreign to Russia's leaders today. This follows the incredible state-sponsored persecution of LGBT people, which taps into (and caters to) the already fairly widespread homophobia in large parts of the population.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/22/opinion/russias-anti-gay-crackdown.html?_r=0 [nytimes.com]

Yes, but... why ? (1)

feufeu (1109929) | about a year ago | (#45052259)

Is this some sort of 'Hey we can do this even better !' or what exactly could be the point of - besides fighting, err, terrorism of course - spying on everyone at the olympics ? Don't get me wrong, I still wish that there wouldn't this sort of spying on harmless people, but what exactly could be gained from it ?
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