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Alcatel-Lucent To Cut 10,000 Workers, Calls It "Shift Plan"

timothy posted about 10 months ago | from the drop-the-f dept.

Businesses 75

Dawn Kawamoto writes "Alcatel-Lucent is planning to cut 10,000 workers by 2015. The telecom equipment maker's newly minted CEO calls this restructuring part of his Shift Plan. Under this plan, Alcatel-Lucent wants to save 1 billion Euros in costs and refocus its operations on next-gen IP networking, cloud and ultra-broadband access and away from legacy technologies like its 2G and 3G wireless. In the meantime, Wall Street thinks it may be cleaning itself up for a sale of some of its assets or its operations to Nokia, which will need to bolster its telecom equipment business after selling its smartphone operations to Microsoft. But a Nokia-Microsoft deal may be too little, too late."

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75 comments

Non-sequitur (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45069645)

What does the last link have to do with the submission?

Re:Non-sequitur (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 10 months ago | (#45069837)

What does the last link have to do with the submission?

1) if they're trying to sell to Nokia, then they'll be SOL if Nokia is struggling too much.
2) it's a slashdot "cloud" article, which seems to be slashdot's version of AllThingsD or something similar. To tell you the truth I kinda liked it. The layout and info is nice. I know I'm supposed to shake my fist and say "Garr! Dice Holdings!" but whatever.

Re:Non-sequitur (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45071455)

helps fill timothy's daily quota of SlashCloud/SlashBi links.

Fire people (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 10 months ago | (#45069647)

Refocus on some vague next gen thing.

Where have we seen this movie before?

Nothing to see here, move along.

Re:Fire people (4, Insightful)

RichMan (8097) | about 10 months ago | (#45069673)

You missed the important part

As CEO collect outrageous bonus.

Re:Fire people (5, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | about 10 months ago | (#45069727)

And jump ship before the long-term consequences of your actions become apparent.

Re:Fire people (2)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | about 10 months ago | (#45072245)

Strange how shareholders are willing to pay CEOs large amounts of money just in order to ruin their company. Or maybe that's not how it is in reality.

Shit Plan (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45069663)

Couldn't agree more. Unless you are cutting some CEOs and directors.

Re:Shit Plan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45073783)

Those guys left back in `08 on their own volition.

Justifications for cutting ppl (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45069721)

"We will cut 100k ppl because... cloud....4g.....outsourcing....smartsizing"
*Shareholders applauding to buzzwords*

Alcatel makes decent Android phones (1)

jkrise (535370) | about 10 months ago | (#45069725)

In India; Alcatel makes smartphones for Idea Cellular; and they are quite good. Very rugged; good specs; fairly low cost - $120 for a 5" smartphone.

Wonder if this move is to get eventually swallowed like Nokia - except the CxOs; nobody else benefits.

Re:Alcatel makes decent Android phones (1)

Grizzley9 (1407005) | about 10 months ago | (#45072795)

In India; Alcatel makes smartphones for Idea Cellular; and they are quite good. Very rugged; good specs; fairly low cost - $120 for a 5" smartphone.

Wonder if this move is to get eventually swallowed like Nokia - except the CxOs; nobody else benefits.

My understanding is that they have only lent their name to the phones and don't actually have anything to do with them but are made by a 3rd party.

Classic strategy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45069809)

This is the CEO implementing the classic death spiral - reduce employees rapidly to get a few good financial quarters until the customers desert. It can be difficult and expensive for customers to change vendors so you have time to collect enormous sums before the eventual collapse of earnings. I hear there is even a Harvard business school class on how to convert a dying company's assets to personal wealth.

Re:Classic strategy (0)

thisisnotreal (888437) | about 10 months ago | (#45070919)

oh fuck.. i hope you're wrong.

Re:Classic strategy (1)

teg (97890) | about 10 months ago | (#45083415)

This is the CEO implementing the classic death spiral - reduce employees rapidly to get a few good financial quarters until the customers desert. It can be difficult and expensive for customers to change vendors so you have time to collect enormous sums before the eventual collapse of earnings. I hear there is even a Harvard business school class on how to convert a dying company's assets to personal wealth.

OTOH, when a company is struggling and have been losing money for years you do need to cut costs. And Alcatel-Lucent has been losing money for a while. According to the article, they want to cut "sales, support and administrative areas" - in addition to legacy tech. So it looks as if they are trying to preserve most of their R&D.

This is the future. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45069893)

Companies will continue to test their breaking point.

while(company == alive)
{
if (company == ok)
fire_employees(X);
else
hire_employees(Y);
}
sell_assets(Z);
deploy_parachute();

Re:This is the future. (1)

ebh (116526) | about 10 months ago | (#45073359)

#define X 10000
#define Y -10000
#define Z MAXINT

Sounds like the Same Old Shift (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45069939)

Take the assets of a struggling company, combine them those of another struggling company, and combine both of those with a third struggling company and what do you get?

A blue chip stock, that's what! Definitely time to hand out performance bonuses to top management.

Re:Sounds like the Same Old Shift (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45070773)

Damn right! Time to BTFATH!

Just liquidate already (1)

asm2750 (1124425) | about 10 months ago | (#45069991)

Alcatel-Lucent has been hemorrhaging jobs for what feels longer than a decade. Time to just close up shop and put all the assets on the chopping block.

Re:Just liquidate already (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45073839)

Lucent has been laying off people regularly since March 2001.

RIP Bell Labs (4, Insightful)

ErichTheRed (39327) | about 10 months ago | (#45070001)

A-L has been going down the tubes for quite a while. It's pretty amazing to think that part of the company used to be the mighty Bell Labs. You know, Unix, the transistor, one of the last corporate-funded basic research institutes... It kind of makes me want to have the old AT&T monopoly back just to have that.

Admittedly, they probably do have huge legacy costs in the form of less productive employees and products that don't make them as much money anymore. Also, the telecom landscape has changed a lot over the years. I work for a similar company, and while our group works on newish stuff, there's a ton of older products just sitting around that used to be very high margin and no longer have the revenue to support their costs.

That said, it's never good when an older, established company suddenly announces a monster layoff like this. In the older companies, you just know it's going to be 10,000 58-year-olds in the developed countries who will suddenly find themselves out of work with zero prospects for new employment, hanging on until Social Security kicks in. That's the sad part of these "smartsizings" -- when you're just a number in a spreadsheet, companies have no idea how much you still have to offer in terms of talent and experience. I'm approaching the ripe old age of 40 now, and am constantly staying on top of all the new stuff just to keep the skill set sharp. That's one thing I could do without in the IT "profession" -- so much new buzzwordy stuff is rehashes of technology decades old with better supporting technology. Too bad Gartner and their ilk are the only ones that CIOs listen to!

Re:RIP Bell Labs (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 10 months ago | (#45070109)

"A-L has been going down the tubes for quite a while. It's pretty amazing to think that part of the company used to be the mighty Bell Labs."

Not really, bad or short sighted leadership can take even the biggest company down to the rocks in a short time. When all that matters is "next quarters profits" your company will be in the shithole within 5 years.

Re:RIP Bell Labs (1)

gtall (79522) | about 10 months ago | (#45070787)

Yes, but in A-L's case, they made the mistake of Carly Fiorina. She did what a lot of companies did, she lent money to her customers to buy Lucent stuff. Alcatel was incredibly blind to buy Lucent. After 3 years at L, Carly gave H-P the kiss of death, her being a serial failure.

Re:RIP Bell Labs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45072039)

The problem started with Henry Schacht. In 1996, he announced at an all employee meeting that every division has to grow %20 year to year. Paraphrase, "If your group isn't growing %20, you should look for another group to work in". (Basic research included)

Re:RIP Bell Labs (1)

Grizzley9 (1407005) | about 10 months ago | (#45072881)

Yes, but in A-L's case, they made the mistake of Carly Fiorina. She did what a lot of companies did, she lent money to her customers to buy Lucent stuff. Alcatel was incredibly blind to buy Lucent. After 3 years at L, Carly gave H-P the kiss of death, her being a serial failure.

It started well before Fiorina. And I was dumbfounded at the idea of it when I started working there. Merging with Alcatel was just a cash infusion for Lucent and now it's back down to the bottom. Who will be the next buyer to keep it going!

Re:RIP Bell Labs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45074279)

I was there when she was doing that. Guess she never heard of "letters of credit". I was at Bell Labs pre-divestiture, too. How the mighty have fallen.

Re:RIP Bell Labs (1)

thisisnotreal (888437) | about 10 months ago | (#45070933)

remember when Nortel crashed in canada. the pillars are falling down :(

Re:RIP Bell Labs (1)

Lieutenant_Dan (583843) | about 10 months ago | (#45072317)

While many good people lost their job in Nortel, there was a LOT of deadwood at Nortel. Kanata has never been the same since.

We had one upgrade with Nortel telecom equipment, where I had one engineer and five (or six) project managers. You need one or sometimes even two good project managers, but never FIVE, especially when the engineer is doing all the heavy lifting (figuratively and literally). So by charging us $300/hr, we knew we were subsidizing several crappy layers of ineffeciency.

A-L may in a similar boat. There are probably people who did not keep fresh or add very little value, because they were brought in when a VP went on an empire-building spree.

Re:RIP Bell Labs (1)

CanadianMacFan (1900244) | about 10 months ago | (#45073403)

I remember when Nortel was at it largest I had a job and part of my responsibilities involved going around to install software. One of the problems Nortel had was that the level of a manager was determined by the number of people reporting to them. So if a manager wanted to go up a level they either got another project or hired more people for their existing projects. Some of the new people that they were hiring in 1999 were only there to boost numbers because they had trouble turning on the computer.

Re:RIP Bell Labs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45072061)

It's a really sad state of affairs when something as great as Bell Labs struggles to survive while something as useless as Facebook is worth over $100B.

I'm getting tired of this industry (4, Interesting)

DontBlameCanada (1325547) | about 10 months ago | (#45070019)

Unless you're in senior management, you have absolutely no control over your future. I can do the best job, get top ratings for performance, but if I'm unlucky and am working on the wrong projects... poof no job. Layoffs are done by cutting whole programs, without even attempting to retain the best talent. We're chattel, nameless drones who are viewed as necessary evils. Worse, I may be potentially viewed as substandard by future employers because the product I was working on wasn't viable, as though I had any opportunity to influence it's direction.
I truly enjoy writing software, but I would never recommend this career to my children or grandchildren. Way too much volatility coupled with abusive employers...

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45070215)

Is there a career worth recommending? Getting into senior management is much harder than being a software peon. At least in software, there are usually other opportunities out there, but the management track completely derails if the company fails, you start from the beginning.

Every career path has pros and cons, risks and rewards. If you don't make it to the top in management, you will usually suffer greatly. Playing the odds, it's better to be the software peon.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (1)

scamper_22 (1073470) | about 10 months ago | (#45070389)

medcine, law, banking, government work, education...

More professionalism and stability and experience makes you more valuable.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45070761)

LOL @ government work. They're all outta work right now!

Yeah "right now" (1)

walterbyrd (182728) | about 10 months ago | (#45070991)

Government is not 100% stable, but it is far more stable than other alternatives.

Re:Yeah "right now" (1)

timeOday (582209) | about 10 months ago | (#45075387)

Federal, yes. But local / state government seem to me like about the worst deal going - the poor pay still reflects the job security and good benefits the jobs used to have.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (1)

plopez (54068) | about 10 months ago | (#45074795)

Which government? There are thousands of them after all, just in the US.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (1)

thisisnotreal (888437) | about 10 months ago | (#45070953)

medicine, education

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (2)

ScottCooperDotNet (929575) | about 10 months ago | (#45071019)

medicine, law, banking, government work, education...

More professionalism and stability and experience makes you more valuable.

Each of those fields have guilds (or unions) that keep the barrier to entry high, so the compensation stays high. For example, the trend for lower-cost routine medicine done by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and even Pharmacists is being negated by even higher professional requirements. Many of those jobs once only required a Masters, will now require a Doctorate. Thanks to the American Medical Association and doctors' control of state licensing boards, the increase in cost in this area is disregarded under the guise of 'quality'. There was a recent story about a doctor in Oklahoma who used Skype to treat patients, and the state board came down on him hard, not because he caused harm to a patient, but because remote medicine causes harm to their business model.

Lawyers used to have an apprentice system, where one could 'read the law' under another practicing attorney and become a lawyer in one's own right. Now, years of classroom time is required, and courts often won't allow anyone who hasn't taken the Bar Exam to practice law before them, and to even take the exam, law school is required.

Teachers now have educational-specific degree requirements, so even if you have a Masters in your field (for example, mathematics) you cannot teach Algebra 1 to high school students, or often even teach in a classroom at all. Teachers' unions and state boards restrict who can teach, so if you wanted to take a year or two out of your main career path and be a teacher, you can't. Again, under the guise of 'quality'.

So maybe what we need is our own IT Guild, that licenses software developers, sets professional standards, and puts up barriers to entry. If software engineering was held to some of the standards physical engineers have, like safety, security, stability, we'd be able to push for state licensing, and we'd have the ability to say no to poor coding hackjobs our bosses ask for. We could even have a tax on code produced outside of the country, to negate the cost savings of moving projects overseas. I doubt it will happen though, we pay for our freedom with the risks of not having our own IT Guild.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (2)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 10 months ago | (#45072329)

So what we need to do, then, is to create a guild to monopolize IT services and programming. We'll call it the "Coding Guild". Then members of this guild can have different titles, such as "Guild Programmer", "Guild Administrator", "Guild Architect", "Guild Tester" (sometimes called "Guild Testsman"), etc. And we can even have a handy slogan: "He who controls the code, controls life."

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (1)

CanadianMacFan (1900244) | about 10 months ago | (#45073539)

I have absolutely no problem with school boards requiring teachers being trained in how to teach. I wish universities had the same requirement. I was in university in the early to mid 1990s and had very little respect for my professors. Sure they may have known about their specific sub-field of study but that doesn't mean they are familiar anymore with the broad subject matter or even know how to teach. For many of them teaching was something that they only did because it was a requirement. They were at the university to do research. Just because someone knows a subject matter does not mean they know how to convey that knowledge to others in an understandable manner.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (1)

thisisnotreal (888437) | about 10 months ago | (#45071213)

here's a blooming career option: Euphemism Nomenclator.
Who else to come up with terms like "Shift Planning" / 'Right Sizing' / 'Realignment'

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (2)

ebh (116526) | about 10 months ago | (#45073561)

I'd be delighted if one of my kids told me he or she wanted to be an electrician. There will always be a demand, there are fun toys and interesting tech to play with, there are physical things you can look at and say, "I built that!", and unlike plumbers, you don't often deal with raw sewage.

You don't get vilified as lazy and overpaid by the lumpen like teachers, or publish-or-perish while bowing and scraping for grant money like professors. You're not in college and beyond until your late 20s or longer, like doctors, not to mention the insane student loan debt and crushing malpractice premiums.

And, you're not subject to the whims of either the stock market or PHBs or drunken executives the way we in the corporate world are.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (1)

ErichTheRed (39327) | about 10 months ago | (#45070511)

The only long-term "stability" I've seen lately isn't even really stability -- it's contract work. I'm still an FTE simply because I have a family and don't want a divorce because I'm travelling around the country 300 days a year. But, I have many people I've worked with who have quite the lifestyle simply because they make multiples of a typical full time salary by stitching contract jobs together. It's amazing to me that a company doesn't hire permanent staff because it's "so expensive' and then turns around and hires contractors at $150+ an hour, who basically work the same 40 hour schedule. The downsides are that you basically have to run a business as well as do your actual job, and from what people have told me, the travel really drains you after a while. Favorite comment from a consultant friend of mine, "That first class seat on the plane doesn't make much difference when you're sleeping the whole flight because you're dead tired." (I disagree, I'm 6'2" and coach travel is awful...)

The real secret is to make your own stability, and the problem is that it takes lots of self control. You need to pay off your house, not buy crap you can't afford if you lose your job, and save money both for now and for later. Being unemployed sucks, but being unemployed AND having creditors knocking on the door is worse. I'm a big stability fan too, and I tend to choose employers who are also stable, but these days you can never tell.

One of the things that might change things a little bit in the stability department is the whole healthcare reform thing. A lot of people I know are basically trapped in full time employment because they or their family member has some medical problem that makes getting private insurance unworkable. Even if you have to pay full price for a plan from the insurance companies, (a) you'll actually get coverage, and (b) hopefully the cost will be closer to the group rates large employers get.

Software or IT work will eventually lose its salary advantage, but I think things might be better if various factions in the IT field come together and actually make it a branch of "real" engineering or a profession, with the same education requirements and barriers to entry that other professions have.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (1)

ebh (116526) | about 10 months ago | (#45073665)

I've spent about half my 30-year career as an employee and half as a contractor (which I am now). When you count benefits and everything else, the difference in net cost to the client isn't as much as you'd think. The advantage to the client is disposability. While it may look like companies fire their employees as easily as they throw out their cafeteria trash, there's more overhead involved in getting rid of an employee (even without tenure, collective bargaining,etc.) and WAY more when hiring an employee than when renting and returning a contractor.

Speaking of net, my net income as a contractor (full-time, on-site) is not a whole lot different from the equivalent employee position. (YMMV, especially if you're an H1-B.) Of course, I bill short-term work much, much higher, but that's because there's less of it. I prefer the (very relative) stability of being on a full-time PSA versus billing a couple hours a week from a dozen different clients.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (2)

wiredlogic (135348) | about 10 months ago | (#45071195)

Of course. Those pesky employees negatively impact profit margins. Without them the shareholders can extract maximum value from their investment.

Re:I'm getting tired of this industry (1)

CanadianMacFan (1900244) | about 10 months ago | (#45073601)

It's not just the tech industry it's every industry now. The stock market demands an easy solution to slowing revenue growth and all too often the "easy" solution is to chop some staff because everyone only looks at the short term. Even the government is doing this in order to reduce our taxes in order to try and get re-elected. We are going to get into trouble with all of this short term thinking.

Hi, I'm the new CEO. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45070031)

Here's our new strategy: We're all about the cloud.

BTW you're fired. I'm sorry, but I was hired to (hold it a sec) ... I said oak. Oak panelling and crown molding for the entire room, and can you move up the schedule? I'm in a hurry...make the tough decisions.

The dream of the Nineties (1)

jmitchel!jmitchel.co (254506) | about 10 months ago | (#45070053)

(Alcatel-)Lucent involved in a new massive layoff? It's another 90s revival. The scars never quite healed from starting my career there in the 90s.

Re:The dream of the Nineties (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45070255)

The ring logo [dilbert.com] was the tipping point.

Re:The dream of the Nineties (1)

Grizzley9 (1407005) | about 10 months ago | (#45072993)

(Alcatel-)Lucent involved in a new massive layoff? It's another 90s revival. The scars never quite healed from starting my career there in the 90s.

I still work there. Amazing that through what seems layoffs continuously since 2001 that we are still around. I guess the cash infusion from merging with Alcatel helped push us along for a few more years. Though from what I know, due to unions and such in the EU, they are overstaffed there but it is very difficult to layoff.

Re:The dream of the Nineties (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 10 months ago | (#45073697)

Based on what I'm reading on Wikipedia, they have over 70,000 employees. I imagine they are gaining and losing employees all the time. The only time you hear about it in the news is when they lay off 10,000 employees, but you don't hear about it when some random division is doing well and hires 50-100 people. It may even be that big layoffs is the only way to get rid of people. Over time, you hire a few people here, a few people there, and numbers go up. But nobody really has a reason to get rid of everybody. All the managers want bigger operating budgets, and as long as people aren't actually being destructive, there's no reason to get rid of them. A big order has to come from higher up to get rid of people when there really isn't anything they are doing wrong.

As a side story, I was talking to a guy a few months back who said they had tons of jobs, and that they were hiring up a lot of people. A couples weeks later I heard about a bunch of layoffs. Maybe he was just uninformed, or maybe the particular division/building he was working in was actually doing quite well. It's hard to say.

Everytime I hear about Alcatel layoffs, I look across the street from my and don't notice their parking lot get any emptier. It's actually overflowing, and many of them take up spots that should be for our building. Maybe they are laying off 10,000 people, but I'm sure there's quite a few divisions in the company that are still hiring.

Re:The dream of the Nineties (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45075569)

Lucent alone had 150,000 employees in 1999 (http://www.thebhc.org/publications/BEHonline/2011/lazonickandmarch.pdf). Granted it was more than ten years ago, but my memory of my last couple of years there was of life under continual threat of (roughly literal) decimation. Over at Ye Olde NSC whole regions of the building were reduced to empty cubicle mazes, which felt distinctly post-apocalyptic to roam.

Whoopsie (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about 10 months ago | (#45070157)

I see the marketroid who typed up the press release accidentally put a 'f' in there.

'Shift Plan', because... (3, Funny)

jlowery (47102) | about 10 months ago | (#45070237)

'Shaft Plan' was a little too insensitive.

Re:'Shift Plan', because... (1)

thisisnotreal (888437) | about 10 months ago | (#45071049)

was thinking 'the shit plan', personally

Re:'Shift Plan', because... (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 10 months ago | (#45071115)

Who is the CEO that won't risk his neck
For his brother man?
SHAFT!
Can you dig it?

Re:'Shift Plan', because... (1)

turgid (580780) | about 10 months ago | (#45075269)

Check it out! [youtube.com]

Calls It "Shift Plan" (1)

v1 (525388) | about 10 months ago | (#45070393)

Laid off employee shows up on Wheel of Fortune. "Thanks, Jack, I'd like to sell an 'R'..."

More like... (1)

denmarkw00t (892627) | about 10 months ago | (#45070569)

SHIT PLAN.

Oooooh. Someone else said it, but I don't have any followup, just wanted to do that one bit and this bit after it.

Re:More like... (1)

thisisnotreal (888437) | about 10 months ago | (#45071061)

damn. i just dropped this steaming pile up there before seeing yours..

Re:More like... (1)

Andrewkov (140579) | about 10 months ago | (#45071169)

You're not shit canned, you're shift planned!

Re:More like... (1)

denmarkw00t (892627) | about 10 months ago | (#45073833)

Oh dammit!!!

Shift Happens

So late to this party

You say Tomato.. (1)

apcullen (2504324) | about 10 months ago | (#45072017)

You say Shit Can... I say Shift Plan!

There's a shortage! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45073133)

Yet another purge at a technology company. I used to try to keep a list of them. How can there be a shortage of technology-industry workers with all the layoffs, firings, and purges that are constantly going on?

The "Rio Rancho" Alcatel-Lucent (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45073439)

A friend of mine told me it looks pretty much like the Glangarry Gleen Ross movie inside there. " Get MAD you sob! get MAD! ". "Do you know what it takes to sell ALU products? it takes BRASS BALLS to sell ALU products." From high tech breakthrough patents to web banners customization sw. Way to go.

We've officially heard nothing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45073729)

I work at Alcatel-Lucent in the U.S., and as of mid-afternoon today, we've heard absolutely nothing official about this. Even my boss only knows about the layoffs from the same news outlets I read before work this morning.

Re:We've officially heard nothing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45075163)

What? It came out in an email this morning detailing the results of the Shift Plan.
Americas: 2,100 net reductions
APAC: 3,800 net reductions
EMEA: 4,100 net reductions

Re:We've officially heard nothing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45075541)

Of course it isn't going to be official. You must not expect such bad news coming out from top exec's mouth. The strategy is clear, the last year kick-in-da-butt wasn't enough to make the left-overs move their asses before they do it. Now they pushed even further. This is a coward act of people trying to make even more money with bad situations. "this is it, I'm telling you, this is it!!" margin call baby

Your first rodeo? (1)

Zynder (2773551) | about 10 months ago | (#45076579)

Why would you seem surprised that they haven't bothered telling you yet? Is this your first big corporate rodeo? Every company that I have ever worked for never tells us, the workers, shit about what is going. It gets people panicky. They get depressed and lower output. They get pissed off and steal or sabotage equipment. Some even get super pissed and come to work armed for a good old fashioned game of Postal. I have typically always heard about what was happening to me from the news before managment bothered to "officially" annouce it. Your employer will even probably deny it for a week or so until they just can't hide it. But you know what answers you'll get from them when you specifically ask them "Will I be geting laid off?" They'll just say "we just don't know yet," "we have some plans still up in the air so we can't speculate," "we're doing everything we can," and a whole host of other PHB talk. Do you know when you will "officially" find out you're getting the axe? EXACTLY 2 weeks before your layoff date. Not one minute sooner.

i think... (1)

madcat_sun (2812213) | about 10 months ago | (#45074029)

it is misspelled its shit plan

Hopefully, Google will buy it (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 10 months ago | (#45075979)

I worked for ATT when Bell Labs was spun off as Lucent by Fiorina (worse CEO that an American company can have). Lucent was loaded with bright ppl and great technology. If Google can buy the patents, it will make sense for them to buy Lucent.

Re:Hopefully, Google will buy it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45087359)

If ALU's patents worth that much, the company wouldn't be in this deep "shift". It's cheaper for google to keep paying a few royalties, initiate another building level and hire a few lucent good minds like jim gettys to reinvent internet with stuff like SPDY . Otherwise, buying ALU means plus 8k on top of the 10k on vacation.

patents (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | about 10 months ago | (#45077705)

Acatel-Lucent did mortgage its patents to Goldman-Sachs [fiercewireless.com] . One need a long fork when having diner with the devil, and I am not sure their is long enough.
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