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New High Tech $100 Bills Start To Circulate Today

Soulskill posted about 6 months ago | from the all-about-the-benjamins dept.

The Almighty Buck 302

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "New $100 bills made their debut today in the U.S. They include high tech features designed to make it easier for the public to authenticate but more difficult for counterfeiters to replicate. Those measures include a blue, 3-D security ribbon, as well as color-shifting ink that changes from copper to green when the note is tilted (PDF). That ink can be found on a large '100' on the back of the bill, on one of the '100's' on the front, and on a new image of an ink well that's also on the front. 'The $100 is the highest value denomination that we issue, and it circulates broadly around the world,' says Michael Lambert, assistant director for cash at the Federal Reserve Board. 'Therefore, we took the necessary time to develop advanced security features that are easy for the public to use in everyday transactions, but difficult for counterfeiters to replicate.' The bill was originally due to reach banks in 2011, but three years ago the Federal Reserve announced that a problem with the currency's new security measures was causing the bills to crease during printing, which left blank spaces on the bills. This led the Feds to shred more than 30 million of the bills in 2012. The image of Benjamin Franklin will be the same as on the current bill, but like all the other newly designed currencies, it will no longer be surrounded by an dark oval. Except for the $1 and $2 bill, all U.S. paper currency has been redesigned in the last 10 years to combat counterfeiting."

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302 comments

Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (0)

madhatter256 (443326) | about 6 months ago | (#45075695)

The new $100 bill looks similar to the euro bill. Who knows, pretty soon all of our currency will look the same and eventually become one currency, and we all know what that will bring...

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (1, Insightful)

slick7 (1703596) | about 6 months ago | (#45075731)

The new $100 bill looks similar to the euro bill. Who knows, pretty soon all of our currency will look the same and eventually become one currency, and we all know what that will bring...

It is the same, it's backed by nothing. The gold is gone, where's the gold? The silver is gone, where's the silver?

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (0)

Alomex (148003) | about 6 months ago | (#45075891)

Let me FTFY:

It is the same, it's backed by nothing material. It's a promissory note from the issuing government, just like, say, company issued debt .

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076311)

The difference is that if a company goes out of business, bond holders get first dibs on the stuff - land, buildings, equipment, stock, patents, etc so that they can sell if off and recoup something. You buy the bond after evaluating the risks and rewards. Government issued money must be used whether you want to or not and if the issuer "goes out of business", you are left with nothing.

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075949)

What's gold and silver backed by? Oh yeah, that's right nothing but our imagination.

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076251)

oh please. It has had value since humans placed value on things. At least it has intrinsic value unlike paying debt with debt. Oh wait, you can't even do that. I can discharge debt with debt or set off debt, but I can NEVER pay it because the US gov made doing that illegal. Well then I will just set off my debt and have them pay it with the money (gold) they stole from everyone in 1930's.

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076255)

What's gold and silver backed by? Oh yeah, that's right nothing but our imagination.

So long as chicks will put out for shiny things, men will value gold and silver.

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (5, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#45075957)

Money is like a strapless evening dress on a 70 year old: It's held up by the collective belief that anything is better than having to see it drop.

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076247)

so money is held up by agism and misogyny? ... actually i guess i might be able to believe the latter

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (5, Insightful)

AK Marc (707885) | about 6 months ago | (#45075963)

It was never backed by gold. It was always backed only by promises. There was not enough gold to pay back if every dollar was brought in for a gold payout.

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (1)

gsgriffin (1195771) | about 6 months ago | (#45076069)

The 'Old Man' at the Gold and Silver Pawn Shop in Las Vegas has all the silver. Smart man!

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076205)

With a fiat currency, the value is backed by our ability to pay our debt bonds. That's how a fiat currency works. On 10/17/2013, it's value will spiral to worthlessness.

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075893)

Full story here: http://stuffblackpeopledontlike.blogspot.com/2013/10/at-heart-of-gun-control-debate-beats.html [blogspot.com]. Truth hurts when you are in denial. But only then.

At the heart of the gun control debate beats an uncomfortable truth: homicides and nonfatal shootings are almost exclusively clustered in black neighborhoods, with the fear (and legitimate threat) of being a victim of such 'random' violence the primary reason for white flight and subsequent democratic takeover of cities by black elected officials.

Were gun control advocates serious about stopping gun crime, making it illegal for black people to own guns (and coming down harshly on those who illegally possess guns in the black community) would instantly remove the primary reason for white flight from a city such as Gary, Indiana.

Such a sane policy would save thousands upon thousands of black lives each year (gunned down by other blacks), and - more importantly - allow for actual wealth to be created with white people able to put down roots in a community, instead of abandoning neighborhoods every generation when the scenario mentioned in the first paragraph inevitably occurs.

Instead, our government actively passes laws to take guns away from the law-abiding, fails to aggressively target black communities in cities like Chicago, Newark, and Baltimore where illegal guns flourish, and does every thing imaginable to destroy white communities and neighborhoods (untold wealth has been lost since the declaring of restrictive covenants unconstitutional).

Why not just make guns illegal for black people to own in these cities and in Gary?

White people might move back to the city, considering it's a city that whites abandoned decades ago because of the legitimate fear of being the victim of random black crime.

The NRA, in working to protect gun-rights for all Americans, actually works to kill American cities like Gary and Indianapolis (where almost all homicides by guns and nonfatal shootings involve a black suspect); guns do make us safer, but when you combine guns and black people you get unsafe streets and eventually 'blight' where neighborhoods once thrived.

In the black communities of Indiana, you do get similar homicide and nonfatal statistics to Chicago.

At the heart of the gun control beats the uncomfortable truth no one is willing to confront, which is a clear indication this nation is reaching terminal status.

Restrictive gun laws would work, if you actively policed the sections of cities where gun ownership is forbidden.

We don't have that today (even in Chicago), because police departments are incredibly fearful of doing anything that would negatively impact the black people and create a public relations nightmare (picketing, boycotts, end of careers, and editorial condemnation from local newspapers/affiliates); but we could have that if we were prepared to restore health to our cities (or wherever black people are found in America).

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075959)

Look everyone, it's the ghost of Ronald Reagan!

Re:Looks European.... cue the conspiracy... (1)

gweihir (88907) | about 6 months ago | (#45076329)

Only difference is, European paper money quality has been so much better for a long time, that the largest notes are about 5...10x higher in denomination, even before the Euro. The largest one is 500EUR ~ 679USD.

US paper money sucked badly for a far longer time than the stuff used by the rest of the world. Well, better (very) late than never. You may consider $200 and $500 bills next. Well, maybe in 20 or 30 years when your tech has caught up.

What a farce (1, Troll)

roman_mir (125474) | about 6 months ago | (#45075701)

What a complete farce, the only people who are truly counterfeiting the currency are the government officials and their lapdog central bankers, and you can't prevent them from adding zeros to the electronic bank accounts by adding anti-counterfeit measures to the bills.

The only way to make currency impossible to counterfeit is to not have fiat currency in the first place, which means the people would choose something real to be money, I am talking about gold, and you can't really counterfeit that.

Re:What a farce (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 6 months ago | (#45075801)

Actually, most $100 bill counterfeiting is in the former USSR and adjacent countries.

Re:What a farce (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#45075989)

So we now make our money safe by implementing security means they had in their money for a decade now, because we know they don't have access to that kind of sophisticated technology. Uhhuh.

Makes about as much sense as anything coming out of capitol hill lately.

Re:What a farce (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 6 months ago | (#45076037)

So we now make our money safe by implementing security means they had in their money for a decade now, because we know they don't have access to that kind of sophisticated technology. Uhhuh.

Makes about as much sense as anything coming out of capitol hill lately.

Pretty much.

Next up, 2020, are one and two dollar coins.

Re:What a farce (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076217)

Are you sure about that? Seems like there is a certain organization in the USA with almost no oversight that prints tons of $100 bills. Inflation is a measure of how much "counterfeiting" they have done. Money should have constant value, they should print to try and make that happen.

Re:What a farce (3, Interesting)

Lloyd_Bryant (73136) | about 6 months ago | (#45075813)

The only way to make currency impossible to counterfeit is to not have fiat currency in the first place, which means the people would choose something real to be money, I am talking about gold, and you can't really counterfeit that.

Care to place a wager on that? [myfoxny.com]

Re:What a farce (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about 6 months ago | (#45076025)

actulay not you can debase currency and at one time it was a crime treated as seriously as treason and had some very nasty death penalties.

Re:What a farce (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075873)

archimedes

Re:What a farce (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076151)

The only stuff in the universe that cannot be counterfeited is energy.

I propose a new currency based on the kWh. Instead of slips of paper or plastic credit cards, people will use rechargeable batteries and actually transfer units of work between each other.

At first there will be extremely rapid inflation as people set up solar collectors and other such stuff, but eventually nearly every inch of the earth will be dedicated to collecting energy. Things like tax credits and welfare can be eliminated as every man, woman, and child will be able to collect or generate at least some energy (the government could give out stationary bikes that collect energy), which will act as a base negative tax rate.

With so much energy then available, what would our standard of living be?

Soon it will be worth $1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075729)

NT

Re:Soon it will be worth $1 (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#45075997)

It will still be worth 100 USD. No doubt about that.

It might be worth 1 EUR, though. Well, technically it IS worth an EUR, but we prop that toy money up because we simply got too much of it ourselves.

But but but (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075737)

The government is shut down!!!!11

Re:But but but (1, Offtopic)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#45076005)

No, more like a TV on standby. You don't really get anything out of it, but it still sucks up juice.

Re:But but but (0)

Farmer Tim (530755) | about 6 months ago | (#45076033)

The government is shut down!!!!11

And the money flows. Looks like the libertarians are right after all...

$2 bill? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075739)

are 2 dollar bills in circulation? just asking because I haven't seen any.

Re:$2 bill? (1)

Entropy98 (1340659) | about 6 months ago | (#45075755)

are 2 dollar bills in circulation? just asking because I haven't seen any.

They are, ask for some at the bank.

Re:$2 bill? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075967)

There's a vegan strip club here that makes change in $2 bills... They say they're "twice as much fun!"

Re:$2 bill? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076063)

"here" wouldn't, by any chance, be Portland, would it?

There was a presentation 2 years ago at NodeConf by someone who worked in a vegan strip club in Portland about how she rebuilt the security system using Arduinos, Node and Twilio.

Re:$2 bill? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076215)

That's the one. Apparently the Secret Service has been giving them grief for dying the bills red [wweek.com].

Re:$2 bill? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076101)

A strip club with no animal products on the menu? Cool!

Re:$2 bill? (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#45076031)

2 dollar bills would actually be what I'd forge if I were to. Think about it, it's legal tender, it's an amount where most businesses won't start to make a fuss over and nobody really knows what they should look like.

Re:$2 bill? (0)

laie_techie (883464) | about 6 months ago | (#45075843)

are 2 dollar bills in circulation? just asking because I haven't seen any.

IIRC, 1976 was the last year fresh $2 bills were minted. Some banks still have a few in stock. They are still worth two bucks.

Re:$2 bill? (3, Interesting)

bhetrick (1812392) | about 6 months ago | (#45075941)

The banks that don't have them in stock will almost always be willing to include a brick of $2 bills in their next currency order to the Fed if you agree to take all 1000 of them. It takes me about a year to go through a brick just using them for small cash purchases.

Re:$2 bill? (3, Interesting)

Lloyd_Bryant (73136) | about 6 months ago | (#45075875)

There are something like 3 million of them in circulation, and new ones are still being printed periodically. But many people, like yourself, have never actually encountered one.

(I've heard anecdotes of people trying to spend one being accused of counterfeiting, because the cashier had never seen one and assumed that it was a fraud).

Shutdown? (0)

dysmal (3361085) | about 6 months ago | (#45075753)

If the government is supposed to be shut down, how could anyone release this money?

Re:Shutdown? (2)

slick7 (1703596) | about 6 months ago | (#45075787)

If the government is supposed to be shut down, how could anyone release this money?

The federal reserve is not part of the government, it never was, it never will be.

Re:Shutdown? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076011)

Come on - we both know the government and the federal reserve are both controlled by the lizard people.

Re:Shutdown? (1)

compro01 (777531) | about 6 months ago | (#45076039)

The Fed doesn't print the money, they're just the central bank that issues the money, which isn't the same thing. The actual printing of the banknotes is done by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, and the coins are made by the United States Mint.

It's similar in Canada, where the Bank of Canada issues the money, the coins are made by the Royal Canadian Mint, and the banknotes are printed by a couple different private companies under contract. Interestingly, neither of those companies is Canadian-owned. One is American (R.R. Donnelley & Sons) and the other is German (Giesecke & Devrient).

Re:Shutdown? (2)

mark-t (151149) | about 6 months ago | (#45076239)

The Bank of Canada is wholly Canadian owned. Legally, it is a crown corporation, belonging to the federal government. Ultimately, the Bank of Canada is owned by the people of Canada.

R.R. Donnelly runs the Canadian Bank Note Company, which prints bank notes for Canada, but this has always been a private company (before 1920, it was a subdivision of the American Bank Note Company in New York). The Canadian Bank Note Company is not to be confused with the Royal Canadian Mint, which is another crown corporation, and is also wholly owned by the Government of Canada. CBN also prints passports, driver's licences, and assorted other documents that are government-issued.

All that, and yet ... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075763)

And yet they can't do such basic things as, say, change the sizes of the notes so that vision impaired people can tell the difference between a one dollar and ten dollar bill just by checking its length. (Have a look at the Australian notes [wikipedia.org] for an example: each note is seven millimeters longer than the preceding one by value.)

They'd also do well by dropping the one and two dollar bills, replacing them with coins; the currency has devalued so much, it's not worth keeping the low value notes as notes. You could also make a case for ditching the penny, to boot.

But hey, what would I know ...

Re:All that, and yet ... (1)

Lloyd_Bryant (73136) | about 6 months ago | (#45075951)

They'd also do well by dropping the one and two dollar bills, replacing them with coins; the currency has devalued so much, it's not worth keeping the low value notes as notes. You could also make a case for ditching the penny, to boot.

But hey, what would I know ...

The government would *love* to be able to discontinue those bills, and replace them with coins. But to date, there have been *two* attempts to replace the $1 bill with a $1 coin, and both have failed miserably because people refused to use them.

Re:All that, and yet ... (2)

iggymanz (596061) | about 6 months ago | (#45075969)

not true, the only reason the programs failed was because the government cowardly refused to proactively remove and destroy $1 bills. the lifetime of a $1 bill is only 18 months on average, in two years the country could be converted over

Re:All that, and yet ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076093)

Adopt the Canada system. When they introduced the $1 and $2 coins they actively removed the paper notes from circulation.

People can try to refuse to adopt, but since the government wont put them back in circulation eventually they are all soaked up.

Re:All that, and yet ... (2)

mark-t (151149) | about 6 months ago | (#45076339)

Actually, Canada did not actively remove the $1 bill from circulation right after the $1 coin was introduced. They reduced the printing of $1 bills considerably when they introduced the $1 coin, but what the mint found in the aftermath was that people would tend to use the bills far more frequently than the coins. and this would create above average wear and tear on them. With fewer bills in circulation already, the rate at which bills were needing to be replaced rose significantly, increasing costs, which largely defeated the purpose of introducing the coin in the first place, and they retired the bill about two years after introducing the $1 coin. A couple of years later, they decided to avoid the whole mess they had with the $1 currency entirely by pulling the $2 note at the same time that they started minting $2 coins.

Re:All that, and yet ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076187)

They don't have to do anything differently than what they do now when it comes to destroying worn out currency. They just have to stop printing new $1 bills and then people would eventually have to use the coins.

Re:All that, and yet ... (1)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | about 6 months ago | (#45076195)

This was done in Canada, and it worked just like you described. I always wondered why the US didn't do it the same way.

Re:All that, and yet ... (1)

Golddess (1361003) | about 6 months ago | (#45076211)

The government would *love* to be able to discontinue those bills, and replace them with coins.

It costs 18.03 cents [usmint.gov] to mint those dollar coins, but only 5.4 cents [federalreserve.gov] to print a one dollar bill. So why exactly would they want to get rid of the paper bill?

Re:All that, and yet ... (4, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | about 6 months ago | (#45076327)

It costs 18.03 cents [usmint.gov] to mint those dollar coins, but only 5.4 cents [federalreserve.gov] to print a one dollar bill. So why exactly would they want to get rid of the paper bill?

Because coins can last for decades, whereas paper money has to be continually replaced. I'm sure I read somewhere that the Bank of England heats the building by burning old money, which is replaced by new notes.

Re:All that, and yet ... (1)

mirix (1649853) | about 6 months ago | (#45075971)

I like how euros (and most European currencies in general, IME) physically scale(d) with value, very handy even for a person with good vision.

Definitely disagree on the 1/2 bills though. Canada got rid of both years ago, and there's just too much bloody change. I need to get suspenders or something.

(we did finally kill the penny this year, though. thank god).

Re:All that, and yet ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076207)

You can't replace the $1 bills, how will we tip the strippers?

but all the old stuff is still good, right? (4, Insightful)

JeffOwl (2858633) | about 6 months ago | (#45075765)

So why would I bother trying to counterfeit the newer more difficult bills instead of just doing the older easier ones since they remain legal tender?

Re:but all the old stuff is still good, right? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075823)

Eventually, these get circulated enough so that when a cashier is presented with an old $100, they can inspect it more thoroughly because they don't have to do it as often.

Re:but all the old stuff is still good, right? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076225)

And if they don't do it as often, they won't be that experienced in what to look for to ID a fake note.

Re:but all the old stuff is still good, right? (2)

Entropy98 (1340659) | about 6 months ago | (#45075825)

So why would I bother trying to counterfeit the newer more difficult bills instead of just doing the older easier ones since they remain legal tender?

As the years go by the older notes will get less common, especially new looking old notes.

I was at a casino once and this guy put a stack of crisp old style 100s on the table. The casino employees spent 15 minutes inspecting them, calling others over to look at them, etc before they accepted them.

Re:but all the old stuff is still good, right? (4, Informative)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#45076077)

That's why forgers have found ways to "age" their bills. It works a bit like aging jeans to give them that appealing "ruggedly used" look.

Yes, "laundering money" gets a whole new meaning that way.

Re:but all the old stuff is still good, right? (2)

GrandCow (229565) | about 6 months ago | (#45075831)

So why would I bother trying to counterfeit the newer more difficult bills instead of just doing the older easier ones since they remain legal tender?

Because change takes time and you need to start somewhere? They'll start phasing out the old $100's at the bank and replacing them with the new ones. The old ones will be destroyed. As people use them and more leave circulation it will be more and more suspicious for people to break out the older bills. Will there still be counterfeit bills popping up for years? Sure. But the point is that it will become more suspicious if someone tries to cash in a lot of them.

Re:but all the old stuff is still good, right? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#45076095)

But by the time it really is suspicious, don't you think the forgers catch on?

So far every security feature has been thwarted sooner or later. The new roadblock is the color changing ink. Well, let's see how long it takes. I give it a year.

Re:but all the old stuff is still good, right? (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about 6 months ago | (#45075841)

So why would I bother trying to counterfeit the newer more difficult bills instead of just doing the older easier ones since they remain legal tender?

Because it'll only work so long. They collect and destroy the old bills and replace them with new ones. About 15 years ago, I tried to "pass" some real 20-year-old dollar bills I inherited. They'd been sitting unused in a desk. Since they were a little different from the then-current design, they occasionally got some extra scrutiny.

Pedant note: I'm not claiming that this is foolproof or anything. Just noting something I experienced using new old stock bills.

Re:but all the old stuff is still good, right? (1)

bugs2squash (1132591) | about 6 months ago | (#45076163)

They should have some kind of built in expiry enforcement mechanism on the bill. If they are not traded in for new ones within, say, 10 years they should become worthless, or ramp down in value to zero over the years. All it needs is a published expiry date on the bill.

Obligatory William Gibson Quote (1)

Penumbra (175042) | about 6 months ago | (#45075773)

“The U.S. hundred is the international currency of bad shit, Hollis, and by the same token the number one target of counterfeiters.”

In other news... (3, Insightful)

sydbarrett74 (74307) | about 6 months ago | (#45075803)

...the United States still has the world's fugliest currency.

Re:In other news... (2)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 6 months ago | (#45075907)

...the United States still has the world's fugliest currency.

What, you got a problem with Olmec heads and vague references to the illuminati? :3

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075929)

It's like they do it on purpose.

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075931)

Since when did U.S. Dollars start having Queen Elizabeth on them?
 
*puts on bullet-proof vest*

Re:In other news... (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 6 months ago | (#45076003)

hey show some respect, that's just George our founding father in his friday night drag. And he really doesn't care to be called a queen either, he says "double-gaited" will do just fine

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076133)

Funny... The US bill has "in god we trust" on one hand, and the first ammendment on the other?

For what its worth, many nations of the world have the queen on them.
I'm canadian and i personally think we should get rid of her but some people actually want to keep the ties...

Re:In other news... (1)

compro01 (777531) | about 6 months ago | (#45076219)

I'm canadian and i personally think we should get rid of her but some people actually want to keep the ties...

Yeah, but who would we replace her with? Kim Campbell?

About time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075811)

While various countries took care to regularly update their bill printing tech, for the longest time the country with the most bills in widest circulation did... nothing. As long as the counterfeits didn't leak back into the country, it wasn't a problem. Where else have we seen that attitude?

A load of Shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075817)

They rolled out similar plastic money in Canada and it was counterfeited within a year.

The big problem was the $20s, they already seemed fake and a lot of people reported them as such and so reports would get easily dismissed. Guess which denomination turned out to be a big problem

Re:A load of Shit (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 6 months ago | (#45076109)

I've heard of a handful of isolated cases of people counterfeiting the new polymer Canadian bills, but no stories about any that actually entered circulation.

In other words, the hopeful counterfeiters who've attempted this so far are only fooling people who can't be bothered to actually check for even the most basic security characteristics. The forgeries discovered were actually quite crude,and it's nothing less than laziness on the part of the recipients that led to it being passed off as genuine in the first place. One wonders if they could have been equally successful passing off monopoly money as genuine, simply if it were at least sized correctly (jokes about how Canada currency looks like monopoly money to some people aside).

The techniques used in the new Canadian bills have been in use in Australia for about 25 years now, and to date, by my understanding, the measures have defeated *every* attempt to pass off a fake bill as genuine under remotely close scrutiny.

It's not... green? (3, Insightful)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 6 months ago | (#45075819)

Is it me, or does it have a bluish tinge now that makes it easier to tell that it's a different denomination?

Most countries already use different colored bills to help distinguish one denomination from another (and to aid in quickly determining how much cash on hand you have by a quick glance). Only in the US do I have to manually count out every bill to make sure a $5 didn't sneak in with the $1s and so on.

Of course, perhaps it's time to go beyond linen/cotton/paper based bills and move to plastic (polymer) based ones...

Re:It's not... green? (1)

Virtucon (127420) | about 6 months ago | (#45075943)

Is it me, or does it have a bluish tinge now that makes it easier to tell that it's a different denomination?

Sorry since we're spending more than we take in we can no longer print with Green Ink. Using Red Ink would have been a give away to the Republicans so now we're just printing them with the Blue ink instead so you'll support the current Administration by using them and you won't feel so bad that that $100 bill is only worth about $4.50 now.

Re:It's not... green? (3, Interesting)

compro01 (777531) | about 6 months ago | (#45076145)

Yes, all the bills except the $1 and $2 are slightly different colours now. The $5 is purple, the $10 is orange, the $20 is green, the $50 is pink, and the $100 is teal.

The ruling in American Council of the Blind v. Paulson required them to add accessibility features to the notes and the colours are one of those, in addition to some kind of tactile feature.

Surprised they didn't incorporate the blank spaces (1)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 6 months ago | (#45075901)

Hey, wonder why they didn't incorporate the accidental blank spaces as an additional security feature? You know, like old school game disks used to have certain sectors purposefully corrupted as a method of copy protection, so if you copied the game to a new disk and the computer didn't see the bad sectors where it expected to, it would know it was a copy...

Re:Surprised they didn't incorporate the blank spa (1)

Alomex (148003) | about 6 months ago | (#45075981)

Bills have (or used to have) intentional mistakes that a hand engraver was likely to fix subconsciously, including in some cases typos in microprint and tiny jagged (as if by accident) straight lines.

Nowadays bills are copied using high-speed high-precision laser scanners so I do not know if those artifacts are still used as security devices.

Re:Surprised they didn't incorporate the blank spa (1)

Lloyd_Bryant (73136) | about 6 months ago | (#45076099)

Uh, because anyone making a set of counterfeit plates would just make sure his plates had the same blank spaces? The idea is to put in features that the counterfeiters couldn't easily copy...

(and FYI - it took me about 20 minutes to slap together a simple TSR to provide the proper "bad" sectors where required for those stupid disks. Turns out that was trivially easy to get around too...)

Re:Surprised they didn't incorporate the blank spa (1)

bugs2squash (1132591) | about 6 months ago | (#45076189)

Encrypt the serial number into the features on both sides of the bill. That way at least the forgers have to copy multiple bills using multiple plates if they want a bunch of different serial numbers.

just counterfeit old ones... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45075955)

Theres no grace period to trade in your old bills. Sure they'll get taken out of circulation eventually but you can still find old-school 100s (the ones that look like the 1s do now) floating around and still pay with then

federal reserve corporation's 0% interest rates (-1)

nickmalthus (972450) | about 6 months ago | (#45075987)

Interests rates have been zero percent for years and will remain so indefinitely. Counterfeiting is passe when the federal reserve corporation prints unlimited money for it's member banks who then loan even more money out through fractional reserve banking. Anyone who is still counterfeiting is late to the game when unfathomable unencumbered money creation is legal.

Re:federal reserve corporation's 0% interest rates (4, Insightful)

iggymanz (596061) | about 6 months ago | (#45076059)

no, the Federal Funds Rate is currently 0.25% and for overnight loans. very short term so does not have the explosive inflationary effect you seem to imagine.

mo3 up (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076029)

gains market share y00r own towel in

Down but not out (1)

TheloniousToady (3343045) | about 6 months ago | (#45076047)

Darn, now that I can no longer counterfeit Ben Franklins with my printer, I'll have to go back to counterfeiting printer cartridges.

Waiting for the trolls... (1)

duke_cheetah2003 (862933) | about 6 months ago | (#45076169)

Seriously, I'm waiting a patent troll to step up to the plate and sue cuz the new currency uses something the troll patented.

Re:Waiting for the trolls... (1)

Gravis Zero (934156) | about 6 months ago | (#45076199)

Seriously, I'm waiting a patent troll to step up to the plate and sue cuz the new currency uses something the troll patented.

the government has the power to seize any patent at will. while they have not done this to date, they might if it messes with our currency.

Well... C is for Christmas... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076181)

All those bells... very festive.

So basically... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45076221)

...the features the swiss money had since 1995: http://www.snb.ch/de/iabout/cash/history/id/cash_history_serie8

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