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8 Users of Silk Road Arrested, 'Many More To Come'

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the many-people-suddenly-nervous dept.

Crime 318

An anonymous reader writes "Last week authorities shut down Silk Road, an online black market that made use of Tor to hide activity. They also arrested the site's primary operator, Ross Ulbricht, and seized his possessions. Now, an AP report indicates at least 8 more arrests have been made on people suspected to have sold drugs through the site. Four of the arrests happened in the U.K., two were in the U.S. and two were in Sweden. It looks like they're gearing up for more arrests, as well. Keith Bristow of Britain's National Crime Agency said, 'These latest arrests are just the start; there are many more to come.' Authorities are reportedly mining the site's customer review system, which contains months worth of transaction data, for further leads."

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Crime (5, Funny)

GrBear (63712) | about a year ago | (#45080321)

Crime doesn't pay, but the hours are great!

Re:Crime (5, Insightful)

somersault (912633) | about a year ago | (#45080411)

It doesn't pay, but being in some prisons is better than working minimum wage, and definitely better than being homeless.

Re:Crime (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080503)

Speaking of Swedish prison my dad knows a guy who calms it saved his life. How? No alcohol on weekdays. But on the week ends (Swedish prison let most of the prisoners out for weekend) the guy would go drinking with one of the guards. After following this habit for a 2 years. He still no longer drink during week days.

Re:Crime (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080843)

And to think that Assange is worried about being subjected to that sort of hell, preferring to say cooped up in an office for years to come.

Re:Crime (4, Insightful)

pellik (193063) | about a year ago | (#45080931)

Assange is affraid of extradition to the US not answering charges in Sweden.

Re:Crime (1, Offtopic)

SwedishPenguin (1035756) | about a year ago | (#45080981)

He's more worried about being extradited to the US, and while politicians here say that won't happen and I sort of think that would deal a PR blow both to Sweden and the US, I don't blame him for thinking so considering how much Sweden currently kowtows to every whim of the US. Obama was here only last month after what was practically fawning love-letter from our prime minister to his idol, it was branded by our foreign minister (known for acting as a spy for the US embassy during right-wing government negotiations after the 1976 elections and for his subsequent close ties to the US) as a "feel-good" meeting. This is no longer the same country where the prime minister (Olof Palme, later assassinated) once condemned the firebombings of Vietnam resulting in US withdrawal of their ambassador.

Re:Crime (5, Informative)

SwedishPenguin (1035756) | about a year ago | (#45080921)

Swedish prison let most of the prisoners out for weekend

Err, no, never heard of that. A prisoner can apply for "permission" after serving something like a third of his/her time in prison, and then they can leave prison for up to three days at a time (decided by prison administration, or, as in a recently publicized case, by a central agency on appeal), but I don't think any prisoner gets permission every weekend...

Re:Crime (5, Informative)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about a year ago | (#45080573)

More accurately: Crime is a high-risk career. If you're good at it, the pay is very good. Even just common burglary you can make thousands in one day's work. If you're not good at it though, you make nothing at all and end up in prison.

Re:Crime (1)

Sunshinerat (1114191) | about a year ago | (#45080621)

Its all good until you get caught...
The problem is when do you stop, as long as it goes well, no reason to stop, you may expand the operations...
Then one day, you are caught and all was for naught.

Re:Crime (5, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#45080643)

Sounds a lot like being a CEO or financial investor. If you're good at it, you can steal millions every day.

Re:Crime (5, Insightful)

Forbo (3035827) | about a year ago | (#45080879)

Except in the finance world, you can screw people out of everything they have, get caught and STILL get your bonus.

Re:Crime (4, Informative)

goodmanj (234846) | about a year ago | (#45080733)

Crime's like any other job: the high-paying, less risky jobs all require tons of skill and training, or family connections. If you haven't got a crime education or a crime pedigree, your only choices are super high-risk jobs like mugging or super low-paying jobs like corner drug sales.

http://freakonomics.com/books/freakonomics/chapter-excerpts/chapter-3/ [freakonomics.com]

Re:Crime (0)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#45080917)

My hat is off to you, I almost posted a link to the same material (at a different site).

Re:Crime (2)

Errol backfiring (1280012) | about a year ago | (#45080675)

Crime DOES pay, if you give some officials some of it.

I find it more interesting... (4, Interesting)

crafty.munchkin (1220528) | about a year ago | (#45080341)

... that people used their real names and addresses on Silk Rd as sellers, and expected to never get busted in the process.

Re:I find it more interesting... (2)

Anon, Not Coward D (2797805) | about a year ago | (#45080377)

maybe those were real addresses... but not of the real guys on silk road

Re:I find it more interesting... (2)

Threni (635302) | about a year ago | (#45080625)

One more reason not to run Tor exit nodes or open Wifi points...

Re:I find it more interesting... (2)

Qzukk (229616) | about a year ago | (#45080775)

Yeah, sure, because the first thing the cops check for when they're told 5523 south 43rd street is selling drugs is whether they've got wireless or not.

If you're lucky, they bothered to double check the address so they don't kick in your door at 5532 with a no-knock warrant, unannounced, guns blazing.

Re:I find it more interesting... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080861)

Or, you know, just the opposite.

Re:I find it more interesting... (2)

Imrik (148191) | about a year ago | (#45080387)

I don't know about all of them, but for the arrests I heard about they didn't. They had to use information from both inside and outside silk road to match people to their identities online.

Re:I find it more interesting... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080437)

I believe for the pair in Bellevue, they stupidly used their own return address on their packages, which was a PO Box. The smarter sellers use real addresses of random businesses which should be totally safe. Obviously many sellers weren't so smart or simply became complacent.

Re:I find it more interesting... (4, Interesting)

jonbryce (703250) | about a year ago | (#45080397)

You need to use a real address if you want to buy stuff, and in the UK at least, you don't need to have that much before it is "possession with intent to supply". People could have been buying wholesale on Silk Road and selling it on the street, and even if they weren't, if the quantities were more than about a day's supply they would get charged with that anyway.

Re:I find it more interesting... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080469)

This is true, but considering from the standpoint of police resources, they are going to go after the sellers and big buyers first. There are literally thousands of people who ordered an ounce or two of pot or a few molly pills every once in a while; they don't have the time to dedicate to that, even if it's technically a crime.

There is no fame and glory in busting a kid who ordered pot online, whereas there will be headlines if they bring down the big sellers. Busting the sellers is how they can go around and talk about taking out these dangerous criminal elements and get more funding.

Re:I find it more interesting... (2)

DrXym (126579) | about a year ago | (#45081057)

Well quite. I expect the US cops presented their counterparts in various countries with a large list of suspected customers / sellers and they went after the low hanging fruit. Maybe these people were known to police already and the logs gave them cause to arrest them. Although the charge would still have to be proven and even the most blatant dealer could beat the charge assuming they had practiced operational security (e.g. ensuring all the illegal activity and the bitcoin wallet all lived in a shadow volume). But then again they might not have been arrested in the first place if they had been that smart.

I doubt some guy who'd ordered a personal amount of weed is going to get arrested though perhaps the cops have enough information to give them a courtesy call.

Re:I find it more interesting... (1)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#45080975)

I doubt they had any personal information on the site. I suspect they failed to launder their bitcoins sufficienty.

Silk Road rating A-- (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080375)

Instead of weed, package contained SWAT team.

Would not buy again.

(with apologies to xkcd)

Same as it ever was. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080381)

Just another reason for the feds to shut down Tor completely. Welcome to the Police State.

Re:Same as it ever was. (5, Informative)

The-Ixian (168184) | about a year ago | (#45080427)

Tor was developed by DARPA and is funded by the NSF and the US State Dept.
 
I think your fears are a little unfounded.

Re:Same as it ever was. (2)

CreatureComfort (741652) | about a year ago | (#45080527)

Or, at least the wrong fears...

Re:Same as it ever was. (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about a year ago | (#45080583)

And the NSA is working to compromise it, as recent leaks revealed.

The US government isn't a monolith. Different departments within it are often working at cross-purposes, or even in open opposition.

Re:Same as it ever was. (1)

leonardluen (211265) | about a year ago | (#45080963)

Does it surprise anyone that the NSA is working to compromise Tor? at the very lease i would expect them to make a hobby of trying to compromise any network designed to hide or encrypt communications. if not for business reasons (keeping ahead of their rivals) at the very least i would expect them to do it for fun and to hone their skills. they are crypto guys it is what they do.

Re:Same as it ever was. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45081027)

https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-talk/2013-September/029956.html

Important to note ..... (5, Informative)

i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) | about a year ago | (#45080391)

that this isn't a failure of the technology. Ulbricht made the mistake of allowing the feds to connect the dots. Silk Road apparently kept some kind of logs. Here's hoping you didn't buy from them.

Re:Important to note ..... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080421)

It's an important reminder that it only takes one mistake to get caught, and it doesn't even need to be your own mistake.

Re:Important to note ..... (1)

pellik (193063) | about a year ago | (#45080989)

If sellers allowed useful contact information to reach Silk Road at all it's their mistake they get caught. Being on Tor doesn't guarantee any kind of anonymity, but those who follow best practice (open wifi, clean browser, clean OS, etc.) for illicit behavior are almost certainly fine right now.

Re:Important to note ..... (1)

Aguazul2 (2591049) | about a year ago | (#45080459)

Buyers are not much at risk. It is the sellers they are after.

Re:Important to note ..... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080635)

the sellers have much needed bitcoin to confiscate. the federal government needs funding, ya know.

Re:Important to note ..... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#45080789)

I imagine big buyers will be targets as well. Sure someone who just bought a few grams here or there is fine, but there might have been people moving real weight and replacing traditional suppliers this way.

Those folks are screwed.

Re:Important to note ..... (1, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#45080997)

Buyers are the low hanging fruit. They're the ones who actually needed to provide a physical address somewhere along the way.

Re:Important to note ..... (2)

lxs (131946) | about a year ago | (#45080721)

If you're really paranoid you could suggest that TOR is broken and they watched the guy from early on until they had a plausible non-TOR reason to "discover" him. After investing loads of resources into breaking TOR, would you want to throw all that away on a single bust?

Re:Important to note ..... (2)

TheCarp (96830) | about a year ago | (#45081061)

I remember checking out silk road back when it started (I think there were under 300 transactions at the time). I browsed around a bit and was amused... wondered who had the brass balls to order bulk heroin shipped to them from pakistan.

Even at the time I noticed something... I noticed one guy with the same name as the site name "Silk Road" and he was selling one product: Mushrooms. I said a few times to people I knew that if someone wanted to find the guy behind silk road, he should look at the shroomery forums, because anyone going into business selling mushrooms has been there.

It came as no shock to me that that was key to finding him.

With all the problems in the world... (5, Insightful)

MRe_nl (306212) | about a year ago | (#45080431)

Let's focus on recreational drugs!
It's as if we don't want peoples attention on the real criminals.

Sociopath plutocrats and their dogs.
http://www.globalissues.org/article/26/poverty-facts-and-stats [globalissues.org]

Re:With all the problems in the world... (2)

flyingfsck (986395) | about a year ago | (#45080525)

Well, obviously we got to focus on small time criminals. If the police would arrest all the investment bankers, then the whole world will be back in a depression again...

Re:With all the problems in the world... (4, Funny)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about a year ago | (#45080905)

I dunno, I think I'd be pretty happy about it.

Re:With all the problems in the world... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080661)

Right! And why the hell police is wasting time on catching pickpockets and writing parking tickets when there are murderers and rapists still on the loose, North Korea still oppressing people and children in Africa still starving? Damn waste of taxpayers money, I tell ya!

Seriously, you could make an argument for not pursuing recreational drug users, or for investigating state crimes - but you went for a nonsequitur mixing both, making it an argument for... I don't know, increasing tinfoil production?

Mod Down - Logical Fallacy (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080699)

You have committed a false dilemma fallacy. [wikipedia.org] That is not insightful. Moderators, please mod the parent down.
Thank you.

Re:With all the problems in the world... (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year ago | (#45080821)

These guys are also murderers. Still not interested?

So... (4, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#45080435)

Anybody interesting and hilariously anti-drug in public life on the list yet, or do those get filtered out before they send in the jackboots?

Re:So... (2)

Big Hairy Ian (1155547) | about a year ago | (#45080535)

Surely bearing in mind Silk Road was a website they will send in the Jackbots :D

Re:So... (3, Funny)

Peter Kingsbury (3046159) | about a year ago | (#45080647)

Oh, I bore it in mind, alright. And stop calling me Shirley.

Re:So... (5, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#45080655)

If Japan gets involved, they'll use Samurai Jackbots.

Re:So... (0)

CimmerianX (2478270) | about a year ago | (#45081013)

I would mod you up for that reference if I had points left.

Re:So... (5, Informative)

Bob9113 (14996) | about a year ago | (#45080913)

Anybody interesting and hilariously anti-drug in public life on the list yet, or do those get filtered out before they send in the jackboots?

I think it goes a little like this:

DEA Agent: So, I hear you are opposed to warrantless surveillance.
Junior Senator: Umm, yes?
DEA Agent: And my undertstanding is that recently you've been reconsidering your position.
Junior Senator: No, I haven't.
DEA Agent: See this post we have here from Silk Road where you say that BC Chronic made The Simpsons funny again?
Junior Senator: What I meant to say was, I believe warrantless surveillance is a vital and necessary tool in our war on violent extremism.
DEA Agent: I thought so.

Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In... (-1, Flamebait)

TheGoodNamesWereGone (1844118) | about a year ago | (#45080461)

3... 2... 1. GO! Write posts explaining how people buying things like herion and cocaine on the black market is okay, and how TOR would *never* be used for bad purposes.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (5, Insightful)

wbr1 (2538558) | about a year ago | (#45080529)

Nice troll. Buying on a black market is never good. However, the fact that our society/governmet forces one to exist, when its existance has demonstrably caused harm, created violence, gangs, addicts, and an underclass of simple users as felons, all to feed the public a boogeyman to help rake in funds for those in power and with entrenched interests is what is horrible. The fact that you probably buy it hook, line, and sinler scares me too.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | about a year ago | (#45080577)

While I agree that going after pot and shroom users is stupid, heroine is illegal for a very real and compelling reason: it kills. Quite a few others as well. I think the users need rehab and not jail time, but the dealers who enable people to destroy themselves for profit need to be shut down.

I personally hijacked my own addiction center in the brain with Skinner boxes, so I have no room for drugs on top of my MMOs.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080707)

Re: Skinner Boxes...

Operant conditioning chamber

Main article: Operant conditioning chamber

While a researcher at Harvard, B. F. Skinner invented the operant conditioning chamber, popularly referred to as the Skinner box, to measure responses of organisms (most often, rats and pigeons) and their orderly interactions with the environment. The box had a lever and a food tray, and a hungry rat could get food delivered to the tray pressing the lever. Skinner observed that when a rat was put in the box, it would wander around, sniffing and exploring, and would usually press the bar by accident, at which point a food pellet would drop into the tray. After that happened, the rate of bar pressing would increase dramatically and remain high until the rat was no longer hungry.

Skinner discovered that consequences for the organism played a large role in how the organism responded in certain situations. For instance, when the rat would pull the lever it would receive food. Subsequently, the rat made frequent pulls on the lever. Negative reinforcement was also exemplified by Skinner placing rats into an electrified chamber that delivered unpleasant shocks. Levers to cut the power were placed inside these boxes. By running a current through the “operant conditioning chamber,” Skinner noticed that the rats, after accidentally pressing the lever in a frantic bid to escape, quickly learned the effects of implementing the lever and consequently used this knowledge to stop the currents both during and prior to electrical shock. These two learned responses are known as Escape Learning and Avoidance Learning. The operant chamber for pigeons involves a plastic disc in which the pigeon pecks in order to open a drawer filled with grains. The Skinner box led to the principle of reinforcement, which is the probability of something occurring based on the consequences of a behavior.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B._F._Skinner

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (2)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#45080825)

Not Skinner boxes, he meant BF Skinner boxes cured him, AKA prison cells, emphasis on the BF.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080805)

Since the human body destroys itself in every case, a substance like heroin that makes life enjoyable is actually the best thing in the world. That you think dealers "need to be shut down" demonstrates that evil has seeped into your heart.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080813)

No. Heroine only kills because it is unregulated. Nearly every OD is because some one got an unexpectedly pure batch and used what they thought was their regular dose. Perhaps you were thinking of meth?

I am a little worried by your other comments. What's next? Fatty foods and large sodas? Dangerous sports? How many ways do people destroy themselves are you prepared to stop? I'm slippin' down a slope here!

To me, it all comes down to what used to be considered a basic American freedom, to do with my body as I see fit. If I want to rent out my butthole to buy chemicals that kill me, that's my right and none of your damned business.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080895)

This guy [wikipedia.org] can help you with that.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (1)

TheGoodNamesWereGone (1844118) | about a year ago | (#45080609)

Your solution to crime is to make nothing illegal. What is solved? You cannot seriously be arguing that hard drugs are a (tm)Good Thing and that everyone should have free or even subsicized access to them. I say this as a pretty regular marijuana smoker. There's a vast world of difference too between the bright internet, that tries to protect the privacy of its users, and the dark internet, which has become a wretched hive of scum and villainy. No, you can't blame the technology, but you can sure blame the people that (ab)use it.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (5, Informative)

LF11 (18760) | about a year ago | (#45080757)

I do not think that your hypothesis that hard drugs are bad is not necessarily correct. I invite you to learn an alternate model of addiction which may change your world a bit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rat_Park [wikipedia.org]

What do you think?

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (4, Insightful)

todrules (882424) | about a year ago | (#45080771)

By making drugs legal, it solves a couple of things. First, it would stop the synthetic drugs that have been popping up everywhere. These are much more dangerous than the drugs that they try to imitate. Synthetic marijuana has killed people, but real marijuana doesn't. That's a byproduct of the War on Drugs. Second, it could be controlled and taxed, which would bring down the prices and negate the risk for organized crime. For example, when I was in high school, it was easier for me to buy pot than it was to buy alcohol. It wasn't worth it for the local drug dealer to sell me beer, but it was for pot.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (0)

karnal (22275) | about a year ago | (#45080915)

The bigger problem though, is if synthetic drugs are cheaper and easier to make - they'll still appear and be sold, perhaps even disguised as the "real thing". Then there's all sorts of issues with that happening, from improper doses as well as potential issues with style of dosing (inhaling vs injecting etc.)

I agree that legalization might help in some conditions, but ultimate regulation would be key in that you'd know what you're getting. The unknown of some random guy selling you something isn't an issue if you have the means. Of course, the random guy selling might be cheaper - and that would still not stop it completely.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (1, Insightful)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#45081095)

Cigarettes are legal, but there is still considerable crime around them, including large scale smuggling and tax evasion. There will continue to be a market for illegal drugs in one form or another even if certain street drugs are legalized. (I very much every one would be.) Some people won't want to pay taxes, some people will want something different. People go looking for new, different, bigger, better, longer lasting highs all the time. And as the story about the skin eating drug Krokodil [usatoday.com] showed, people don't necessarily care about the consequences if they end up taking certain drugs. People say that alcohol prohibition in the US didn't work, and there were certainly problems attached to it. But it is a fact that Prohibition caused alcohol consumption to fall sharply in the US, and per capita consumption was far lower even after it ended than before it began. It took something like 50 years for alcohol consumption to return to where it was.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080793)

decades of drug war have yet to reduce the number of addicts or drug users, obviously criminalizing it isn't working,
this is prohibition all over again

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080865)

Dude, go back to facebook, twitter and the other web 2.0 shit and leave us our internet. Or go build your own.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (2)

Crackez (605836) | about a year ago | (#45080891)

Portugal has had an interesting experience with Decriminalization: http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/evaluating-drug-decriminalization-in-portugal-12-years-later-a-891060.html [spiegel.de]

Making drug users into felons is not a net positive for society, but man the prison industry sure benefits!

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (1)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#45081099)

No, we're arguing that drugs (hard drugs is a meaningless propaganda term) exist, and there are ways to regulate them that work better than prohibition.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080697)

right....because if it were all legal, people wouldn't be addicts still...

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (1)

Bob9113 (14996) | about a year ago | (#45080859)

Buying on a black market is never good. However,...

Excellent post. Thank you!

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (2)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year ago | (#45080863)

Let's be clear about this. Silk Road operators had a guy killed. They are no different in that regard than the thugs running any other drug gang. When you buy on the black market, you are paying with blood money that destroys other peoples' lives and livelihoods. You know this is the consequence of your action. You can go ahead and blame the government if you want, but YOU are providing the money that gets people killed.

Yes, maybe the product should be legal. If so and you care, talk to your representatives. Start a political campaign. But DO NOT pay the murderous racket that brings you illegal drugs.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (1)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#45081081)

Let's be clear about this. Silk Road operators had a guy killed.

So has Obama.

They are no different in that regard than the thugs running any other drug gang.

Or the anti-drug gang we call the DEA.

When you buy on the black market, you are paying with blood money that destroys other peoples' lives and livelihoods. You know this is the consequence of your action.

Same as when you pay your taxes, or buy coca-cola, bananas, iphones, diamonds, or gasoline.

You can go ahead and blame the government if you want, but YOU are providing the money that gets people killed.

The government is the one that created the black market. They know this is the consequence of their action. They bear complete responsibility for failing to regulate the drug market safely.

Yes, maybe the product should be legal. If so and you care, talk to your representatives. Start a political campaign. But DO NOT pay the murderous racket that brings you illegal drugs.

Right, and if we all stopped using drugs, and asked nicely for drug prohibition to be repealed, what do you think would happen? Why would they listen to us when from their perspective prohibition would have been a complete success? Resistance is the only way we ever win freedom.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (1)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#45081017)

Buying on a black market is never good.

When you live under an authoritarian regime, black markets make you more free. That's good.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080579)

3... 2... 1. GO! Write posts explaining how people buying things like shovels and knifes on the regular market is okay, and how talking would *never* be used for bad purposes.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080737)

Not a post, but a set of questions:

Does a shovel, when used as intended by the seller cause anyone harm?
Does a knife, when used as intended by the seller cause anyone harm?
Does heroin, when used as intended by the seller cause anyone harm?

One of these ones is not like the others.

CAPTCHA: trapping

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (1)

lxs (131946) | about a year ago | (#45080857)

In all three cases the seller intends to make a profit. Any motive beyond that is pure speculation on your part.

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080939)

Does a shovel, when used as intended by the seller cause anyone harm?

To an environmentalist, yes.

Does a knife, when used as intended by the seller cause anyone harm?

To a pumpkin, yes.

Does heroin, when used as intended by the seller cause anyone harm?

Sure, but the environmentalist protecting his pumpkins doesn't mind.

One of these ones is not like the others.

Let's see ... shovels and knives are inserted into something ... but knives and heroin are inserted into the body ... and the sellers, heroin user and environmentalist are all people ... so my answer is "pumpkin!"

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (4, Insightful)

Thanshin (1188877) | about a year ago | (#45080607)

3... 2... 1. GO! Write posts explaining how people buying things like herion and cocaine on the black market is okay.

hmmm! ...hmm! ... People should be the owners of their own lives and taking responsibility away from people and treating them as stupid children turns them into stupid children!

Right? ... Right? ...What did I win?

Re:Queue The Anarchist & Druggie Comments In.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080695)

How about you queue up in the shoot-a-troll line on the receiving edge?

HAhahHahahaha (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080483)

Good. I hope all the fucking dealers and junkies go to prison and get ass-raped.

Re:HAhahHahahaha (2)

Macchendra (2919537) | about a year ago | (#45080645)

Yes, prison spreads HIV, Hep B&C, Tuberculosis, etc. And it causes non-violent offenders to be subjected to sexual violence. Thanks for pointing that out.

Re:HAhahHahahaha (1)

sirber (891722) | about a year ago | (#45080651)

Why? They did nothing to you.

OS X (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080513)

Anyone ever look at the "This Day on Slashdot" stuff? Funny to see how many people saying that Apple is not a media company, and how they will never ever port to x86....

Easy to trace??? (1)

Big Hairy Ian (1155547) | about a year ago | (#45080519)

Weaver said in an email, while the traceable nature of bitcoin transfers means the FBI "can now easily follow the money."

WTF I thought part of the point of Bitcoin was it's bloody difficult to trace!!

Re:Easy to trace??? (1)

Zironic (1112127) | about a year ago | (#45080581)

No, Bitcoin was never designed to be hard to trace, in fact Bitcoin by design is easy to trace.

Re:Easy to trace??? (3, Funny)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year ago | (#45080599)

Weaver said in an email, while the traceable nature of bitcoin transfers means the FBI "can now easily follow the money."

WTF I thought part of the point of Bitcoin was it's bloody difficult to trace!!

I find all money difficult to trace .... my wife takes it and I see not race of it again.

Re:Easy to trace??? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080611)

No. Bitcoin is by design traceable to ensure a transactions integrity -- one can create an arbitrary address, but money will have to be transferred in and transferred out in order to be useful. Both transactions will have records located forever in the blockchain indicating source, destination, and date. All are required to insure integrity of the transaction. Bitcoin was designed to be free from arbitrary manipulation of its value, not true anonymity.

Re:Easy to trace??? (2)

SirGarlon (845873) | about a year ago | (#45080613)

The problem with blind faith in cryptography is that cryptographic protocols are bloody difficult to get right. In the case of Bitcoin, the anonymity weakness seems to have more to do with the marketplace [bitcoin.it] than the coins themselves.

Idiots in the making (0, Troll)

cyberpocalypse (2845685) | about a year ago | (#45080533)

Over 10 years ago, the US gave everyone a glimpse of their tapping capabilities via way of Carnivore aka DCS1000. Then news came out about Magic Lantern which was used to collar mobster Nicki Scarfo. That then should have been a no-brainer: "the gov is/can watch you..." Few years later, idiots^W people took to TOR which was initially a Navy project. They created an "E-Bay like" site where people can "rate my drugs." What a bunch of illiterate morons who used the site. If I were a reporter, my story would start something like: "Silk Road users were so technologically advanced, yet dense on common sense..."

Re:Idiots in the making (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080597)

It didn't require any special spying programs to catch DPR. DPR made many fatal blunders that led to his detection and downfall. In other words, old-fashioned detective work was able to catch him.

Government oppression (1)

udachny (2454394) | about a year ago | (#45080605)

This is government oppression in action. The collective must not be enforce anti-drug laws, such laws are an affront to individual freedoms, they are oppressive and authoritarian.

Of-course this is just another way to oppress a minority, in this case the minority are drug users / drug sellers and because these groups are minorities, the majority feels it can deny them their individual rights to private property (possession / manufacturing / usage) without repercussions. Of-course the majority is very short sighted, as it most often is, denying rights to some individuals by defining them as groups that are 'not us' in one way or another but eventually all this does is it grows the power of the oppression and more and more people eventually become THEM and not 'us'. So at some point all people end up losing individual rights, and then it's sad and funny at the same time, to watch those same mobs rally around them not being equal to the those in power.

You lose your equality the moment you use your mob status to take away equality of others, who you see as smaller groups than you.

There can be no groups that are denied individual rights, if you allow that to happen then eventually you yourself will be in one of those groups.

Crime rule #1. (4, Interesting)

goodmanj (234846) | about a year ago | (#45080671)

Crime rule #1: If you're going to do crime, don't do crime with anyone you haven't known since high school. Doing crime with random strangers over the Internet is just fcking stupid.

Can they do that? Isn't that illegal, or invasion (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080745)

of privacy? I think this isi highly illegal activity, but then what isn't these days? If you are the G-men then you can break laws! Tor one has the expectation of privacy, so this goes against the law.

We need to organize protests (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45080759)

I've never bought or sold anything on Silk Road. However the actions of the government are threatening my rights to be free from government persecution. Drugs in and of themselves have the potential to harm the users and no one else short of other illegal actions (by government, which result in violence and crime, or violence against another through force/coercion to use). It's not the users of Silk Road who have committed a crime here. It's the government. The government is not protecting the citizens by criminalizing possession or sale. It's creating a violent state and perpetrating crime.

The politicians and those involved in law enforcement need to be held to account for crimes against the people. Unfortunately until more people stand up and say no more we are going to see people persecuted. Snowden, Ross Ulbricht of Silk Road, Julian Assange, Michael Hastings, David Miranda of Guardian's partners reporter fame, Eric Eoin Marques of Freedom Hosting, Ladar Levison of Lavabit, Manning, Bernie S, amongst others. Some are people heavily involved in free software projects who have been harassed by the FBI. Even people who have no connection with any kind of crime have been harassed by the FBI and there friends threatened with arrest. This has lead to friends of those harassed having to separate themselves and discontinue communications. This disruption of communications amongst people who might stand up is disturbing.

It is disturbing that people arrested have no right to communicate with each other. People who otherwise might potentially stand up in protest to have the law changed can't. The law is effectively prohibiting protest and freedom of speech. The law is preventing democracy.

While I'm not going to stand up and fight a losing battle I will encourage people to donate financially to projects which are fighting these abuses. Consider becoming a member of the EFF, ACLU, and other organizations. If you haven't done so contribute to the defense funds of those who are standing up. If you have the guts to stand up do so! Just be prepared to spend some time in jail.

Re:We need to organize protests (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45081025)

It is disturbing that people arrested have no right to communicate with each other.

It's only disturbing if you're a complete idiot.

People who have been arrested have most of their communications monitored. The only unmonitored communication they are allowed is with their lawyer.

The arrested people's lawyers are free to communicate and coordinate with one another. The people can even use the same lawyer.

Two arrested people talking to one another, however? That's a fast routeto stupidly providing evidence that will put you away for far longer than if you'd kept your mouth shut.

The balance between anonymity and accountability (4, Interesting)

hessian (467078) | about a year ago | (#45080885)

I would like to be able to purchase my drugs anonymously, but since I'm paying Silk Road a percentage, I'd like some kind of guarantee.

Some kind of accountability, in other words.

How to balance the two? They don't balance. Even if the only accountability is a seller's good name, there must be some kind of linked identification which, over time, provides enough information to find the individual and arrest them.

Far more interesting is... (1)

GeekWithAKnife (2717871) | about a year ago | (#45080951)

how this will affect bitcoins in the long run. There was a bit of a fall...but will BTC now be deemed more legit or will all this work as an incentive to make it outright illegal?
Hope it works out for all those people with their Terahash ASIC machine buying plans.
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