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Irony: iPhone 5S Users Reporting Blue Screen of Death

timothy posted about a year ago | from the ok-this-feels-intuitive dept.

Bug 192

MojoKid writes "It's been a long time since many have seen a dreaded 'blue screen of death' (BSoD), but it's back and in the most unlikeliest of places. Oddly enough, some Apple iPhone 5S owners are reporting BSoD errors, though they're a little different from the ones you may remember seeing on Windows desktops. Rather than spit out an obscure error code with a generic description, some iPhone 5S devices are suddenly turning blue before automatically restarting. The Numbers app in Apple's iWork suite, a free program with new iPhones, seems to be the primary cause, though BSoD behavior has also been observed in other applications, according to complaints in Apple's support forum."

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Hell freezes over. (5, Funny)

o_ferguson (836655) | about a year ago | (#45105937)

Guru Meditation: BSoD.

Re:Hell freezes over. (1)

fisted (2295862) | about a year ago | (#45105993)

Don't panic()

Re:Hell freezes over. (2, Funny)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year ago | (#45106611)

But damn it, I'm jealous! I'm running Linux on my computer and Android on my phone and they don't have that feature! Damn.

Always behind the curve, I am.

Re:Hell freezes over. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106745)

I'm sure, if you look really hard, you'll find that feature as well. I'm sure the Apple devs can fix this reproducible flaw rather quickly.

Re:Hell freezes over. (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year ago | (#45106979)

Available here, for your pleasure [jwz.org] (scroll down to BSOD). Someone told a story here once about having it on their computer, when the manager walked in and saw it and nearly fired them for having that server running Windows.

Re:Hell freezes over. (1)

msauve (701917) | about a year ago | (#45106503)

Wrong paradigm.

DSAT [allacronyms.com]

How unusual... (5, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#45105951)

Aside from the whole 'a tightly sandboxed "app" taking down the system' thing (which makes one wonder if Apple's apps follow the same rules as everyone else's, or whether there is some Nasty bug in an API), don't iDevices use a totally different design for their screen of death? Macs, certainly, both PPC and Intel, can be made to execute BSOD-level crashes; but the process looks totally different.

Re:How unusual... (4, Informative)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year ago | (#45106039)

There are plenty of bugs in iOS, even for low-permission apps. I've been messing around with the mach parser, and I've found several ways to crash the device (other people have reported similar things). The interface between userland and kernel is just complicated, and sandboxing has never been and never will be a magic bullet.

That said, your second point is a good one, why would it suddenly turn blue when ever other crash just causes it to turn black with a rotating circle? Doesn't really make sense.......

Re:How unusual... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106067)

There are plenty of bugs in iOS, even for low-permission apps. I've been messing around with the mach parser, and I've found several ways to crash the device (other people have reported similar things). The interface between userland and kernel is just complicated, and sandboxing has never been and never will be a magic bullet.

That said, your second point is a good one, why would it suddenly turn blue when ever other crash just causes it to turn black with a rotating circle? Doesn't really make sense.......

Because iPhone fanboys are also hipsters, and the blue screen is old enough to now qualify as "Retro". You're just not cool unless your device dies with a warm, blue glow!

Re:How unusual... (3, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#45106189)

Pffft. Everyone with an iPhone gets a blue screen. My phone is built with a CRT - they only make those at this one old Soviet factory that they recently found.

Re:How unusual... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106211)

My phone has a cord, faggot.

Re:How unusual... (3, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#45106283)

My home phone has a _string_.

Re:How unusual... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106297)

My home phone is a large fire and a blanket.

Re:How unusual... (4, Funny)

Columcille (88542) | about a year ago | (#45106353)

My home phone is a piece of dried mammoth hide stretched across some sticks that I beat with a rock.

Re:How unusual... (4, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#45106357)

You win.

Re:How unusual... (0)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year ago | (#45106643)

No, I laughed harder at "you win" (but I've been smoking tonight). Somebody mod these jokers up, I enjoyed that!

Of course, right now I'd probably laugh at the government... Oh, wait...

Re:How unusual... (0)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | about a year ago | (#45106413)

My home phone is the remnant of a massive dying star, spinning rapidly and emitting its radio signals deep into the universe.

Re:How unusual... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106543)

My home phone is an AT&T terminal.

Re:How unusual... (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#45106285)

Pffft, my smart phone doesn't even use screens. It uses the teletype interface on printed paper and a the equivalent of a BSoD is that it just spits out a few blank paG3$j<:J!@*
&x%
ChX?_S
p8}#o

[CARRIER LOST]

Re:How unusual... (1)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | about a year ago | (#45106395)

I was causing kernel panics before it was cool.

Re:How unusual... (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | about a year ago | (#45106919)

There are plenty of bugs in iOS, even for low-permission apps. I've been messing around with the mach parser, and I've found several ways to crash the device (other people have reported similar things). The interface between userland and kernel is just complicated, and sandboxing has never been and never will be a magic bullet.

That said, your second point is a good one, why would it suddenly turn blue when ever other crash just causes it to turn black with a rotating circle? Doesn't really make sense.......

Because iPhone fanboys are also hipsters, and the blue screen is old enough to now qualify as "Retro". You're just not cool unless your device dies with a warm, blue glow!

Why can't they go even more retro and have a nice psychedelic fireworks display like my Commodore 64 did when it crashed? At least when it crashed you got some entertainment value out of it.

Re:How unusual... iSky showing through? (3, Informative)

j-stroy (640921) | about a year ago | (#45106407)

Could it be in the iCloud API? Native apps like Numbers store docs in iCloud.

Re:How unusual... iSky showing through? (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year ago | (#45106677)

Could be, but today I'm seeing that setting the text in a UITextView in a thread other than the main thread will cause iOS 7 to freeze irrecoverably. So the bug could be in a lot of places, I guess. They've changed a lot.

Re:How unusual... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year ago | (#45106623)

There are plenty of bugs in iOS, even for low-permission apps.

It may not even have to exploit a bug. You could reboot DOS with a program a few bytes long. You could exploit a feature of the OS in a way nobody thought of before to BSOD any device, provided everything fell into place.

Re:How unusual... (3, Interesting)

rtb61 (674572) | about a year ago | (#45106839)

You can effectively sandbox but for it to really work it requires a major change in system design and, a major commitment to a bug free OS, OS on chip. Offers far faster boot time, keeps the OS really secure but if it isn't bug and security issue free, then you have real problems. Software coders have always been as slack as hell compared to CPU engineers.

Re:How unusual... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106849)

Presumably because it's crashing the GPU driver in such a way that it fills the frame buffer with 0xFF000000, and the frame buffer is arranged in BGRA... That doesn't sound like a particularly unlikely scenario tbh.

Re:How unusual... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106111)

Dude, what are you talking about.

This is not a bug! If you see this happening, it's an indication you're among the chosen ones!

All glory to the hypno-Jobs

Re:How unusual... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106197)

The issue is a user app likely triggering a problem in a system function. I haven't seen many blue screens in Windows over the recent years, but when I have, it is some sort of invalid pointer exception usually in a .sys file.

Re:How unusual... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106273)

Aside from the whole 'a tightly sandboxed "app" taking down the system' thing [...]

Ideally, it would not crash at all. Next preference would be to only crash the particular app.

However, in some ways rebooting the system (while a DoS, and a serious security issue) is better than running arbitrary code of some kind. If you're going to have your system go off into the weeds into an unknown state, it's better to reset everything into a known-good state than trying to guess about trying to recover things.

Regardless, certainly something that needs to be properly fixed.

Re:How unusual... (4, Informative)

_xeno_ (155264) | about a year ago | (#45106345)

Aside from the whole 'a tightly sandboxed "app" taking down the system' thing (which makes one wonder if Apple's apps follow the same rules as everyone else's, or whether there is some Nasty bug in an API)

It looks to be a bug in their text-to-speech API. If you watch the video, he triggers the BSOD by starting the app speaking, then returning to the home screen (which stops the app, remember, iOS doesn't do real multitasking*), then restarting the app. So presumably it's a bug in the accessibility APIs that are used to do text-to-speech.

* OK, yes, it does, but you know what I mean in this instance, yes? User apps are not allowed to use multitasking, so the running app is stopped.

Re:How unusual... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106461)

I've had it blue screen after tapping play on a video in the facebook app (only posting anon 'cause I don't want to admit I use facebook).

User apps are allowed to do real multitasking (4, Informative)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#45106837)

User apps are not allowed to use multitasking,

User apps are allowed to do anything for around ten minutes after they are shut by the user (they may be killed sooner if they use too many resources or the foreground app needs all the resources).

User apps can also have periodic tasks that run in the background (in iOS7).

User apps can also run indefinitely in the background under some conditions, like for navigation or... for background audio. So it might be some hiccup in the text to speech system operating while the app it is attached to is running in the foreground. I would think anything reading text generally would keep reading even if you closed the application, though it would depend on the application and how it set up the audio session...

Re:User apps are allowed to do real multitasking (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45107001)

If you notice, the app keeps speaking until he brings up the new (annoying, IMO) running app overview screen. It then stops despite obviously having text left to speak, he touches the app to bring it in the foreground, and it crashes. My money is on the text-to-speech stopping when the overview is brought up causes a bad state, then when the app comes up it probably checks whether it's running or not, gets bad info, and then goes BOOM. I would put good odds on it being either in the text-to-speech API or in the audio API.
 
In my own work, I found iOS 7 introduced a major flaw in the audio where it no longer acts appropriately in a particular situation in the background and I had to write a workaround -- a hack, really, but it's the only solution that doesn't require months of work -- in order for my app not to get in a bad state where it can no longer run audio again.

Re:How unusual... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106485)

Heck - isn't the BSoD color configurable ?

Re: How unusual... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106829)

The blue isn't a crash screen at all. Apple uses a default tint/color in iOS 7 that is that blue color. So what's happening is we are seeing an empty view rendered with that default color. I have come across a very similar result while updating apps to iOS 7. In some of the GUI elements the default color was rendered over the entire element instead of what should have been rendered.

Re:How unusual... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106985)

I took a look at some of the forum posts. What is interesting is that this isn't happing for everyone, everywhere. That is very strange. My suspicion is that every user with the problem has restored the new phone from a backup kept from an earlier model... and that once upon a time, they had a jailbroken device. I have a strong feeling when its all said and done, it will be revealed definitively that the user somehow did something to cause this. I'll bet my shorts that if they restore the phone, and do not restore an old backup, they won't be able to reproduce the problem. Also, I predict they will all lie their pants off to hide the fact that once upon a time they were hacking their phones until they got bored or fed up with keeping up with the jb community. (As awesome as the doers and devs in the jb community are, it is not easy for a mere mortal user to stay abreast of everything... there is no order, no central authority, and they have limited resources, and support for the number of available devices becomes impossible; meanwhile, Apple is (or was) actively trying to suppress them.)

Re:How unusual... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106995)

don't iDevices use a totally different design for their screen of death?

Yes indeed; the Apple BSOD has rounded corners.

Obvious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45105965)

Of course, without Job's magic aura Apple software is as crappy as Windows software.
Hence the BSOD. Iphone reliable as always. ;)

Re:Obvious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106135)

Except of course that Apple software is much, much more expensive...

Re:Obvious... (1, Informative)

HiThere (15173) | about a year ago | (#45106161)

Sorry, but Apple used to be a lot more reliable. I'll admit that I don't know anything about their systems since the late 1990's, but they USED to be a lot more reliable than MS. AND easier to use.

I switched away from Apple not because I considered their systems poor, but over licensing issues. (Admittedly MS was worse, but Apple snuck in licensing modifications in a security patch, which I find unforgivable.)

Re:Obvious... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106391)

I would dispute that. I don't recall MS-DOS ever crashing itself. True, programs were allowed such low level access to the PC hardware that they could cause a crash, but MS-DOS itself was rock solid and even program crashes were rare. I'm remembering all of the old demoscene stuff that used weird, undocumented functionality and were still stable.

DOS extender (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#45106673)

some of the DOS extenders crashed time to time

Re:Obvious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106425)

Sorry, but Apple used to be a lot more reliable. I'll admit that I don't know anything about their systems since the late 1990's, but they USED to be a lot more reliable than MS.

Apple did produce fast and reliable software in the mid 90's. System 7.1 absolutely rocks. The only real problem I ever encountered with it was when somebody decided to addd 030 extensions to a 020 system (both being 68k CPUs). It was also fast for normal operations like opening windows in finder and stuff like that. In fact Windows 7/8 or OSX on a brand new high end computer is slower than they were back then. However starting with MacOS 8.0 the OS became bigger and bigger and both performance and stability suffered. Modern Apple OSes aren't bad at reliability or performance, but they aren't that much better than other OSes as they were back then.

Having said this I don't really consider OSX to have either performance or stability problems. Personally I encounter more issues with Windows 7 than OSX even though I spend more time in OSX and develop software mainly in OSX. Also I have yet to see iOS crash. The problems I read people have now is a bit of a surprise to me. Admittedly I don't own anything with iOS personally (don't have the need), but that isn't the same as I never use it.

Re:Obvious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106803)

One of the most reliable setups I remember was a plain Mac SE with a 20-40 meg hard drive, System 6, and Word, with very few INITS/CDEVs loaded.

After 8.0, Macs just got too unstable to be usable. If I wanted to change to another application, I'd reboot. When done for the day, I'd reboot. All this to prevent having to reboot unexpectedly when I have work going on.

At least OS X fixed the stability issues, although the Mac's filesystem is still craptastic, still using a variant of the filesystem used in the late 1980s, except ditching resource forks. Apple should have just bit the bullet, licensed ZFS, and actually had a modern, reliable filesystem for their stuff.

Most unlikeliest? (4, Funny)

ShaunC (203807) | about a year ago | (#45105977)

Sounds like somebody's grammar checker had a blue screen...

Re:Most unlikeliest? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106017)

His irony sensor is also misincalibrated.

Re:Most unlikeliest? (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year ago | (#45106659)

Chill out, dude. [google.com]

Well (4, Insightful)

The Cat (19816) | about a year ago | (#45105979)

There is a great deal of evidence to indicate we are no longer capable of advancing software.

It has been remarked that if we built buildings the same way we build software the first woodpecker to come along would destroy civilization.

Take a look around. The government apparently spent $165 million on a web site that doesn't work.

There's no discipline in software development. It's slapped together to meet an artificial deadline. It's considered done if it compiles. It's shoved out into the marketplace so everyone can stuff their pockets and then all the developers are fired to make way for the new employees who will design the next piece of shit.

The only measure of how good software is depends on how shiny and "innovative" the user interface is. What the software actually does is utterly irrelevant.

Gerald M. Weinberg (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106023)

"It has been remarked"

yes, and we know WHO made the remark.

Re:Well (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#45106075)

Arguably, the sheer lousiness of software is more striking because it (still, despite decades of work and the amount of money riding on some of it) crops up in the face of well heeled customers, whether retail buyers of expensive personal electronics or enterprise/gov buyers who are willing to spend nearly unlimited amounts on their pet contractors...

With buildings, there is plenty of construction that's roughly on the standards of software (Just do an image search for 'Shantytown' if you doubt me...); but structural quality is mostly stratified economically. If you want a building that works, and you have the cash, you can have one. With software, the cities of the world would be a nearly random assortment of mostly shacks, some incrementally nicer than others, with a scattering of structures that were built in 3,000 BC and are in perfect condition, buildings that are constructed from graphene and carbon nanotubes; but have doors made of soggy cardboard stuck to the frame with chewing gum, and other such oddities.

That's the odd thing. Plenty of kinds of engineering are hard and expensive, and sometimes subject to unexpected cost overruns and such; but we've gotten it to the point where if you live in a country with a functional society and fire codes and things, you can buy good buildings, aircraft that don't crash, and other nice things.

With software... your mileage may vary.

Re:Well (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about a year ago | (#45106457)

but we've gotten it to the point where if you live in a country with a functional society and fire codes and things, you can buy good buildings, aircraft that don't crash, and other nice things.

That's just silly. Everybody knows that safe buildings, aircraft and "other nice things" are all a product of magic free market fairy dust. Because the economic elite only want what's best for us.

But not for Bhopal. Or Love Canal. Or the Gulf of Mexico. Or West, Texas. Or Fukushima. No free market fairy dust for them.

Re:Well (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106081)

There is a great deal of evidence to indicate we are no longer capable of advancing software.

It has been remarked that if we built buildings the same way we build software the first woodpecker to come along would destroy civilization.

Take a look around. The government apparently spent $165 million on a web site that doesn't work.

There's no discipline in software development. It's slapped together to meet an artificial deadline. It's considered done if it compiles. It's shoved out into the marketplace so everyone can stuff their pockets and then all the developers are fired to make way for the new employees who will design the next piece of shit.

The only measure of how good software is depends on how shiny and "innovative" the user interface is. What the software actually does is utterly irrelevant.

Writing good software is an engineering task. As is building bridges, skyscrapers etc...
Unfortunately CS courses are not about teaching software engineering. They're all about teaching the latest fad in computer language and off you go into the marketplace. And lets not even mention of the sunday-day programmers that barely can put 4 lines of code in javascript right.
Put penal/civil responsabilites on those that code, and see how the whole industry changes for the better. Until that time you'll have shitty and not so shitty coders that write shitty code (hint just because it compiles doesn't mean it works correctly) because we ship code as is. It brings down your server room ? Not our fault. Just look at what software companies write in their EULAs. No other industry could do such a thing. We're not responsabile for anything. My ass you're not.

Re:Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106177)

>Put penal/civil responsabilites on those that code, and see how the whole industry changes for the better.
And it'll cost 10 times more.

Software seldom kills people when it breaks.

Re:Well (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106513)

Hey, what if I miscalculate the frequency responses in the fart app I'm currently engineering and it'll make your bowels explode on first listening?

Seriously, "let's add all kinds of certifications and civil penalties!" pops up after every semihigh profile bug and doesn't get more sensible with the time. We already got all kinds of PCIs, HIPAAs, SARBOXes and ISOs to follow. Adding a few levels of bureaucracy to general purpose computing is not a smart idea.

Re:Well (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | about a year ago | (#45106665)

Sometimes it does, see Therac-25. [wikipedia.org]

also an apprenticeship system where you learn from (2, Insightful)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#45106191)

also an apprenticeship system where you learn from pros in the field with real work. Not some professor reading from a book and / or loads of theory.

Re:Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106279)

So, you're saying you want to pay government prices for software?

Re:Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106579)

Actually, the whole discussion started with the premise that even "government prices" can't buy you quality software.

Re:Well (3, Interesting)

gweihir (88907) | about a year ago | (#45106163)

There are people that can write solid, dependable, secure software and advance the state-of-the-art in this area. There are also people that can learn to do this with the right education. Both groups are small and highly intelligent. Most of them chose to go into careers where they actually have a career path, managers that do not tell them how to do their jobs and a salary in line with their talents.

On the other side, most people writing software today are incompetent, or at best, half-competent. I have seen teams needing several months to write software that I can create in a week with significantly better quality. I have reviewed business-critical software for large organizations, where the programmers did not even understand the very basics. http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2010/02/the-nonprogramming-programmer.html [codinghorror.com] does _not_ overstate the problem.

So we are very much capable of advancing software, but advancing software has been a game for competent experts for a while. Just look at what people are advancing other engineering disciplines, or mathematics or physics. More and more people of that quality are needed for software as well. But the culture is not there. Software is regarded as a solved problem, which is anything but true. But it drives down wages, cause bad working and career conditions and turns away many of the few people that have the required talent. Stupid.

Re:Well (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year ago | (#45106441)

There's no discipline in software development. It's slapped together to meet an artificial deadline. It's considered done if it compiles. It's shoved out into the marketplace so everyone can stuff their pockets and then all the developers are fired to make way for the new employees who will design the next piece of shit.

The only measure of how good software is depends on how shiny and "innovative" the user interface is. What the software actually does is utterly irrelevant.

All deadlines are, by definition, artificial. Aside from that, your comments are disturbingly descriptive of the status quo in software development in many organizations.

Re:Well (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year ago | (#45106697)

There is a great deal of evidence to indicate we are no longer capable of advancing software. It has been remarked that if we built buildings the same way we build software the first woodpecker to come along would destroy civilization.

That seems a bit contradictory. If the state of the art sucks (i.e., is primitive) there is certainly room for advancement.

The only measure of how good software is depends on how shiny and "innovative" the user interface is. What the software actually does is utterly irrelevant.

Well, the front end and back end are equally important. But the thing is, anybody can write software. Learn a language and outdo everybody. Or learn assembler and write a new language that overcomes the downfalls of present languages.

But I think your gripe is with how commercial software is developed. Fuck commercial software, real nerds will do without it.

Re:Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106855)

There is a great deal of evidence to indicate we are no longer capable of advancing software.

It has been remarked that if we built buildings the same way we build software the first woodpecker to come along would destroy civilisation.

Frankly, this analogy is bullshit. If we build buildings the way we build software, we'd build hundreds of thousands of them before one fell down, because the number of unique parts in them is tiny compared to the number of unique parts in software. Oh wait, one in every few hundred thousand buildings *does* fall down.

So much for Apple's "attention to detail..." (0, Troll)

bogaboga (793279) | about a year ago | (#45105999)

You find it everywhere... I mean, just Google that phrase. Let me see what the fan boys will spin this out...

Re:So much for Apple's "attention to detail..." (0)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year ago | (#45106035)

Look! A detail! How cute!

Re:So much for Apple's "attention to detail..." (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106179)

What attention to detail? The CPU itself is manufactured by their arch competitor [techcrunch.com] , would you trust such a hardware?

The pic... (1)

xushi (740195) | about a year ago | (#45106027)

For such a view/picture being displayed, I wouldn't blame the iPhone for restarting ! :)

According to SJ... (3, Funny)

bob_super (3391281) | about a year ago | (#45106043)

... They're just looking at it wrong.
They didn't make a shiny golden backplate for you to waste your time looking at the screen, people!

Re:According to SJ... (1, Insightful)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year ago | (#45106333)

Dude's been dead for a couple years now... it might be time to find a new meme.

Re:According to SJ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106481)

How about using appl€ for the name?

Unlike Microsoft (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106071)

Who would shrug and tell you it's a driver problem, Apple will actually fix their problems.

Linux Fanbois will of course howl, even though they don't use Apple products. Pussies.

Don't be surprised if (4, Funny)

djupedal (584558) | about a year ago | (#45106093)

. . .these turn out to be forced/silent restarts by Apple on the backend, due to a laundry list of reasons best left to others - don't ask how I know.

Re:Don't be surprised if (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106303)

. . .don't ask how I know.

You should run. NOW!

By the time you hear the black helicopters it will be too late.

Hmmm (3)

stevez67 (2374822) | about a year ago | (#45106099)

When I searched the Apple support communities for BSoD and even just "blue" I find issues dating all the way back to 2008 across all Apple products and OSs, but no cascade of BSoD reports recently. I've been using the iWorks suite on my iPhone for weeks and no BSoD yet. I feel deprived lol.

Warning RDF Collapsing! (2, Funny)

meerling (1487879) | about a year ago | (#45106103)

Uh oh, looks likes Job's Reality Distortion Field is collapsing.
If this keeps up, Macs may start turning into fruit or something. :p

Re:Warning RDF Collapsing! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106169)

Most of their users are already fruits. And vegetables.

Seriously? (0)

Dunbal (464142) | about a year ago | (#45106113)

Poor little Apple users. I'll just leave this [youtube.com] here, shall I?

Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106133)

Anti Apple comments just flame the fanboys. Jokes about hipsters and "gone to the dogs" don't help but get the fanboys rabid again, and they don't add to the discussion.

Ok, BSOD: So what? Is this a trend? I Haven't heard of it from Apple in a long time, so no.
Linked to post Jobs era? Probably.
End of the world for Apple? No
Apple as bad as Microsoft ? No
  No one is perfect, not even Apple. Don't lose sight that valid comments are the best defense against any fanboy, and rest assured I've thought about starting "punch an Apple fanboy in the head" day numerous times.

Re:Apple (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106415)

Apple is worse than Microsoft. People like to slam Windows 9x for being unstable, usually rightfully so, but they forget that the Macs of the time were even worse. By the time OS X came out, MS had Windows NT 4, 2K and XP out, which were all very stable. Since then, every MS OS has been stable, including Vista.

On top of that, Apple freaks out when people want to customize or doing something "out of bounds" with their Mac. Microsoft has always encouraged people to do what they want with Windows.

I repair embedded controllers our company produces (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106157)

Lattice has an amazing FPGA chip with non-volatile memory with a flaw. It will at times lose what you've programmed into it. They've declined to acknowledge this flaw.

Our illustrious engineering department chose BLUE as the color of the boot loader. It's not normally displayed. However when Lattice Semiconductor's special needs child loses it's mind it caused a blue screen of death.

I publicly mocked them on global company emails over this.

In the next product they chose piss yellow as the boot load screen.

Hey it's better than Guru Meditation.

iOS 7 has practically bricked my iPhone 4 (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106167)

It's slow as molasses since the upgrade, and this is after installing the subsequent updates. What the fuck, seriously? As if they hadn't had an opportunity to learn with the whole iOS 4 and iPhone 3G debacle?

I should have known better. The iPhone 4 is three years old. Never trust an upgrade beyond two years after your device's introduction.

(At least not from Apple.)

Re:iOS 7 has practically bricked my iPhone 4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106445)

Check the net. People speculate that iOS intentionally cause problems for old phones, specially the battery life is attacked. The purpose should be to make people believe their phones are worn out and make them buy new ones. While I wouldn't be surprised if Apple or any other company did something like that, I must say that I'm not convinced. New phones are affected as well, which points to the direction that Apple really did screw up somehow. Still it could be intentionally and they screwed up at the same time.

Re: iOS 7 has practically bricked my iPhone 4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106491)

If you're comparing iOS 7 on the iPhone 4 to the shitpile that was iOS 4 on the iPhone 3G, you lack experience with one of the two. It's slower, sure, but "bricked" is right over the top. There's a difference between constantly reminding you that you're not using the most current hardware and causing you to consistently miss calls that you attempted to answer before the first ring had ended.

It is *not* a bug! (2)

msobkow (48369) | about a year ago | (#45106175)

It's Apple's new "iBoot" feature, which automatically restarts the phone when it detects an NSA probe, acting as if you noticed the spies and shut off your phone as a result. The more frequent your reboots, the more interested the goobernmint is in you. :P

Oh no, it's frozen, ah BSoD, it's rebooting? (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#45106311)

Siri, WTF just happened? Siri?!

::OK:: ... The NSA now has root.

64 bit CPU issues (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106335)

The crashes appear to only (mainly?) affect the new 64 bit CPUs. It would appear that some parts of the API/apps use code hardcoded to 32 bit applications. If this is really the case, then it should be a matter of time before bugfixes are released. It's not ok for a phone of that pricetag, but it isn't a complete disaster either.

I have seen people blame objective C as the culprit as some other programming languages have abstraction levels high enough to make the code immune to bugs due to CPU type. The thing is that C/C++/objC can write code with great performance, which translates to longer battery life. It is possible to write code immune to 32/64bit bugs in all of those 3 languages, but it takes more skill from the programmers and increase development time and costs. It doesn't surprise me if 64 bit considerations was skipped intentionally before Apple announced 64 bit phones. Testing 64 bit software before the 64 CPUs became available was naturally out of the question as well and 3rd party developers was given access to new phones possibly way too shortly before the release.

This excuse works much better for 3rd party software developers than for Apple as we would assume insight knowledge of new CPUs, but maybe it was secret inside as well due to risk of spies or leaks. It might also be a sign that the software was rushed a bit too much. People also complain about power usage in iOS 7, which also hints immature software.

OpenBSD phone encrypted with TrueCrypt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106337)

is this too much to ask?

O Rly? (-1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about a year ago | (#45106341)

I've had 3 BSOD's this past week on a PC.

I have seen Android devices that randomly shut down, and one that won't reboot if you let the battery go too low. I own a few that do that

After a while, this Ford versus Chevy nonsense gets old. All devices have issues. I own some of each, and have had some issues with each. Usually fixed with an update.

Re:O Rly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106539)

Well, if you got a BSOD on a PC, you should upgrade your version of windows, since it's well known that the blue screen of death was eliminated in windows 7 or 8 (can't remember which), as it's now a black screen of death. Granted, maybe you meant black screen of death by BSOD, but BSOD is still synonymous with blue screen of death.

And as for an android device that won't reboot if you let the battery go too low, well, duh. How can it reboot with a dead battery :P

Microsoft will sue Apple because of this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106383)

The BSOD is a patented invention of Microsoft.

Differences (1)

Horshu (2754893) | about a year ago | (#45106385)

Microsoft: obscure error code with a generic description Old Apple: Bomb icon that says 'Error' New Apple: Plain blue screen, nothing else So simple and refined!

It's official. (2, Insightful)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about a year ago | (#45106561)

Apple is the new Microsoft.
Just with a shinier surface.

So that was the problem with those 486 desktop PCs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106707)

We were holding it wrong!

Now thats bad... (1)

ulzeraj (1009869) | about a year ago | (#45106721)

And thats a damn phone OS. I'm quite scared of how Mavericks will turn out. Or the OS X team is still competent as they used to be?

So, it's the iDon'twork suite then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45106755)

"The Numbers app in Apple's iWork suite"..."seems to be the primary cause"

Finally! (1)

FuzzNugget (2840687) | about a year ago | (#45106827)

Apple has caught up with Microsoft.

crash frequency (1)

tgibbs (83782) | about a year ago | (#45106907)

App crashes used to be fairly frequent on the iPhone, while system crashes were much less frequent, but happened now and then. In recent years, system crashes have pretty much vanished, while app crashes have gotten a lot less common. I don't think I've seen a single system crash with iOS 7 on my 4s, which is unusual for a major OS revision. My new 5s does appear to crash a bit more. I see an app unexpectedly quit every day or two, and I've had 2 or 3 system crashes--more like the frequency of crashes I remember from the first year or two of the iPhone.

A Long time? (0)

chr1st1anSoldier (2598085) | about a year ago | (#45106947)

Where did anyone get this idea of the BSOD taking a hiatus? I deal with it almost daily in Windows 7. Maybe these win7 systems were not informed of the BSOD furlough?

Re:A Long time? (2)

LodCrappo (705968) | about a year ago | (#45106967)

Your computer is broken. Have it repaired. (Or stop trolling... Sometimes it's hard to tell so apologies for giving a serious answer if so)

The typical Win 7 machine is impressively stable. I haven't seen a blue screen in years.

Re:A Long time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45107005)

Sounds like you just have a crappy system since I've never had a BSOD on Windows 7 on my machine.

not only 5s or os 7? (4, Interesting)

LodCrappo (705968) | about a year ago | (#45106965)

Here is video of an older iPhone and os making exact same blue screen/restart.
Seems to take different actions to trigger, but not sure this is a new bug.
From the comments sounds like it wasn't too uncommon either..

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KjyQLlEHomQ [youtube.com]

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