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New Goggles Offer Minority Report-Style Interface With Heads-Up Display

samzenpus posted about 9 months ago | from the goggles-they-do-something dept.

Technology 67

Lucas123 writes "A Taiwanese non-profit R&D organization is demonstrating a new heads-up type display that allows users to interact with the floating virtual screens using finger swipes. The new i-Air Touch technology from the Industrial Technology Research Institute is being developed for an array of devices, including PCs, wearable computers and mobile devices. The technology allows a user's hand to be free of any physical device such as a touchpad or keyboard for touch input. ITRI plans to license the patented technology to manufacturers. The company sees the technology being used in not only consumer arenas (video), but also for medical applications such as endoscopic surgery and any industrial applications that benefit from hands-free input."

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What should we call it? (3)

Beardydog (716221) | about 9 months ago | (#45219137)

I don't know.... iSomething? Something Air? Something Touch? None of those are quite Apply enough...

Re:What should we call it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45220005)

iTouchAir

Re:What should we call it? (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 9 months ago | (#45220045)

When you see the users waving hands in the air like they just don't careâ¦

The iSoCrazy.

Re:What should we call it? (1)

Cryacin (657549) | about 9 months ago | (#45220855)

I believe that's ISOCrazy. And most companies are already.

Re:What should we call it? (4, Funny)

Chas (5144) | about 9 months ago | (#45220663)

Gorilla Arms Inducer.

Re:What should we call it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45267227)

iGorilla

Can't wait for a room full of cubicle drones... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45219139)

all sitting back looking like they are groping a pair of imaginary boobs.

i-Air (TM) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45219153)

Anyone else see a fruity problem with that name?

Worst possible user interface. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45219207)

Congratulations Tom Cruise on popularizing the worst possible user interface!

Who exactly finds the "minority report" interface desireable? Do these people really look at their computers and think to themselves, "you know waving my arms around like an idiot just to do basic work is a great idea!"?

I so do (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45219465)

Yeah. Me. I want that.

Re: Worst possible user interface. (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45220609)

Wrong.

I'll tell you why. The MR interface has a lot of useful subtleties your brain obviously couldn't wrap around. The idea that we can point and click or type on the keyboard is kind of absurd done in the air, sure. But if I'm working a stepper type control with a range, I might prefer an interface that can detect my 'turning the knob' gesture. Especially if the precision is essentially a 10th generation Kinect type sensor. I can perform better gestures with both my upper limbs better than I could with my dexterous fingers.

The tech isn't really there, and this device hits a few good points but misses more.

Yes, a gesture filled world will look odd at first, but higher precision tech will iron out the wrinkles and make it less goofy.

-Guy who forgot his login credentials

Re: Worst possible user interface. (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | about 9 months ago | (#45223337)

I've been playing around with my LEAP motion sensor for a while now, which is close as affordable consumer tech currently gets, and it's a mixed bag.
On one hand, I get gorilla arm; also, my computer is in a basement with poor lighting and I think that affects it's tracking some; there's also the very good point that there is no tactile feedback (that could be rectified if such an interface required some kind of finger glove;) but regards gorilla arm, it makes more sense to me to stand and gesticulate than sit, which seems to reduce that a bit, and coupled with a really good voice recognition feature (we're getting there) I could envision a day were people are using this more and more; the keyboard could become moot in the future.
Personally though, I like typing; I just hate the new modern keyboards with their spongy feel and minimal travel, again, lack of tactile feedback is a lose.
The biggest lose with the keyboard, currently, is that the mouse is separate. You have to keep removing your hand from the keys, over to the mouse, move something, then move your hand back, type some more, repeat.

Re:Worst possible user interface. (1)

jandersen (462034) | about 9 months ago | (#45221105)

That Tom Cruise has any success as an actor is one of the great mysteries of this era; he is about as expressive as a block of wood. I don't know if the "MR interface" is a good idea or not, but the association with him has permanently tainted an otherwise good story.

I can sort of imagine situations where an interaction style sort of like might be meaningful, but to my mind it is just science fiction effects: the sort of things you put into a story to make it impressive, but which don't actually have any advantages. A bit like when you see Kirk speak to the Enterprise computer - it was very impressive at the time and stirred people's imagination, but when it comes to getting real work done, speech is far too imprecise and slow. Yes, most people can dictate a memo faster they can type it, but then you get all the "Ummm..." and "Oh, I didn't mean that, ..." etc as well. And it is far faster to type "ls -l" than saying "give me a full directory listing, please".

Re:Worst possible user interface. (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 9 months ago | (#45221793)

There's been a push for AR as the output device for expert systems, basically to walk a nonspecialist through a procedure in situations where it's not possible to send a specialist. The classic is instructing an astronaut on an unanticipated medical procedure or a soldier through a battlefield repair on some important apparatus. If you're going to use AR to guide the operator, it should probably be their UI too.

The consumer applications are a way to sell a few bad prototypes and keep the company going while they get major industries involved I'm sure.

I'm With You (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45222929)

I wholeheartedly agree with your sentiment. All of these movie interfaces are wonderfully enticing, when passively watched in a movie theater, but would suck massively in real life.

Wild gesticulation in the air are absurd replacements for what is today, merely finger twitches.

Utter lack of any tactile feedback is an atrocious pain to use. Today's touchscreen devices, tablets and phones, demonstrate this clearly. But, lest we forget, even they provide feedback in that we can feel when our finger hits the glass. Waving your hand in the air? Fail. See Kinect.

Faded translucent displays are absurd for people that want to be able to clearly see the information and not suffer massive eye strain or even permanent damage to their vision. Even an eagle-eyed teen is going to notice the difference between a real display and these translucent disasters.

Re:Worst possible user interface. (1)

slash.jit (2893213) | about 9 months ago | (#45222947)

How about interactive virtual porn?

The video narration is in Engrish (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45219353)

still understandable.

Yeah... Except (4, Insightful)

l0ungeb0y (442022) | about 9 months ago | (#45219355)

Minority Report featured huge wall-sized displays that everyone could see what you were interacting with and appreciate the subtle finesse and precision with which you operated.

With these, people will cut throw startled glances and cut wide arcs around the goggle wearing special needs person doing a bizarre mime routine while walking down the sidewalk.

Re:Yeah... Except (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45220527)

In Minority Report Tom Cruise had special gloves on and they had these transparent plates they needed to push in and out to transfer data between the systems.

It was impressive ten years ago, but today XBox One looks much more advanced.

Oh Yeah! (5, Funny)

digitalPhant0m (1424687) | about 9 months ago | (#45219375)

The technology allows a user's hand to be free of any physical device

Oh yeah, I'll bet it does...

Can't wait (5, Funny)

wjcofkc (964165) | about 9 months ago | (#45219397)

Apparently in the future everyone will have tremendous upper body strength. In all seriousness though, I consider the enumerable guys in my office building who insist on taking their business meetings all the way to the urinal via bluetooth. I can just imagine the sensory input overload being so overwhelming that they get mixed up, start waving their arms around and pee all over themselves and anyone within range.

Re:Can't wait (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 9 months ago | (#45219711)

Apparently in the future everyone will have tremendous upper body strength.

Yup, it's the gorilla arm problem all over again: Try waving your hand in front of your face for about 10 minutes and see how you feel after a while.

An interesting experiment to demonstrate what an actual comfortable interface would look like: (1) Drop your arms to your sides. (2) Bend the arms at the elbow to bring them up to desk height, keeping everything else relaxed as possible. (3) Wiggle your fingers. That's where the thing you interact with should be: If you're like most people, your fingers will be more-or-less positioned to grasp an invisible object about the size of a volleyball in between your hands, interacting with the vertical surfaces. The reasons keyboards aren't actually made like that have to do with (A) the inability in that position to see what you're doing, (B) the impossibility of the right hand help the left hand or vice versa, and (C) it was easier to build mechanical typewriters the way modern keyboards are laid out, with all the key hits coming from more-or-less the same angle. But it's useful for showing what does and doesn't feel natural.

Re:Can't wait (1)

belthize (990217) | about 9 months ago | (#45219785)

Try plastering a wall for 8 hours a day or framing for 8 hours a day or any other physical labor, if you can't move your finger around for 10 minutes you need to get some exercise.

Re:Can't wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45219953)

Eight hours a day, huh. Perhaps you have forgotten about lunchtime, morning and afternoon breaks, smoke breaks, piss breaks, driving the pickup truck time, nail and coffee shopping time, and poopy break time. More like 3.25 hours a day, spread out thinly.

Re:Can't wait (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 9 months ago | (#45221713)

When doing that, you typically don't put your arms up continuously. For example, when I'm putting up sheet rock, sometimes I'm cutting things into shape, sometimes I'm moving a section over to the wall, sometimes I'm taking measurements, and sometimes I'm reaching up to put in screws. When I'm painting, sometimes I'm reaching up to roll paint on the surface, but sometimes I'm reaching down to put paint on the roller. When I've done building projects, a lot of the time was spent working at the much more convenient sawhorse level, or assembling pieces on the floor, rather than trying to do all the carpentry vertically. I've never encountered someone, including professionals in building trades, who holds their arms up continuously for extended periods, because that simply drains strength from your arms.

A buddy of mine who was a top-notch bricklayer was sometimes putting down a course or mortering, but a lot of the time was reaching down to pick up bricks.

Re:Can't wait (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 9 months ago | (#45219913)

oh god, another geek who still hasn't figured out how to use his arms properly. Gorilla arm has never been a problem for the hundreds of occupations that use their arms in that way. It is only a problem for those people who have so little experience using their arms that they think it would be a problem.

Re:Can't wait (1)

terryk29 (2756467) | about 9 months ago | (#45220883)

(also replying to belthize above) Earlier today I was toenailing rafters with a hammer, and yet right now I'm still glad I can rest my forearms on my desk and nudge the mouse around. (And no, it's not because I'm tired or out-of-shape!)

The difference with physical labour is that it's usually gross motor skills in short intervals. Also, you're usually benefiting from the interface being not only haptic but able to resist and support real forces, e.g.: to place a block, you only have to wrestle it in the plane; it's being supported vertically by the wall it's sitting on.

OTOH, using the Minority Report interface for the wrong task would demand fine (or medium) motor skills w/o the usual bracing of your hand against the work, piece of gear, or the tool itself when in contact with the work. So neither physical labour nor many hands-on crafts would make you immune to gorilla-arm syndrome.

Maybe only ballet could prepare you properly? But you may still want to brace your elbow on your chest while you point. Of course, this is just another case of "where appropriate", i.e. applied to quite particular industrial and/or creative tasks.

Re:Can't wait (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 9 months ago | (#45227721)

Tai chi, yoga, most martial arts, all strive for economy of effort with maximum work.

The key is to stop fighting yourself. Most people don't realize, and mostly geeks with very little physical experience, that frequently they have opposing muscle pairs in constant battle. One must learn to seperate the force necessary for movement and the force necessary to counteract gravity, tai chi is excellent for this because the slow movement brings out the opposing forces.

Once you can do handstand for 30 secs to a minute, without strain just even breath, then you'll understand the beauty of the human body as a tensegrity.

Re:Can't wait (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 9 months ago | (#45221633)

Or maybe usign a touch screen is different from plastering.

Not sure how, or why, but considering this seems to be a problem for touch screen users and not for the various other occupations, it seems this could be the case.

Re:Can't wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45222073)

An idea: When doing work on vertical surfaces (like walls), in many cases you apply some amount of force to the surface, and thus also get support by it. On the other hand, applying significant force to the touch screen is probably not advisable; there's a reason why it is called touch screen, not punch screen.

Re:Can't wait (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 9 months ago | (#45227765)

It is only a problem for some. Mainly for those who do not know how to support their own weight, so they come up with myopic explanations, like the AC below, that it's all because you can't push (hard) against a touchscreen or the air. These people will never understand until they can support their own weight. Tensegrity.

Re:Can't wait (1)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about 9 months ago | (#45221831)

There are two reasons that make gorilla arm an issue in particular for touch screen (or gesture based) interfaces:
- When using a touch screen or gesture interface continuously, you have very little (if any) opportunity to rest your arms a moment by leaning them against something. This puts a constant strain on your muscles that becomes problematic after a while
- The required precision of gestures puts an additional strain on your muscles


In contrast, most other professions where your arms are in constant use have your arms / hands resting on something from time to time, and/or constantly cycle muscles between tension and relaxation. There are a few professions where this is not the case, and those suffer from gorilla arm as well if no regular breaks are taken.

Re:Can't wait (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 9 months ago | (#45227857)

So you think that a touch/air interface requires you to always have your arms moving? Do you know how stupid that sounds? Do you constantly need your fingers typing or your hand on the mouse? Do you never have to think?

Re:Can't wait (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 9 months ago | (#45223655)

In how many occupations do you hold your hands up in front of your face for long periods of time? From art to shelf stacking I can't say any one of them involved persistently waving my forelimbs around in my eyeline.

Here's a test: for the next week, only use your handhelds with them held up in front of you, level with your head.

Re:Can't wait (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 9 months ago | (#45227511)

Painting, framing, dancing, mining, arts, etc...

I use my tablet like that as an exercise to make sure that i'm using my arms properly, i.e., elbows point down. Perhaps YOU should try it.

Re:Can't wait (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 9 months ago | (#45232375)

I've done three of those, and none of them involved me waving my arms in front of my face. Moving my arms up there periodically, and back down, yes. The point with the tablet is to emphasise that nobody spends more than a few minutes at a time with their arms up and it'd be excruciating to operate a computer where the tactile interface was only in your eyeline.

Misread... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45219399)

For a moment there I thought it was Google that was offering us Minority Report-style interface with heads-up display...

Can we get over minority report already? (5, Informative)

crossmr (957846) | about 9 months ago | (#45219421)

Seriously have journalists never seen any other SF movie?
It's like the only movie that's ever had a futuristic interface in it at all.

The moment I see some mouthbreather mention minority report I stop caring about anything they've written.

Re:Can we get over minority report already? (2)

Brulath (2765381) | about 9 months ago | (#45219695)

It's not so much Minority Report as it is them trying to find a viable interaction method for augmented reality. The AR versions has some significant benefits over the Minority Report interface, in that it can theoretically overlay data on real-world objects and make things ranging from internal surgery to constructing aircraft a simpler undertaking by allowing you to see inside or where things should go. This method of interacting is severely limited (it's essentially a 1.5inch thick virtual touch screen held 11inches in front of you at all times) but it's more or less the best we have until voice or neural interfaces become practical.

That said, the consumer uses are extremely limited and wearing bulky glasses is probably more likely to get in the way of a surgeon than help them. Interactive AR is still not there yet.

Re:Can we get over minority report already? (1)

crossmr (957846) | about 9 months ago | (#45221097)

No, the issue is the repeated and overused comparison of 90% of new tech gadgets to minority report by idiot journalists who couldn't write their way out of a paper bag.

Re:Can we get over minority report already? (1)

niftydude (1745144) | about 9 months ago | (#45219841)

Agreed, it was a crappy Tom Cruise vehicle that I very much regret having watched.

Re:Can we get over minority report already? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45220889)

But that is useful. You see it goes like this. You go to patent office and say: "hey I have a patent application for a device like you have seen minority report".
Now tell me what is wrong with this scene?

Re:Can we get over minority report already? (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 9 months ago | (#45221775)

You have a closer point of comparison, or are you just being a smartass?

Re:Can we get over minority report already? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45222859)

Do you know any other SF movie which did future technology correctly?

Tired Arms (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45219425)

That's the only thing that a "minority report style interface" would give the world.

I really don't understand why anyone thinks it would be practical, even for a few minutes, to really work this way.

Re:Tired Arms (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 9 months ago | (#45219919)

because we all aren't brains with useless physical bodies.

Turn on the light, I can't click! (2)

Arkh89 (2870391) | about 9 months ago | (#45219469)

So basically, the depth camera uses longitudinal chromatic aberration (the red green and blue colors are not in focus for the same distances). So it needs to have your finger well lighted at any time...
I see no problem with that at all...

What would Tufte say? (4, Insightful)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 9 months ago | (#45219565)

There's a lot of push towards I/O systems that are more convenient for the manufacturers, but less so for the end consumer.

The first keyboards were heavy and had tactile feedback. If you fumbled a key typing in your password, you knew whether it entered because you could feel the "click". Nowadays the keyboard is lighter than a paperback and there's no feedback - accidentally brush a key with your finger and you have to look (for non-password text entry) or start over.

Twist knobs are highly intuitive, especially when coupled with feedback. Twist a knob and see the hands of the clock move, or see the numbers change. Control the speed natively, and if you go too far it's obvious how to back up. Nowadays we have buttons to tap, incrementing the count by 1 each time. Tap 50 times to set the minute display, and if you go too far you have to go all the way around again. This was done largely because buttons are easy to fabricate (using PCB contacts), not because they are inherently better.

Modern typing is done on the display (phone, surface), so not only don't you have tactile feedback you can't feel the boundaries of the keys, and your fingers mask the key display. And it's really tiny - in order to access all the keys you have to type extra keys that switch between keyboards (upper/lower/symbol). Again, it was done for ease of manufacturing, not ease of use.

Is the ribbon any easier than, for example, cascading menus? The problem with the Windows original menu system was that every application put their commands in the top-level Start->Programs folder, leading to start menus containing hundreds of links. (I take the time to move StartMenu command links into subfolders by type, which makes it much easier, but on my dad's computer it's impossible to find anything.)

Ever since minority report people have been touting the wonders of air-gesture input, and that it is the next "big thing", but is it better? (Actually, I remember it from Johnny Mnemonic, 7 years earlier.) Seems like this is just something that's easier to manufacture, but not easier to use. Sure, the customer will be able to do everything they could do with a mouse/keyboard, but more slowly, less conveniently, and with lots of frustration. That's an externality to the manufacturers, but it's better for them because they don't have to build in a touch interface. Probably [electrically] more reliable, too.

Is this really progress? I wonder what Edward Tufte would say about modern interfaces.

Lots of things easier (5, Interesting)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 9 months ago | (#45220101)

The first keyboards were heavy and had tactile feedback. If you fumbled a key typing in your password, you knew whether it entered because you could feel the "click".

If you pay attention that's not really how you type. You learn where keys are by muscle memory, not because they have a shape. When I'm typing if I'm doing it right I'm not feeling edges of keys, just keys depressing under my finger. And I notice mistakes on the screen, not from where my fingers hit.

Nowadays we have buttons to tap, incrementing the count by 1 each time. Tap 50 times to set the minute display, and if you go too far you have to go all the way around again.

We do? That sounds horrible. Just about anything I've ever used that has you set large sets of numbers just lets you type them directly.

Modern typing is done on the display (phone, surface), so not only don't you have tactile feedback you can't feel the boundaries of the keys, and your fingers mask the key display. And it's really tiny - in order to access all the keys you have to type extra keys that switch between keyboards (upper/lower/symbol). Again, it was done for ease of manufacturing, not ease of use.

Sorry, but I consider that wrong in lots of ways.

You have tactile feedback in that you can feel where you are in relation to the edge of the device. Also while your finger obscures the key pressing displays what the key is so you can see exactly what was hit. But touch typing is no harder than on a computer, because over time you learn where to press and also because predictive mechanisms correct most mistakes.

Also, the problem is inherently one of size. Touch screens are not "more convenient for the manufacturer". You have no idea how much software and hardware is involved to get a touch screen keyboard working well. A physical keyboard is just buttons. But the reason why touch screen keyboards are winning out in small form factors is because the are more convenient for the USER. As good as the Blackberry keyboard was, I hated using those tiny keys and the virtual keyboard on a touchscreen has larger keys - and also can tailor the keyboard to a task like entering numbers rather than having to deal with a row of tiny numbers on a tiny keyboard.

Is the ribbon any easier than, for example, cascading menus?

I don't like the ribbon much but yes, direct access is in fact easier than deeply nested menus.

Ever since minority report people have been touting the wonders of air-gesture input, and that it is the next "big thing", but is it better?

Even though I disagree with your core argument, I do agree with your conclusion. I'm not sure air-gesture input is better. But I think like all things, over time it will be folded into the mix as just another possible way to tell a computer what to do. I rank it slightly ahead of talking as a socially acceptable interface, although you probably look a bit crazier with the motion.

Re:Lots of things easier (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45220911)

Just to one part of an argument - you say that the modern display typing is better than real physical keyboard because you still have feedback and do not have burden of carrying the bloody keyboard with you with all the cables or batteries or what else. I could even agree to customers feeling that way but not that it is really better. To find out why go to any forum where people type short and not so short messages - you can tell which ones use their phones and other shitty input devices. Get rid of that and I agree with you that such interface is better. If not then fuck yourself in knee.

I agree with the argument about 'manufacturer convenience' tho. Still they do it not because it is better but because that is what people want. People want many things most of them are silly, quite a lot dangerous and silly.

Re:Lots of things easier (1)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | about 9 months ago | (#45221351)

Nowadays we have buttons to tap, incrementing the count by 1 each time. Tap 50 times to set the minute display, and if you go too far you have to go all the way around again.

We do? That sounds horrible. Just about anything I've ever used that has you set large sets of numbers just lets you type them directly.

I think that GP isn't talking about smartphones/etc here, but rather stupid idiot shit like microwaves, alarm clocks and "induction"* oven tops with touch controls. I am now in the process of buying a new oven top for the place we just moved in to, not because the old one is broken, but because the user interface is mind-numbingly stupid. It looks near -impossible to find an induction oven with good-ole fashioned physical switches. Grrr.

* they should really be called hysteresis ovens, since they produce > 90% of the heat by ferromagnetic hysteresis. This has always annoyed me. If it were actually an induction oven, it would work equally well with non-ferromagnetic pots (i.e. aluminium).

Re:Lots of things easier (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45223035)

You obviously can't touch type. If I type while copying a document on paper, and not looking at the screen all the time, I can tell when I have made a mistake while typing - WITHOUT seeing it on the screen.

The ribbon is NOT "easier than deeply nested menus" - how deeply nested do you mean?

The fact that you can't feel the advantages that a tactile keyboard offers over a non-tactile, or even 'non-existent' one, says it all...
Please tell me that you don't work for some software company's 'user experience' department...

Re:Lots of things easier (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 9 months ago | (#45231371)

The fact that you can't feel the advantages that a tactile keyboard offers over a non-tactile, or even 'non-existent' one, says it allâ¦

On a desktop I see a plain advantage. But on a smaller device the advantage vanishes, especially when portability is desired⦠until you get down to phone size and then physical keys are a detriment as I said.

I'm also not saying that physical keyboards are not good. Just that virtual keyboards are not bad, and can offer some real advantages.

Re:What would Tufte say? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45220895)

What an overly generalized bunch of rambling nonsense.

...and your fingers mask the key display.

Wait, you can see through your fingertips when you're typing on a keyboard but not when you're typing on a smartphone?

I do prefer a clicky mechanical keyboard myself, but what are on about with the knobs thing? Automation, which is what a computer is all about, should ultimately require LESS human input. Why not strip away shit that becomes less valuable as automation improves?

And your problem with tapping too many times and having to go through again? Maybe don't buy the cheapest fucking bed side clock on the planet. None of the ones I've used in recent history suffer from that particular design problem.

This again? (1)

RevWaldo (1186281) | about 9 months ago | (#45219623)

Don't we go through this "new gesture-based interface that will change everything" jazz every couple of months?

Wake me when TigerDirect emails me an offer for it - $99 with FREE SHIPPING!

.

Movies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45219833)

Everyone wants to create interfaces from the movies because they look cool, regardless of actual usability or anything. Seems to be the only motivator for progress these days in the tech world; if something's cool or not. Boring, but practical innovation went out the window a long time ago.

I'm Terribly Sorry (1)

hyades1 (1149581) | about 9 months ago | (#45220721)

Of course I wasn't flipping you off, Officer. I was merely directing my home computer to post a picture of our parrot to Reddit.

Obligatory (1)

Kozar_The_Malignant (738483) | about 9 months ago | (#45220785)

The goggles; they do nothing!

One small problem... (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 9 months ago | (#45220953)

Nobody wants a Minority Report-style interface.

Re:One small problem... (1)

edmanet (1790914) | about 9 months ago | (#45223069)

Only because Tom Cruise was in the movie.

Another great patent. (1)

citizenr (871508) | about 9 months ago | (#45221127)

They patented putting Leap motion on top of VR glasses, genius! Nobody would come up with this one.

Re:Another great patent. (1)

coofercat (719737) | about 9 months ago | (#45221843)

Did you?

Re:Another great patent. (1)

citizenr (871508) | about 9 months ago | (#45225811)

yes, and 50 other people on Occulus rift forum.

Some questions unanswered.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45221587)

The real question is: Does it work with PORN?

Appropriated by Congress (1)

Ronin Developer (67677) | about 9 months ago | (#45222717)

In the past, it was said people who behaved like this had Tourette's (very real, debilitating and somewhat treatable...not making fun of them). Now,it's going to be the new normal.

Imagine a bunch of Congress critters wearing these things....it will make CSPAN funnier than the Comedy Channel. Especially when they start playing Doom or Halo during a crucial vote....yelling...Die F-er!!!!!!

Gibson's Cyberspace (1)

edmanet (1790914) | about 9 months ago | (#45223053)

We're just getting closer to William Gibson's concept of cyberspace. Add some "trodes" for your fingers, slot an OS into the jack behind your ear, and you'll be sipping virtual coffee with Count Zero in the Sprawl.
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