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First New Top-Level Domains Added To the Root Zone

timothy posted about a year ago | from the dibs-on-linear-b dept.

Networking 106

angry tapir writes "The Internet – or at least its namespace – just got bigger. Four new top-level domains have been added to the Internet's root zone. The four new gTLDs all use non-Latin scripts: 'web' in Arabic, 'online' in Cyrillic, 'sale' in Cyrillic, and 'game' in Chinese. In total, the generic top-level domain process run by ICANN will result in the expansion of top-level domains from 22 to up to 1400."

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.sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222187)

LOL!!!

facebook.beheadings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222373)

Instant win.

Re:.sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222423)

.lol

Re:.sucks (0)

Richy_T (111409) | about a year ago | (#45225287)

roflmao.lol

Phishing (5, Insightful)

sbrown7792 (2027476) | about a year ago | (#45222215)

And phishers everywhere rejoiced

Re:Phishing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222301)

For that, register .coRn.
Check this out - monsanto.corn.
Depending on kerning, it's almost indistinguishable.

Re:Phishing (1)

Fnordulicious (85996) | about a year ago | (#45223581)

That’s the problern with bad keming.

Re:Phishing (2)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#45223627)

For that, register .coRn.
Check this out - monsanto.corn.

Kernel panic!

Cyrillic is not a language (4, Informative)

necro81 (917438) | about a year ago | (#45222217)

Cyrillic is an alphabet or script; it is not a language. The TLDs written in Cyrillic, when translated into Russian (the most abundant language to use the Cyrillic script) are "online" and "sale".

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (5, Informative)

rxmd (205533) | about a year ago | (#45222321)

Actually no. This is just the English words "online" and "site" (not "sale") transliterated into the Cyrillic script. A lot of languages that are written in the Cyrillic alphabet use "online" and "site" as loan words from English, the new TLDs will fit all of them.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (1)

taiwanjohn (103839) | about a year ago | (#45224189)

The Chinese one has a similar/opposite sort of problem: The same word can be written in traditional or simplified script, in either of two main encoding schemes on the local computer (Big5 and GB, respectively) while unicode is often used for internet (there are others too). I assume unicode is used for the TLD, but I wonder how the simplified/traditional problem gets handled. I would assume it defaults to simplified, but I'm curious how those with traditional systems are supposed to interface with it.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (3, Informative)

nullchar (446050) | about a year ago | (#45225381)

In China, CNNIC manages .cn in ASCII for their country code top level domain (ccTLD). They also manage .xn--fiqs8s (simplified) and .xn--fiqz9s (traditional) for ".china" in Chinese.

When you purchase a domain under .xn--fiqs8s, you get the same string in .xn--fiqz9s. This is referred to as "IDN Bundling". DNS resolves for both, but you only have to manage one domain.

It's yet to be seen what the New gTLDs will do for Chinese simplified vs traditional. Most likely, they will only accept simplified characters (to keep it simple!) but they could do bundling.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (4, Informative)

kharchenko (303729) | about a year ago | (#45222365)

Actually, the second one is "site", not "sale". The ludicrous thing is that neither word is actually russian - they are simply transliterations of the english "online" and "site" words in cyrillic.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (1)

sageres (561626) | about a year ago | (#45222663)

Hi Friend, I myself find it a bit ludicrous the amount of Rusglish in modern Russian Although could you tell me the Russian equivalents of the English "Online" and "Site"?

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (3, Informative)

mi (197448) | about a year ago | (#45222909)

Although could you tell me the Russian equivalents of the English "Online" and "Site"?

There really aren't (single-word) equivalents, which is why the English words are now so widely used for the purpose even by the purists and the anti-Americans (of whom there are very many among Russians nowadays)...

The best I can come up with would be "na linii" ("on line") and "mesto" ("place"), but neither are quite exact a match for the English terms...

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (1)

hazah (807503) | about a year ago | (#45223617)

The English equivalents make as much sense as the russian ones though. Site before the Internet was just what the Russian equivalent is. We simply got used to it, so it's not an issue.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (1)

TheLink (130905) | about a year ago | (#45224233)

Yep think more about keyboard, monitor, drive, speakers, etc and they start seeming a bit weird ;).

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (1)

kharchenko (303729) | about a year ago | (#45228083)

Sure, but my point is that they had a chance to add two top-level domains in cyrillic and they chose to transliterate two english words.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222937)

The TLDs written in Cyrillic, when translated into Russian (the most abundant language to use the Cyrillic script) are "online" and "sale".

I don't understand. If Cyrillic is only a script and not a language, then how can it possibly be "translated" into Russian?

I thought "translation" applied only when converting one language to another.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223027)

Duh it's in Cyrillic, they picked the Russian word written in Cyrillic. Come on slashdot users, we expect better logic from you! Translated is a very forgiving word as far as usage, we all knew what he meant.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223671)

Come on slashdot users, we expect better logic from you! Translated is a very forgiving word as far as usage, we all knew what he meant.

When someone is making a pedantic post to explain the difference between a "language" and a "script", I expect them to get the terminology correct.

From the few Linguistics courses I've taken, it was made very clear to me that precise usage of terminology is extremely important. My (limited) understanding is that the term "transliterate" would have been the correct term to use (not "translate").

Once we're at this level of pedantic discussion, I have a much higher expectation of correctness from the posts.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (1)

badzilla (50355) | about a year ago | (#45223149)

You "translate" when you convert one language to another, for example during translation into French you will be replacing the English word "mother" with its French equivalent "mère". However "transliterating" is different. Both English and French use the same letter M for the sound at the beginning of "mother." As it happens so does Cyrillic use the same letter M. This is not guaranteed for all letters though and with a different example "father" Cyrillic uses a circle with a vertical stroke through it for the sound at the beginning. Because the Russians have no native words for many modern concepts and computer terms they are happy to borrow from other languages. Russians use the word "online" in the same sense that we do. Although when you actually hear a Russian speak that word it sounds more like "orn-layeen".

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (1)

fast turtle (1118037) | about a year ago | (#45223615)

you translate into subspace/hyperspace from normal space. You do not translate from one language to another, you refactor it.

Re:Cyrillic is not a language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222997)

Just to be a little pendantic you should use "common" or "prevalent" there where you typed "abundant", but we did understand what you mean.

Massive US land grab (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222229)

The root zone is managed by the United State's government, with ICANN providing suggestions. The UN nations should stop this land grab in it's tracks and refuse the right for their domestic DNS providers to resolve the new domains until the issue of international control is settled. Once these TLDs take hold, it will be much harder to go back due to interoperability concerns, so now it's the best moment to FUD their development.

Let's not even mention the few hundred million dollars in TLD fees, that will surely be employed by ICANN to further US control over the Internet and surveillance by gently steering the protocols in the right directions.

Re:Massive US land grab (2)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about a year ago | (#45222359)

You seem to have missed the Montevideo Statement [icann.org] a few weeks back. All of the Internet governance bodies are going NGO.

Re:Massive US land grab (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222479)

That's complete and utter hogwash. This is not about profits but about political control. The new TLDs will massively extend the number of US controlled domains. All the issues regarding these TLDs, including summary seizers, will be settled under US jurisdiction. It will also entrench the existing status quo by providing ICANN with a large revenue stream while having no direct financial ties to the US government.

Re:Massive US land grab (1)

Lennie (16154) | about a year ago | (#45223253)

The new TLDs will massively extend the number of US controlled domains.

There is no structural difference between a gTLD and cTLD.

Please do tell me how a new gTLD gives the US more control than they already have over the root itself ?

Most of the new gTLD's are brandnames or TLDs like this Cyrilic .online.

I assume the brandnames already had a .com.

And the others will be selling second level domains.

Do tell, I'd like to know how the US has more control.

Re:Massive US land grab (1)

nullchar (446050) | about a year ago | (#45224609)

The controller of the root servers controls the entire namespace. Size of the namespace doesn't really matter. Too bad alternate roots never took hold. Nor has any distributed DNS infrastructure gained any acceptance.

.onion on TOR is the largest non-ICANN top level domain. Anyone know how large .onion is?

Re:Massive US land grab (1)

mythosaz (572040) | about a year ago | (#45225353)

With Freedom Hosting and TSR gone, I assume it's down from like 12 sites to 3 or 4....

Re:Massive US land grab (0)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#45222401)

Given these 3 new languages are 90% covering dictatorships, I'm fine with the US controlling them.

The only thing worse than the US, as far as land grabs and world domination goes, are Russia, China, and almost everywhere they speak Arabic.

Go ahead, fap. You know you want to.

Re:Massive US land grab (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223459)

The UN nations should stop this land grab in it's tracks and refuse the right for their domestic DNS providers to resolve the new domains until the issue of international control is settled.

Hate them United Nations Nations!

Good (-1, Flamebait)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year ago | (#45222235)

Now the muzzies can keep their beheading videos on their own domain

Re:Good (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about a year ago | (#45222351)

No one should own any of the domains.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223805)

Pretty sure the French [wikipedia.org] have beheaded more than the "muzzies" but since there were no video recorders it's ok, right? I guarantee they would have been recorded, if the technology existed. But yes, let's hate people because they're different. I hate redheads because of the atrocities of the IRA and that one Heather that turned me down for a date. Who's the Muslim girl that broke your heart? Was it a boy? You in the closet? That would explain your constant need to remind everyone how much you hate the "muzzies" - some Mohammed broke your heart.

Google Translator compatible? (1, Flamebait)

PoconoPCDoctor (912001) | about a year ago | (#45222239)

These new domains seem to split the internet, unless the pages can be read by the English speaking world. Maybe that's the idea, but it seems to move away from the intent of a universal internet.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (2)

canadiannomad (1745008) | about a year ago | (#45222285)

This splits nothing. You can go to a funky alphabeted url just as easily as a latin alphabeted url... Just need the link or to use an appropriate keyboard/on screen keyboard. The internet is pretty split along language lines anyway, if you hadn't noticed. (I do notice, cause I speak 3 languages, and am currently in a country that speaks another.)

Re:Google Translator compatible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223625)

But without proper character encoding on slashdot we'll never be able to link to them, thus the split is between slashdot and the world outside of slashdot, and I for one am staying within slashdot (it's just safer in here).

Re:Google Translator compatible? (2)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about a year ago | (#45222287)

These new domains seem to split the internet, unless the pages can be read by the English speaking world. Maybe that's the idea, but it seems to move away from the intent of a universal internet.

Right now there are many millions of websites I can't read because I don't speak Chinese, Korean, Russian, etc. etc. etc.... There can be no "universal Internet" unless everyone speaks the same language, which is never going to happen.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#45222369)

Speaking the same language isn't strictly necessary if automatic translation technology catches up. Of course, there will always be words and phrases that don't translate, but those will become avoided in order to better facilitate a "universal" Internet. The fact that I can *access* those pages is more important to facilitating a universal Internet than being able to *read* them.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (1)

Fnordulicious (85996) | about a year ago | (#45223661)

Automatically turning language breakdown get lucky. It does not ever want to be.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#45224433)

SciFi universes lacking some kind of universal translator usually have a common language. A middle ground that I haven't really seen mentioned anywhere is each language being spoken in a dialect that is more easily machine-translatable. In other words, the structure of natural languages would shift to be more easily understood by machine translators. You see this already with speech to text programs like Siri and Android have (or even with SEO) - people learn to talk in a way that the machine can more easily grasp. Over time, I could see that becoming the defacto way of writing for the web.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (5, Funny)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year ago | (#45222391)

These new domains seem to split the internet, unless the pages can be read by the English speaking world. Maybe that's the idea, but it seems to move away from the intent of a universal internet.

Right now there are many millions of websites I can't read because I don't speak Chinese, Korean, Russian, etc. etc. etc.... There can be no "universal Internet" unless everyone speaks the same language, which is never going to happen.

Not to mention there are many in English that I don't understand; on genetic sequencing, quantum effects, plasma physics, etc.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222657)

And a raft of sites I don't understand about Who Hates Fags, chemtrails, how great Apple products are, etc.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223851)

Not to mention site promoting religious/ethnic tolerance, huh, racist?

Re:Google Translator compatible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222331)

Yes! And so do all of the pages where the text is in some bullshit non-English language.

We should demand that every website be in 100% American English, to avoid fragmenting the Web.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (1)

somersault (912633) | about a year ago | (#45222517)

Troll levels: off the charts.

The "English speaking world" is not the internet. Nor is it anywhere close to being the actual world.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (0)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year ago | (#45223101)

In fact, it's a minority.

Roughly, 20-30% of the world speak English.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (2)

wvmarle (1070040) | about a year ago | (#45223499)

Far less if you only include native English speakers: US + Canada + Australia + UK = 317+26+23+63 = 429 million. Add some smaller countries like SA and NZ and reach maybe 500 mln, that's barely 7% of the world's population.

I expected more if you include speakers of English as a second language (like myself).

Re:Google Translator compatible? (0)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about a year ago | (#45222595)

It's worse than letting gays into the Catholic church. They've polluted the purity of the Internet more than divorce has polluted the sanctity of Marriage.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223189)

Yes!

All domain names and content should be forced by law to be in Esperanto.

Re:Google Translator compatible? (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about a year ago | (#45223381)

How often do you visit Chinese-language or Arabic-language web sites? They all have URLs that are using standard ASCII characters, what's stopping you.

It's "site", not "sale" (2)

ManiaX Killerian (134390) | about a year ago | (#45222251)

The word in cyrlillic ("") is "site", not "sale".

Re:It's "site", not "sale" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222317)

Time for an UTF-8 upgrade?

Re:It's "site", not "sale" (4, Insightful)

Fnordulicious (85996) | about a year ago | (#45223685)

Slashdot: News for nerds, stuff that matters in ISO 8859-1.

Wrong translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222263)

It is actually "site" in cyrillic and not "sale". I would post the cyrillic original but alas no utf-8 for slashdot in 2013.

Correction (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222273)

The new Cyrillic TLD, "", doesn't translate to "sale" in Russian, it simply means "site".

Re:Correction (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222293)

Dammit, forgot that Slashdot still doesn't support Unicode. I meant the second TLD mentioned in the article, anyway.

The Internet is an IP network (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222281)

that DNS sits on.

(shabaka) (2)

purnima (243606) | about a year ago | (#45222349)

is "network" in Arabic. Not web.

Re: (shabaka) (2)

nullchar (446050) | about a year ago | (#45224659)

Here is the marketing website behind it: http://dotshabaka.com/ [dotshabaka.com]

not sale, site (1)

anapsix (1809378) | about a year ago | (#45222363)

Not "sale" in Cyrillic, but "site"

External September is over... (1)

philipmather (864521) | about a year ago | (#45222425)

The World Wide Web has officially just jumped the shark.

I submit that Eternal September has now ended as all the Newbies will proceed to drown in an ever-rising sea of spam and phishing. I suspect gTLD expansion will do to the Web community what global warming may do to low lying coastal areas.

Re:External September is over... (2)

tverbeek (457094) | about a year ago | (#45222603)

The Web jumped the shark back in the 1990s, shortly after Microsoft started bundling a browser with Windows.

Re:External September is over... (2)

istartedi (132515) | about a year ago | (#45223669)

I see the rise of FaceBook and mobile, roughly around 2007 as a real shark-jumping. This transformed the web into a much more consumer oriented, dumbed down experience. The intelligent stuff is still out there, but new users aren't drawn into it. Even if they would be inclined to Slashdot, they're corrupted and distracted by all the finger-painting pinch-zoom twerking.

People were still building their own web pages in the 90s, still experimenting. It was the fertile ground from which many green herbs were growing... ultimately to be choked off by weeds. Perhaps the rise of MySpace is indicative of that phase. In general, the transition from "you've got to know a little HTML to put up a page" to "just type your life story into our site" is the latest step into oblivion.

Of course everybody has their own take on this, and there have been several stages. The opening of the Internet to AOL users in the mid-90s is the original September moment.

Sorry, I know Slashdot loves to bash MS; but I didn't see the bundling of IE having much impact on the quality of the Web.

Re:External September is over... (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about a year ago | (#45228517)

I wasn't bashing MS; I was bashing people who can't be bothered/figure out how to install software for themselves.

Re:External September is over... (1)

fatphil (181876) | about a year ago | (#45222671)

Says the guy who bought himself a ".me" domain under the ".uk" CCTLD.

The jumping started way back, it's now just actually landed with a splash.

Re:External September is over... (1)

philipmather (864521) | about a year ago | (#45223185)

Looks like my typing skills have also jumped the shark.
I actually like the set-up that the UK gTLD has... .me.uk - general use (usually personal) .net.uk - ISPs and network companies (unlike .net, use is restricted to these users) .org.uk - general use (usually for non-profit organisations) .co.uk - general use (usually commercial) .ltd.uk - limited companies .plc.uk - public limited companies .gov.uk - government (central and local) .police.uk - police forces[8] .judiciary.uk - courts (to be introduced in the near future)[7] .parliament.uk - parliamentary use (only for the UK Parliament and the Scottish Parliament) .mod.uk - Ministry of Defence and HM Forces public sites .nhs.uk - National Health Service institutions .nic.uk - network use only (Nominet UK) .sch.uk - Local Education Authorities, schools, primary and secondary education, community education .ac.uk - academic (tertiary education, further education colleges and research establishments) and learned societies ...nice and rational.
I'd have isp.uk for ISPs rather than .net.uk which I'd leave for ancillary technical uses perhaps. I despise the current suggestion to offer up the 2nd level space, $whatever.uk for sale. I'd also have a bank.uk, and library.uk and some other 2nd level domain for properly secured HTTPS, IPv6, DNS-SEC and DANE enabled (or equivalent) sites whose standards are monitored, enforced and regulated by some government body. Call it sec.uk and perhaps just move .co/ltd/plc.uk under that same mandate.

Re:External September is over... (1)

nullchar (446050) | about a year ago | (#45224843)

.UK has done well to expand its namespace. However, it seems likely that $secondlevel.uk domains will be sold in the future, mostly invalidating the existing 3rd level domains.

One could argue Vietnam has gone overboard with their namespace expansion: .ac.vn .arts.vn .banks.vn .biz.vn .business.vn .cafe.vn .cars.vn .com.vn .edu.vn .email.vn .factory.vn .fashion.vn .flowers.vn .food.vn .golf.vn .gov.vn .health.vn .hotels.vn .info.vn .int.vn .it.vn .lawyers.vn .models.vn .musics.vn .name.vn .net.vn .nguyen.vn .org.vn .phone.vn .pro.vn .realestate.vn .resort.vn .shopping.vn .stocks.vn .tours.vn .travel.vn

Re:External September is over... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223911)

The web jumped the shark when people started putting an usenet/email-style signature in their /. sig.

Translation Disprepancy. (1)

rtoz (2530056) | about a year ago | (#45222505)

When I translated "" (which is specified as sale in Cyrillic ) using Google translate, Google automatically detected "Russian" language. And, the translation output is "website" not "sale".

[hlp] anyone? (1)

Flavianoep (1404029) | about a year ago | (#45222611)

How can you insert Cyrillic letters or IPA symbols on /.?

Re:[hlp] anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222973)

Step 1: Create a time machine and travel to 2050 when Slashdot supports it.

2013: The first non-Latin TLDs... (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year ago | (#45222621)

...and Slashdot can't show them to us.

Re:2013: The first non-Latin TLDs... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222793)

Lol. I just came here to see whether anyone had a link to a working server with the new domains.

Re:2013: The first non-Latin TLDs... (2)

Lennie (16154) | about a year ago | (#45223347)

Really, you think these are the fist non-Latin TLDs ? These are just the first more open under the new gTLD process. Non-Latin TLDs have existed for much longer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Internet_top-level_domains#Internationalized_country_code_top-level_domains [wikipedia.org]

Here is the full list in Punycode ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punycode [wikipedia.org] ) of all the now non-Latin TLDs (as slashdot doesn't do UTF-8):
XN--0ZWM56D
XN--11B5BS3A9AJ6G
XN--3E0B707E
XN--45BRJ9C
XN--80AKHBYKNJ4F
XN--80AO21A
XN--80ASEHDB
XN--80ASWG
XN--90A3AC
XN--9T4B11YI5A
XN--CLCHC0EA0B2G2A9GCD
XN--DEBA0AD
XN--FIQS8S
XN--FIQZ9S
XN--FPCRJ9C3D
XN--FZC2C9E2C
XN--G6W251D
XN--GECRJ9C
XN--H2BRJ9C
XN--HGBK6AJ7F53BBA
XN--HLCJ6AYA9ESC7A
XN--J1AMH
XN--J6W193G
XN--JXALPDLP
XN--KGBECHTV
XN--KPRW13D
XN--KPRY57D
XN--L1ACC
XN--LGBBAT1AD8J
XN--MGB9AWBF
XN--MGBA3A4F16A
XN--MGBAAM7A8H
XN--MGBAYH7GPA
XN--MGBBH1A71E
XN--MGBC0A9AZCG
XN--MGBERP4A5D4AR
XN--MGBX4CD0AB
XN--NGBC5AZD
XN--O3CW4H
XN--OGBPF8FL
XN--P1AI
XN--PGBS0DH
XN--S9BRJ9C
XN--UNUP4Y
XN--WGBH1C
XN--WGBL6A
XN--XKC2AL3HYE2A
XN--XKC2DL3A5EE0H
XN--YFRO4I67O
XN--YGBI2AMMX
XN--ZCKZAH

Re:2013: The first non-Latin TLDs... (1)

Lennie (16154) | about a year ago | (#45223377)

And I made a mistake:
These are just the first under the new more open gTLD process.

"First"? (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about a year ago | (#45222711)

These would be the first new gTLDs added ... since .aero, .asia, .biz, .cat, .coop, .info, .jobs, .mobi, .museum, .name, .post, .pro, .tel, .travel, and .xxx.

So not really "first".

Is the title supposed to read "first non-Latin"?

Re:"First"? (1)

Flavianoep (1404029) | about a year ago | (#45222933)

Is the title supposed to read "first non-Latin"?

Actually not. There is a Russian Federation top level domain that does only accept Cyrillic and therefore I can't type on /.

Re:"First"? (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about a year ago | (#45223563)

Can you use that in a URL? Or is that filtered as well?

Re:"First"? (1)

Flavianoep (1404029) | about a year ago | (#45225139)

No, I can't. I've tried. However there are escape codes to type domains in Cyrillic with only Latin letters, e.g. http://xn--d1abbgf6aiiy.xn--p1ai/ [xn--d1abbg...y.xn--p1ai] (this must be the Russian Federation's president's site, but I can't be completely sure because I can't read Russian.)

Re:"First"? (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about a year ago | (#45223553)

Not even the first non-Latin, as it is already for quite some time possible to register .hk (Hong Kong) using Chinese characters for the TLD. This allows one to have a fully Chinese domain name, as for longer time it was already possible to use Chinese characters for domain name, but with .hk as extension.

Re:"First"? (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about a year ago | (#45223969)

And it is remarkable to note that there are websites that demand an email address for certain things (login name, contact, etc) that are written to help the user avoid entering incorrect data by enforcing a FOUR CHARACTER MAXIMUM on the TLD. If you have an email under the .museum domain, you're screwed. And then all the XN- domains which, as I recall counting at the time, got up to 26 characters long.

These are also the sites that enforce character limits on the local part of any email address, disallowing any but the common characters and ignoring all of the unusual ones, like '+'.

Re: "First"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45224387)

A glimpse in a web programmer's brain:

Hmmmm... an email input field; guess I should validate that.

But RFCs are so hard; there's like reading and stuff.

Oh wait, I know what a real email address looks like, so I'll just come up with my own definition and validate on that!

And that, friends, is why web programmers get no respect. If you are a web programmer who would never pull such a stupid stunt, then you need to start self-policing. Next time one of your fellow web programmers starts harming the entire profession's reputation that way, punch him/her in the crotch!

Re:"First"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45224897)

That was my reaction as well. They were talking about the expansion from 22 to 1400. My reaction was 1400 is way too ma.... We currently have 22!? I then racked my brain and the best I could come up with, without cheating was 14. Of course, I don't know how many I've actually seen an actual website on, even including phishing and spam.

slashlol (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45222857)

Of course they can't post the actual TLDs, that would require unicode support.

Worst.Idea.Evar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223211)

Enough said.

So long global internets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223497)

Unless there's Chinese and Arabic layout on a standard qwerty keyboard... haven't looked on the back of the dam*d thing lately :-/

Oh, wait! I bet you can always use Alt-Ctrl-<some monstrous code here> to type in a character that's not on the keyboard. Just like in the good ol' PE2 days.

You think I'm kidding - you obviously never had to register an account with German-hosted site on a French-keyboard computer and then use it on your US keyboard in Bulgaria/Russia/some other Cyrillic loving country.

thank god it's not working on /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223549)

I just tried to post the "strange" characters after the dot in this comment.

Not working, all hail the latin characters!

test (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45223679)

... my last comment with non latin characters disappeared ... sorry for the noise.

Right-to-left scripts? (1)

GCsoftware (68281) | about a year ago | (#45224251)

I wonder how a browser will display something like .shabakah - will most software have right-to-eft rendering and the ligature support for Arabic? Also imagine an Arabic TLD that allows Latin domain names - how the hell do you render that..? Anyway, I'm gonna go kill some time on the shabakaat

Re:Right-to-left scripts? (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about a year ago | (#45224513)

Anyway, I'm gonna go kill some time on the shabakaat

Ick. Shabacow tastes much better than shabakaat. Shabasheep, yum. And shababacon? Yabba dabba shaba!

Re:Right-to-left scripts? (1)

nullchar (446050) | about a year ago | (#45224923)

Check out the marketing site: http://dotshabaka.com/ [dotshabaka.com]

Copy/paste that text into your favorite text editor to see how it handles right-to-left scripts (and move your cursor around and use 'home' and 'end' keys).

Unicode Normalization (1)

laie_techie (883464) | about a year ago | (#45224315)

Unicode has several combining characters (such as a combining acute accent). There are also lots of single characters which already include an accent (U0225 is an 'a' with acute accent). Will the DNS standard dictate that all be normalized (either all decomposed or all composed; and put in a canonical order), or will U0225 be treated differently than 'a' followed by a combining acute accent?

Re:Unicode Normalization (1)

nullchar (446050) | about a year ago | (#45224967)

Yes, they will be standardized. All of the registries participating list the Unicode code points for all allowable characters in each script. They disallow "variants" so you cannot mix low code point ascii with high code point cyrllic to prevent IDN homograph attacks [wikipedia.org] .

Censorship apparatus (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45224543)

This will strengthen China's censorship apparatus. They already use linguistic differences to block people from using their resources.

Most of the people on Slashdot can figure out how to type Chinese characters. We're all pretty technically savvy. We can use translators and install internationalized keyboard apps on our smartphones.

Can you defeat simplified Chinese CAPTCHAs? Not easily unless you are a native speaker who is familiar with Chinese calligraphy and typefaces. Chinese top-level domain names numbering in the thousands means you have to read Chinese fairly well to even be able to type them in. Instant CAPTCHA.

If China were Taiwan, I wouldn't have a care in the world, but this country is all about surpressing the rights (workers, speech, redress) of its citizens.

Join me in opening up the Chinese Internet. 1 billion people will thank you.

Look-alikes (3, Interesting)

rabtech (223758) | about a year ago | (#45226121)

Does anyone know if they handle the look-alike issue or are we still stuck with URLs that appear to be latin "paypal.com", but with the "y" replaced by a greek lower gamma (Î) #x3b3, "p" replaced with cyrillic Er (Ñ) #x440, or some other equivalent that appears identical?

I understand why it's a hard issue: the cyrillic lowercase Er looks *identical* to latin p so they can be mapped to the same character, but the greek lower gamma isn't the exact same glyph as latin lower y, they just look close enough that a user might not notice. Would it be a slight to greek users to force greek domain names to use a misshapen lower gamma? Then what do you do with greek alpha, where the capital matches the latin glyph exactly but the lower does not?

Then there's the issue that every computer everywhere can enter latin characters, but not everyone has software for or how to use stuff like Chinese characters or Japanese Hirigana. Keeping to basic latin characters makes entering domain names universal, though I understand why that's convenient for an English speaker like me to say. I'd be curious to hear from some people who have non-European first languages how much having to use latin domain names seems to bother the average computer user and whether there is any actual cry for international domain names in their country? How difficult/easy is it to enter latin characters on your keyboard layout? Does it present a barrier to entry for the less educated/literate, or does everyone remember their English classes from school?

I'm missing something (1)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | about a year ago | (#45226785)

How does adding 4 domains take the total from 22 to 1400? Shouldn't it be 26?

Re:I'm missing something (1)

Entropy98 (1340659) | about a year ago | (#45227361)

How does adding 4 domains take the total from 22 to 1400? Shouldn't it be 26?

I believe they will be adding more over a peroid of time.

Guming up the works (1)

WaffleMonster (969671) | about a year ago | (#45227529)

Oops I'm sorry email from user@mydomain.enrichicann is not valid.

Hey that new TLD does not work in DNS cuz we are not blindly delegating * to root zones.

Don't allow icann to continue to be enriched at the cost of fucking over the Internet. ICANN does not own you or the network and systems you control.

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