Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

US Executions Threaten Supply of Anaesthetic Used For Surgical Procedures

Soulskill posted about 9 months ago | from the are-you-saying-that-killing-people-has-consequences dept.

Medicine 1160

ananyo writes "Allen Nicklasson has had a temporary reprieve. Scheduled to be executed by lethal injection in Missouri on 23 October, the convicted killer was given a stay of execution by the state's governor, Jay Nixon, on 11 October — but not because his guilt was in doubt. Nicklasson will live a while longer because one of the drugs that was supposed to be used in his execution — a widely used anesthetic called propofol — is at the center of an international controversy that threatens millions of U.S. patients, and affects the way that U.S. states execute inmates. Propofol, used up to 50 million times a year in U.S. surgical procedures, has never been used in an execution. If the execution had gone ahead, U.S. hospitals could have lost access to the drug because 90% of the U.S. supply is made and exported by a German company subject to European Union regulations that restrict the export of medicines and devices that could be used for capital punishment or torture. This is not the first time that the E.U.'s anti-death-penalty stance has affected the U.S. supply of anesthetics. Since 2011, a popular sedative called sodium thiopental has been unavailable in the United States. 'The European Union is serious,' says David Lubarsky, head of the anesthesiology department at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida. 'They've already shown that with thiopental. If we go down this road with propofol, a lot of good people who need anesthesia are going to be harmed.'"

cancel ×

1160 comments

Dead Wrong (-1)

ArgonautThief (2611499) | about 9 months ago | (#45233711)

That's dead wrong!!!!!!!!!! fp ftw

Hangings (4, Insightful)

JackieBrown (987087) | about 9 months ago | (#45233737)

We should just go back to hangings. It works for killing Nazis and war criminals.

Re:Hangings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233783)

I was thinking Guillotine.

Re:Hangings (4, Interesting)

sycodon (149926) | about 9 months ago | (#45233811)

Firing squads are effective too.

For child killers, burning works for me.

Re:Hangings (5, Insightful)

mrvan (973822) | about 9 months ago | (#45233879)

I think it would be best to have a firing squad composed of the jury that found someone guilty and imposed the death penalty. If you have the guts to condemn someone to die, I think you should also have the guts to execute that penalty.

(and yes, I also think that every non-vegetarian should be willing to butcher an animal)

Re:Hangings (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233995)

When the term "judge, jury, and executioner" is used, it's usually in a pejorative sense. Merging the latter two positions is a bad idea from a separation of power standpoint.

Re:Hangings (0)

X0563511 (793323) | about 9 months ago | (#45234003)

Just so long as only, say, 2 of the weapons are actually loaded and the others are blanks. This way you can never know if it was -actually you- who did it, but still requires you to "own it" by pulling a trigger.

Re:Hangings (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234017)

Butchering is gross. I wouldn't mind snapping its neck and hading it off to someone else to butcher, though.

Being grossed out by something doesn't constitute a moral imperative. I'm pretty grossed out by a woman's period but I still have sex with them.

Re:Hangings (2)

mjr167 (2477430) | about 9 months ago | (#45234057)

I think the problem with firing squads was occasionally they would miss and just horribly wound the guy...

But having the jury do it is an interesting proposal.

Re:Hangings (2)

JeffOwl (2858633) | about 9 months ago | (#45234179)

Oh sure, then you'll have psychopaths turning up as the only people who can't/won't try to avoid jury duty.

Re:Hangings (1, Funny)

udachny (2454394) | about 9 months ago | (#45233847)

USA has plenty of bullets, I don't understand this entire thing, 1-3 head shots should be enough for anybody.

Re:Hangings (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233849)

Or we could just stop having government thugs murder people.

Re:Hangings (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233977)

Absolutely not! Executions are as much a part of America as slave ownership.

Re:Hangings (-1)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45234097)

Human society needs some method of permanently removing those from society who are clearly a threat to other members of that society, and are very likely to remain that way for the rest of their lives (those who clearly can't be reformed). That means either lifetime imprisonment or execution. Lifetime imprisonment is the more humane option in most cases, but on a practical level it's also VERY expensive. It's essentially allowing said criminals to continue to victimize society by leeching taxpayer dollars that could be spent elsewhere on more deserving causes. Execution is an alternative that is less humane in most cases, but it also permanently ends any further exploitation of society by those who can't be reformed and can't live in said society.

In a purely rational sense, as distasteful or immoral as some find it, there is an important place for execution in the criminal justice system.

Re:Hangings (1)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45233911)

A simple gunshot to the head would probably be more humane, if a bit more bloody.

Re:Hangings (1)

Anon, Not Coward D (2797805) | about 9 months ago | (#45233933)

why not gas chambers then? seriously... death penalty is always a baaad idea

Re:Hangings (5, Insightful)

X0563511 (793323) | about 9 months ago | (#45234031)

Nitrogen in a gas chamber is probably the most humane way to do it. You just... lose consciousness. There's no distress since carbon dioxide displacement still happens. This is why working with such gasses in an enclosed space always has those warnings etc.

Re:Hangings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234147)

Suffocation's not a fun way to go, neither is it a "humane" way (if there is such a way).

Re:Hangings (4, Funny)

durin (72931) | about 9 months ago | (#45233939)

Why not just pull the warning labels off everything they use and let the problem sort itself out?

Re:Hangings (1)

bhlowe (1803290) | about 9 months ago | (#45233999)

Ok, use a different drug. My vet can recommend something.

Re:Hangings (1)

intermodal (534361) | about 9 months ago | (#45234155)

I concur. and if we insist on sticking with lethal injection, I propose we replace the anesthetic with store-brand diet soft drinks or spoiled milk or something. What we put in these people is entirely arbitrary; put enough of something other than blood in a bloodstream and it will kill someone.

lethal injection is for sissies (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233745)

I think a country/state that is very proud of (1) their inalienable right to own and wear guns, and (2) insists on killing people found guilty in a very imperfect process, should have the guts to just shoot those people. Executions aren't supposed to be nice, so just get over the squeamishness and just shoot the buggers.

Re:lethal injection is for sissies (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233877)

I think a country/state that is very proud of (1) their inalienable right to own and wear guns, and (2) insists on killing people found guilty in a very imperfect process, should have the guts to just shoot those people. Executions aren't supposed to be nice, so just get over the squeamishness and just shoot the buggers.

The especially weird thing is that a lot of the same people who are big on capital punishment and packing heat also will be the first to bitch about "big government" interfering in their lives with their taxes, healthcare and other "nanny state" regulations. Seems that deliberately, intentionally killing citizens is the most serious form of government intrusion in one's life -- not something to trust to the incompetent, liberal, meddling "gubmint". You know, the terrifying phrase: "I'm from the government, and I'm here to help."

Re:lethal injection is for sissies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234019)

Let's see, because capital punishment is determined by *gasp* jury of peers, not a judge.

Re:lethal injection is for sissies (0)

sI4shd0rk (3402769) | about 9 months ago | (#45234119)

And that changes things... how? The government still carries out the whole thing. If you claim to want small government but support the death penalty, you're nothing but a liar.

Hint (0, Flamebait)

clickclickdrone (964164) | about 9 months ago | (#45233759)

Capital punishment is barbaric. Leave it back in ye olde days. Or maybe it just appeals to your blood lust?

Re:Hint (4, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | about 9 months ago | (#45233799)

I don't think you've noticed, but we are a barbaric nation, by-and-large. Less educated, more violent, and more plutocratic than comparable nations. Our barbarism in our justice system isn't a mysterious artifact of unknown origin, it's a reflection of a larger anti-intellectual culture.

Re:Hint (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234085)

I don't think you've noticed, but we are a barbaric nation, by-and-large. Less educated, more violent, and more plutocratic than comparable nations. Our barbarism in our justice system isn't a mysterious artifact of unknown origin, it's a reflection of a larger anti-intellectual culture.

This--^.

.. but also, I wouldn't ascribe it all to anti-intellectualism. Our hyperviolent media culture has, on one hand, desensitized the population to warlike levels of violence, while also reinforcing and amplifying the belief in absolute good vs. evil. Of course, the meme goes, in the pursuit of "justice"(tm), all manner of questionable deeds (see also: warlike levels of violence) are suddenly the one true and right way.

Now there is a rise of gun-ready vigilantism because of "rampant violent crime". Nobody is safe from the criminal element anymore!!!! Statistically, society has become less violent over the years, but... criminals!!!

Re:Hint (-1, Troll)

rubycodez (864176) | about 9 months ago | (#45233951)

no, barbaric is letting monsters live who committ their hideous crimes again and again. Murder, rape, child molesting, kidnapping there are hundreds of cases of repeat offenders. don't believe the urban legend lie, putting one of those kinds of crimminals to death saves lives.

Re:Hint (5, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 9 months ago | (#45234071)

no, barbaric is letting monsters live who committ their hideous crimes again and again. Murder, rape, child molesting, kidnapping there are hundreds of cases of repeat offenders. don't believe the urban legend lie, putting one of those kinds of crimminals to death saves lives.

Right, because as we all know, there's no such thing as a life sentence without parole.

Re:Hint (-1, Troll)

rubycodez (864176) | about 9 months ago | (#45234123)

you speak of theory that only works between your ears. in practice, thousands of times the monsters are out again and do their crimes again.

Re:Hint (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234163)

Right, because as we all know, there's no such thing as a life sentence without parole.

Technically... execution is life in prison with out parole...

Re:Hint (2)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | about 9 months ago | (#45234077)

They're already in prison anyway. Unless your country routinely experiences prison breaks, it shouldn't make any difference.

Re:Hint (0)

rubycodez (864176) | about 9 months ago | (#45234175)

no they get released for various reasons and commit crimes again. example "oh he was mentally ill at the time and not responsible for his actions". you are thinking of theory, I speak of reality.

Re:Hint (5, Insightful)

clickety6 (141178) | about 9 months ago | (#45234101)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_exonerated_death_row_inmates#United_States [wikipedia.org]

Best to make sure you actually have the criminal...

Re:Hint (0)

rubycodez (864176) | about 9 months ago | (#45234145)

that argument no longer holds water, now that we have the DNA testing and other advanced forensics that set those people free.

Re:Hint (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234131)

Slashdot Logic in full effect here, folks. "The death penalty has no effect on recidivism, therefore we need MORE DEATH PENALTY!"

Re:Hint (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234135)

Until the day that you are sitting on death row, wrongfully accused. Then it's barbaric and completely wrong again.

Re:Hint (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234025)

Capital punishment is barbaric. Leave it back in ye olde days. Or maybe it just appeals to your blood lust?

Agree completely. I must point out (again) that the automatic appeals process costs taxpayers at least $2 million dollars, therefore life in prison/no parole is economically cheaper for taxpayers. And if the convicted prisoner wants to have any perks of prison life (TV/Radio/ better food/extra time out of cell, etc), those perks need to be earned by paying off their debt to society and the victim's families. But killing for the sake of a sense of revenge puts us at the same level of the criminal's mindset when they killed their victims. It doesn't make us any better. (posting AC due to moderating comments here)

Re:Hint (2)

imatter (2749965) | about 9 months ago | (#45234087)

I guess yo'u're right, paying for them to live in prison and not have to contribute is the best solution!

Why not hemp rope, made in USA (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233767)

Don't understand why people are obsessed with "humane" executions.

FFS you're killing a guy, and it's supposed to be a punishment.
Let's just go back to a short rope and a tall tree at sunrise.

Why do they use fancy drugs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233775)

I never understood why they don't perform executions via massive heroin overdose. It's cheap, reliable in sufficient quantity, and they'd feel amazing right up until their heart stopped.

Re:Why do they use fancy drugs? (1)

bagorange (1531625) | about 9 months ago | (#45233981)

I have wondered that myself.
Is there some sort of medical/hippocratic oath objection to using what is a medicine to deliberately cause death?

Re:Why do they use fancy drugs? (2)

bagorange (1531625) | about 9 months ago | (#45234063)

Reply to my own message, presumably (as per the summary, derp) imports of diamorphine would be more difficult if it was used in executions.

Re:Why do they use fancy drugs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234083)

you seriously have never read the hoppocratic oath?

Re:Why do they use fancy drugs? (1)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45234173)

Overdoses aren't reliable enough. You need something that it consistent and predictable with every person. You don't want to use a drug that requires wildly different doses for different people (such as former heroin addicts, for example, who may have a high tolerance).

Numbers don't add up (-1, Flamebait)

sureshot007 (1406703) | about 9 months ago | (#45233777)

According to http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/ [deathpenaltyinfo.org] 2013 thus far has seen 32 executions, and 2012 saw 43 executions. How in the world could less than 50 a year cause a problem for millions of patients? I'd think it would be the other way around...

Re:Numbers don't add up (1)

ThePhilips (752041) | about 9 months ago | (#45233851)

Reading disorder??

As the summary says: the drug it imported from Germany. If used for execution even once, the EU ban would kick in, preventing Germany to import it. Import is banned - USA gets no drug, regardless if for executions or treating patients.

Re:Numbers don't add up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233859)

You didn't even read the summary, did you ?

Re:Numbers don't add up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233873)

Now, instead of not reading the TFA, it would appear that we're not even reading TFSummary.

The Slashdot commenting community is evolving like a Pokemon!

Re:Numbers don't add up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233907)

You should attempt to read the link.

Re:Numbers don't add up (1)

JackieBrown (987087) | about 9 months ago | (#45233915)

The threat is that Germany would stop exporting the drug to the US as a whole. Then the US hospitals would no longer be able to resupply it.

Re:Numbers don't add up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233983)

I think the problem is, that if the US uses this anesthetic, other countries couldn't export it because it might be used in such a scenario. It's not an issue of a shortage, but rather, the inability of EU countries to export it if it is also used for execution. It's pretty ridiculous, given that it's less than a 1 in a million chance of it happening, but apparently that doesn't matter.

Re:Numbers don't add up (1)

sureshot007 (1406703) | about 9 months ago | (#45234047)

It does look like I missed the point of the article, but I was talking about the idea that a "shortage" of the traditional stock is becoming a problem, when you are only talking about a few dozen cases annually. You mean to tell me that you can't find something else to use that doesn't "threaten millions of patients"?

Re:Numbers don't add up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234081)

I don't think this is intentionally a troll post, just an idiot who only read the headline, and not the summary or the article.

Re:Numbers don't add up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234089)

Because any drugs used in the executions are restricted when it comes to importing them into the US. That means if this drug Propofol is used in ONE execution, it will be restricted and will not be available for 50 million patients annually.

But you'd have to read the summary...

Why can't we make it here? (1)

tompaulco (629533) | about 9 months ago | (#45233781)

Without taking stand on the death penalty, I have to ask, why can't we make anaesthetics here, instead of buying it from overseas? is there some law that says we have to buy everything from overseas and not allow American workers to earn a living?

Re:Why can't we make it here? (2)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | about 9 months ago | (#45233837)

RTFA - it says "Federal regulations make propofol difficult to manufacture in the United States". It does not elaborate on what those regulations are.

Re:Why can't we make it here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233937)

I bet it's the DEA and the Controlled Substances Act.

Re:Why can't we make it here? (1)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | about 9 months ago | (#45234043)

In this particular case, I doubt it.

Propofol isn't a controlled substance under the CSA.

Re:Why can't we make it here? (5, Interesting)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | about 9 months ago | (#45234051)

I found an informative article [nbcnews.com] . Summary: It says that essentially the US firm Hospira is unable to proceed due to the FDA not authorizing changes in the manufacturing process. Teva, an Israeli company, exited the business after what sounds like a combination of manufacturing issues and a large number of spurious lawsuits over a hepatitis C outbreak. The drug itself is extremely hard to manufacture, and profits are nearly non-existent so there's little incentive for competitors to enter the market.

Possibly the issue would be resolved if the FDA were to change the regulations, but again, no information on what exactly the problem is were reported.

Re:Why can't we make it here? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 9 months ago | (#45234065)

Likely precursors or such are schedule 3.

Re:Why can't we make it here? (1)

Rich0 (548339) | about 9 months ago | (#45233841)

Without taking stand on the death penalty, I have to ask, why can't we make anaesthetics here, instead of buying it from overseas? is there some law that says we have to buy everything from overseas and not allow American workers to earn a living?

Indeed, that would happen on its own if the Germans cut off the supply of the drug. Hospitals would still need it, so other suppliers would step in to provide it.

Re:Why can't we make it here? (2)

durin (72931) | about 9 months ago | (#45233861)

I think this has to do with either patents or copyright. Something that the US has a "very serious stance" on...

Re:Why can't we make it here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233869)

Yeah, capitalist greed. As good as a law, if not better.

Re:Why can't we make it here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233909)

Its probably some MPAA style shakedown system for the drug companies thats stopping this.

Re:Why can't we make it here? (5, Informative)

Too Much Noise (755847) | about 9 months ago | (#45234049)

Apparently a combination of regulations and manufacturing problems. See here:

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/37403276/ns/health-health_care/ [nbcnews.com]

Now that is old news (2010) and apparently both Teva and Hospira are going to restart production ... slowly. However, unless and until they get a significant output going (not soon), Fresenius is the sole supplier, more or less. See here:

http://www.in-pharmatechnologist.com/Processing/Propofol-Lethal-Injections-Blocked-as-Teva-and-Hospira-Re-Enter-Market [in-pharmat...logist.com]

Re:Why can't we make it here? (1)

Spillman (711713) | about 9 months ago | (#45234169)

Even if it were made here, the next argument that will surface will be revealing the identity of the physicians who administer the drugs. Since these are controlled substances, a physician has to prescribe them. I SHIT YOU NOT! So the Missouri Department of Corrections has to pay doctors to be present at executions to load the drugs and push the buttons. As you can imagine, they keep the identities a secret.

There was a shortage o doctors for a while who wanted to do this and the state had to reach out and find some that would. At that time, the defendant was arguing that it was cruel and unusal to have a non-physician administer the drugs.

IANAL but my father is

Home grown. (3, Insightful)

grub (11606) | about 9 months ago | (#45233787)


They do make bullets in the USA, right?

Use something else then (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233791)

Guillotine, hanging, shooting, buried alive, grenade in mouth, pillow suffocation, electric chair

There are lots of way to kill a man. Why do we continue to pick the most expensive ways?

Buy American! (1)

FilmedInNoir (1392323) | about 9 months ago | (#45233793)

I think it's time that America invent, patent and produce it's own lethal injection drug.
And that we then move that production to China where cheap costs will allow us to execute 100x the number of people.
People that have turned to a life of crime because of losing their jobs to overseas manufacturers.

Re:Buy American! (1)

ThePhilips (752041) | about 9 months ago | (#45233985)

In other words, privatize the execution industry.

Just think about all the possibilities of the privatized execution!

We're All Guily (4, Insightful)

macromorgan (2020426) | about 9 months ago | (#45233801)

How does killing killers make us any better then the killers themselves?

Re:We're All Guily (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233963)

Come on now, that isn't really on-topic here even if good question to the Tea Party. And besides, most of the people denied health care wouldn't actually be killers.

Re:We're All Guily (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234099)

Because they were given a fair trial before.

Hegemony (1)

JayWilmont (1035066) | about 9 months ago | (#45233807)

Hegemony is no longer fun when it is Europe doing it to us in the USA.

(However, turnabout is fair play.)

Why are important drugs single source? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233809)

Completely disregarding the whole capital punishment debate, history shows that eventually every place on the planet is going to have a natural disaster, trade dispute, regime change, or something else is going to disrupt production or distribution. If you don't have a second source that is completely independent, you are going to have a bad time.

Re:Why are important drugs single source? (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 9 months ago | (#45233857)

In a word: Money.

Re: Why are important drugs single source? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234133)

Intel has chip fabs on several continents. Why can't a drug company?

Money doesn't really explain it.

Re:Why are important drugs single source? (0)

rubycodez (864176) | about 9 months ago | (#45233975)

why are big pharmy like drug cartels? the question contains the answer, ha.

Bring back the guillotine. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233813)

It's quick, it doesn't miss, and doesn't need a doctor to operate it.

Re:Bring back the guillotine. (3, Informative)

mjr167 (2477430) | about 9 months ago | (#45234107)

Actually there were numerous incidents where it did miss or didn't cut all the way through and they had to crank it up again and redrop it or wait for the guy to bleed to death. It wasn't really all as merciful as it was supposed to be...

Re:Bring back the guillotine. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234109)

It's quick, it doesn't miss, and doesn't need a doctor to operate it.

 
  Tell you what.....

We will do that as long as YOU voulentear to pick the guys head up and mop up the litres of blood afterwards.

Still fealing cocky about the death penalty?

Re:Bring back the guillotine. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234143)

Maybe you should look into the history of the guillotine. It isn't always quick (and your head stays alive until it loses oxygen) and sometimes it misses. They used to have people jump up and down on the blade to get it to cut all the way through.

Pentobarbital (4, Informative)

mfh (56) | about 9 months ago | (#45233833)

They are switching drugs in Missouri [theguardian.com] , while adding a team of compounding pharmacists, so the drugs will be made on site and therefore not subject to Europe's politics. Also some of the European flexing here is a direct result of NSA wiretapping.

Re:Pentobarbital (5, Informative)

SomeKDEUser (1243392) | about 9 months ago | (#45233965)

No. Europe's position is a longstanding one. And as the EU is a larger market than the US, an EU law forbidding a drug company to help with capital punishment carries weight.

The link with the spying thing is that US companies may be faced with the choice of picking either one or the other market, if privacy directives from the EU come into force. And this is terrifying for US companies, because, again, the EU market is larger.

Rare? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233843)

And I thought after Michael Jackson's death, the problematic Propofol supply would get better.

Good for the EU. (0, Troll)

TheSpoom (715771) | about 9 months ago | (#45233845)

May it cause the powers that be to rethink ending a person's life out of some misguided and ultimately incorrect notion of "deterrence".

Hangings too good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233853)

Hanging is too good for these people, they should be forced to live in American society.

Capital punishment is never justified, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45233855)

Preface: Capital punishment is never justified because it cannot be appealed by new evidence once carried out.

THAT BEING SAID.

You're killing someone! Is it that hard?! WE DO IT ALL THE TIME FOR NO REASON AT ALL!

As good a time as any (5, Insightful)

Captain_Chaos (103843) | about 9 months ago | (#45233883)

Maybe it's time for the US to take the hint and stop this barbaric and medieval practice?

Seriously, why does it not bother more Americans that by having the death penalty they find themselves in the illustrious company of countries such as Libya, Sudan, China, Iran, Iraq and North Korea (the "Axis of Evil") and Syria?

Re:As good a time as any (2, Insightful)

sI4shd0rk (3402769) | about 9 months ago | (#45234073)

Vengeance seems to be a top priority for some reason. And as someone else pointed out, it's hypocritical how some who claim to want small government also say that the government should have the power to murder people who've already been imprisoned; I can't think of a much bigger sign of "big government" than that.

Re:As good a time as any (-1, Troll)

rubycodez (864176) | about 9 months ago | (#45234095)

or south korea, japan, thailand, viet nam?

you are confused on what is barbaric. for example, child molesters and rapists and murderers get out of prison and commit their crimes again. thousands of times. that is barbaric. putting down a monster is not barbaric, it is the merciful thing to do

Well, it is Germany, after all... (3, Insightful)

RedCharlie (1801646) | about 9 months ago | (#45233993)

If I had to excuse any one country for being squeamish about how its chemical products are used, it would be Germany. (But maybe Gov Nixon could ask them if they had any leftover Zyklon B hanging around...I bet that stuff doesn't go bad...)

EU point of view (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234005)

As European, I am sorry for those who can't access anesthetics: nevertheless, I absolutely blame capital penalty and I find EU point of view correct. As well as US adopted and still have embargo against Cuba for political reasons, thus condemning "good people" to lower access to medicines and other basic stuff, then Europeans are allowed to stop selling anesthetics that can be used for lethal injections.

IDEA!!! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234045)

Use all that heroin\crack\cocaine that gets seized for this purpose.

Time for the US to stop this barbaric practice... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234053)

...of importing anaesthetics and to make them in the US instead.

Only if you fund your system... (4, Insightful)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 9 months ago | (#45234103)

I could *perhaps* be convinced of the death penalty if the USA was willing to truly fund its justice system to ensure that trials were fair - And I mean fund to the tune of BILLIONS of dollars. You're never going to convince me of state-sanctioned killing while rich white guys are getting away with murder and poor black guys are being executed.

Nitrogen narcosis? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 9 months ago | (#45234111)

How costly would it be to flood the chamber with nitrogen?

On the downside, in some people's opinion, it's apparently not an unpleasant way to go*.

*because they've tried it on people in slightly less-than-lethal concentrations, before some wiseguy asks.

Sounds counter-productive... (1)

evilviper (135110) | about 9 months ago | (#45234117)

Europe doesn't have magic fairy dust that lets them manufacture drugs nobody else can.

If they are going to cut-off the US market, that opens up a HUGE opportunity for any other manufacturer to step in and produce it, without ANY competition in the US.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...