Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Can Nintendo Survive Gaming's Brave New World?

Soulskill posted about 9 months ago | from the be-friendlier-to-gamers dept.

Nintendo 277

Nerval's Lobster writes "Jon Brodkin talked to indie developers (including the creator of Super Mario Bros. Crossover), former Nintendo employees, and a number of others about where exactly Nintendo went wrong over the past few years. Their conclusions? Nintendo made a number of mistakes, including a lack of an indie-developer ecosystem, a refusal to license out core properties such as Super Mario to other gaming platforms (or even iOS and Android), and platforms that don't appeal to hardcore gamers. While the developers suggest Nintendo is taking steps to broaden its horizons, such as by reaching out to smaller studios, it's questionable whether such efforts will succeed in a world where the PS4 and Xbox One are about to enter the market, and iOS and Android are swallowing up mobile gamers' time and dollars. What do you think?"

cancel ×

277 comments

Nintendo is here to stay! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234485)

Nintendo has ALWAYS aimed itself at content more for younger target audiences than the other consoles. They fill that niche quite well, always have and always will...

Re:Nintendo is here to stay! (4, Insightful)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45234649)

always have and always will...

And it's that attitude at Nintendo that has been their problem for 20 years now--blindly assuming that since they were on top once that they'll always have a guaranteed place in the console world, no matter how much the competition (or world) passes them by. Many a company has followed that kind of arrogance right into bankruptcy.

Re:Nintendo is here to stay! (4, Insightful)

neonKow (1239288) | about 9 months ago | (#45234979)

On the other hand, it's also premature to declare a company dead when their console one generation back was a huge success, and their handhelds are still extremely popular. On top of that, it's easier than ever to not be "locked in" to a policy of not supporting indie developers with everything being on the cloud now.

Re:Nintendo is here to stay! (5, Interesting)

TWX (665546) | about 9 months ago | (#45235005)

Nintendo also found a way to appeal to old people and fairly infirm people. Nintendo was the first to make a practical break from the up-down-left-right-a-b controller to something that worked without needing to push buttons, depending on the game. Yes, Nintendo is now going to have to compete with other nontraditional controller systems, but they're up for the task.

There's a lot of money to be made in appealing to non-hard-core gamers, in appealing to those who might casually game, but aren't going to play every day or even every week. There are lot more of those than there are hard-core gamers, and if you can get significant market penetration in a group that probably shouldn't even care, then you can make a lot of money.

Nintendo appears to be able to do that, moreso than other companies. Sega's position was what the other game makers' positions are today, and it ultimately cost them when they slipped and their hard-core gaming clientele left, and they didn't have a casual gaming business to sustain them.

Re:Nintendo is here to stay! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235357)

PS3 Sales since 2006: 75 Million
XBOX 360 Sales since 2005: 79.4 Million

Nintendo Wii Sales since 2006: 100 Million
Nintendo DS Sales since 2004: 153.9 Million

Yes, their latest set-top console was a flop. No, Nintendo is not going to disappear anytime soon.

Re:Nintendo is here to stay! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235527)

PS3 Sales since 2006: 75 Million
XBOX 360 Sales since 2005: 79.4 Million

Nintendo Wii Sales since 2006: 100 Million
Nintendo DS Sales since 2004: 153.9 Million

Yes, their latest set-top console was a flop. No, Nintendo is not going to disappear anytime soon.

The irony of you doing this to prove him wrong and forget that Nintendo's latest set top console is actually the WiiU is just to awesome not to point out.

Re:Nintendo is here to stay! (0)

horm (2802801) | about 9 months ago | (#45235539)

Wait, are you talking about Nintendo or the United States?

Re:Nintendo is here to stay! (2)

MitchDev (2526834) | about 9 months ago | (#45235465)

Exactly.
Nintendo is for kid-friendly and casual fun games.
They have their niche, no reason to bash themselves to pieces on the rocks of XBox, PlayStation, and PCs.

Porting their core products to other systems would hasten Nintendo's death if you didn't have to buy Nintendeo hardware to play them.....

smash bros (3, Interesting)

Xicor (2738029) | about 9 months ago | (#45234509)

all they need to do is continue to come out with smash bros. i know a bunch of ppl who buy an entire console just to play that ONE game.

Re:smash bros (2)

Strawser (22927) | about 9 months ago | (#45234621)

I bought an xbox just to play GT3. It's a fun enough game that I was willing to throw down the extra bucks for a console and steering wheel just for that game. A lot of people buy a console just because they like one game that runs on it. Kind of a first world problem.

Re:smash bros (5, Funny)

Strawser (22927) | about 9 months ago | (#45234631)

Damn. Meant GT5. Maybe I should have bought a pair of glasses to proof my posts with, instead.

Re:smash bros (4, Funny)

The Moof (859402) | about 9 months ago | (#45234721)

I'd say so, since you bought a PS3 exclusive for your Xbox.

Gran Theft Turismo (1)

tepples (727027) | about 9 months ago | (#45234953)

Or might it have been GTA5 instead of GT5?

Re:Gran Theft Turismo (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 9 months ago | (#45235187)

you can use a steering wheel in gta5?

Re:smash bros (2)

Strawser (22927) | about 9 months ago | (#45235505)

Gotta admit, I'm not much of a gamer. I played GT5 at a friends house, and was so in love with it I went and bought one. I basically just asked the guy at the store what I need to play GT5, and he sold me a console, a steering wheel, and the game. So the console is just "that black thing in my living room that has a steering wheel." So, yeah, it's a Xweestationthingie that I play The Car Game on.

In any event, this all goes to the point: A lot of people, like me, who aren't particularly interested in gaming, and (very clearly) have no knowledge of it, still buy a console just to play one game.

Cheers.

Re:smash bros (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234657)

Yes, you are correct. There are a lot of man children out there.

Re:smash bros (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235575)

For me, it's Mario Kart. But they're straying too far from their roots now, so I skipped the 3DS version. They need to make a Mario Kart Collection, with all of the karters and tracks from all of the previous games in the newest engine. I will buy that, even with new hardware.

Smash Bros. is good, but I bought the GameCube one, and that worked on the Wii, so I didn't bother getting the Wii one. They could've called it Street Fighter With Mario and it would've been accurate. I never saw a reason to buy Street Fighter II Turbo or any of the other "hyper turbo mega awesome blowjob editions" (though that "blowjob edition" one sounds like a worthwhile upgrade). The same holds true for Smash Bros. Unless Peach, Daisy, Zelda, and the female Ice Climber can give me head, I probably won't buy it. The GameCube one is "good enough". I'm not what you'd call a fighting game enthusiast, though, so YMMV.

Yes, They Can (5, Insightful)

rsmith-mac (639075) | about 9 months ago | (#45234521)

*Looks at Pokemon X/Y sales [polygon.com] and 3DS/2DS sales*

All signs point to yes. Dying companies don't sell 4 million games in 2 days and millions of consoles in a year.

Re:Yes, They Can (1)

gorzek (647352) | about 9 months ago | (#45234611)

Yeah, Nintendo's handheld units print money. The 3DS had a rocky start but it's doing very well now.

Likewise, I suspect Nintendo will turn the Wii U ship around. It won't be as popular as the Wii--the Wii was a one-time blip that I doubt anyone will repeat--but the Wii U will probably do fine once it has a decent library and gets enough household recognition. I hope Nintendo learned a lesson there: don't launch a console that causes naming confusion and don't launch one without a good set of launch titles!

Re:Yes, They Can (4, Insightful)

Godai (104143) | about 9 months ago | (#45234743)

I agree. The WiiU has been a disappointment, but we're only just *now* seeing the first set of 1st party stuff show up. I rolled my eyes at "refusal to license out core properties such as Super Mario to other gaming platforms (or even iOS and Android)", since that's exactly why they'll survive just fine. Want the new Pokemon? Have to buy a Nintendo system. And they will!

And the new Mario game is set to show up soon, looks fantastic and should support online co-op finally. I haven't bought a WiiU yet, but that one might tip my hand so I can play Mario with my brother.

Re:Yes, They Can (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about 9 months ago | (#45234931)

Unfortunately, for the first time ever, Nintendo was selling a new console at a loss. Which means a single title that sells that platform isn't enough to make a profit anymore. When people bought the wii for wii sports or wii fit, it was a good thing. If people did the same with WiiU, nintendo would go bankrupt.

Re:Yes, They Can (1)

intermodal (534361) | about 9 months ago | (#45234995)

Not after Pokemon Black/White they won't. If it weren't for my experience playing Black, I'd probably have a 3DS and X or Y. Now I'm not sure I care, and I've been playing through their older games when I need my pokemon fix.

Yes they will (1)

emuls (1926384) | about 9 months ago | (#45235403)

4 million units in 2 days suggests that yes they (including me) will.

Re:Yes, They Can (1)

aliquis (678370) | about 9 months ago | (#45234981)

I don't know whatever this work:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valve_Corporation [wikipedia.org]
Total equity: 2,5 billion US dollar.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo [wikipedia.org]
Total equity: 1.1 trillion Yen.

1100 yen in usd = 11.3 USD.

Do that mean Nintendo is worth about 4.5 times as much as Valve at the moment?

I've had ideas about Apple and such previously and I guess Valve isn't for sale but what if Nintendo had actually bought them / it had become part of Nintendo?

Maybe it wouldn't be good for the brand (of Valve) but it would make Nintendo a huge player in online distributed games, would lower the demand for them to innovate complete consoles (maybe they could make more accessories? Or just roll their own machines just as Valve do) and they could start selling their titles through Steam which would likely increase their sales by quite a bit?

Valve/Steam would get a huge library of old Nintendo titles (or well, could get, I guess they would be bundled with an emulator or whatever, an already done one may not work for licensing reasons but maybe Nintendo got the know-how to make one themselves ..)

I would assume it's quite likely Valve will make up a bigger and bigger value relative Nintendo over time. But then again I don't know how much growth Nintendo can make in other areas and I guess if they idea was to sell their games on all platforms for instance maybe that would bring in a huge amount of money to (though they would sell cheaper and give part of the profit away to someone else.. I guess that's something Nokia refused to do to and see where that took them =P), anyway, if Nintendo and Valve was one they of course wouldn't have that problem.

Re:Yes, They Can (2)

gorzek (647352) | about 9 months ago | (#45235105)

It's hard to know where to begin in shooting down that idea. Nintendo and Valve have massively different company cultures, to the point that I think attempting to merge them in any meaningful way would be a complete disaster for both. Valve also depends on open platforms--Nintendo's entire business model revolves around closed ones. It would be hard to find two companies who are more complete opposites.

Yes, they say opposites attract, but that's an insightful sounding cliche, not a fact of life. The reality of trying to merge such vastly dissimilar companies would be a nightmare for both.

Valve likes copyleft. Nintendo doesn't. (1)

tepples (727027) | about 9 months ago | (#45235353)

what if Nintendo had actually bought [Valve]

Not so sure that would happen. Valve is embracing a copylefted operating system called SteamOS for its entry to the hardware market, and Nintendo is known to be anti-copyleft [slashdot.org] .

Valve/Steam would get a huge library of old Nintendo titles (or well, could get, I guess they would be bundled with an emulator or whatever, an already done one may not work for licensing reasons but maybe Nintendo got the know-how to make one themselves ..)

Nintendo already made official emulators even before Virtual Console started printing money. Animal Crossing for GameCube, the e-Reader for Game Boy Advance, and the Classic NES Series for Game Boy Advance all included an NES emulator.

Re:Yes, They Can (1)

Holammer (1217422) | about 9 months ago | (#45235329)

Blaming it on the name... It's a factor but it's not the entire explanation.
Yes, Nintendo will sell a decent amount of machines whenever they unleash their eagerly awaited first party titles, that's basically Nintendo's own analysis and that's the problem. They're going to sell millions of Zelda/Mario/Kart/Smash Bros, but third party developers get to eat shit and nobody will have the confidence to develop proper games for the system apart from shovelware and some token conversions of 360/PS3 games.
At this rate Wii U will have the worst third party library since the Wii and N64. They're lucky they have strong handhelds to keep 'em alive.

Let's first define shovelware (1)

tepples (727027) | about 9 months ago | (#45235491)

nobody will have the confidence to develop proper games for the system apart from shovelware

I've seen that 10-letter word tossed around, but nobody appears to be able to agree on a proper definition. (And without a proper definition, discussion goes nowhere [c2.com] .) In the early 1990s it meant selling a bunch of demos of indie games on a single CD because they were so small, originally having been developed for floppy or BBS distribution. Now that BBS distribution has grown into a broader paid download market for sale of lower-budget games, I'm not sure from Wikipedia's article [wikipedia.org] what "shovelware" even means. Is there even a line between "low budget" and "shovelware"?

Re:Yes, They Can (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235389)

The Wii isn't quite the "success" many of us think of. They sold a lot of consoles due to the novelty of the concept, most people bought one or two games then let the console collect dust. I don't think they'll sell as many consoles in volume with the Wii-U, but I think the ones they do sell will go to customers who are willing to buy games and stick with the system this time. Long term they'll have a healthier customer base. I had doubts myself, but mainly picked up a Wii-U to simplify my wiring situation - I've been happy with the system, especially the controller (second only to the Wavebird imo).

Re:Yes, They Can (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 9 months ago | (#45235421)

Likewise, I suspect Nintendo will turn the Wii U ship around. It won't be as popular as the Wii--the Wii was a one-time blip that I doubt anyone will repeat--but the Wii U will probably do fine once it has a decent library and gets enough household recognition. I hope Nintendo learned a lesson there: don't launch a console that causes naming confusion and don't launch one without a good set of launch titles!

Well, the problem with the Wii was third party games practically all sucked. And in recent years, Nintendo has all been about first-party games because third party devs really produced lousy games (I think this started around the GameCube era?).

And the Wii U's problem is the dearth of first-party games - everything the Wii U has (save maybe 3-4 first party titles), is already out on other consoles so there's very little reason to buy a Wii U.

That was Nintendo's problem - there were few first party titles at launch. Now that there's far more, the Wii U is selling a bit better, but its first year was marred by the lack of compelling content that differentiated it over the existing consoles.

Re:Yes, They Can (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234703)

1) Per many people, Nintendo has been constantly dying since the release of Sega's Genesis console.
2) Since that time, Nintendo has had many first-party games sell millions, both in the short term and over the long tail of marketing.

Ergo, Yes, Dying companies do sell that much.

Re:Yes, They Can (1)

intermodal (534361) | about 9 months ago | (#45234977)

Sure they do. But the question is whether these sales encourage or discourage purchases of future titles in the franchise, the driving reason behind purchases of their niche consoles. I left the Mario franchise (except Kart, which is still amazing) behind after they went 3D with it. The last Pokemon game I bought was black, and I was thoroughly disappointed. If it weren't for that, I'd have a 3DS and X or Y, but instead I have about $500 after taxes that my wife and myself did not spend on Pokemon games and 3DSXLs, and went back and played FireRed instead of finishing Black.

Re:Yes, They Can (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235507)

The last Pokemon game I bought was black, and I was thoroughly disappointed [and I] went back and played FireRed instead of finishing Black.

So what you're saying is that once you went black, but you *did* go back?

I guess this disproves the saying, then...

Re:Yes, They Can (1)

dsvick (987919) | about 9 months ago | (#45235245)

I'd have to agree. Regardless of what they do in the console realm, their handhelds will be going strong for at least the near future.

When we decide that our son deserves a reward or we want to just surprise him with a new game, a $30 3DS game is much easier on the wallet than a $60 console game. The same logic applies to when he wants to spend money he has saved up, he can get usually afford a new 3DS game, or even two used ones, but almost never can he get a new console game.

Huh? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234529)

Why should they have licensed out their core franchises to third parties? All that usually does id result in shovelware.

Re:Huh? (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 9 months ago | (#45234641)

Shovelware? Have you LOOKED at most of the DS and Wii games? MOST of them _are_ shovelware!

The quality of Nintendo's games have always been fantastic (technical, game design, etc.)

Nintendo chose Quality over Quantity, and with that, I would agree with your argument. The other consoles chose Quantity, knowing that it was a gamble -- with enough titles, eventually you will get enough "mega-hits".

Re:Huh? (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 9 months ago | (#45235115)

I agree with this. Nintendo needs to maintain very tight control of their core franchises. They possibly could have gone the route of developing their own games for Android/IOS, but I think I know why they stayed away. It's really hard to offer a consistent good product, especially on Android, with so many different devices to target, and while certain games work well, the fact that there's only a touch screen for input really limits what you can do with it . I've tried using emulators, and playing Mario type games using a touch screen is extremely frustrating.

Re:Huh? (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 9 months ago | (#45235263)

maybe with apple releasing the MFi controllers, this would enable nintendo to get into the iPhone game. I'm already seeing controllers that essentially insert the phone into an xyab setup. imagine a nintendo-branded iPhone controller with games that only played on that controller. that would be pretty sweet.

$59.99 controller for a $2.99 game (1)

tepples (727027) | about 9 months ago | (#45235547)

maybe with apple releasing the MFi controllers

There had been previous attempts to put controllers on iOS by having controllers emulate the keyboard, such as the iControlPad and the iCade. Perhaps their lack of uptake can be attributed to few people wanting to buy a controller that costs as much as 10 to 20 games.

Release the 1DS (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234539)

Release the 1DS. It's for toddlers and infants, this time.

No like until now: Sega 2.0 overlods (2)

faragon (789704) | about 9 months ago | (#45234561)

Except for hardcore gamers, in my opinion there is no reason for "low-performing gaming consoles" when in 2-3 years a mid-priced smartphone with HDMI + bluetooth running Android will reach similar results. They can become a platform-agnostic seal, providing what users want from them: Mario stuff and fun family games.

Re:No like until now: Sega 2.0 overlods (4, Insightful)

pla (258480) | about 9 months ago | (#45234801)

Except for hardcore gamers, in my opinion there is no reason for "low-performing gaming consoles" when in 2-3 years a mid-priced smartphone with HDMI + bluetooth running Android will reach similar results.

You could have said the exact same thing about the PC vs consoles for the past 30 years, and yet, consoles keep on kicking.

The PC didn't kill consoles for the same reason that smartphones won't - People don't want to screw around with variable configurations and unknown levels of performance and controller compatibility. They want a known-working machine such that they can buy a game, put it in, turn it on, and have it work exactly the same way as it did last time, as it does for everyone else, as the manufacturer intended it to work.

Ironically, I see modern consoles as their own biggest enemy in that regard - Forced upgrades that break older features, forced online play even for simple single-player games, DRM that (especially for new releases) fails to authenticate the player as often as it works, for-pay premium content in games you've already bought... The console companies have done their damnedest to shift the experience as far as possible away from their one and only edge over general purpose devices: "it just works". Until... It doesn't.

Re:No like until now: Sega 2.0 overlods (1)

DdJ (10790) | about 9 months ago | (#45234941)

The PC didn't kill consoles for the same reason that smartphones won't - People don't want to screw around with variable configurations and unknown levels of performance and controller compatibility. They want a known-working machine such that they can buy a game, put it in, turn it on, and have it work exactly the same way as it did last time, as it does for everyone else, as the manufacturer intended it to work.

I am less certain than you seem to be that smartphone manufacturers will be unable to adequately address that problem.

Let's say you use a succession of Android phones, and your TV has a ChromeCast attached to it, and some particular bluetooth controller becomes a de-facto standard. The experience begins to approach that of a solid console. If it's also extremely cheap...

(Would I bet on this? No, not with my own money. But I wouldn't bet against it either.)

Cramming, latency, de facto controller (1)

tepples (727027) | about 9 months ago | (#45235077)

Let's say you use a succession of Android phones [...] . If it's also extremely cheap...

I don't see how it'll become "extremely cheap" in Slashdot's home country as long as upgrading from a dumbphone to an Android phone costs hundreds of dollars per year on the major carriers. Verizon and Sprint don't use CSIMs for CDMA2000, instead programming the CDMA2000 subscriber identity directly into the phone. They decline as a standard practice to activate service on a smartphone without an expensive data plan. AT&T is known to cram a data plan onto a voice-only SIM inserted into a smartphone [slashdot.org] . Or should people buy and carry two phones: a feature phone to make calls on and an Android phone to play games on over Wi-Fi?

and your TV has a ChromeCast attached to it

That might work for turn-based games, but real-time games are far more sensitive to latency than the noninteractive movies and television series for which the Chromecast was designed. How much display latency does the Chromecast add?

and some particular bluetooth controller becomes a de-facto standard

This is likewise easier said than done. How would this come about?

Re:Cramming, latency, de facto controller (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 9 months ago | (#45235335)

or, get an iPod touch. problem solved

Re:No like until now: Sega 2.0 overlods (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 9 months ago | (#45235313)

The PC didn't kill consoles for the same reason that smartphones won't - People don't want to screw around with variable configurations and unknown levels of performance and controller compatibility. They want a known-working machine such that they can buy a game, put it in, turn it on, and have it work exactly the same way as it did last time, as it does for everyone else, as the manufacturer intended it to work.

I am less certain than you seem to be that smartphone manufacturers will be unable to adequately address that problem.

Let's say you use a succession of Android phones, and your TV has a ChromeCast attached to it, and some particular bluetooth controller becomes a de-facto standard. The experience begins to approach that of a solid console. If it's also extremely cheap...

(Would I bet on this? No, not with my own money. But I wouldn't bet against it either.)

or... just get an iPhone and problem solved.

Re:No like until now: Sega 2.0 overlods (1)

pla (258480) | about 9 months ago | (#45235385)

I am less certain than you seem to be that smartphone manufacturers will be unable to adequately address that problem.

I think that smartphones and tablets could address all of those problems except two: Unknown level of performance (unless they artificially limit their games to a "weakest link" baseline level, in which case that still leaves room for a high-performance dedicated gaming rig to steal the show); and screen resolution, which ranges all the way from HVGA (320x480) to FHD (1080p).

Will they set aside their differences to come up with a standard set of interfaces, however? Yeah, suuuuure - Let me know when I can use a USB mouse (not Bluetooth, actual USB) on an iPad.


That said, you do suggest more of a platform lock-in than I had originally taken the idea to mean. In that case, okay, I could see Apple (and only Apple) getting away with that. But then, you basically just have Apple's answer to the XBox, rather than a general purpose device.

Yes they can.... (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 9 months ago | (#45234573)

Release Mario Kart and other Mario titles on the iPad\Andriod tablet platforms. Even at $29.95 they will sell faster than Apple can make digital copes to send to customers.

Re:Yes they can.... (1)

P-niiice (1703362) | about 9 months ago | (#45234917)

i hate everything in the last several years from Nintendo , but would unapologetically buy Mario Kart for my Nexus 7 and love it like a small baby

30% Margin is not acceptble. (0)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 9 months ago | (#45235231)

Release Mario Kart and other Mario titles on the iPad\Andriod tablet platforms. Even at $29.95 they will sell faster than Google can make digital copes to send to customers.

I am not sure if Mario Kart could compete effectively against $1 games(or even free) many of which are incredible fun, That is without 30% cost selling in a third party store.

No (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234581)

Next...

WII has been a nice second console (1)

dakohli (1442929) | about 9 months ago | (#45234593)

I have a WII, didn't see the need to upgrade to the WII-U. I also have a XBox, had a PS3 but only because I wanted to watch BlueRays. Is it me, or has Nintendo just lagged a bit in terms of graphics? They revolutionized the controllers with the WII, but now I really feel the others have caught up. I do not know if the Nintendo catalog will be enough to keep people with the platform just to play those games. Time will tell.

Re:WII has been a nice second console (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 9 months ago | (#45235271)

I have a WII, didn't see the need to upgrade to the WII-U. I also have a XBox, had a PS3 but only because I wanted to watch BlueRays. Is it me, or has Nintendo just lagged a bit in terms of graphics? They revolutionized the controllers with the WII, but now I really feel the others have caught up. I do not know if the Nintendo catalog will be enough to keep people with the platform just to play those games. Time will tell

It's not you. It's that the Wii was aimed at a different market. When the Wii was release way back in 2007, HDTVs were a relative rarity. A good chunk had one, almost no one had two or more. And the one HDTV was almost never in the kid's room. (It's unfortunate, but Nintendo's got a reputation for being aimed towards kids).

So having HDMI was considered not very useful - when most people weren't going to use it, why bother? It's another licensing fee to pay out in the end.

Now that HDTVs are everywhere and old SD sets are basically all gone (all replaced by the old HDTVs...), HDMI is basically essential and you can count on even the kids having an HDTV.

The only time it really was an issue was the few Wiis that were hooked up to the main TV alongside the Xbox and PS3 so the kids had to fight to use it alongside dad who wanted to watch the news.

What an odd question... (4, Insightful)

MrChom (609572) | about 9 months ago | (#45234613)

...because, I mean, cash rich companies with great selling mobile devices, portfolios of valuable IP, and games that sell 4+ million copies in a few days go bust all the time... Just because the WiiU isn't the hottest selling console doesn't mean the 3ds isn't doing utterly stupendous numbers for them.

I think as long as they make cool games... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234615)

Then I don't care!

I bought an original Nintendo to play Super Mario Bros on. Then I bought the SNES for the next Mario/Zelda, then the GameCube to play Mario again and then Zelda Four Swords and 4 GBA's! I bought the Wii for New Super Mario Bros, and again the Wii U for NSMB WiiU (or whatever it is called). Currently I have 1 game for each of those platforms (Wii and Wii U), and its the Mario games!

As long as they make games that are so fun to multiplayer with my friends I will buy whatever console and game it takes to play it! The only game I play with friends on PS3 or XBox360 is the Rock Band games, and that was only because they didn't have it for Wii yet at the time.

Not saying Nintendo is doing well but... (4, Insightful)

medv4380 (1604309) | about 9 months ago | (#45234617)

The suggestion that Nintendo should release on iOS and Android would be suicide. The sales figures for the 3DS have already proven the nuts that keep saying Nintendo should release Pokemon the iPhone are insane short term thinkers. Their hand held dominance has yet to be killed. I'll believe Nintendo should start looking at selling on the iCult(Trolling Apple) when Pokemon starts selling less than 1 Million at launch. Since X/Y hit 4 Million I don't think they have to worry about that. Their console market, on the other hand, has been weak since the N64 days. The Wii's success was mostly a fluke caused by MS and Sony raising prices too much, and a couple of gimmicks that were worth some attention by some: motion controls, and wii fit.

Re:Not saying Nintendo is doing well but... (1)

Reibisch (1261448) | about 9 months ago | (#45234939)

I don't think anyone is suggesting that they release new titles on iOS or Android, but they have an enormous catalogue of older titles to capitalize on. 3DS hardware sells because of new 3DS software, not because of thousands of back catalogue titles.

Re:Not saying Nintendo is doing well but... (1)

ducomputergeek (595742) | about 9 months ago | (#45234951)

The WII appealed to women. No joke. I know a lot of guy's girlfriends and wives who hated Nintendos and Sega and Playstations absolutely loved the WII when it came out. Now it didn't last, but largely that demographic are still playing games, but now doing so on Facebook and their phones.

Re:Not saying Nintendo is doing well but... (3, Interesting)

tuffy (10202) | about 9 months ago | (#45235079)

The Wii's success was mostly a fluke caused by MS and Sony raising prices too much, and a couple of gimmicks that were worth some attention by some: motion controls, and wii fit.

That was no fluke; it was the logical extension of the same strategy that made the DS so successful after a rocky start. Nintendo built a system with a unique feature (motion control), made new IPs that leveraged that feature (Wii Sports, Wii Fit), targeted the nongamer crowd by offering a pleasant "Mii" aesthetic and offered classic Nintendo franchises for everyone else (Mario Kart). The end result was wildly successful.

By contrast, the Wii U is bombing because although it also has a unique feature (gamepad), its new IPs are mostly niche titles (Wonderful 101) instead of mainstream ones and the next iterations of Nintendo franchises are either also niche (Pikmon) or late (Wii Sports, Mario Kart).

Licensing out properties? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234655)

Folks are probably too young to recall the clusterf*** that was the CD era in terms of licensing. Working with Sony, the fine print practically would steal the rights to Nintendo's bread and butter. And back with the CDi, the fine print there gave Phillips the right to use Nintendo's properties in a set number of games.

The result? A bunch of crappy Zelda and Mario games that are only memorable for just how B-Movie quality they were.

Re:Licensing out properties? (1)

Xest (935314) | about 9 months ago | (#45235363)

Sega has gone from gaming great to frankly being an also-ran since it resorted to just whoring Sonic out to any old Joe who wanted a piece of the blue hedgehog.

I'd hate to see Nintendo suffer the same fate.

Pull a SEGA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234665)

I think Nintendo should pull a SEGA and get out of the hardware business. they have plenty of software IP franchises to sustain them. I'd also _love_ it if they embraced SteamOS and started publishing to SteamOS (thus preventing Microsoft and Sony from getting their business)

Actually I was thinking reverse (1, Interesting)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 9 months ago | (#45234791)

I think Nintendo should pull a SEGA and get out of the hardware business. they have plenty of software IP franchises to sustain them. I'd also _love_ it if they embraced SteamOS and started publishing to SteamOS (thus preventing Microsoft and Sony from getting their business)

Actually I think the reverse. Sega had to leave the hardware business because of the expensive (read Billions in losses) cost of hardware. Todays ARM devices can be profitable for a few dollars. They have a large back catalogue; great brand; experienced staff...with connections. Many companies are fighting for the ARM console. Sega has a better chance than most with little risk.

No hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234699)

I've said it before to people, Nintendo is too small and their core audience is not hardcore enough for them to compete with Sony and MS on hardware. They should get out of the console business and develop cross platform games. Maybe some accessories.

When NTDOY was bigger than SNE (1)

tepples (727027) | about 9 months ago | (#45234903)

I've said it before to people, Nintendo is too small

At one time, Nintendo's market cap exceeded that of Sony Music, Sony Pictures, Sony Electronics, and Sony Computer Entertainment combined. But I'll admit that that was during the "Wii prints money too" era.

Mario on iOS (3, Interesting)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | about 9 months ago | (#45234713)

Let's pretend for a moment that Nintendo was to make a Mario game for iOS. Would it be in full 3D like Mario 64, or a classic platformer like Super Mario 3?

Neither, it'd be an endless runner where you simply tap the screen to jump on Goombas and over gaps, because touch screens lack the control for anything more sophisticated.

Sure, there are games on the App Store that are fully fledged platformers, but are they any good? No, because (in my experience) your hands are covering 80% of the screen making it impossible to see what's actually going on.

If this is the future of gaming, you can count me out.

Controllers on iOS and Android (1)

tepples (727027) | about 9 months ago | (#45234873)

touch screens lack the control for anything more sophisticated.

True. But iOS 7 adds support for external gamepads that clamp onto the iPhone, and even before that, there were controllers that emulate a keyboard. Android has supported USB HID, Xbox 360, and PS3 controllers for a long time, though Android 4.2 and 4.3 broke Wii Remote support. But I'm not so sure people will buy a $40 controller to play a $1 to $6 game. Nintendo could try porting the touch-friendly games it has made in the Mario franchise on the DS, such as March of the Minis.

Re:Controllers on iOS and Android (1)

Newander (255463) | about 9 months ago | (#45235041)

OK, but once you've attached a decent controller to your phone you've lost the convenience that makes mobile gaming such a force.

Re:Controllers on iOS and Android (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235371)

Which defeats the purpose of casual gaming with something you pull out of your pocket. Add ons all cost $. You might as well play for something far superior if you're going to start shelling out money to bulk out your portable screen. A PSP/PSVita/2DS/3DS is going to be way more streamlined in it's design and most of the games you'd buy for them will keep you occupied for 20x-50x longer.

Re:Mario on iOS (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about 9 months ago | (#45235179)

I will agree that I don't like playing games on the tablet or phone for just the reason you stated. My son on the other hand has an xbox 360 that has primarily been used to watch netflix since all of his gaming is done on either a tablet or android phone. I don't think it is the quality of the games that has caused him to ignore the xbox it is more likely because he can play anywhere anytime {except school} even riding in the car. Add facebook and texting and he pretty much lives on his android phone or the tablet.

if he had some kind of charging/hdmi dock with wireless keyboard and touchpad that would let him take the tablet off the dock and keep watching netflix while he made a snack and then return it to the dock without missing a beat... I'm fairly sure the xbox 360 would end up in the closet

Treasure trove of old games on old systems... (1)

swan5566 (1771176) | about 9 months ago | (#45234719)

...that they do little to capitalize on with modern consoles.

Nintendo still exists? (0)

DogDude (805747) | about 9 months ago | (#45234785)

They might be a big player in some Asian countries, but I think their mainstream appeal is over, frankly. It seems like they've developed themselves into a corner with titles for kids and Asian stuff, exclusively. I don't know anybody that uses anything Nintendo, and I've never seen any of their current lineup of gadgets.

Re:Nintendo still exists? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235243)

I don't know anybody that uses anything Nintendo
You need to meet more people then.

For example to show how silly your statement is. "I dont know anyone who watches FoxNews are they still around". They have a huge 'fan' base, and enemy base if you follow what people post on the internet (who btw must watch it to know how it is). Yet I really dont know anyone who watches it.

My point? You have a narrow view of the world. Your world view is not the only one out there. There are at least 30 million people out there who own and use nintendo equipment and that is just the newer portable stuff. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_3DS#Sales

That being said they are quickly driving themselves to be irrelevant. To ignore Android and iPhone as not cannibalizing sales is to ignore reality. Those two put the final nail into the coffin of arcade games in the united states. One or two 'must have' games may shift some hardware but unless you keep coming up with must have games people will eventually say 'i dont need it' and at that point you are moving 0 more units of HW to that person. It is why many stores could not give away Wii games at this point. There was a glut of low quality junk with a ton of gimmick games. People quickly got bored of it and became confused about 'what do I buy so I do not waste 30 bucks'...

The console to own this gen will be the PS4. XB1 will do 'ok' because it is similar to the PS4 and the porting effort will be low (expect to see slightly stripped down PS4 games on xb1). Nintendo will have close to 0.

Re:Nintendo still exists? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235405)

That's because you live in your parents basement and never leave. Every resturaunt has families with children playing on those things while waiting and eating. Stores have familes with the same senario. You seem terribly blind to what is around do.

Re:Nintendo still exists? (2)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 9 months ago | (#45235429)

i wear nintendo underwear

No, but neither can gaming (2)

Millennium (2451) | about 9 months ago | (#45234811)

HD has made games inherently too expensive to produce. The only things that turn any profit at all are graphics-are-everything reskins of games developed back when it was profitable to focus on things that actually mattered, and those will only sustain the industry for so long. We're headed for another crash, one that Nintendo could have survived a generation ago when it resisted the HD gimmick. Now that it has fallen into that trap, though, it's as hosed as Sony's and Microsoft's gaming divisions will be.

Re:No, but neither can gaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235053)

I'm a bit more optimistic about Nintendo's chances in a crash scenario. HD isn't exactly bleeding-edge anymore - it's now mass-market level. Nintendo's strategy has revolved around staying a step behind the frontier of graphics and processing power, in order to focus on delivering value in things other than graphics. If and when the next crash comes, third parties will start differentiating on other things to keep costs down, and Nintendo is still in the best position to capitalize on that.

Re:No, but neither can gaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235509)

In a way the upcoming crash reminds me of the first video game crash in 1983 which Nintendo became the victor of, rising from the ashes of Atari, Intellivision, and Coleco.

In the past, people would pony up a few C-notes for a console, then a C-note a game. However, with the fact that used games may not be resellable, the fact that the cost of a game is just a fraction of what is needed to play it through (due to DLC), and the fact that the core console advantage, "plug in, turn on, stick media on, play" is gone due to the Draconian platform DRM, that console advantage is gone.

Another console advantage was bug-free games. A game had a 1.0 release, and only a 1.0 release in the past, because there is one printing run of a CD or burning a cartridge, and that was it. No second chances. Now with the update mechanisms in place, a game can ship that is essentially unplayable, the media mainly being data files. The release is essentially an early beta, and at best a game might get patched to late beta quality, but nowhere near the quality of works in the past. With this gone, might as well use a PC anyway, since there are better autoupdate mechanisms in place, be it Microsoft's store, Apple's App Store, Steam, or use a third party updater like InstallShields or Google's to fetch and install updates.

In general, consoles have no point other than being connected to a TV and are a cool looking box to play DVDs and BD-R media on. At least I can back up my saved game progress on a PC, which can't be done on a console.

Lost their way (1)

twocows (1216842) | about 9 months ago | (#45234819)

Nintendo lost their way because of the "fad gaming" that was popular with the Wii. They tried to go somewhere with that because it was making them a lot of money, but the problem is that it was just that: a fad. If you want to ride that train, you need to see what's coming next and make sure your thing is the next fad, too. Nintendo didn't do that and lost most of that audience to Facebook and mobile gaming. That problem was compounded by the poor marketing for the Wii U (many consumers don't even realize it's a completely new system due to the unfortunate name).

This wouldn't have been such a big deal if they hadn't alienated their core fanbase in the process. A lot of former Nintendo fanboys have migrated to other platforms by now because Nintendo just wasn't putting out the volume nor the quality necessary to keep us interested (flops like Metroid: Other M especially didn't help matters). Plus, they didn't have the majority of popular cross-platform games. This, in turn, made a lot of their fans go out and get other platforms to play these games. And when the Wii U rolled around, there wasn't really any reason to get it because we could get more and better games on the other platform we were forced to get. I have no plans to get a Wii U unless it comes down substantially in price no matter what they release for it. I'm not going to spend that kind of money on a system just to play the new Smash, one or two new Zelda games, and possibly a new Metroid game that may or may not be good. I like those series, but it's just not worth it when I have a limited income.

All this has happened before... (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 9 months ago | (#45234871)

Nintendo did not just survive the crash of '83, they were the ones that took the lead in resurrecting the industry.

Then again, they survived their mid 90's slump. And each time the XBOX/PS war is rekindled on a new generation of systems.

And even if Wii-U falters, Nintendo can survive on brand recognition alone from the mass of parents in their 30s and 40s that grew up with the NES. Now, perhaps in 10 years when the XBOX/PS generation gamers start having kids of their own, things might change.

Re:All this has happened before... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235437)

The PS generation should be starting to have kids right now, so we'll likely see in the next 5 or 10 years if that has an effect. Don't forget that there is a huge DS/Wii generation coming up behind the PS/XBOX generations.

At least the can float on cash (2)

wjcofkc (964165) | about 9 months ago | (#45234947)

While I don't think it's reached that point yet, at least Nintendo has plenty of cash to float on. One of Nintendo's bigger issues is that they used to be a trend setter. They don't seem to understand that the landscape is drastically changing and that there is nothing they can do about it other then keep up or fall behind. They are no longer steering the industry, but apparently no one has told them that. Don't get me wrong, I love Nintendo and I want them to continue to succeed.

As an old timer, I can thing of a console I would paid a couple hundred bucks for: An all in one system that has every game ever made from 8-bit through Game Cube (or at least 64) pre-loaded and ready to be hooked up to my HDTV. I have been wishing for this for a long time.

BTW - if you have not yet played Super Mario Bros. Crossover, you have not lived until you have played SMB as one of the Contra guys.

Nintendo is done (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45234971)

The old joke is that a dinosaur was so big, and had such a small and 'distant' brain, that it could take it days to realise it was actually dead. We use the 'dinosaur' comparison to one powerful companies to recognise dominance and power, but also the fact that everything passes in time.

Japan lost its software base a while ago now, and THIS factor is what dooms companies like Nintendo. Rather than being a games-first company, and surviving on because they keep a flow of desirable unique software products, Nintendo converted to a hardware-first company when its hand-helds, and then Wii, became extremely successful.

Now the hardware game is over for Nintendo. It doesn't make enough quality games using its own forms of IP, and no quality developer wants to target games at the Wii U or Nintendo handhelds. Kids of all ages love tablets. Tablets are getting cheaper and more powerful at an astonishing rate. A projection into the near future shows no hope for Nintendo to hold onto its dominance in this area UNLESS it collapses the cost of the hardware, and even then they would only delay the inevitable by a little bit.

In the mains-powered console market, Nintendo is an embarrassment. Its Wii was putrid, but gained incredible fashion success on the back of hand-motion controlled casual games. The Wii U, for reasons no-one can understand, didn't build on the hand motion system, but sought another gimmick- the faux tablet. While everyone else understood that the entire point of such a portable device was to allow remote streaming of full power console games, giving the mobile device graphics that had never before been possible, Nintendo specifically DEMANDED that games companies used the faux tablet as a rubbishy extension to the big screen gaming experience.

This meant porting games to the Wii U became a mega-expensive NIGHTMARE to publishers. The Wii U is a weak platform with weak sales, and yet Nintendo DEMANDED that ported games would have to have mega-expensive work done finding a reason to place ADDITIONAL graphics on the faux tablet. Any game that did NOT use the display of the tablet controller would be seen as a 'shoddy' port by Nintendo, and the Wii U owners.

Microsoft and Sony, in the other hand, GOT IT. They both allow, with the Xbone and PS4, for you to "game in bed" with the Sony handheld or 'gaming' Android tablets (tabs with hard controls). Playing GTA 5, or Battlefield 4, as the FULL games, on a handheld is a whole new world.

Nintendo will collapse to the nucleus of its gaming IP, like Sega before it. I must admit, I don't get it why nerds have such a difficult time accepting that companies rise and companies fall. The age of the home computer has had so many examples of this across its short history. Microsoft and Intel are in terminal decline, with Intel having no apparent solutions at all in its future. But then building your own chips is just about the most expensive enterprise there is, and when you can no longer defend obscene levels of profit, your company cease to be viable.

Nintendo fantasised that it could simply 'invent' an endless stream of fashion gimmicks, and ride them forever. But the triviality of the motion controller made Nintendo ignore the idea of QUALITY in gimmick, a mistake Apple avoids. The Wii U was a shoddy piece of total garbage, with insanely underpowered GPU and CPU systems, a tiny amount of memory, and the tablet gimmick being as under-cooked and wrongly directed as possible. Nintendo isn't going down fighting- Nintendo bought a shovel and dug its own grave.

Will *Nintendo* survive? Sure. (3, Insightful)

DdJ (10790) | about 9 months ago | (#45235001)

Will Nintendo survive?

Sure. Remember that they were founded in 1889. They had a business before video games, and if necessary, they'll have a business after video games.

I think that's where some of their behavior actually comes from. There's a certain level of autonomy that I don't think they're willing to give up, even if that means their video game business tanks.

What a great article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235025)

I wonder why the Nintendo board doesn't do exactly as these utterly clueless reportless say.

After all, they are reporters, so they are right. And nintendo? They've just been in the market for a century. And succeded with a class and consistency that is completely unmatched in the industry. Who the hell are they to think they know what they are doing?

Protip: yes, it is sarcasm! no need to point it out, thank you very much.

Armchair CEO's (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 9 months ago | (#45235441)

I wonder why the Nintendo board doesn't do exactly as these utterly clueless reportless say.

I don't agree with the article, but a quick look around just at the massive missteps made in the gaming industry that have bought down great companies. Nintendo currently have a lemon on there hands with the Wii U, and the console market is going to get busy again, threatened by Nintndo and Sony for Power...and Android *everywhere*. The Nintendo board clearly have made a mistake. I agree this article is probably not it, but it exists because Nintendo is with its console in trouble, and stupidly just as everyone gets used to having a smart device under there TV.

Some basic stats... (3, Informative)

TheSimkin (639033) | about 9 months ago | (#45235043)

http://www.vgchartz.com/ [vgchartz.com] Nintendo sold over 4 million copies of Pokemon and 423 thousand 3DS the week of Oct 12. I see no reason to think they are going away any time soon.

Why was this article chosen? (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 9 months ago | (#45235049)

Nintendo is in an interesting spot, The Wii U is not a great success. The answer is not going to be found by an Xbox 360 owner...the loser of the last generation (arguably a draw with the PS3)

The answer is not going to be Hardcore gamers (pick your definition of what one is) they never did, they produce great first party titles as the draw...something the article claims is there failure.

The answer is not going to be making software for the 13% of the smartphone market with an iPhone either!!! (although I would imagine Cook would shit himself)

This article was wrote from an iPhone/Xbox owner and draws stupid conclusions because of it. Nintendo has a problem and its the (dumb) hardware

Percent of dollars spent in anglosphere (1)

tepples (727027) | about 9 months ago | (#45235145)

I don't have exact figures, but I've read that Apple's 13% of activated smartphones account for far more than 13% of the dollars spent on paid applications, especially paid games. This is true especially in the anglosphere, where you don't even have to redub your game's voice acting into multiple languages to get it into Canada, USA, Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand.

Re:Percent of dollars spent in anglosphere (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 9 months ago | (#45235543)

anglosphere ftw!

How is a guy who writes "SMB Crossover" an indie? (1)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | about 9 months ago | (#45235071)

>> indie developers (including the creator of Super Mario Bros. Crossover)

How is a guy who writes "Super Mario Brothers Crossover" an "independent developer"? Seems like he's a leech on the core brand: Mario and the extended Nintendo world. Furthermore, as long as the core brand is compelling enough and has enough followers to inspire leeches, I don't think it's in any danger of fading away.

Been a long time coming (2)

J-1000 (869558) | about 9 months ago | (#45235103)

This is a continuation of a chain of events that began when the N64 was released. Whether it was the cart vs CD debate, or whether it was something else, the result was that the majority of third party developers stuck with the Playstation. It's been the same story ever since: Third parties are hard to come by, and Nintendo's first party games are criticized for being too childish. The first Wii was a huge success because it filled a casual gaming need that is now being fulfilled by iPads and phones.

Nintendo's handhelds seem to do well, perhaps because the same people who talked up the "childish" nature of Nintendo's games were also self-selected out of the handheld gaming audience.

Nintendo (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235109)

Nintendo made a number of mistakes, including a lack of an indie-developer ecosystem,

True. Nintendo hardware is very nice. An indie-developer program would attract talent and open the door to great games and a profitable future. They just need to find the right branding, probably something like a "Mario Labs" where the gamers also play the role of 'investors', deciding if projects deserve a grant or deserve to get canned.

a refusal to license out core properties such as Super Mario to other gaming platforms (or even iOS and Android), and platforms that don't appeal to hardcore gamers.

False. Core properties (Super Mario, Zelda, et al) are what make a Nintendo console what it is. If you want to play Super Mario, you know what console you need to have in order to play it -- A Nintendo. As soon as Mario makes an appearance on iOS or Android, that's the end of what makes Nintendo special. In essence, they'd become another SEGA; a popular system when I was a teenager, but now just a hit or miss game studio. That's not the road Nintendo wants to go down.

While the developers suggest Nintendo is taking steps to broaden its horizons, such as by reaching out to smaller studios, it's questionable whether such efforts will succeed in a world where the PS4 and Xbox One are about to enter the market, and iOS and Android are swallowing up mobile gamers' time and dollars.

Nintendo knows what the other companies don't:
- $250 entry point
- Make very reliable hardware, but do NOT make it a loss leader [wikipedia.org]
- Curate available titles very carefully to ensure maximum revenue

The gamers looking for the high-end PS4 and Xbox One experience aren't Nintendo's core customers.
The games playing casual games on iOS and Android aren't Nintendo's core customers either.
Nintendo should not be the dog who lost his bone to a reflection.
They know their customer base and they serve them well, which is why they keep making a profit.

Game Consoles are pretty lame. (1, Informative)

Z00L00K (682162) | about 9 months ago | (#45235143)

Game consoles are just stupid bricks that don't evolve. Looking at the speed that the PC industry has evolved it's easy to see that the game consoles are quickly left in the dead behind when it comes to performance.

Irony not lost on me (0)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 9 months ago | (#45235325)

Game consoles are just stupid bricks that don't evolve. Looking at the speed that the PC industry has evolved it's easy to see that the game consoles are quickly left in the dead behind when it comes to performance.

The irony that the PC market is taking a serious kicking from both Microsoft and Apple who are both racing to turn these powerful/upgradable/ General Purpose Machines into dumb electronic devices, killing these devices, while slavering at the jaws for the console market, marketed at a larger audience...they call it Smart TV....Google is already there....and they are about to launch a console too.

uhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235285)

Pokemon X and Y called... they said yes.

"Hardcore" (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235365)

Hardcore gamers play all kinds of games.

"Extreme" gamers are the ones that flock to the FPS of the month while sipping energy drinks.

Brave? (1)

Jawnn (445279) | about 9 months ago | (#45235391)

WTF is "brave" about the world of gaming platforms?

Questioning the sanity of this article (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45235393)

Ummmm... didn't Wii sales pretty much dominate last round?

Nintendo is in a great position and they know it. Last round of consoles, they learned that the best way for them to compete was to not compete. They made a console that was totally different from the other two. While Sony and MS were fighting it out over who could make the best of the traditional consoles, Nintendo was cleaning up with their weird system, because people often get multiple systems.

Wii U? Not so much. But then again, they haven't leveraged any of their own properties yet.

This article's premise is incredibly flawed:

-a lack of an indie-developer ecosystem?
Why would they want an indie developer ecosystem? Consoles are built on their huge exclusives. What was the last major game that came out of an indie studio that could've sensibly come out on a Nintendo system first?

-a refusal to license out core properties such as Super Mario to other gaming platforms and platforms that don't appeal to hardcore gamers?
Yes, this makes sense. License out one of the things that truly make your console unique. Oh wait, no. By not licensing out their products, they keep full quality control in their hands (does anyone want to revisit the Phillips CD-i Zelda games?). They can also keep people coming back for the stuff that is uniquely theirs and if they want to bring a new studio in, that can happen too (Retro with Metroid Prime is a good example).

Heck, this article even seems to think that them licensing out their properties to platforms that don't appeal to hardcore gamers is some kind of a solution. The Wii's success rode on the back of the fact that the console wasn't made for the hardcore gamer.

This whole article reads like a solution to a problem that someone doesn't have.

These articles are so exhausting... (4, Interesting)

gmezero (4448) | about 9 months ago | (#45235523)

Here is a response I wrote for Game Zero about the whole "Nintendo is gonna fail" stupidity... back in 2000... still relevant.

The Future of Console Gaming: Part 2 - The Five Year Plan [gamezero.com]

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...