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Do Is Done

Soulskill posted about 10 months ago | from the do-becomes-don't dept.

Software 51

Taco Cowboy writes "Salesforce has announced that it will be shutting down its task management software Do.com on 31 January 2014. 'Salesforce acquired the social productivity company back in February 2011, when it was called Manymoon. At the time, Manymoon served over 50,000 companies.' The announcement was made in an email to customers yesterday. The company did say they are working on an export tool to retrieve data from Do.com. It will be ready on 15 November. Users will no longer be charged after 1 November, and yearly subscribers will get a pro-rated refund."

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Huh? (5, Informative)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 10 months ago | (#45245071)

Do.com? Manymoon.com? Sorry... No clue.

Re:Huh? (4, Funny)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 10 months ago | (#45245233)

Didn't you know? It's the law that if you don't already know enough to know what a story is about, then you're not allowed to ask questions and must remain silent lest you anger the gods by showing any curiousity within these hallowed pages.

Re: Huh? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45245429)

In the next few weeks they'll be purchasing and setting up a redirect to "doh.com"..

Re:Huh? (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 10 months ago | (#45245529)

Do.com? Manymoon.com? Sorry... No clue.

Yeah, the two way to get customers is to do marketing or to have your users spread word of how great your product is. I never saw either on these guys. Great products have the latter, good products have both, and danger-danger products have only the former. With neither, I guess it's somebody's pet project.

Re:Huh? (2)

blackraven14250 (902843) | about 10 months ago | (#45247805)

How, exactly, does having marketing preclude it being a great product?

The product that sells in large quantities is the one with effective marketing, and the product that performs well is the one with users' support. They are not mutually exclusive.

Re:Huh? (1)

deltaromeo (821761) | about 10 months ago | (#45248477)

Same here! I thought this was going to be about Gnome-Do which I stopped using a long time ago in favour of Synapse.

Odd timing (5, Insightful)

pla (258480) | about 10 months ago | (#45245097)

Curious, that they would choose to do this just a few weeks before their annual Dreamforce trade-show. You'd think they'd wait just one more month to pull the plug...

Unless they plan to announce some shiny alternative at Dreamforce. A far more expensive alternative, of course. But Shiny.

Hmm...

Re:Odd timing (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 10 months ago | (#45246123)

I've noticed that most SASS companies have been pulling in the reigns lately and trying to focus more on core functionality. I think a lot of these companies had been adding every service they could think of, then their customers would get the tool and run with it. A year or two later they find that its not all that profitable but their customers now have business processes dependent on it and are pissed when they find out it's not being developed any longer. More and more when we deal with a SASS vendor we're demanding to see their "Roadmap" so we don't use the bits that are getting deprecated.

Re:Odd timing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45246641)

pulling in the reigns

pulling in the reins

Re:Odd timing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45246697)

I think I subconsciously decided to make this (annoying) correction because I was listening to Toto's "Africa", with another homophone - "rains". I may be punished for both these crimes in a later life!

Re:Odd timing (2)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#45247083)

a funny thing about sw roadmaps....

I followed one big consumer communication electronics manufacturers roadmaps for many years - both those published for world wide pr and sometimes with glimpses into the internal.

they never, ever followed through on them. NEVER, not once was their 12 month roadmap worth the bits it occupied. and that's for the features - but what became really funny over the longer time period is that they never managed to even stick to the naming schemes( major version always used a different naming/versioning scheme than the last despite all of them having a number on them - the number on them eventually went up and down and skipped numbers too, though skipped numbers were I think in two instances because of the mentioned roadmap having a release on them that used the number, even if those releases then never materialized).

Re:Odd timing (1)

GNious (953874) | about 10 months ago | (#45249923)

We went from version 1.5 to v6.1 to 20xx.y in a decade... I think the next release will be version 9.

Re:Odd timing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45250265)

Do you work for Microsoft?

Re:Odd timing (1)

Cederic (9623) | about 10 months ago | (#45250327)

The question you need answering about software roadmaps is less about the feature set they're adding - that'll depend on demands from the biggest customers and an element of strategy - but the areas of focus for the company.

Salesforce will be developing the primary force.com platform, so a reasonable question is 'how are you integrating do.com, are you looking to expand it or migrate the customers, what are your plans for ..'

You're right that specific feature sets can and will change, but the future of the entire platform should be possible to determine..

Re:Odd timing (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#45246653)

why? they obviously want the companies into salesforce, so now they have an oppurtunity to push that angle.

50,000 companies? (5, Insightful)

roman_mir (125474) | about 10 months ago | (#45245163)

Seriously, these ridiculous numbers, like: 50,000 companies were clients of whatevermoomoo.com should not be trusted. No company that can serve 50,000 companies loses business, if necessary it can transform business, it can lower prices, it can do whatever it takes to hold on to that gigantic customer base. More than that, if you have 50,000 companies on your resume, you think it's hard to land business in another 1000? Seriously, SAP or Oracle or Microsoft or IBM or Google or Apple or whatever has that kind of customer base, do you see them just shutting down at some point, disappearing because they can no longer figure out HOW to serve 50,000+ companies as customers?

These are made up numbers.

Re:50,000 companies? (4, Funny)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 10 months ago | (#45245315)

Seriously, these ridiculous numbers, like: 50,000 companies were clients of whatevermoomoo.com should not be trusted. No company that can serve 50,000 companies loses business...

Perhaps what they meant to say was that they had 50,000 web site hits...

Re:50,000 companies? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45245461)

Or 50 companies with 1000 employees each.

Re: 50,000 companies? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45245511)

More likely 50,000 different different email domains. So if had a personal do.com account I'd count as a company just like someone with 1000 licenses.

Re:50,000 companies? (2)

rsborg (111459) | about 10 months ago | (#45245721)

Seriously, these ridiculous numbers, like: 50,000 companies were clients of whatevermoomoo.com should not be trusted.

My Google Apps was one of those "businesses" that tried out Manymoon's Google Apps plugin. I'm not going to buy anything, and stopped using it shortly. If that's the quality of the businesses that are part of the 50,000 then I wouldn't be surprised it's being shuttered. That said its bizarre that Salesforce couldn't just rebrand it and merge it into it's CRM offering.

Re:50,000 companies? (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 10 months ago | (#45245747)

SAP, IBM, and Microsoft most likely charge their customers a lot more than these guys did. Just because they "serve" 50,000 companies, doesn't mean those companies were paying them anything. Also, the customers of SAP, IBM, and Microsoft are probably most likely larger companies. Perhaps all the companies they were serving were really small mom and pop businesses, and they weren't paying anything, or were only paying $5 a month.

Re:50,000 companies? (1)

roman_mir (125474) | about 10 months ago | (#45245835)

If that's the case, then again, it's not a real business, never was! You don't have a business that subsidises other businesses for no reason, you have to be able to make a profit, which means you are definitely covering your costs and you are now running in the black, saving for more investment and maybe expansion.

Any fool, if given a billion dollars can turn it into a million dollars by running a "business" that hands out money, and that's what it is, if your business is losing money by "serving" while subsidising others.

My point is, if a company has 50,000 LEGITIMATE clients, who are businesses (or not businesses), then they should be able to restructure, if their business is not going well. Sure, failures can happen, especially in the over-regulated, over-taxed, over-inflated world of large collectivist governments, which sue companies for attempting to stay alive by modifying their business model (like gov't lawsuits against company mergers for example, that may in fact prevent a business restructuring, vital to the company's survival in a changing economy), but if you have legitimate customers, you don't even need 50,000 to stay afloat if you have 2 brain cells to rub together.

This was not a legitimate business then, buying a pencil for $1 and selling it for 50cents won't work, no matter how much volume, you are still losing money on each sale.

Re:50,000 companies? (2)

Bite The Pillow (3087109) | about 10 months ago | (#45247683)

One of the companies was apparently Google [techcrunch.com] . I guess we won't trust those idiots again.

Manymoon started out as free, which is probably where the 50k number came from. After being acquired, the plan was to keep giving it away [readwrite.com] while selling it to people who wanted to buy whatever premium services it added. How ridiculous is 50k companies/users on a free application which stayed near the top of Google Apps and LinkedIn apps lists?

The release announcement, when Manymoon became Do.com is worth a read [venturebeat.com] for anyone who wants to register an informed opinion.

From all accounts, it was a decent way to get stuff done while on the go, even if "on the go" means being physically in the same place as other people, just not talking to them at the moment.

Do? (1)

Keruo (771880) | about 10 months ago | (#45245201)

I never used Do, but for social project management/tasks I'd give asana [asana.com] a try.
I've been using their free version for few personal projects and it's great.

Pity (5, Interesting)

wirefarm (18470) | about 10 months ago | (#45245267)

It was a very simple, very clear service that I could actually use with non-technical clients for project management.

Good thing is, you could probably duplicate the functionality in Ruby on Rails in a weekend

Re:Pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45245667)

Have you looked at either flow (getflow.com) or wunderlist (wunderlist.com).

Re:Pity (1)

Skapare (16644) | about 10 months ago | (#45247475)

I'm a Python programmer, not a Ruby programmer, you insensitive clod. And what about my Java programmer friends?

Re:Pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45249415)

Will take them a couple of months....

Re:Pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45258533)

Python programmers have Java programmer friends???

Is that even possible?

I'm sure in some states it's even illegal...

not really for nerds and not stuff that matters. (0)

Gravis Zero (934156) | about 10 months ago | (#45245327)

Slashdot: News for managers and stuff that matters to them?

Re:not really for nerds and not stuff that matters (0)

Desler (1608317) | about 10 months ago | (#45245961)

News for Dice.com clients stuff that matters.

Re:not really for nerds and not stuff that matters (2)

Cederic (9623) | about 10 months ago | (#45250361)

Ok, maybe I'm a manager.

Cloud services shutting down is interesting. What happens to their data is interesting. The whole SaaS market has been changing throughout the lifetime of the Internet, and it's interesting.

How fucking techy do you want? Aren't you interested in the very different approaches to cloud software, from IaaS (Infrastructure), PaaS, IaaS (integration), SaaS, etc. The different models offered by Amazon, Microsoft, Salesforce. The complexities and legalities of hosting your data externally, and the architectural complications arising from use of multiple cloud solutions combined with in-house systems? The trade-offs between remote execution and local control?

This may not be your particular brand of 'techy' but trust me, there's a fuck of a lot going on here. And one of the major cloud services providers shutting down a service is very interesting, both for the 'why' and the 'how'.

Re:not really for nerds and not stuff that matters (1)

garyebickford (222422) | about 10 months ago | (#45251381)

Yes. It's not on the bits & bytes level, but the complexities are fundamentally similar and the answers can be just as, or more, difficult to figure out. And the additional impact can be enormous. I haven't had to actually roll out any cloud based services, but I'm looking at a couple right now for a presently-small-but-hopefully-larger business. Managing the loss of a SaaS vendor (for any reason) is analogous to a NAS or other major data center component blowing up (or preferably getting ready to die, so we can do something in advance) - questions like "where is the data backed up" and "how do we migrate our data to the new server/service" must be answered.

In both cases, in the ideal case all of the possibilities have been explored and contingency plans have been created (and maintained). For instance, it seems to naive me, for example, using cloud products that support the OpenStack standard, and having at least one running test/failover system either in-house or at another vendor's facility, along with other strategies, would minimize the potential impact and provide maximum flexibility. But it's never quite that simple.

wut? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45245551)

What the fuck is this story about?

Re:wut? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45245849)

its the clueless fucktards at dice thinking that biz news = IT news

Re:wut? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45246909)

its the clueless fucktards at dice thinking that biz news = IT news

Now come on, dude. The URL, title & summary have a domain in them. A domain ! How is that not internet related (and therefore technology related)?

I thought it was the "do" keyword (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45245577)

I thought it would be a bit about the "do" keyword going away. I never really felt the need for the "do" loop in C and always found "do" to be kind of a silly keyword. Programs are always doing something, so saying "do" to mean something in any language is vague and/or redundant.

Re:I thought it was the "do" keyword (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45246831)

No, no - the story really refers to the "do" going away from "sudo". It's back to "su" from now on!

Re:I thought it was the "do" keyword (1)

garyebickford (222422) | about 10 months ago | (#45251411)

It's just vocabulary. In FORTRAN, "DO 100 I = 1,10" where 100 is the line number of the last statement in the loop means the same thing as "for (i=1;i=10;i++) {...} In the card, punch tape, and early 110 baud (10 chars/sec) teleprinter days shorter was very advantageous - the same reason that most of the common unix commands are two letters.

Go is Gone (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45245591)

"Megadream has announced that it will be shutting gown its sleep management software Go.com on 31 January 2014. 'Megadream acquired the super productivity company back in February 2011, when it was called Honeymoon. At the time, Honeymoon served over 50,000 couples.' The announcement was made in an email to squirrels yesterday. The company did say they are working on an export stool to retrieve hats from Go.com. It will be ready on 15 November. Users will no longer be charged after 1 November, and yearly subscribers will get a pro-rated refund."

Why You Shouldn't Trust the Cloud (4, Insightful)

rueger (210566) | about 10 months ago | (#45245737)

Another web based service has the plug pulled with little or no warning. When Google does it it's news. When a small company does it it gets ignored.

In my case it was little company called Catch.com, [techcrunch.com] which synced notes written in a little app called AK Notepad. Not the end of the world, but intensely irritating when it just stopped working one day and all data disappeared. And when they were too scummy to leave some way of downloading user data after a month or so.

At this point I'm looking at moving pretty much everything out of web based services and back to my desktop, or at least to a server space that I control. And watching ideas like Ark.OS [arkos.io] with considerable interest.

I may not be a multinational corporation, but I no longer trust any company to handle data that matters to me.

Re:Why You Shouldn't Trust the Cloud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45246689)

As much as I like the idea, Ark.OS seems to be claiming that you should "decentralize your web" by running all your services off one local machine. That seems like a bad choice of words. You are putting all your own data in a central point of failure, which just happens to be under your control, which you can back up. This is not decentralization, this is centralization for the purpose of control. It has major advantages yes, and in my opinion outweighs the disadvantages, but it in no way provides what decentralization provides: no single point of failure.

They could also provide a setup focused on decentralization (multiple mirrored servers, etc). but I don't think Ark.OS is focused on that (despite using "decentralize" in their description). Thats a completely different thing than they offer. I'd suggest they replace "decentralize" with "control" on their site, then it makes sense.

I really wish services would get their terminology right, especially when they are offering something legitimately good and interesting.

Re:Why You Shouldn't Trust the Cloud (1)

rueger (210566) | about 10 months ago | (#45246791)

Agreed that Ark.OS isn't yet THE answer, but it is looking in the right directions.

As much as I like the ubiquity of Google's services - everything available anywhere, at any time - I find myself looking back very fondly to my old Palm Pilots. One sync per day to my desktop machine, and I knew that my contacts etc were safe and secure.

What I really want is a way to sync my smartphone's contents with the server that hosts our web sites, without forcing everything through someone else's servers.

Re:Why You Shouldn't Trust the Cloud (1)

Bite The Pillow (3087109) | about 10 months ago | (#45247737)

I don't follow - SalesForce had $957M in revenue last quarter, and this is definitely news - it's not some small company that never made it to the front page of Slashdot.

Large companies hosting cloud services with paid accounts will always provide some sort of transition warning, because expensive lawsuits follow when they don't. You don't need to file a suit, just wait for someone else to - it's inevitable.

If you trust a small company to handle your data, you're asking for problems. If you're asking it to do so for free, which is how Manymoon started and Do.com continued, you're basically asking to be screwed over the barrel.

It looks like Catch.com was free, based on this quote "Users there are already lamenting the loss, begging Catch.com to reconsider, or release a paid version." So what really did you expect? Evernote was beating the hell out of Catch based on all free market measures, so the outcome there is pretty much guaranteed.

Re:Why You Shouldn't Trust the Cloud (2)

blackraven14250 (902843) | about 10 months ago | (#45247877)

Except, these guys are absolutely not doing the same thing Catch did to you. First, they're announcing it months in advance. Second, they're making it cost nothing for users for the months leading up to the shutdown. Finally, they're providing an export tool well in advance.

Massofass, BeaucoupPatout, Tons-O-Buns... (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 10 months ago | (#45245771)

Manymoon? Was Bunchabutts [motherblogger.ca] already taken?

Finally, a release! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45246417)

Do is Done!!

Oracle & MySQL? (1)

upside (574799) | about 10 months ago | (#45247431)

Could it be they plan to offer a more expensive service?

so (0)

abdelkhabir94 (3410203) | about 10 months ago | (#45252579)

which synced notes written in a little app called AK Notepad. Not the end of the world, but intensely irritating when it just stopped working one day and all data disappeared. And when they were too scummy to leave some way of downloading user data after a month or so. jason bond picks review [youtube.com]

many kinds of windows 7 keys online sale (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45256799)

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Big guys, weird maneuvers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45258107)

These things happen more and more often. I was working for a software company (backup software) and our product has been acquired by a big company. Prior to that , we had a decent amount of happy customers, and we took good care of them. After the acquisition, the "big guy" closed the product because it didn't make enough money (for their standards, obviously). And who cares about the customers left behind?
At least do.com is offering enough time to look for alternatives, and there are plenty to choose from. One I would recommend (pretty similar in functionality and UI) would be Paymo. Those who are interested can find out more here: http://bit.ly/HlxzHY

Cheers, and if you have better alternatives, please let everybody know!

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