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Web Literacy Standard Announced By Mozilla

Unknown Lamer posted about a year ago | from the required-reading dept.

Education 64

An anonymous reader writes "Doug Belshaw and Carla Casilli, along with a community of stakeholders, have been working on a specification of skills needed for web literacy. Doug report that Brett Gaylor and Chris Lawrence announced version 1.0 of the spec. In a nutshell it's described as 'A map of the territory for the skills and competencies Mozilla and community think are important to get better at to more effectively read, write & participate on the Web.' Usages include writing curricula influenced by it, and issuing Open Badges that align with it (using the 'alignment' metadata field). Doug also calls for help with localization of the spec into other languages."

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dear douhg adn karla (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264103)

fuk u hahahahalol111111111

Huh? (3, Insightful)

mythosaz (572040) | about a year ago | (#45264111)

I can't be the only one confused by this article summary. It's going to take an hour of reading Wikipedia to figure it out...

Re:Huh? (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | about a year ago | (#45264369)

I can't be the only one confused by this article summary. It's going to take an hour of reading Wikipedia to figure it out...

It's the Al Gore pokemon, which hit the graveyard a number of years back, but apparently Mozilla just played the Monster Reborn! card. Remember how he said "We must also promote global access to the Internet. We need to bridge the digital divide not just within our country, but among countries. Only by giving people around the world access to this technology can they tap into the potential of the Information Age." Yup. That. It's baaaaaaack.

Up next, throwing down a wall of magikarp while they desperately try to evade the massive amounts of snark that is about to descend upon them.

Re:Huh? (1)

narcc (412956) | about a year ago | (#45264981)

Wait, that was bad?

Can they tap in to the potential of the information age some other way?

Re:Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264409)

There must be an ironic statement about the author's literacy somewhere...

s/author/editor/ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45266233)

The submission [slashdot.org] didn't leave the 's' off 'reports'.

Re:Huh? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264971)

I felt the same way, went to the site and divined its purpose, however since Literacy is its purpose one would expect they might have attempted to utilize some.

Frist! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264135)

Is first posting a skill or a competency?

Re:Frist! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264379)

If you actually get first post and write something funny then it's a skill. If you don't, then Mozilla award a "YOU FAIL IT!" badge.

how about the important stuff, like... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264145)

* Supporting open and non-DRMed standards, so the web doesn't turn into TV 2.0

* Blocking advertisements, since they violate privacy and in some cases carry malware

* Supporting non-locked-down systems, so that running tools like adblock remains up to the people, not to multinational corporations.

* Blocking javascript by default, for the same reasons

* The essential principles of public key crypto, and how to keep their communications secure.

Surely we should be educating people about those things too?

Re:how about the important stuff, like... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264169)

You want to educate people not to spend money? Your business plan is intriguing to me, and I wish to participate in your bankruptcy liquidation auction.

That would lead to more paywalls (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#45264373)

Blocking advertisements

"You are using an ad blocker. You have three ad-free views left this month. Please subscribe for unlimited ad-free views."

Blocking javascript by default, for the same reasons

All third-party apps in Firefox OS are written in JavaScript. Good luck writing web applications without it, especially web applications intended to run with zero bars.

The essential principles of public key crypto

Would this include how to travel long distances to a key signing party in the same city as someone with whom you wish to communicate?

Re:That would lead to more paywalls (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45265547)

"You are using an ad blocker. You have three ad-free views left this month. Please subscribe for unlimited ad-free views."

Tough luck. The internet was doing just fine before paywalls. It will be better once they die. I've honestly don't know a single person that even considers them. People just surf away to somewhere else when they encounter one.

Would this include how to travel long distances to a key signing party in the same city as someone with whom you wish to communicate?

No, because that is not even vaguely necessary.

Journals, be they academic or Wall Street (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#45265605)

The internet was doing just fine before paywalls.

The Wall Street Journal has been paywalled since 1997. This is more than two-thirds of the time that the World Wide Web has existed.

I've honestly don't know a single person that even considers them. People just surf away to somewhere else when they encounter one.

Not everyone has that luxury, especially when the only lawful source of a given work is paywalled, or all publishers of a given class of works collude to set up a paywall. See the recent Slashdot story Why Johnny Can't Speak [slashdot.org] .

Would this include how to travel long distances to a key signing party in the same city as someone with whom you wish to communicate?

No, because that is not even vaguely necessary.

How else do you verify that the person you're communicating with is the person you think you're communicating with, not a man in the middle? Just because you have verified a stranger's identity doesn't mean you trust that someone to verify other strangers' identities.

Pointless (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264201)

This is utterly pointless crap. No one needs web literacy merit badges. My 70-year-old grandmother gets around just fine on the net without some crummy scout badge. Kids surf the net with ease before they learn not to drink bleach. No one needs net training; it's a false demand created by academics who don't understand that there are more pressing first-world problems to solve, like teaching people to distinguish between an oak and a holm oak.

Re:Pointless (2)

psithurism (1642461) | about a year ago | (#45265559)

I'm having trouble figuring out their interface and what all is available in their double tabbed page layout. My degree in CompSci doesn't seem to be helping, but that makes sense, because before I got lost, I think it said something about credentials and experience being irrelevant.

I think what they are trying to do is design a standard for web competency and then let you "learn anywhere," e.i. let someone else figure out how to teach you these things and then you can come back and use their page creation apps appropriately.

Re:Pointless (2)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about a year ago | (#45266293)

Soon you won't be able to get a job unless you are Firefox Web Certified. HR managers are going to love this. It will make their job a lot easier.

Re:Pointless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45269679)

Really? I think there's some useful stuff in there. For example:

Explaining the differences between the web and the Internet
Using and understanding the differences between URLs, IP addresses and search terms
Explaining the differences between client-side and server-side scripting

Most of my friends and coworkers have NO idea what a IP address is. They even misunderstand simple concepts like what a web server is. It makes every day conversation really annoying when I can't explain to my friends the most basic things about my job as a web developer. We use the web every more and more every day, the average Joe should be able to explain at least some of its simple components. More useful than knowing about oak trees, IMO.

Irrelevant to your friends' employment perhaps? (1)

fantomas (94850) | about a year ago | (#45271609)

Not knowing the difference between the web and the internet or understanding what IP addresses are does not reduce the employment chances of many people. It maybe more useful than knowing about oak trees (unless you're a carpenter, furniture maker or tree surgeon) but I don't think a lot of taxi drivers / accountants / airline pilots / office workers are too bothered.

not completely pointless (1)

CaptainNerdCave (982411) | about a year ago | (#45271479)

You've never worked a helpdesk, have you? There are few things more painful than spending 40 minutes on a call with someone who can't figure out how to copy and paste, or type their username and password into the provided and labeled fields.

These are people working for some of the biggest engineering firms in the world. I only wish I were joking.

4chan badge (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264293)

Who wants to show off having earned their 4chan badge?

Re:4chan badge (4, Funny)

narcc (412956) | about a year ago | (#45264999)

What do I do if I I see someone wearing a 4chan badge? Should I call the police?

I feel like I should call the police.

Overlooked the actual need for literacy... (1)

qubezz (520511) | about a year ago | (#45264305)

>> Community Participation Getting involved in web communities and understanding their practices

  • Encouraging participation in web communities
  • Using constructive criticism in a group or community setting
  • Configuring settings within tools used by online communities
  • Participating in both synchronous and asynchronous discussions
  • Expressing opinions appropriately in web discussions
  • and Defining different terminology used within online communities

WTF? TL;DR.

Re:Overlooked the actual need for literacy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264575)

This sounds like the kind of shit anthro grad students were babbling about Second Life [peterlang.com] and the new forms of community enabled by online presence... until they realized that the only people on Second Life were anthro grad students trying to find some sort of new form of community enabled by online presence about which to write an article.

Seriously, the internet is a set of tools created by geniuses to be used by idiots. The no-docs, no-training-needed factor was a (the?) major part of the popular adoption of those sets of tools.

Re:Overlooked the actual need for literacy... (1)

fatphil (181876) | about a year ago | (#45264815)

Plenty of whatthefuckery within. From their wiki page:
"""
Who is using Open Badges?
        * User stories -- Hypothetical examples of how badges can help solve problems in everyday scenarios.
"""

So, if top of the list of people using it are "hypothetical examples", can we assume that the real "Who is using Open Badges?" FAQ answer should be "Basically nobody - only me and my imaginary friends."?

read, write & participate (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#45264395)

Why do you need to do all three? Many people use the Web as a data feed, and don't do any of this "Web 2.0" stuff - not I, since clearly I'm participating here. Why assume everyone is a 15yo girl on Facebook? Why even have a spec?

Re:read, write & participate (1)

fatphil (181876) | about a year ago | (#45264847)

Who knows, who cares.

All I know is that when these catch on, twisted fuckers like me will make up a whole bunch of fake ones in order to dilute them to a level where they can be safely ignored.

I think I'll offer read, write, and participate badges for "goatse".
Probably offer an "NSA" badge too. If you think you've had your mail read by the NSA, then you can have one of those.

Simple Web Literacy (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264423)

Knowing not to visit sites with "goatse" in the url is literacy enough.

Re:Simple Web Literacy (4, Informative)

techno-vampire (666512) | about a year ago | (#45265475)

Oh, I don't know. The first time you click on a goatse link can be an eye opening experience. Or, of course, if your tastes don't run that way, an eye closing experience. In either case, it will probably be an experience you'll never forget, even if you want to.

Re:Simple Web Literacy (1)

ExCEPTION (102399) | about a year ago | (#45266453)

Are you sure that only eyes were opening?

RMS will fail to make the grade (2)

fatphil (181876) | about a year ago | (#45264599)

So would I, I'm sure. It'll be some modeish clap-trap that many greybeards will have rejected as not sufficiently better than what we were doing before 99% of the current internet population had even heard of the net.

Know how to say HELO, or GOMFL!

Want people to know what they're doing online? (4, Insightful)

sootman (158191) | about a year ago | (#45264709)

Step 1: ALWAYS SHOW THE FUCKING STATUS BAR! (Firefox, Safari.) And make it the whole width of the window. (Chrome) And it should do exactly ONE thing: show the exact, complete URL of a link you're hovering over.

That is all.

Actually, wait, it isn't. Step 2: ALWAYS SHOW THE ENTIRE URL IN THE URL BAR -- INCLUDING the protocol and all the other ugly bits. In one color text. Again, as much as the width of the window will allow you to see. MAYBE put the main domain in bold so it looks like www.bankofamerica.ihaxxoryou.com/give/me/your/money. But let me turn that off if I know what I'm doing.

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264777)

I'm reading Slashdot?! How did that happen I don't even.

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (1)

fatphil (181876) | about a year ago | (#45264895)

I just went to their standards webpage, and right at the top was greeted by this:
"""
Your browser may lack functionality needed by Webmaker to function properly. Please upgrade your browser for an improved experience.
"""

Skroo yoo! I like w3m, I can run it in a screen that I can pick up from an SSH session. (Likewise lynx and links, I'm not saying anything against those.) Whatever kid was behind this "standard" can get of my bloody lawn!

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45265563)

Contrary to how you might feel, showing people too much information can be counter-productive. Web literacy is about teaching people about these things so they know what to look out for. There's a reason that some of the URL is hidden in modern browsers, and it's not "because it looks prettier". The status bar was even more of a potentially-misleading article, and thankfully Firefox now shows you the URL without the risk of showing you whatever a malicious site might want you to see. Maybe not for us "give me back my simpler Mosaic times!" types, but them's the breaks.

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45268407)

There's a reason that some of the URL is hidden in modern browsers, and it's not "because it looks prettier".

and pray tell what is this misterious reason? The only reason I ever heard was 'its intimidating to users' (because they don't know what it means) and "we're just doing what chrome does"

In the same way they tought us in school what the format of a postal adress is, and what the different parts are, they should be teaching people what a url is and what the different parts of that are.

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (1)

dtremenak (893336) | about a year ago | (#45266013)

I think the browser you're looking for is Seamonkey. The status bar is always visible. The status bar shows exact link URLs. The URL bar shows the entire, exact URL, with the main domain in black and the rest in dark grey (same visual effect as bolding, but without changing character width, so it's easier to read).

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45267587)

SeaMonkey is great, but there's no mouse gestures extension for it. A bit of a deal-breaker for me, sadly.

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (1)

Dagger2 (1177377) | about a year ago | (#45270825)

That's not the problem the GP is talking about. The problem is the default configuration of the browsers most people are using.

People who know what they're doing can change the configuration or seek out alternatives. However, in order to become a "person that knows what they're doing", you need to start somewhere. How are people ever going to learn about URLs if you munge the address bar?

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (1)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | about a year ago | (#45266285)

Step 3: Show a throbber when a page is loading. IE doesn't give any indication that it is doing something.

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45266659)

This does not really work if someone wants to deceive you. You can hover it all you want but the URL you go to might be completely different. For example (at least for me at the time of writing) if you do a Google search and hover the results you might get something like slashdot.org, but if you click (or right-click to copy it) it changes the URL to Google's own which then redirects you to the real one.

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (1)

sootman (158191) | about a year ago | (#45268449)

That's because they're using javascript to show you the URL you'll wind up at, but they bounce you through their own click-logger first. Like I said, "it should do exactly ONE thing: show the exact, complete URL of a link you're hovering over" -- which is to say, do NOT be altered by javascript or anything else.

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45268961)

That's always annoyed the piss outta me. Why would they even make the URL display text modifiable in the first place? I mean, that just screams 'exploit vector'...

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (1)

Dagger2 (1177377) | about a year ago | (#45270585)

They don't: dom.disable_window_status_change is true by default in Firefox. Google changes the actual destination of the link when you click on it. You can see it in action if you click and hold the mouse button (and if you drag the mouse off of the link before letting go of the mouse button, you'll note that the link destination stays set to Google's redirector.)

Personally, I disable Javascript on google.com with YesScript [mozilla.org] (which causes them to serve the plain HTML version of the search results, which has the outbound tracking addresses in each link from the start) then use this userscript to rewrite the links:

for (let link of document.querySelectorAll("a"))
    if (link.href.match(/\/url\?q=([^&]+)/))
        link.href = decodeURIComponent(RegExp.$1);

Re:Want people to know what they're doing online? (1)

nmr_andrew (1997772) | about a year ago | (#45271035)

I was going to mod up, but:

1. You're already at +5

2. I just looked up and here is the content of my URL bar: http://news.slashdot.org/story/13/10/28/2241252/web-literacy-standard-announced-by-mozilla

So, it at least looks like FF 24 can do what you want - even the main domain is in bold (ok, actually it's normal, the rest is slightly greyed out). The URL bar is only about half the width of the browser window, however. I unfortunately do not remember what "new" setting I had to unchange to restore this behavior.

Badges? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45264821)

What does this even mean? I got up to the "issuing open badges" bit in the summary, and now I just have a mental picture of people facing Web Literacy Gym Leaders.

Re:Badges? (1)

gmhowell (26755) | about a year ago | (#45264927)

We don't need no steenkin' badges.

oops, free badge : ) (1)

tibman (623933) | about a year ago | (#45264823)

Anyone else notice that leaving noscript on shows you all the answers and just gives you the badge?

Re:oops, free badge : ) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45265005)

On which one? This one was about as crappy as I'd expect from my local librarian: http://toolness.github.io/hackasaurus-parable/navigator-badge/

Re:oops, free badge : ) (1)

SeaFox (739806) | about a year ago | (#45265679)

Anyone else notice that leaving noscript on shows you all the answers and just gives you the badge?

If you're versed enough in Internet browsers to use NoScript and not have it ruin your normal web experience, you should be able to pass the test with flying colors anyway.

Ok (0)

The Cat (19816) | about a year ago | (#45265277)

Step One in a licensing scheme for Internet use?

I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45265317)

Do any of these standardisers know what "top-posting" is and why it's a waste of human bandwidth?

A web literacy test for Mozilla (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45265471)

Question 1: The data language that defines the structure of a web page is:

a) HTML
b) Javascript

Question 2: Your web browser is at version 4.1.2. You make some minor changes to the code base. The next version of your web browser will be:

a) 4.1.3
b) 37

Question 3: The web standard for full-color animated images is:

a) MNG
b) Verboten

Question 4: This extensible feature allows a browser to load non-standard data formats:

a) Plug-ins
b) A hard-coded component for each format, each of which requires optional features be turned on

Question 5: Your browser does not support a certain feature in the web standards. You should:

a) Add a feature request in your bug tracking system
b) Get the feature removed from the next version of the web standards and close any related feature requests in your bug tracking system.

Question 6: Your browser does support a certain feature in the web standards, like tbody scrollbars. You should:

a) Celebrate
b) Get the feature removed from the next version of the web standards, remove it from the browser, and close any related feature requests in your bug tracking system.

Question 7: You don't feel like implementing all of XHTML2 in your browser. You should:

a) Implement the good parts, skip the bad parts, and develop alternatives to the bad parts.
b) Break XHTML1 pages so developers get a bad feeling about anything with XHTML in the name, then promote an alternate standard that is intentionally incompatible with both versions of XHTML.

Question 8: You have an idea for a completely new web feature like cookies or scripting or a common gateway interface. You should:

a) Send an RFC to developers, collect feedback, implement it, document it, and publish an open-source implementation.
b) Wait for the W3 to act.

Question 9: A certain browser feature is found to be a severe threat to user privacy and security. You should:

a) Develop measures to protect users.
b) Remove the option to disable it.

Question 10: A user who wishes to view the source of a dynamically generated web page can:

a) Select 'view source'
b) Eat a dick

Re:A web literacy test for Mozilla (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45266313)

Question 1: The data language that defines the structure of a web page is:

a) HTML
b) Javascript

c) Microdata! Oh wait, that died. RDFa Lite!

Question 2: Your web browser is at version 4.1.2. You make some minor changes to the code base. The next version of your web browser will be:

a) 4.1.3
b) 37

c) 4.2.0 since you didn't say the minor changes were only for security/stability. What, you didn't think SeaMonkey counts in this Mozilla quiz?

Question 3: The web standard for full-color animated images is:

a) MNG
b) Verboten

c) I'd say aPNG, but since you didn't limit it to binary images: SVG with SMIL.

Question 4: This extensible feature allows a browser to load non-standard data formats:

a) Plug-ins
b) A hard-coded component for each format, each of which requires optional features be turned on

c) A newly added-on extension to the plug-in system [google.com] that you came up with but decided not to implement yourself.

Question 5: Your browser does not support a certain feature in the web standards. You should:

a) Add a feature request in your bug tracking system
b) Get the feature removed from the next version of the web standards and close any related feature requests in your bug tracking system.

c) Send an RFC to developers for a better standard [mozilla.org] , collect feedback, implement it, document it, and publish an open-source implementation.

Question 6: Your browser does support a certain feature in the web standards, like tbody scrollbars. You should:

a) Celebrate
b) Get the feature removed from the next version of the web standards, remove it from the browser, and close any related feature requests in your bug tracking system.

c) Hold on valiantly to MathML [htmlpad.org] while every other browser removes support.

Question 7: You don't feel like implementing all of XHTML2 in your browser. You should:

a) Implement the good parts, skip the bad parts, and develop alternatives to the bad parts.
b) Break XHTML1 pages so developers get a bad feeling about anything with XHTML in the name, then promote an alternate standard that is intentionally incompatible with both versions of XHTML.

c) Get over yourself and use HTML5

Question 8: You have an idea for a completely new web feature like cookies or scripting or a common gateway interface. You should:

a) Send an RFC to developers, collect feedback, implement it, document it, and publish an open-source implementation.
b) Wait for the W3 to act.

c) File an enhancement bug and watch it get resolved WONTFIX.

Question 9: A certain browser feature is found to be a severe threat to user privacy and security. You should:

a) Develop measures to protect users.
b) Remove the option to disable it.

c) Add this to the bookmarks toolbar> about:config?filter=javascript.enabled

Question 10: A user who wishes to view the source of a dynamically generated web page can:

a) Select 'view source'
b) Eat a dick

c) Ctrl A, right-click -> View Selected Source, or just Ctrl Shift C

someone call an editor! stat! (1)

coaxial (28297) | about a year ago | (#45265803)

The Web Literacy Standard: a map of the territory for the skills and competencies Mozilla and community think are important to get better at to more effectively read, write & participate on the Web.

Who ever wrote that run-on sentence needs to some old fashioned literacy,

Re:someone call an editor! stat! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45266007)

It reads like a mission statement. That's a genre in and of itself, and it has rules, one of which is that it should be incomprehensible to the average reader as a sign that it is in fact, in the final analysis, meaningless. Another rule is that the mission statement must be one "sentence" (for whatever value of "sentence" would horrify even Cicero's periodic prose style). Another, that every stakeholder should have a say in what goes into that "sentence," which for any number of stakeholders greater than one means that the sentence would, in fact, be a paragraph comprising several or many sentences, were the mission statement written in a different genre.

"Map of the territory" sounds like educational/academic jargon (eduspeak, as they themselves call it) inspired by, eventually, literary figures like Borges, but also all sorts of humanities fields like religious studies; see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Map–territory_relation [wikipedia.org] . That kind of jargon is always a good clue that the authors are too far up in the ivory tower to be rescued by an army of well-meaning princes with any sort of expediency. "Web Literacy," really, would have been a good clue of that too: as someone pointed out above, there's no real need for "web literacy" because the web has undergone generations of evolutionary change to ensure that the dumbest people on the planet can buy glittering trash through it. Anything requiring the remotest bit of "literacy" got naturally/market selected out of the system in the 90's, back when concepts like "web literacy" were still somewhat in vogue. Thanks to Herculean efforts at improving human interface and user-friendly designs, not to mention the bankruptcies of anyone who didn't pay attention to those changes, anyone of any age, from the cradle's tender innocence to the aged grandparent's wisdom, can watch live streaming porn and leave insightful political commentary underneath the footers of important news stories. No one needs to be trained to do so, nor are "badges" ever going to be anything more than a joke.

re No. More. Money. (1)

jelizondo (183861) | about a year ago | (#45266121)

Dear Mozilla:

I have been sending money your way because I thought it was used to develop Firefox and Thunderbird and other useful code; but for this shite, I rather keep my money.

What's next? The Al Gore achievement award?

Jeez!

Obligatory: We don't need no steenking badges (1)

istartedi (132515) | about a year ago | (#45266133)

I can't believe nobody has said "we don't need no steenking badges" yet, or pointed out that the exact lines of the quote are different [youtube.com]

Mozilla announced version 1.0 of the spec (1)

globalist (1332141) | about a year ago | (#45266365)

I expect version 20.0 by December.

Well ... (1)

cascadingstylesheet (140919) | about a year ago | (#45266997)

... if anything can tame lame social networking and blogs about cats, it would be throwing stifling academia and certifications at it.

People would lose interest in the net in no time.

Google and JavaScript required (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45267827)

This is the first lesson. You cannot participate without Google and JavaScript: the discussion forum is on Google and the Mozilla wiki requires registering an account which requires filling in a Google captcha, which requires using JavaScript...

This teaches centralized dependency and ignoring best practices regarding privacy and security, not cool Mozilla.

unstable UIs (1)

doom (14564) | about a year ago | (#45269167)

web literacy: don't use software where the "designers" claim the right to broadcast UI changes to you at their whim.

Blind Leading th Blind (1)

0xG (712423) | about a year ago | (#45269207)

to get better at to more effectively read, write & participate on the Web

Did someone say literacy?

Consider the Alternative (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45276439)

This is both useful and important. This will be a great resource for teachers, for example. The alternatives (and they already exist) are copyright maximalist propaganda programs and vendor backed "teaching aids" which mainly push proprietary software (looking at you, Microsoft!). The Mozilla people have a proven track record of dedication to the principles of an open Internet, a solid reputation, and the kind of name recognition that can get them accepted in schools.

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