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Magma Reservoir Under Yellowstone Is Much Bigger Than Previously Thought

Soulskill posted about 9 months ago | from the journey-to-the-center-of-wyoming dept.

Earth 93

schwit1 writes "The reservoir of molten rock underneath Yellowstone National Park in the United States is at least two and a half times larger than previously thought. Despite this, the scientists who came up with this latest estimate say that the highest risk in the iconic park is not a volcanic eruption but a huge earthquake. Jamie Farrell, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Utah, mapped the underlying magma reservoir by analyzing data from more than 4,500 earthquakes. Seismic waves travel more slowly through molten rock than through solid rock, and seismometers can detect those changes. The images show that the reservoir resembles a 4,000-cubic-kilometer underground sponge, with 6–8% of it filled with molten rock. It underlies most of the Yellowstone caldera and extends a little beyond it to the northeast."

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93 comments

free power (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276329)

time for a big old geothermal plant?

Re: free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276385)

Until the crust becomes unstable, causing a massive extinction level erruption and consuming our stargate.

Re: free power (5, Insightful)

cffrost (885375) | about 9 months ago | (#45276675)

Until the crust becomes unstable, causing a massive extinction level erruption and consuming our stargate.

Yes, but we won't need the power plant following an ELE — this power plant would be self-decommissioning at the exact moment we're finished using it. Also, couldn't this power plant potentially extend its (and our) own service-life (should this be the risk that does us in...) by transferring energy from the caldera in a less abrupt manner?

Re: free power (2)

RMingin (985478) | about 9 months ago | (#45280689)

JOR-EL! We've told you again and again, the Kryptonian geothermal power systems are SAFE! If you don't stop this scaremongering campaign, the council will have you censured! Charges may be filed in the Hall of Justice!

Re: free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45281157)

Sending a clear signal to a near cluster of wraith hives that will arrive on halloween night

Re: free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45281627)

Until the crust becomes unstable, causing a massive extinction level erruption and consuming our stargate.

Until Doctor Who (third doctor, Jon Pertwee) shows up in Bessie to save the day.

Re: free power (1)

Flere Imsaho (786612) | about 9 months ago | (#45285403)

We should have buried that thing long ago, anyway.

Re:free power (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 9 months ago | (#45276571)

No, far better to have loads of medium sized ones spread all over.

Re:free power (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 9 months ago | (#45278793)

It would be however the issue of finding sites with hot rock means you are stuck with big volcanic ones or a slightly larger number of ones with a lower temperature difference. In a few places there are efforts to survey for possible geothermal sites under existing power transmission lines but I haven't heard of any success.
Sadly there hasn't been much success even in obvious non-volcanic hot spots. It gets very expensive to drill down well beyond a kilometre.

Re:free power (1)

blue trane (110704) | about 9 months ago | (#45280119)

I was just in Butte, Montana where they have a park on the grounds of former copper mines that drilled holes a mile deep, in the early 20th century. How expensive could it be, with our improved technology?

Re:free power (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 9 months ago | (#45282885)

First off, most oil wells in America are currently drilled at 6000-10000' feet deep. That is, 1.5 - ~3 KM deep. Secondly, many of those oil wells have temps of 125-150C.
With fractional drilling and the pump out of these areas, one smart idea is to drill and bend at around 12K' under a number of oil wells that are mostly spent. Then use that to push either water or CO2 through and heat up.

Now, as to Yellowstone, you can drill less than 1000' and hit loads of places with LOTS of heat. And yeah, they have mapped it already. What is missing is that the laws forbid it, yet, I think that they are making horrible mistakes. A simple binary system would work great there. AND, it could be used to return large amounts of minerals that can be pulled from the water.

Re:free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45285495)

A simple binary system would work great there. AND, it could be used to return large amounts of minerals that can be pulled from the water.

You know what mineral is dissolved in Yellowstone waters? Geyserite [wikipedia.org] . It's like limescale, only even less valuable and harder to remove from your pipes.

Yellowstone is pretty much useless for mineral extraction: the deep rocks are magmatic basalt, and the shallow rocks are basalt derivatives. I suppose you could extract silicon, magnesium, iron, or aluminum from them, but there are other ores that are far, far easier to work with. It's half the reason why Yellowstone is a national park; the other half is that you can't farm land that gets snowed on in July.

Re:free power (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 9 months ago | (#45286445)

Much deeper than that so far (~5km from memory for a "close to surface" geothermal heat source) and those deep oil wells were not cheap anyway. Google for "hot wet rock" - maybe with the net being what it is add "geothermal" :)
It's interesting stuff but the costs have made development of a pilot plant very slow.

Volcanic stuff in comparison is obvious and already in production use in at least two countries.

Re:free power (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 9 months ago | (#45287839)

You will find that most of the current active geo-thermal systems are located close to the surface (like 1000-3000' down).
And I think that you were looking for hot dry rock(Australian) or EGS (USA) for enhanced geothermal system is what you are looking for.
Now, for being able to drill most anywhere, you need to go deeper with a supply well that pushes a working fluid through cracks out to other collection wells that then generate steam. This concept was developed in America back in the 70's, but was stopped by reagan.
You will find that about 10 different implementation have/are being done. 2 are worth looking at, which is the Aussie's project (google for australia geo-thermal habenero and that should tell you something ).
The other big one is America's EGS over in Oregon. It is located by an extinct volcano (newberry) and like the Aussie project is moving forward and looking good.

Re:free power (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 9 months ago | (#45288765)

Yes that's the sort of stuff I meant - good summary there. I've been following the slow progress of two Australian projects over the last decade and a bit. Drilling deep holes costs a lot more than those projects can easily obtain. In one of those projects it's effectively natural nuclear power :)
Getting enough of a temperature difference for electricity generation isn't easy that way - very deep or volcanic are the options. If you lower the bar even more to heat pumps however then you don't have to go very deep to get enough of a temperature difference - I think the water in the flooded mine tunnels under Glasgow is being used in such a project with suitable sites in about half of the city. The numbers I heard on that were 4W of heat moved for every 1W of input - source was a "naked scientist" podcast I heard yesterday but I think it was recorded some months ago.

Re:free power (5, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 9 months ago | (#45276743)

time for a big old geothermal plant?

Several companies have applied for permits to build geothermal plants near Yellowstone Park. So far all applications have been denied, by either the federal government or the state of Montana, out of concern that they would adversely affect the geothermal features of the park. We need to understand the geology better before we start tapping the heat.

Re:free power (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 9 months ago | (#45276815)

The one group that did it was a religious nut group who also did an open system. And yeah, it had an impact. So now, we are insane in our action. We need to allow small ones with binary to go in there and test these, and then raise them up from small to medium.

Re:free power (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about 9 months ago | (#45278835)

What are you even talking about? Power plants with "binary"?

Re:free power (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 9 months ago | (#45282915)

binary power plants, are basically, closed cycles. That is, they pull up steam or CO2 and then use that to heat water or even ammonia, while the original steam/CO2 is re-inected back into the ground. Note that the secondary steam/ammonia drives the generators.

Re:free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45286757)

I think the word "need" in your last sentence is a bit excessive. We don't "need" to do anything.

Re:free power (4, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | about 9 months ago | (#45276871)

No, politicians and bureaucrats need to understand mathematics better so that they realize exactly how much heat you'd have to remove to start influencing geological events. Especially ones that measure 4000 km3...

Re:free power (4, Interesting)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 9 months ago | (#45277023)

No, politicians and bureaucrats need to understand mathematics better so that they realize exactly how much heat you'd have to remove to start influencing geological events.

It may be less than you realize. According to the National Park Service [nps.gov] : In Iceland and New Zealand, geothermal drill holes and wells 2.5 - 6.2 miles distant have reduced geyser activity and hot spring discharge.

There may be 4000km^3 of magma, but if the geysers and GT plants are both using the same topmost 0.001%, there can be an effect.

Re:free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45278147)

Or maybe it's a case of "correlation vs. causation". Since I am most definitely not an expert on geyser's, but know my statistics, that seems like a possible scenario.

And even IF geysers reduced their activity: Wouldn't the insane amount of cheap and ecologically neutral energy be a good argument to ignore the cost of losing some geysers? Better than chopping up bats and birds of prey in windfarms, I guess.

Re:free power (1)

Alomex (148003) | about 9 months ago | (#45278743)

Can we do away with the "correlation vs causation" meme every time someone quotes a study? This might be news to you but 99% of scientists already know this and control for it. But more importantly, in matters like this a correlation is enough to stop building until a proper explanation path is developed.

Re:free power (1)

Will.Woodhull (1038600) | about 9 months ago | (#45279707)

The power would be cheap, once we got past the start-up costs of moving all USA industry to Montana and Wyoming. Otherwise, the cost of transmitting all that power to current points of consumption would be rather spendy. Not to mention that if it snows those lines down south would be a real strain for the Wichita Lineman [youtube.com] , and all the rest of us who would prefer to remember the song rather than once again hearing it constantly wherever fine muzak is played.

Re:free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45287271)

The power would be cheap, once we got past the start-up costs...

Wasn't the same said about nuclear power?

Re:free power (1)

Applehu Akbar (2968043) | about 9 months ago | (#45291137)

Yes, but I see an advantage to the Yellowstone scheme: when building the plant attracts the usual assortment of luddite yammerhead protesters, we could send in the bison and the grizzlies to take care of them. We could call it sustainable reuse of biological materials.

Re:free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45280065)

Or maybe it's a case of "correlation vs. causation". Since I am most definitely not an expert on geyser's

Yes, we can tell you're no expert on ANYTHING. Experts have been to college, you didn't even graduate high school, Mr. Greengrocer. There is no "correlation vs causation; there is no animosity between the two. If there is a correlation there is a 75% chance of causation. If A correlates to B, it's either A causes B (impossible if B preceeds A), B causes A (impossible if A precedes B), both A and B are caused by C, or coincidence.

Your grocer's apostrophe shows you to be an uneducated fool, BTW.

Re:free power (1)

g0bshiTe (596213) | about 9 months ago | (#45280579)

Yes and no,

The problem is it's a National Park and as such protected from things such as this.

The loss of say Old Faithful would be a loss of a national and natural treasure.

Something that's been there for eons and we have to ruin it to pay a few cents on the dollar less for electricity.

Re:free power (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 9 months ago | (#45306959)

You could probably even power a pump to make a "fake" geyser to keep the tourists happy :)

Re:free power (3, Insightful)

quantaman (517394) | about 9 months ago | (#45278197)

No, politicians and bureaucrats need to understand mathematics better so that they realize exactly how much heat you'd have to remove to start influencing geological events. Especially ones that measure 4000 km3...

While cheap geothermal would be nice I actually don't mind if they're hesitant to start poking the magma filled bubble that is eventually going to burst and wipe out the continent.

Re:free power (1)

JDG1980 (2438906) | about 9 months ago | (#45279423)

While cheap geothermal would be nice I actually don't mind if they're hesitant to start poking the magma filled bubble that is eventually going to burst and wipe out the continent.

Wouldn't poking holes in the caldera help keep it from building up pressure, therefore making an eruption less likely, not more?

Re:free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45279567)

Yes. Just like poking a hole in a balloon will keep it from building up pressure, therefore making the balloon less likely to burst.

Re:free power (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 9 months ago | (#45281117)

What is indeed true during nearly the entire lifetime of the baloon.

Re:free power (1)

Velox_SwiftFox (57902) | about 9 months ago | (#45278651)

it is 80km x 20 km x 2.5 km? Not clear in article.

Re:free power (1)

Alomex (148003) | about 9 months ago | (#45278665)

Actually every experimental deep geothermal hole we've dug so far had measurable impacts on geyser an even earthquake activity. I believe in geothermal as a great source of energy, but evidence thus far suggests we should proceed with caution.

Re:free power (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 9 months ago | (#45279923)

Businesses have an addiction to expansion. And they aren't going to be happy with the government saying "Alright, you've tapped enough, close that big fancy plant you built." It will be one plant this year with no effect. Then it will be more for longer. Then they'll be funding studies disputing anthropogenic geothermal change. "Old Faithful was going to stop erupting a decade after we started anyway. Besides, JOBS!"

Perhaps there's enough heat to tap without any effects, just I'd rather err on the side of not allowing greedy people to plunder a national treasure until we know it's actually a hazard not to.

Re:free power (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45280543)

Perhaps there's enough heat to tap without any effects, just I'd rather err on the side of not allowing greedy people to plunder a national treasure until we know it's actually a hazard not to.

You mean the national treasure that is a huge frackin' time bomb, just waiting to explode and kill us all? I'd rather lose Old Faithful its kin than lose the continent.

Re:free power (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 9 months ago | (#45284875)

Read the whole line you quoted. Lets be sure it's actually a hazard and actually will be solved by plundering it first.

Re:free power (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45277293)

time for a big old geothermal plant?

And they say the biggest threat to Yellowstone is an earthquake...

Re:free power (0, Flamebait)

gmuslera (3436) | about 9 months ago | (#45278419)

What the worst thing that could happen? At least this time US (or what remain of it, another possitive effect) will not deny that they caused a climate change giving free pass to a greedy corporation to build it. And as a plus, global warming will not be a concern for long time.

Honestly, i would not let a squirrel plant an acorn [youtube.com] around there, much less someone building a big bad geotermal plant. Maybe we won't change nothing, but if shit happens, it will be big.

Re:free power (1)

operagost (62405) | about 9 months ago | (#45281063)

You forget, AC, that we are surrounded by liquid hot MAG-MA.

Geothermal has its problems too- pollution, quakes (1)

peter303 (12292) | about 9 months ago | (#45281085)

There are very few "perfect" energy sources in the world, and geothermal has its pecticular share of issues.
The brines associated with geothermal have all kinds of chemicals ike sulfates and metals. They need to be disposed of. This was the chief complaint in not allowing geothermal in Hawaii.
If you create your own fluid circulation system, i.e. inject water to heat up, then run a dynamo, then you risk induced-quakes. These have been associatred with numerous injection geothermal systems in California and Phillipines. And non-geothermal water disposed has cause quaks in several Colorado sites, Switerlandm, Oklahoma, near fracking areas, and so on.

Re:Geothermal has its problems too- pollution, qua (1)

BranMan (29917) | about 9 months ago | (#45290607)

And why is that necessarily a bad thing? The way I look at it if tapping geothermal causes quakes, then quakes were going to happen anyway - eventually. And the longer between quakes, the worse they are. That seems obvious - more time for energy to build up, release more energy at once, worse quake.

I rather trade an earthquake that's a 2 or 3 on the scale every year than wait for the 100 year one that hits with an 11.5!

no supervolcano? (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 9 months ago | (#45276363)

where's my *DOOM*??? we can't even get a 1 mile asteroid to come closer than 2.4 times the earth-moon distance in the forseeable future. (1997 XF11 in 2028)

Re:no supervolcano? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276403)

Ok, how about if a 1 mile wide asteroid smashes into the Yellowstone lava pit and it all explodes and the planet splits in half! Awesome!

Re:no supervolcano? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276517)

Red half, blue half?

Re:no supervolcano? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276581)

You mean red 1/million and blue 999,999 millionth? This was about splitting the planet, not America.

Re:no supervolcano? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45277703)

Don't worry, we have created sufficient terrorists to keep the population afraid.

Re:no supervolcano? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45278007)

FWIW, that's 1ft 4in across the entire USA.

Technodrome! (2)

antifoidulus (807088) | about 9 months ago | (#45276387)

Obviously what is happening is that the Shredder and Krang have been creating magma in their magma-factory inside the Technodrome. They are obviously planning something sinister, so we need to send some turtles, perhaps turtles trained in ninjutsu, down there to set things straight.

Re:Technodrome! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276435)

Michaelangelo [imgur.com] was my favorite ninja turtle.

No, wait, it was Raphael.

-- Ethanol-fueled

Re:Technodrome! (1)

phluid61 (2501032) | about 9 months ago | (#45276673)

Michaelangelo [imgur.com] was my favorite ninja turtle.

No, wait, it was Raphael.

But Donatello does machines! (No GIF while I'm at work)

Re:Technodrome! (1)

_merlin (160982) | about 9 months ago | (#45276899)

Raphael's cool but rude, which I imagine is how our ethanol-fuelled friend likes to see himself.

Be afraid (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276389)

The last Caldera in that region of the country morphed into The SCO Group.

Re:Be afraid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45277291)

The SCO Group does appear to be experiencing occasional minor ascensions. Should we be all running while holding our breath soon?

Re:Be afraid (2)

tobiasly (524456) | about 9 months ago | (#45280077)

The last Caldera in that region of the country morphed into The SCO Group.

Luckily for us they were able to arrange their own extinction-level event before becoming a danger.

Postdocs (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276407)

them and their fucking findings.

Re:Postdocs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45287385)

What's the matter? Annoyed that you didn't qualify for grad school?

Alright, don't worry, I have experience. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276419)

I've played a lot of Minecraft, and what we need to do is dig down to the Magma layer so we can get some diamonds and obsidian. This we can then use to make a portal to the Nether, which we will then enter to be safe from the perilous scourge of the pigmen.

  Everybody get to punching.

Re:Alright, don't worry, I have experience. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45277265)

When I saw this article I knew there'd be a minecraft joke.

Re:Alright, don't worry, I have experience. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45277331)

I actually played lots of dwarf fortress and magma has alot more 'fun' uses in it ;)

Re:Alright, don't worry, I have experience. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45277495)

Aren't pigmen native to the nether?

Re:Alright, don't worry, I have experience. (2)

Jesus_666 (702802) | about 9 months ago | (#45277925)

Digging down to the deepest layers of the world sounds great at first but then someone carelessly shoots a Voodoo Demon and next thing we know we're neck-deep in unicorns and somersauting tortoises. Thanks but no.

Re:Alright, don't worry, I have experience. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45280437)

Digging down to the deepest layers of the world sounds great at first but then someone carelessly shoots a Voodoo Demon and next thing we know we're neck-deep in unicorns and somersauting tortoises. Thanks but no.

As if we have the technology to defeat WoF.

Re:Alright, don't worry, I have experience. (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about 9 months ago | (#45278153)

what we need to do is dig down to the Magma layer so we can get some diamonds and obsidian

wouldn't do that... there's probably zerg down there, and if you let them out the protoss will rock up and then we'll all be proper fucked

Re:Alright, don't worry, I have experience. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45282347)

This is exactly how a lot of promising careers in the deep rock mining industry have been derailed.
Get your obsidian... get to the Nether... be jumped by demons immediately and killed... lose your platinum sword forever.
Seen it happen so many times. Destroys families, especially in rural Wyoming and Idaho.

Oh No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276425)

This doesn't give the government an excuse to sell it to Disney or anything, does it?

Geothermal Energy (4, Funny)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 9 months ago | (#45276525)

I'd tap that!

Re:Geothermal Energy (1)

I'm New Around Here (1154723) | about 9 months ago | (#45276687)

You'd burn your tally-wick off!

Re:Geothermal Energy (2)

Jesus_666 (702802) | about 9 months ago | (#45277899)

Careful. I'm relatively certain that Yellowstone Caldera has "(T): Destroy all creatures".

Re:Geothermal Energy (1)

Flere Imsaho (786612) | about 9 months ago | (#45285975)

What are you, the NSA or something?

Quaid... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276553)

Start the reactor.

Oh wait, wrong planet. My bad.

Re:Quaid... (1)

crashumbc (1221174) | about 9 months ago | (#45278823)

ROFL, Well played sir.

p.s. the version with Arnold was the best.

FEAR TIME !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45276587)

For it will come !!

Eventually !!

But you will be long dead !!

And it is for that that you must fear time !!

Time, flowing like a river
Time, beckoning me
Who knows when we shall meet again, if ever
But time keeps flowing like a river into the sea !!

Goodbye my love, maybe for forever
Goodbye my love, the tide waits for me
Who knows when we shall meet again, if ever
But time keeps flowing like a river
On and on
To the sea, to the sea till it's gone forever
Gone forever, gone forevermore

Goodbye my friend, maybe for forever
Goodbye my friend, the stars wait for me
Who knows where we shall meet again, if ever
But time keeps flowing like a river
On and on
To the sea, to the sea till it's gone forever
Gone forever, gone forevermore, forevermore, forevermore

Goddamn global warming! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45277127)

Now it's heating up Yellowstone!

Re:Goddamn global warming! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45277379)

It's not global warming that is going to melt every city on the planet with "liquid hot magma", it's Dr Evil!

Frakking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45277915)

As long as no idiot decides that frakking and oil drilling near that massive doomsday weapon (think "array of supervolcanoes" and "gigatons of dust") is a good idea.

Heck, there is actually a movie about that, too bad I cannot recall the name. It was quite good.

Re:Frakking (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about 9 months ago | (#45278167)

when the value of the US dollar collapses, magma will become the new world reserve currency

Actual Publication (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45278193)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2013.03.022

"Repeating earthquakes in the Yellowstone volcanic field: Implications for rupture dynamics, ground deformation, and migration in earthquake swarms"
Frédérick Massin, Jamie Farrell, Robert B. Smith

Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research
Volume 257, 1 May 2013, Pages 159–173

Re:Actual Publication (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45282019)

"earthquake swarm"

Now there is a new 9th level spell for you.

Highest risk (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 9 months ago | (#45278467)

the highest risk in the iconic park is not a volcanic eruption but a huge earthquake

... that will cause the megaeruption.

Re:Highest risk (1)

JoeMerchant (803320) | about 9 months ago | (#45279037)

This geophysicist seems to have trouble acknowledging existential threats - he's very concerned about earthquakes that kill 28 people, but brushes off events that are 1 million times less likely, yet could kill far more than 28 million people within a year of them happening....

Re:Highest risk (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 9 months ago | (#45279389)

Someone should show him a photo of a black swan [wikipedia.org]

Re:Highest risk (1)

oreiasecaman (2466136) | about 9 months ago | (#45283079)

One black swan is all fine and dandy, at least compared to dragons [wired.com]

Milk on the stove (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45278577)

Maybe it just grew sort of unnoticed?

53 miles long and 28 miles across * 2.5 (1)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about 9 months ago | (#45279275)

Puts the caldera well into Montana and Idaho*

[*] - http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs100-03/ [usgs.gov]

Greaaaaaaaat... (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 9 months ago | (#45280313)

That's like finding out Kim Kardashian's ass is much bigger than originally thought.

One million dollars (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45280977)

We have finally found Dr. Evil's lair.

Good news for Yellowstone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45281497)

Who cares if an earthquake strikes Yellowstone? A volcanic eruption would have a much wider impact.

What is this?! (1)

skaralic (676433) | about 9 months ago | (#45282145)

A magma reservoir for ants?! It has to be at least... 3 times bigger than this!

It's a good idea to frack near this thing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45285881)

Everyone will get some time off from work.

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  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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