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Edward Snowden's New Job: Tech Support

timothy posted about a year ago | from the honest-work dept.

United States 328

Nerval's Lobster writes "Government whistleblower Edward Snowden, exiled in Russia after releasing top-secret documents about the National Security Agency's surveillance activities to the press, has a new job: tech support. Snowden's lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena, told the Associated Press that his client starts work Nov. 1 for a "major" Russian Website, which he declined to name. In June, Snowden—a former CIA employee who worked as a contractor for the NSA—began feeding an enormous pile of classified charts and documents about federal surveillance programs to The Guardian and other newspapers. Many of those documents suggested that the NSA, ordinarily tasked with intercepting communications from terrorists and foreign governments, collects massive amounts of information on ordinary Americans, which in turn ignited a firestorm of controversy. The Snowden revelations have continued into this week, with The Washington Post reporting that the NSA has aggressively targeted Google and Yahoo servers. Snowden's documents suggest that the agency has figured out how to tap the links connecting the two tech giants' datacenters to the broader Web. Google told the Post that it was "troubled" by the report. A Yahoo spokesperson insisted that the company had "strict controls in place to protect the security of our datacenters" and that "we have not given access to our data centers to the NSA or to any other government agency.""

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IT support (5, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#45289849)

"IT support. Have you tried turning the NSA tapping device off and on again?"

Re:IT support (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45289961)

Dammit, it was working fine last week. I had Merkel's phone records, Calderón's e-mails, I even had Rousseff's contact list. Can't you IT people keep anything working!

Re:IT support (1)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#45290151)

Re:IT support (2)

LifesABeach (234436) | about a year ago | (#45290405)

News Flash! AP - (Moscow,Ru) Edward Snowden discovered that the Russian government has tapped into all phones, and internet traffic, globally; film at 11.

Re:IT support (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290445)

two wrongs do not make a right. Especially if you sell yourself as being morally superior (then we find out that your the opposite)...

Re:IT support (2)

Frigga's Ring (1044024) | about a year ago | (#45290537)

While you might have been joking, they have been caught trying. http://www.theverge.com/2013/10/29/5045076/russia-denies-using-poisoned-flash-drives-to-spy-on-g20-attendees [theverge.com]

Re:IT support (4, Insightful)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#45290777)

Much more likely it is an NSA/GCHQ malware USB stick given they have been caught red handed spying at the G20 [theguardian.com] . Even going as far as setting up dummy internet cafes which are a lot more expensive than distributing a few USB sticks.

Accusing Russia at this point of a few malware USB sticks without presenting any hard evidence is really just lame and shows how desperate they are to divert media attention off their own despicable actions (i.e. spying for industrial and economic espionage purposes, G20 has nothing to do with terrorism).

Step forward with the hard evidence if your trying to justify your own criminal actions by accusing others of what you have been caught doing... and even if true it hardly excuses the fact.

Re:IT support (3, Funny)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#45290843)

Accusing Russia at this point of a few malware USB sticks without presenting any hard evidence is really just lame and shows how desperate they are to divert media attention off their own despicable actions (i.e. spying for industrial and economic espionage purposes, G20 has nothing to do with terrorism).

Not nearly as lame as pretending Russia doesn't do it.

Here's a hint guys ... our spy agencies ... SPY ON PEOPLE, ITS THEIR FUCKING JOB. Why the fuck do you guys act surprised or outraged? This has been going on for thousands of years, you're an idiot if Snowden has told you something you didn't know before.

You should be pissed that the NSA is spying on Americans. But you should be more pissed if they weren't spying on leaders of other countries. That is their charter. EVERYONE KNOW IT except apparently a bunch of moron wanna be geeks who seem to be shocked that our spy organization spy on people.

Hell Desk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290051)

I can feel his pain.

Re:Hell Desk (4, Funny)

rvw (755107) | about a year ago | (#45290545)

I can feel his pain.

Then it's your pain, not his.

Re:Hell Desk (3, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#45290861)

I can feel his pain.

Then it's your pain, not his.

In Soviet Russia Snowden feels your pain TOO!

Re:Hell Desk (4, Insightful)

Yomers (863527) | about a year ago | (#45290833)

According to initial tweet on Russian he'll be supporting one of non-government internet portals - more like system administrator, not customer support.

Re:IT support (4, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | about a year ago | (#45290115)

"IT support?"
"Yes."
"I hear a strange noise on my phone."
"It's... cosmic radiation. Yeah. That's it. A whole bunch of cosmic radiation."
[long pause]
"... Tovarisch, you know in this country we do study physics, right?"

Re:IT support (2)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | about a year ago | (#45290707)

Actual most likely job, from the BBC: "Pavel Durov, who founded VKontakte in 2006, invited Mr Snowden through a post on his own webpage to join the company's St Petersburg headquarters to work on data protection."

VK would count as a major website, for sure.

Re:IT support (1)

erikkemperman (252014) | about a year ago | (#45290717)

the Bastard Operator From Hell at El Reg [theregister.co.uk] was looking for helldesk fodder... Coincidence? I think probably so.

SNOWDEN !! DOUBLE-AGENT ?? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45289853)

I think so !!

Re:SNOWDEN !! DOUBLE-AGENT ?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290043)

You thought so before this.

You'd think so even in the face of evidence against it.

Why?

Because you want to think so.

But answer this: if he WERE a double agent, SO WHAT? Does that make the data he got wrong? No. Does it make what the documents say a good thing for the NSA to do? No.

So *even if* you're right and Snowden is a double agent, that has no bearing WHATSOEVER about the crimes the revelations have documented.

Re:SNOWDEN !! DOUBLE-AGENT ?? (4, Insightful)

captainpanic (1173915) | about a year ago | (#45290107)

But answer this: if he WERE a double agent, SO WHAT? Does that make the data he got wrong? No. Does it make what the documents say a good thing for the NSA to do? No.

So *even if* you're right and Snowden is a double agent, that has no bearing WHATSOEVER about the crimes the revelations have documented.

You don't get it. It is not about the data. At this moment the global attention is aimed at the NSA, and it says: "NSA = bad" and "Snowden = good". Some people just want to turn that around, and make it "Snowden = bad", and make people forget about the NSA.

It's really that simple.

Re:SNOWDEN !! DOUBLE-AGENT ?? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290429)

Fuck you mother fucker.... Snowden is a traitor that needs to be killed. Fuck him and fuck you.

Re:SNOWDEN !! DOUBLE-AGENT ?? (1, Informative)

JeffAtl (1737988) | about a year ago | (#45290583)

Snowden did transition from a whistle blower to a spy though. He lost a lot of sympathy when he went down that road.

No. He did not (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290775)

"Snowden did transition from a whistle blower to a spy though"

No. He did not.

He was a whistleblower and remains a whistleblower.

Re:No. He did not (3, Interesting)

isorox (205688) | about a year ago | (#45290821)

"Snowden did transition from a whistle blower to a spy though"

No. He did not.

He was a whistleblower and remains a whistleblower.

He did. Initially the U.S. media were supportive of him as a whistleblower. Their owners and editors then had their briefing, and suddenly actions that were pro-american whistleblowing were anti-american spying.

So yes, he didn't change, but the media's portrayal of him did, and that's what's important.

Re:SNOWDEN !! DOUBLE-AGENT ?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290639)

Yeah, it really IS simple.

Unfortunately, it's simply stupid, isn't it.

It is the same people who say "Oh, oh, don't say bad things about the USA or point out the USA doing bad things, because it's anti-US!".

And the same people whine about how China kills people, has the great firewall, is a real bad person on human rights. And never once think "That's anti-China!" and stop.

However, this current "He's a double agent" doesn't even make a claim on the information! There is no more clean and pure an example of an ad hominem than this! It doesn't even manage to claim the data is wrong, it just goes "The person telling this IS A DOUBLE AGENT!!!".

Re:SNOWDEN !! DOUBLE-AGENT ?? (5, Funny)

CreatureComfort (741652) | about a year ago | (#45290729)

That is so incredibly devious! It take s real fiend to spread rumors and lies this malicious.

NSA Operative: Our public profile is way too high, and this Snowden jerk is winning in the popularity polls. We need to discredit him, quick!
NSA Public Relations Rat: Well, we need to get people to despise Snowden and focus on him and his new antics so we can fade back into the background.
NSA Operative: OK, so who is the most despised group on earth? Terrorists? Traitors?
NSA PRR: No. No. We've been trying that for months, and we just can't get any traction with the press or public. Worse, both those arguments lead back to us and our data.
NSA Operative: How about members of Congress, or the White House?
NSA PRR: You mean get him elected? No good, do you know what a seat in Congress is going for these days? Even our black budget can't afford any more than we already have, and don't even get me started on what a White House position costs now.
NSA Operative: Hmm... pedophile rapist?
NSA PRR: Maybe you're onto something... He is in Russia after-all... Wait! I've got it. The most universally reviled, disgusting, hated group in the world!
NSA Operative: What? What!?
NSA PRR: We'll tell everyone he's....... Tech Support.
NSA Operative: You vicious bastard. Even I couldn't have some up with something so foul. I love you for it.

permissions (5, Funny)

schneidafunk (795759) | about a year ago | (#45289857)

Don't give him root.

Re:permissions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45289909)

snowden ALL=(ALL) ALL

Don't worry, we have an audit trail!

Re:permissions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290033)

Don't give him root.

This.

Agree with what he did or not, he certainly has proven to be unreliable with proprietary information.

I wouldn't trust him with my company's data.

Re:permissions (2)

Reverand Dave (1959652) | about a year ago | (#45290079)

Well, some information is so important that it begs to breach the proprietary wall.

Re:permissions (5, Insightful)

Chatterton (228704) | about a year ago | (#45290177)

If your data's are completely legitimate and show no wrongdoing from the company part, I don't think you should be afraid of him working for your company. A whist-blower is not someone who like to share your data, it is someone who can't bear all the wrongdoing you/your company are doing that he don't see other way to make you stop doing it than showing it to the world hoping that you will change. Generally they are people who have a high level of moral integrity.

Re:permissions (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about a year ago | (#45290241)

Generally they are people who have a high level of moral integrity.

Or at least they think they do... but then again, the people they work against also think they're right, as well. Who exactly gets the absolute right to decide what's ultimately "wrongdoing" as opposed to just "secret"?

Re:permissions (3, Informative)

jbolden (176878) | about a year ago | (#45290269)

Who exactly gets the absolute right to decide what's ultimately "wrongdoing" as opposed to just "secret"?

For the USA, the people of the United States who elected a president that made campaign promises not to do many of the things that Snowden proved they were doing. For corporations the government which they are chartered or acting.

Re:permissions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290383)

For the USA, the people of the United States who elected a president that made campaign promises

And history suggests that this is a good indication of what happens after elections....

Re:permissions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290281)

Generally they are people who have a high level of moral integrity.

Morals are not universal. Perhaps your morals are not 100% compatible?

Re:permissions (5, Informative)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#45290453)

Generally they are people who have a high level of moral integrity.

Morals are not universal.

Oh, the fuck they aren't.

I'm getting pretty fed up with people excusing fucked up behavior by claiming, 'waaah, but morals are hard!'

No, they fucking aren't; you want to be a morally just person? Remember one rule: treat every other person the way you want to be treated. Excluding true sociopaths who are chemically unable to parse the concept, yes, morality really is that simple.

Re:permissions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290331)

I think it's really immoral and wrong that you keep all your money hidden away in a bank account. If I worked for you, it would be my moral obligation to whistle-blow your account number.

Oh, what constitutes a wrongdoing is your opinion, right?

Re:permissions (2)

AchilleTalon (540925) | about a year ago | (#45290745)

I do not agree with this simplistic view. The guy may think you are evil and decide to share your data, it is all left to his own appreciation and judgement. A single guy may destroy a lot of other guys because he believes it is the right thing to do. In some sense, your data is better in the hands of the NSA than in the hands of a free-electron you don't know really what he is thinking and cannot predict what he will do with it..

Sorry to say that, but a whistleblower isn't automagically a good guy with high moral and integrity. You just don't know.

Re:permissions (1)

interval1066 (668936) | about a year ago | (#45290721)

Funny, I have no reason to trust the Gov. with it either, now.

Re:permissions (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290041)

I don't think he'd know what to do with "root" but he might want "administrator" rights or perhaps "domain admin". Likewise, I don't think he'd know what "/" actually is, he's more about "C:\"

.

But this IS slashdot so I'm sure this will start a flame war.. FLAME ON!

Re:permissions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290253)

Yes, before it's too late, if you have an account at MAIL.RU , it might be time to switch email providers and wipe your trash box.

Re:permissions (1)

schlachter (862210) | about a year ago | (#45290459)

Root for Snoden. He's a hero.

Wow, harsh. (5, Funny)

T.E.D. (34228) | about a year ago | (#45289881)

So he hasn't even been arrested yet, and his punishement has already started?

Re:Wow, harsh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45289937)

Yeah, ouch. Apparently being on the opposite side of the world from the US doesn't save you from enhanced interrogation techniques.

I wonder if they'll let him go if he cracks, or if Russia's just amused by his anguished screams.

Re:Wow, harsh. (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | about a year ago | (#45290067)

"IF" he cracks?

Man, I know he's a pretty tough guy but let's be realistic.

His new employer (1)

qbast (1265706) | about a year ago | (#45289887)

He will be tech support for ... FSB

Re:His new employer (0)

auric_dude (610172) | about a year ago | (#45289927)

Edward Snowden to start work at Russian website Former NSA contractor who was granted temporary asylum in June finds job providing support for unnamed site http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/31/edward-snowden-work-russian-website-nsa-contractor [theguardian.com] , must be true as it is reported in TheGuarian. . .

Are you a bot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290155)

Your post is completely incoherent.

Undisclosed web site (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45289895)

Maybe www.fsb.ru?

Thanks to him (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45289911)

The world now is a better and safer place.

.
.
.

OH WAIT!

Re:Thanks to him (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45290035)

He's just the messenger. Whether it gets safer or not is up to us now.

Re:Thanks to him (5, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | about a year ago | (#45290139)

Knowing that there is a ticking bomb under your feet don't automatically disable it, you are not safer than before. But let you take measures to try to be safe in the future, before it explodes in your face. For making the world better you must know where it is broken.

Now *that's* punishment (5, Funny)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about a year ago | (#45289949)

He should've just let them shoot him.

A bunch of lying liars who lie (1, Offtopic)

Dishwasha (125561) | about a year ago | (#45289975)

A Yahoo spokesperson insisted that the company had "strict controls in place to protect the security of our datacenters" and that "we have not given access to our data centers to the NSA or to any other government agency, unless Edward Snowden has evidence that we were cooperating the entire time at which point we will clam up and not be available for comment."

There, fixed that for you unnamed Yahoo spokesperson.

Re:A bunch of lying liars who lie (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290101)

Please mod parent off-topic, we already have another story today for that. Troll is also acceptable, as the poster is completely incorrect in regards to the facts of the story. Check ArsTechnica for the source article.

Poor guy, (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45289981)

Yup, he's got to go to work.
But who would have thought that a contractor would be able to be called a whistle-blower? Or that a snooping agency would have been able be snooping? And that one or the other would be abusing the power of office. Or that the contractors could have two bosses. I wounder...

Re:Poor guy, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290105)

"But who would have thought that a contractor would be able to be called a whistle-blower?"

What is that supposed to be telling anyone?

Taken on face value, this says "people who have evidence of a crime will be called whistleblowers when blowing the whistle on the crime even if they're a contractor".

Well duh.

"Or that a snooping agency would have been able be snooping?"

Ah, you DO know that the NSA were not tasked with "snooping", right?

There's a reason why, for example, the CIA investigate external threats and the FBI investigate internal threats and that it is a bad thing for the CIA to be investigating internal threats EVENE THOUGH "Who would have guessed an investigation organisation would investigate, huh?"

That is because they aren't tasked with "investigate stuff". They have a remit, as do the NSA, and that they stepped outside it.

Think on the recent USA's bellicose attitude to "Chinese cyberwarfare!".

Who would have thought it? An intelligence agency trying to gather intelligence on a foreign government?

Except when it's not the USA doing it, "THIS MEANS WAR!".

Re:Poor guy, (1)

JeffAtl (1737988) | about a year ago | (#45290675)

"Ah, you DO know that the NSA were not tasked with "snooping", right?

There's a reason why, for example, the CIA investigate external threats and the FBI investigate internal threats and that it is a bad thing for the CIA to be investigating internal threats EVENE THOUGH "Who would have guessed an investigation organisation would investigate, huh?"

That is because they aren't tasked with "investigate stuff". They have a remit, as do the NSA, and that they stepped outside it.

As you rightfully pointed out, the NSA snooping internally and sharing it with internal law enforcement are extraordinarily major issues - but that is where it ends. Everything else that Snowden revealed was espionage against the United States.

Foreign intelligence agencies have always spied and snooped so the rest of the world should drop their shocked outrage act.

idiot (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45289991)

since the u.s. claims global jurisdiction over its citizens regardless of where they travel to or reside, and he is still one, now he's gonna have to file taxes.... that means if they don't know it yet, by april 15th, the feds will know his address... and if he doesn't file, he can then be arrested on tax evasion.. even if what he's done already ends up being legal whistleblowing.

Re:idiot (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45290077)

The US claims global jurisdiction over its citizens, so what? You can't always get what you want, ya know?

Worked for Capone (2, Interesting)

Overzeetop (214511) | about a year ago | (#45290097)

If the FBI can't get him, the IRS will. Nice.

Re:idiot (0)

kav2k (1545689) | about a year ago | (#45290111)

Wish I had mod points. It's both hilarious and insightful.

Re:idiot (2)

bobbied (2522392) | about a year ago | (#45290271)

Just not all that true. The same Russians that denied extradition of Snowden from the transit lounge at the Moscow airport are not likely to agree to have him arrested and sent to the USA for tax evasion.

Re:idiot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290391)

Nope. They revoked his passport, he's effectively being treated as *not* being a US citizen anymore.

Re:idiot (1)

JeffAtl (1737988) | about a year ago | (#45290689)

That doesn't strip a person of their citizenship - just the ability to travel.

Re:idiot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290683)

If he's not a moron he will renounce his citizenship as soon as he can find a place willing to let him join.

Re:idiot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290765)

He only has to claim taxes if he makes above a certain limit. Doubtful he'll do that.

Re:idiot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290789)

Why would Russia hand him over to the I.R.S. and not the F.B.I?

Considering how Russia has been pushing back on the U.S. in Syria, I don't see them letting him go so easily.

The US, for all its power, hasn't plugged the leak (5, Interesting)

davide marney (231845) | about a year ago | (#45289997)

Whatever Snowden did to bottle up his stolen cache of documents, it has apparently kept the entire US security apparatus at bay.

Now, THAT'S a project that would look good on an IT resume, anywhere.

Re:The US, for all its power, hasn't plugged the l (1)

InsightfulPlusTwo (3416699) | about a year ago | (#45290029)

Just encode them as illiterate, incoherent, childish ramblings and post them to Slashdot. No one will ever find them there... like looking for a needle in a haystack!

Re:The US, for all its power, hasn't plugged the l (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290145)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) today issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) from qualified organizations to partner with DOE and NREL in facilitating collaboration and best practices in regional stakeholder engagement. NREL plans to fund up to six Regional Resource Centers (RRCs) to carry out stakeholder engagement activities to support responsible development of land-based, distributed, and offshore wind energy in regions across the nation. Proposals are due December 5th, 2013.

Re:The US, for all its power, hasn't plugged the l (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290167)

The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), as part of its commitment to strengthen the nation's clean energy economy and to increase communications with the public and other stakeholders, today announced the launch of a new blog on Energy.gov. [energy.gov]

Re:The US, for all its power, hasn't plugged the l (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about a year ago | (#45290175)

Google! Apple! Apple! Apple! Apple! Google! Apple!

Google! Google! Apple! Apple! Apple! Apple! Google!

Google! Google! Apple! Apple! Google! Apple! Apple!

Apple! Google! Apple! Apple! Apple! Apple! Apple!

Google! Google! Apple! Google! Apple! Apple! Google!

Google! Google! Apple! Apple! Google! Apple! Apple!

Google! Google! Apple! Apple! Google! Apple! Google!

Google! Google! Apple! Apple! Apple! Apple! Google!

Apple! Google! Apple! Google! Google! Google! Apple!

Undetectable.

Bah. Stupid filters don't understand my intent. "Your comment violated the "postercomment" compression filter. Try less whitespace and/or less repetition."

Re:The US, for all its power, hasn't plugged the l (1)

Waldeinburg (737568) | about a year ago | (#45290673)

No no no, it's too intuitive that Google is 1 and Apple is 0! You should swap them!

Oblig. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290697)

http://xkcd.com/257/

Re:The US, for all its power, hasn't plugged the l (1)

Provocateur (133110) | about a year ago | (#45290153)

He can outbid anyone on Ebay. Anyone.

Re:The US, for all its power, hasn't plugged the l (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about a year ago | (#45290249)

The US plugged the leak, no new documents has been leaked lately, just been releasing the June documents in a timely rate. And while there are no new leakers, the government keep promising that they did not ever, is not doing, and will stop doing whatever is in this leaks, hoping that there are people with lower IQ than body temperature (in celsius) that believes them, while now there is no way to truly verify that (they probably will even release their own "leaks" to keep the illusion of that all will be legal from now on).

Anyway, for what Snowden did, (if i owned a big enough company) i would give him a good salary even for doing nothing. And if can do something useful, something that he would enjoy doing, the better.

Re:The US, for all its power, hasn't plugged the l (1)

stiggle (649614) | about a year ago | (#45290531)

Snowden is no longer leaking docs, and hasn't since the original handover.
Its the journalists (Glen Greenwald & Laura Poitras) he handed the docs to who have been trickling out the docs.

They have stated that they have multiple copies in multiple locations and the intercept at Heathrow Airport of Glen Greenwald's partner, David Miranda, where the British confiscated USB drives containing copies of classifed materials did not hinder their access to the material.

(Who gives their partner a bunch of classified docs and then asks them to fly via one of the USA's closest allies and not expect them to get stopped?)

In Soviet Russia (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290015)

Document leaker provides IT support for YOU!

VKontakt (1)

Deflagro (187160) | about a year ago | (#45290039)

That's my guess. :)

Re:VKontakt (1)

MrNJ (955045) | about a year ago | (#45290333)

Yep. Durov offered him a job pretty much as soon as he landed in Russia

Good life (5, Interesting)

skaag (206358) | about a year ago | (#45290091)

After having lived in Russia for some 6 month cumulatively, I have this to say: Edward Snowden is going to love it.

A few reasons:

- Incredibly beautiful women
- Incredibly cool clubs and bars
- Awesome Moscow Ballet / Classical Music / Cultural Events / Arts / Museums
- McDonalds has a whole wheat bun, need I say more?

Re:Good life (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about a year ago | (#45290341)

So, he's going to be able to get into the cool clubs, pay for the beautiful women's drinks, take them to the ballet and then to McDonald's for a whole wheat bun Big Mac on a Tech Support Technician's pay?

I don't think so... Unless tech support pays a LOT more there than it does here, only the trip to McDonald's will be happening, and I'm guessing he will be without an escort.

Re:Good life (1)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about a year ago | (#45290457)

Not sure about Moscow (which apparently is one of the most expensive cities to live in), but I remember taking a girl out in st Petersburg for $40 for the both of us, a couple of years ago. Not to the hottest venues in town to be sure, but it got us good seats at world class ballet (the Kirov, who at the time outshone the Bolshoi company), a great dinner, and drinks and dancing into the wee hours. Damn, Russia was a fun place back then.

Re:Good life (1)

isorox (205688) | about a year ago | (#45290847)

After having lived in Russia for some 6 month cumulatively, I have this to say: Edward Snowden is going to love it.

A few reasons:

- Incredibly beautiful women
- Incredibly cool clubs and bars
- Awesome Moscow Ballet / Classical Music / Cultural Events / Arts / Museums
- McDonalds has a whole wheat bun, need I say more?

It drops to -560 degrees in the winter. He used to live in Hawaii.

May not have given it ... (1, Offtopic)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year ago | (#45290099)

A Yahoo spokesperson insisted that the company had "strict controls in place to protect the security of our datacenters" and that "we have not given access to our data centers to the NSA or to any other government agency.""

Yahoo may not have given it, but it sure sounds like the NSA has done it anyway.

Would Google and Yahoo fess up if true? (1)

NormHome (99305) | about a year ago | (#45290119)

If the NSA had actually tapped the fiber between Google and Yahoo's data centers and the internet without their knowledge and this actually turned out to be true after they investigated would either company actually publicly say "After an investigation we have found the NSA has been tapping our fiber without our knowledge and we are taking steps to stop this"? I think that highly unlikely and if anything even if this was true Google and Yahoo would continue to issue denials that this had ever happened or that it was possible.

And I was hoping... (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about a year ago | (#45290123)

I was hoping he was going to have to learn the Russian phrase for "Would you like fries with that comrade?" Not that tech support isn't punishment too, it just pays better.

His English is likely pretty good, so maybe phone support would be a good gig for him.

What is his job spec ? (0)

Alain Williams (2972) | about a year ago | (#45290133)

Manager of external archiving by any chance ? :-)

Wait a minute (1)

Provocateur (133110) | about a year ago | (#45290137)

Did he start to believe all those In Soviet Russia jokes??

Probably "Russia Today" (aka RT) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290173)

That's my guess. Any others?

You merkins. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290187)

When China wiretaps and cracks US systems, it's an act of war.

When the USA wiretaps and cracks soverign states like Germany, it's "Well, they're spies! Whadayuhexpect?".

Re:You merkins. (2)

bobbied (2522392) | about a year ago | (#45290715)

How you see it depends on what side of the firewall you are on.

Generally, I figure that everybody that's thinking about the social and political world is going to be involved in collecting as much information as they can. They'd be stupid not too. If there is information you don't want others to know then it is YOUR responsibility to protect your information. If somebody manages to get such information from you, it's your fault.

That the NSA monitors world leaders phone calls should come as no surprise to anybody (foreign or domestic). We have done this sort of thing for centuries and have grown quite good at intercepting and deciphering communications of all sorts. Other countries are doing the same thing and many of them are quite capable of gathering information too. Some of these countries are friendly some are not. So, if you don't want your information compromised? Hide it better.

This is not to say anything about how STUPID it is to get caught spying on your friends. Never, ever, get caught spying on your friends should be in the top 10 most important rules of foreign relations. Not that you don't do it sometimes, but that you DON'T get caught doing it, ever. Also, figure that your friends are spying on you too and take the steps necessary to protect yourself and deal with it. So when you boil down all the common sense here, it means that spying on friends happens from time to time, but it should be rare. It should also NEVER be discovered.

Yandex? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290229)

My guess is Yandex, they have a popular search via DuckDuckGo, and if they can upgrade their stuff (needs https on search) so we can ditch DuckDuckGo (US based) for Yandex directly, I'll happily switch.

"NSA has aggressively targeted Google and Yahoo servers"

Why aren't NSA attacking Microsoft Live / Hotmail? I suspect they don't need to to get whatever access they want.

Nice that the FISA court said NSA couldn't hack Google and Yahoo, so they did it under a different authority that doesn't require the FISA court.

worst IT support EVER (2)

drewsup (990717) | about a year ago | (#45290255)

Ed - "Hello this Edward, how can I help you today."

L User - "yes Comrad, my mouse appears not to be working anymore."

Ed - " Ok" (.Clicky- clack- clack) "just let me get root access here on your PC"...

L User- "Click"

Ed - "Hello Comrad, are you still there? I seem to have lost you..."

“[A] firestorm of controversy.” (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290291)

No, he didn't. He achieved nothing—not even controversy. The most he did was sacrifice a great life in exchange for an apathetic nonresponse from the American people. “Nobody can hear you. Nobody cares about you. Nothing will come of this.”

Well done, Snowden!

Understatement in Summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290355)

... Many of those documents proved beyond any reasonable doubt that the NSA, ordinarily tasked with intercepting communications from terrorists and foreign governments, collects massive amounts of information on ordinary Americans ...

FTFY. The released documents 'suggest' wrongdoing by the NSA in much the same way a bear eating your face off 'suggests' the presence of dangerous wildlife in the area.

His new job... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45290409)

The reason they don't tell you what site he's working for is because they don't want you to know it's hosted in Russia....It's the Obamacare site! Maybe he can get it running smoothly!

steals Russian secrets now (0)

peter303 (12292) | about a year ago | (#45290505)

Once a thief, always a thief.

Language & Accent training (1)

Frankie70 (803801) | about a year ago | (#45290725)

He is a currently in a language & accent training class learning how to say 'This is Vladmir speaking. How may I help you?' in Russian.

In the long tradition of Philby, Oswald, MacLean (2)

Ancient_Hacker (751168) | about a year ago | (#45290773)

The USSR often gives jobs, usually non-cushy ones, to defectors. Lee Harvey Oswald got a job in a radio factory assembly line. I guess IT support is the modern equivalent.

Google is quiet (1)

mr100percent (57156) | about a year ago | (#45290803)

Google is "troubled" but I doubt they will raise a much bigger fuss than that. Why? Because they are competing for government contracts against Microsoft and other vendors for Cloud services etc. So while this deeply undermines the company, they probably won't get too loud about it until it starts to wreck their reputation too severely.

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