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Feinstein and Rogers: No Clemency For Snowden

timothy posted about a year ago | from the state-vs-man-for-real dept.

Communications 504

Ars Technica reports, probably to no one's surprise, that U.S. elected officials are unlikely to start seeing Edward Snowden as a righteous whistleblower rather than a traitor to the U.S. government. From the article:"[Sunday], the chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), and her House counterpart, Mike Rogers (R-MI), both emphasized there would be no mercy coming from Washington. 'He was trusted; he stripped our system; he had an opportunity—if what he was, was a whistle-blower—to pick up the phone and call the House Intelligence Committee, the Senate Intelligence Committee, and say I have some information,' Feinstein told CBS' Face The Nation. 'But that didn’t happen. He’s done this enormous disservice to our country, and I think the answer is no clemency.'"

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At which point (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323657)

He'd be kept quiet one way or another.

clemency? (5, Insightful)

duckintheface (710137) | about a year ago | (#45323799)

There is a lot more that Snowden has not released yet. He is wisely using the drip, drip, drip method of disclosure so the press and public have time to digest each successive piece of information. Before it's done, it will become clear that the House and Senate oversight committees were either derelict in their duties or complicit in illegal activities. They either knew or they didn't. Either way, eventually they will be the ones asking for clemency.

Re:clemency? (5, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year ago | (#45323941)

Snowden says there's nothing more he hasn't released yet. He's released all the data to the media. Now he's just commenting on what they release.

Re:clemency? (4, Insightful)

duckintheface (710137) | about a year ago | (#45324065)

That's what I would say too.... if I had a target on my back. If he has disclosed everything, there is no reason to take him out.

Re:clemency? (2)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45324101)

That's what I would say too.... if I had a target on my back. If he has disclosed everything, there is no reason to take him out.

Except for revenge ... and to send a message to any future leakers.

Re:clemency? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323947)

Feinstein is a fucking fascist.. a true democrat. And yes the rest of congress and the voters are complicit. This whole 'committee' business reeks of corruption. How can we allow a single congress person so much power for such a long time?

Re:clemency? (5, Insightful)

Noryungi (70322) | about a year ago | (#45323987)

Or, as the Brits used to say:

Either they knew, and, therefore, they are not fit to oversee the NSA. Or they did not know, and, therefore, they are not fit to oversee the NSA.

US regime busy legitimizing NSA transgressions (5, Insightful)

boorack (1345877) | about a year ago | (#45324055)

In the meantime Feinstein is busy pushing a new bill through Congress. It will not only legitmize NSA spying on everyone but also impose even harsher penalties for anyone who dares speak out. Despite of majority of citizens now being clearly against it (despite of all bullshit and propaganda thrown at them by corporate media). I know it makes many Americans angry but I don't see much difference between civil liberties in US and China right now, the only one being that US regime is far superior in concealing itself behind "freedom and democracy" mirage.

Re:At which point (4, Insightful)

flyneye (84093) | about a year ago | (#45323835)

Someday there will be no clemency for Feinstein and Rodgers.

You know, I've been thinking recently, we watch this from our perspective. Snowden, who loves the People of the United States, does the morally right thing, because it is RIGHT. We know it is right because those exposed are doing WRONG. Further ,their WRONGDOING which was exposed is costing us Allies and resources, because, who wants a bunch of untrustworthy assholes like the Obama Administration, his Congress and Senate and the puppet SCOTUS for friends and allies?
They'll just turn around and get all the dirt they can, to use out of context to get what they want later. If a friend of mine turned out to be treating me thus; I'm afraid I'd have to beat him so hard he would have an extended hospital stay and permanent damage. Luckily, our "Allies" are above that, but, what of the future with these people now? I don't give a damn if they are spying too, We are responsible for US and have to live with ourselves. If we persist in doing business that requires secrecy, we will never be trusted again. If we can't do business above the table with the current economic strategy, perhaps it is time to evacuate D.C., flush, wipe, and quit putting Repubmocrats in office, in order to proceed as a once again great country with actual FREEDOM instead of this joke, where they tell us we are still free in spite of the Repubmocrats stripping freedom away over the last century.
I doubt voting will solve the problem, they will just lie and say they won , probably like they have done for a century anyway. Damn, all they do is lie and cheat people out of their rights to make things more convenient to their ambitions. Why choose between two liars? Vote for someone, just not a Repub or a Dem. Its easy!! Even a nut would be preferential to a lying thieving confidence man.

Re:At which point (3, Interesting)

erikkemperman (252014) | about a year ago | (#45324069)

I doubt voting will solve the problem, they will just lie and say they won , probably like they have done for a century anyway. Damn, all they do is lie and cheat people out of their rights to make things more convenient to their ambitions. Why choose between two liars? Vote for someone, just not a Repub or a Dem. Its easy!! Even a nut would be preferential to a lying thieving confidence man.

I appreciate the sentiment, but am starting to think that maybe it is time to stop voting as long as there are only lesser evils to choose from. We're encouraging them. I think Russel Brand is a bit of a douche, but this editorial [newstatesman.com] strikes me as rather spot on.

Yeah, right... (5, Insightful)

msauve (701917) | about a year ago | (#45323669)

"f what he was, was a whistle-blowerâ"to pick up the phone and call the House Intelligence Committee, the Senate Intelligence Committee,"

Those thugs continue to support government spying on citizens. Whistleblowing does nothing unless it's brought to the attention of someone who both cares and is in a position to do something.

BTW, Mike Rogers is complaining that "Federal data hub threatens privacy," with regard to the Federal Data Services Hub, a component of the health insurance exchanges created by Obamacare, but supports the NSA. He's a disingenuous hypocrite.

Re:Yeah, right... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323711)

my,my a rant you the early-bird...PHONES, you say? like metadata from AMDOCS, phone?
Feinstein is very likely concealing her knowledge of the mossad/AIPAC violations of privacy and national security.
Its as if NSA was only given the crumbs from the AIPAC pie.

think about it, AMDOCS(90% the worlds phone metadata), AKAMAI (facebooger content provider), ONAVO (wtf???), and the list goes on and on and on, contracts DISPROPORTIONATELY awarded to israelis, again,again,again.

Oh, yeah, b4 9-11, there was the UN anti-racist conference, trying to fix the issues of reparations for slavery in the usa, and the issue of apartheid in israel.

well, looky,looky here, Obama is half-black (but not of slaves), and the redskins are partying in the Whitehouse!

Happy Divali!

and if any subcontinentals round here think, even for a moment, that the israelis are your friends, think again. and track your private-data to the israeli wormhole.....

You're a fucking loon. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323771)

Worse, you're proud of it.

Re: Yeah, right... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323811)

everything that has happened in the world since January 21 1976 has been a lie intended to cover up the truth that aliens landed on earth and took over our goverment

Re: Yeah, right... (3, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#45323833)

If only that were true.

Re: Yeah, right... (2)

EdIII (1114411) | about a year ago | (#45324003)

Yes. They might be forcing the most intelligent and beautiful humans to pair off and mate thereby giving us a chance at doing it.

Re: Yeah, right... (1)

mysidia (191772) | about a year ago | (#45324039)

everything that has happened in the world since January 21 1976 has been a lie intended to cover up the truth that aliens landed on earth and took over our goverment

You do mean January 21, 1876; correct?

And "The Aliens" is a codeword, for the powers that be, correct?

Re:Yeah, right... (1)

Gareth Iwan Fairclough (2831535) | about a year ago | (#45323973)

Apartheid was South Africa...

Re:Yeah, right... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45324025)

Actually, alot of pro-palestinian supporters are directly calling what's going on in Israel as Apartheid. Whether it's rightly called that or not is a matter for debate.

Re:Yeah, right... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45324095)

We're getting entirely off topic here, but if you define Apartheid as the practice of having different sets of privileges and obligations for different ethnic groups -- then I'd say the term obviously applies to the situation in Israel and its annexes. The wikipedia article on the subject seems to insist that this must take place in South Africa to qualify, though. Interestingly, there were some murky relationships in the nuclear sphere between these countries, back when SA was still white powered.

Re:Yeah, right... (5, Informative)

bfandreas (603438) | about a year ago | (#45323757)

It gets better.

The German parliament wants to interview him. The current discussion is wether he can come to Germany to do so. And maybe even stay here. There are rumors there may be a legal loophole to not extradite him to the US if he sets foot on German turf. There is a slim majority for that in the German parliament.

All this is obviously pretty hypothetical. What isn't hypothetical is the preemptive US extradition request that arrived pretty much immediately after this has hit the headlines.

Re:Yeah, right... (2)

bfandreas (603438) | about a year ago | (#45323873)

All this is obviously pretty hypothetical. What isn't hypothetical is the preemptive US extradition request that arrived pretty much immediately after this has hit the headlines.

...seems like this preemptive extradition request wasn't issued in response to the latest German involvement. The US pretty much carpet-bombed the world with those yonks ago. Personally delivered by carrier-drone, presumably.

Re:Yeah, right... (1)

feral-troll (3419661) | about a year ago | (#45324075)

All this is obviously pretty hypothetical. What isn't hypothetical is the preemptive US extradition request that arrived pretty much immediately after this has hit the headlines.

...seems like this preemptive extradition request wasn't issued in response to the latest German involvement. The US pretty much carpet-bombed the world with those yonks ago. Personally delivered by carrier-drone, presumably.

... and scotch-taped to a 2000lb JDAM.

Re:Yeah, right... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323893)

Ve haff vays of making you talk.

Re:Yeah, right... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323977)

Goddamnit, would you pick an accent and stick with it?

captcha: crotch

Re:Yeah, right... (2)

mcneely.mike (927221) | about a year ago | (#45324041)

Und, loving it!

Re:Yeah, right... (4, Insightful)

redcaboodle (622288) | about a year ago | (#45323935)

And this will stop the USA from conducting another illegal extradition? [wikipedia.org] .

And the next time a US pres visits Europe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45324037)

They're banged up for war crimes.

Then hung.

On national TV.

You know, like the last moronic megalomaniacal leader of a country to be found guilty of war crimes,

Re:Yeah, right... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45324089)

I'm fairly certain that if they pull this stunt here, they can say byebye to at least one of their major military bases on german soil. That'd be the price the public will demand. Are the US willing to pay it? I do not know, but they better be aware there'd be some truly major fallout about abducing someone like Snowden from here.

Re:Yeah, right... (complicated) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45324085)

The issue is pretty complicated as it is not yet clear if the german government would want to go "all the way" in a major disagreement with the US government. As the US has posed itself this would be political and economic pressure of the highest order.

I doubt our goverment (the german) will go for it but let us assume for some reason that they do. It'd be the first time the US has to use that tactic against a major aconomic and political power in the world, not just some, no offense intended, "second grade country full of brown people". It surely would be a very nasty situation for both sides and you can bet that Germany would suddenly get backup from all kinds of parties. Not just the EU, as heavy as that would be, but probably also from Russia and others.
When pondering this, I am not sure if the right question is "Would germany be willing to go all the way?" but "Can the US even afford to go all the way?"

Assuming they create a major fallout with germany over this, it would also mean they have a major fallout with europe and everyone else who just waited to chip away influence of the US all over the world. They'd suddenly find themselves to be isolated just has they have been before WWI. Do the US want that? Can they afford that? I do not know, but I think the US can consider themselves to be extremely lucky Merkel got reelected who'll play the "No conflict, no matter the price" card. If the last ten years had went a bit differently in regard to our political landscape, someone here might be willing to actually risk this. This could go very, very ugly for the geopolitical stance of the US.

Re:Yeah, right... (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#45323857)

Why would somebody with the information he had call Congress? The house and senate intelligence committees have been the staunchest in the collective insistence that "Absolutely nothing even slightly wicked happened, simply nothing. And, if it did, we were kept fully apprized of it at all times, and it was For America and 100% legal." Plus, 'called'? that'll throw the NSA off your trail...

Re:Yeah, right... (5, Insightful)

Captain_Cozmic (828225) | about a year ago | (#45324035)

Most likely Snowden would have disappeared and no one would ever know about this massive criminal operation taking place. And both Feinstein and Rogers act like little children saying "I don't like the way you play. I'm taking my ball and going home." Neither of them should be allowed in Congress for their violation of their oath of office. More appropriate would be serious jail time for their crimes in allowing this to take place.

Thank god in the land of the free... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323675)

...there is still the death penalty.

And what good would that have done? (5, Insightful)

JeffOwl (2858633) | about a year ago | (#45323677)

Does anyone actually believe that if he had gone to the Senate or the House that anything would change, that the concerns would have been addressed?

Re:And what good would that have done? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323707)

We don't have to guess. There were people who tried to report problems the "right way", it didn't work.

Same goes with the Manning case. There were plenty of people that only reported injustices through the chain of command, nothing happened.

Re:And what good would that have done? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323725)

No, not at all.
What I'm hoping for now is the leak that shows he or someone else actually did that and nothing happened.

Re:And what good would that have done? (5, Insightful)

poodlediagram (1944244) | about a year ago | (#45323793)

Quite agree.

Given that James Clapper was perfectly willing to lie to Congress, what would the NSA administration have done to a 29 year old system administrator, had he aired his views to them? He would have been sidelined, fired or arrested, that's what. And we would be none the wiser.

It is amusing that politicians will express the need for public discussion about NSA surveillance and then condemn Snowden in the next sentence. You can't have one without the other.

In my opinion, he is the definitive whistle-blower. He had only one way to reveal the NSA/GCHQ excesses and revealed them in the right way. Further, he gained nothing personally from all this: no money and he seems to dislike the attention. And spending a month in a Russian airport can't be much fun.

He has my gratitude and admiration, and I wish him well.

Re:And what good would that have done? (5, Insightful)

countach (534280) | about a year ago | (#45324059)

Yeah, they ought to put up a statue of him in Washington Mall. The only difference between him and the founding fathers is the founding fathers got away with overthrowing the corrupt establishment, and he didn't.

Re:And what good would that have done? (3, Informative)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year ago | (#45323815)

Does anyone actually believe that if he had gone to the Senate or the House that anything would change, that the concerns would have been addressed?

Not only that, but does anyone believe that he would not have been redirected to one of the NSA agents to air his concerns? I am sure Senate/House intelligence committees just stand by to address people's complaints (and is not spending all of their time fundraising).

Re:And what good would that have done? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323989)

No, because Congress is full of traitors to this country who choose not to uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States by looking the other way while the federal government spies on citizens, helps militarize police, engages in useless security theater at airports and now others places--and they dare to want to silence anybody who points all that out.

Those who continue to support this national security state are the real traitors to our country.

measures (1)

Vintermann (400722) | about a year ago | (#45323679)

By the measure you use, it will be measured up to you. It might have been outrageous to think so before, but maybe there will come a day where you'll have to answer for what you did - and risk losing something more than reelection prospects.

In other news. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323683)

U.S. elected officials are unlikely to start seeing Edward Snowden as a righteous whistleblower rather than a traitor to the U.S. government.

Then it seems unlikely that the people will see U.S. elected officials as something else than traitors to the U.S. population.
You see, being a traitor to the government is not the same thing as being a traitor to the nation or the people.

Re:In other news. (3, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about a year ago | (#45323841)

The US population have a very simple standard.

politician.traitor = (politician.party != self.party);

Oh yeah (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323685)

"call the House Intelligence Committee, the Senate Intelligence Committee, and say I have some information" and get shut up, laid off, and financially ruined. Really, who would call the forementioned instances and expect them to actually do something? "Don't shoot the messenger" is actually something nobody remembers to not do. Shooting the messengers ( or not reacting to the message ) leads to, well, people taking their messages elsewhere. Or not delivering at all.

CLEMENCY ?? HOW ABOUT DOING IT ROSENBERG STYLE !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323687)

The chair for you !!

Until then: MOER SNOWDEN !!

Disingenuous (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323693)

He was trusted; he stripped our system; he had an opportunityâ"if what he was, was a whistle-blowerâ"to pick up the phone and call the House Intelligence Committee, the Senate Intelligence Committee, and say I have some information

What is she talking about? They all already knew what the NSA was doing. They OK'd it right along with the NSA budget.

I'm no Snowden fan, but if he had come forward he would have been dealt with as a "security risk" in a very permanent way. The only whistling would have been from the government "Whew, that was another close one."

Redux (3, Interesting)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#45323695)

he had an opportunity - if what he was, was a whistle-blower - to pick up the phone and call the House Intelligence Committee, the Senate Intelligence Committee, and say I have some information

Plausible deniability by Congress. "We didn't know". It's like Reagan and Iran-Contra. People said he didn't know. I figured there were two possibilities. Either he knew or he didn't, and I'm not sure which was worse.

We pretty much already assumed it was going on. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323703)

He did what was right. Leave him alone.

So what exactly are the phone numbers? (4, Insightful)

tlambert (566799) | about a year ago | (#45323705)

So what exactly are the phone numbers for the House Intelligence Committee and the Senate Intelligence Committee, so that, you know, future whistle blowers can call them up, and not end up like Snowden?

Re:So what exactly are the phone numbers? (4, Funny)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#45323721)

1-800-JAIL4ME

Re:So what exactly are the phone numbers? (1)

alphatel (1450715) | about a year ago | (#45323765)

1-800-JAIL4ME

Followed by a hell of a lot more secret courts, classified documents, and non disclosures. Until your country-liberating ass is forgotten until the next 8 year term presidency.

Re:So what exactly are the phone numbers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323729)

So what exactly are the phone numbers for the House Intelligence Committee and the Senate Intelligence Committee, so that, you know, future whistle blowers can call them up, and not end up like Snowden?

Aw, come on. People report problems with the organization upwards all the time. Nothing happens. Best way to be ignored is to do things "the right way".
It only works if the people at the top wants the organization to do what is right. That is clearly not the case here.

Re:So what exactly are the phone numbers? (5, Informative)

Rick Richardson (87058) | about a year ago | (#45323969)

http://www.intelligence.senate.gov/

211 Hart Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-1700

Re:So what exactly are the phone numbers? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45324011)

Well I guess someone better call and inform them about the NSA surveillance.
I'm sure they'd put a stop to it if only they only knew.

'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' (5, Insightful)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | about a year ago | (#45323709)

'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' Snowden could claim exactly that against the NSA. This is beyond the pot calling the kettle black.

Re:'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' (5, Informative)

Vintermann (400722) | about a year ago | (#45323735)

Yeah. It's a bit rich to complain of breach of trust when you've just been caught listening in on the phone calls of allied political leaders.

Re:'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323795)

"Been caught" being the operative term. Every modern country does this kind of stuff, and everyone else knows it. This whole charade of shock and disgust -- from Russia and other US frenemies offering Snowden asylum to European countries feigning ignorance -- is merely an attempt by other countries at scoring political points, while desperately trying to keep a lid on their own domestic programs. I mean, seriously... Russia was recently caught poisoning a potential defector with a rare radioactive isotope, presumably to ensure that their official denials would be discounted by others of a similar mind.

Does anyone really think -- I mean, really think -- that the entities screaming the loudest about this stuff are in any way concerned about your freedom and/or privacy? Grow the fuck up; the real world doesn't operate like that.

Re:'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323975)

Will you please stop propagating the 'spying on polical leaders' talking point?

It seems to me as a (conscious?) distraction effort by various media. The real issue is mass surveillance on the general population. Polticial leaders are the most standard targets of all, and that relevation can be shrugged off with all kinds of rhetorics a while from now, when the biggest public outrage has subsided.

Re:'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323843)

In essence it boils down to this:

Is it OK to commit a lesser crime to reveal a larger one? And if it is OK, where do you draw the line?

Re:'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323983)

Snowdens 'crime' was merely malum prohibitum, whereas the crimes of the U.S. government and its agencies constitute malum in se. That is the crucial point here. In my opinion, doning something that is not legally allowed to prevent or end something that is fundamentally wrong is good, as long as there is no way that is likely to accomplish the same without breaking the law.

Re:'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' (4, Insightful)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year ago | (#45323887)

'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' Snowden could claim exactly that against the NSA.

From outside US: until the phase above won't naturally come as "We claim exactly that against the NSA" (instead of "Snowden could...") nothing is going to change in this regard.
You are cheering for Snowden in his "match" against NSA, but not actually supporting him.

Re:'He was trusted; he stripped our system...' (1)

roman_mir (125474) | about a year ago | (#45324081)

You can't really strip the emperor if he is already naked, but you can be the first one to tell the truth about it.

FTFY (4, Insightful)

Titus Groan (2834723) | about a year ago | (#45323713)

"Weâ(TM)ve done this enormous disservice to our country, and he's exposed us for that."

Re:FTFY (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | about a year ago | (#45323747)

I was going to say the same. From what I can see, he did a disservice to parts of the government flagrantly violating the constitution. The did a very important service for the people of the country.

Disservice? What disservice? (5, Informative)

jamesl (106902) | about a year ago | (#45323717)

" ... pick up the phone and call the House Intelligence Committee, the Senate Intelligence Committee, and say I have some information,' Feinstein told CBS' Face The Nation."

You mean the House and Senate Intelligence Committees didn't know about this already? Aren't they in charge? Don't they make the rules? Didn't they say, and aren't they still saying, that it's all legal? In what alternate universe would Snowden think telling the intelligence committees would change anything.

Feinstein thinks we're all ignorant idiots.

Re:Disservice? What disservice? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323761)

pick up the phone?!?!? you must be retardant! Feinstone works for the israelis!
youtube.com/watch?v=9uateluavJQ the AIPAC lobbyists and the media networks are trying SOOOOO hard to keep AMDOCS hushed up...

Re:Disservice? What disservice? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323839)

pick up the phone?!?!? you must be retardant! Feinstone works for the israelis!
youtube.com/watch?v=9uateluavJQ the AIPAC lobbyists and the media networks are trying SOOOOO hard to keep AMDOCS hushed up...

Slashdot is in desparate need of a -1 Crank mod

And if they didn't? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323927)

If the SIC didn't know already, now that they DO know, what are they doing about it?

Finding those who broke the law and punishing them?

Or demanding extraordinary measures to get the one who told of the crimes killed?

THAT is why he didn't go through channels.

Re:Disservice? What disservice? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45324023)

I say we pick up the phone and tell them.

If he had reported it through official channels... (5, Insightful)

the grace of R'hllor (530051) | about a year ago | (#45323723)

Especially channels amenable to spying on US citizens, we would never have heard of Snowden or the spy programs. If he had then tried to publish via other means, neither would his family.

At the risk of Godwin:
If you were, say, a German administrator learning about the death camps and being absolutely appalled, reporting it to any senior Nazi official wouldn't do much good.

Feinstein and Rogers are fringe now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323741)

They don't speak for Congress or the Senate, they are the politicians who spent so much effort covering up what the NSA was up to and preventing the Senators and Congressmen from finding out.

They are fringe now.

Feinstein tried to put herself back into the mainstream by mock outrage over the Merkel bugging and demanding (faux) change, but she promptly put out a fake bill designed to legalize it all. I bet she didn't even write the bill, the NSA lawyers probably wrote it for her.

Rogers spouts talking points the NSA gives him, I don't know his motives but he can't keep a consistent story. His latest thing is that if nobody knows they're being spied on then it's not a privacy violation. Yet if a foreign power spied on his discussions with the NSA he'd freak out.

They really won't get to decide what happens to Snowden, they're just repeating the message they've been told to say.

Traitor to the government---of course. (4, Insightful)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about a year ago | (#45323743)

This shows how messed these people are. Of course he was a traitor to the government. But he and no one else owes loyalty to the government. The fact that these people believe that they, personally, are owed loyalty says far more about them than it does about Snowden. If he's a traitor then the question is if he was a traitor to the country and it's citizens.

I'm inclined to go with "no".

Of course (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323751)

if what he was, was a whistle-blower—to pick up the phone and call the House Intelligence Committee, the Senate Intelligence Committee, and say I have some information,

...then he would have been driven to the nearest desert in a nice black SUV, given a shovel and told to dig his own grave and disposed of nicely and quietly.

Vote Feinstein for moar war!1!! (3, Insightful)

jmcvetta (153563) | about a year ago | (#45323775)

How is this fucking authoritarian fascist even sort-of, possibly, slightly representative of the views of the majority of Californians?

Re:Vote Feinstein for moar war!1!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323945)

You see, she has a (D) after her name, which makes it okay when she does it!

Ugh, I feel dirty even typing that.

Re:Vote Feinstein for moar war!1!! (2, Insightful)

felrom (2923513) | about a year ago | (#45324051)

The majority of Californians sympathize with the Democrat platform.
The Democrat platform is all about more government control of (almost) everything: healthcare, education, regulation, business... everything.
When you've been elected to go to Washington and gain control over everything, it shouldn't surprise those who elected you that you run a giant spying apparatus to watch the same citizens who elected you to control them.
The only thing that should surprise any honest person is that the people who elected Feinstein over and over are angry that she went to Washington and did exactly what they elected her to do: grow the government, give it more power, and let it control everything it touches.

I'd say she is representing the views of the majority of Californians quite well. They're just suffering mass cognitive dissonance over the fact that they're being forced to reap what they've sown.

He's a whistleblower, not suicidal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323777)

Someone who reveals secrets of spies has to have a very good plan for staying alive. First rule: Don't confide in anyone who might be on the payroll.

I bet he called... and got rebuffed (2)

strredwolf (532) | about a year ago | (#45323783)

Someone get those call logs! I bet he called and nobody listened!

Re:I bet he called... and got rebuffed (2)

Noughmad (1044096) | about a year ago | (#45324049)

Yeah, there must be an agency in the US that stores all telephone call logs. Oh, wait...

He Blew the Whistle on Them (5, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about a year ago | (#45323801)

Every time Rogers opens his mouth he says that the intelligence committee was fully briefed and that they knew what was going on. What Feinstein and Rogers are implicitly admitting is that Snowden didn't just blow the whistle on the NSA. He blew it on the intelligence committee too for not doing their job of oversight.

Its just silly to think he should have reported to them that they were corrupt and/or incompetent.

Yeah, right. (5, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | about a year ago | (#45323803)

Feinstein knows full well that this country doesn't have a functioning justice system. If we did, she'd be behind bars herself.

-jcr

Re:Yeah, right. (1)

DaMattster (977781) | about a year ago | (#45323805)

Mod parent up! Snowden is a true patriot!

Disservice? (2)

GrahamCox (741991) | about a year ago | (#45323809)

The disservice was done by the secret courts, the spooks and the "state within". They got caught, and in the long run, that can only be a huge service to the country. Who knows, they might even eventually come up with foreign policy that doesn't piss a lot of people off, thus making the whole apparatus for mitigating it unnecessary.

Re:Disservice? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323845)

well put. What is this "state within" you speak of?
youtube.com/watch?v=9uateluavJQ

So it's pretty clear: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323821)

Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), and her House counterpart, Mike Rogers (R-MI) must go. At least out of office. Preferably to jail. These are the real terrorists.

America - World Police (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323823)

Just wow. No shame whatsoever?!?!? Caught red handed and without the pressure of the press and the public of the world seeing it, there is now doubt whatsoever that it would just get buried under a enormous pile of "don't let this get out, keep it secret and carry on".

What the US has been doing is outright wrong, it's hypocritical and it's got to stop. If any other country was doing so much against so many countries the US would be outraged. Stop the hypocrisy. Stop the world police.

What about the PREVIOUS whistleblowers? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323827)

Okay, Ms. Feinstein, what about the PREVIOUS whistleblowers? The ones you studiously ignored? They followed your inane demands, and got nothing but CRIMINAL PROSECUTION out of it. Therefore, we have clear proof you are lying through your teeth.

Re:What about the PREVIOUS whistleblowers? (1)

jmcvetta (153563) | about a year ago | (#45323849)

nothing but CRIMINAL PERSECUTION out of it.

FTFY

now replace... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323837)

Snowden with gonerment and country with citizen....

A Thank you (4, Insightful)

DaMattster (977781) | about a year ago | (#45323855)

We have a big thank you to Snowden for making us aware of what is actually going on behind the scenes. As a result, I've taken extra security precautions. I don't really know whether or not they will do any good but suffice it to say that I'm taking it more seriously. And, by the way, the old argument, "If you have nothing to hide, you need not worry" is bullshit. Look at the innocent people that get wrapped up in the Criminal Injustice System.

Re:A Thank you (1)

cyber-vandal (148830) | about a year ago | (#45324063)

"If you have nothing to hide you need not worry" is especially appropriate here.

who's asking them? (5, Insightful)

kharchenko (303729) | about a year ago | (#45323861)

Why exactly do they get to have a say in this? Why are we even listening to them?
Feinstein and Rogers are the two key figures responsible for most of these violations in the first place. They are the ones who tacitly sanctioned wholesale violation of the constitutional right against unreasonable searches. Yet their opinion on Snowden's guilt is somehow all over the news. It's amazing that the press is quoting Rogers' preaches on how Snowden has broken the law and needs to be persecuted, when both of these bozos voted to grant retroactive immunity for warrantless wiretaps they've sanctioned under earlier administration. As far as I am concerned, asking for their opinion is like asking a robber on what to do with a good Samaritan who stopped the robbery.

Snowden was an idiot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323879)

He was the system administrator.
He should have just done sudo su president.obama
and then emailed the newspapers all this stuff. Clean out all the logs of your commands, and keep working like nothing happened.

Snowden & rest: (5, Insightful)

Mister Liberty (769145) | about a year ago | (#45323921)

No clemency for Feinstein and Rogers.

Thank You, Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45323951)

Enough said.

Traitor! (0)

Subnuke (3419799) | about a year ago | (#45323979)

Snowden is kind of naive, along with the rest of the press wetting their pants over the NSA's antics. You really don't think the Russians, Germans and French don't spy on us? This isn't "Little Brother".

Oh? (1)

sabbede (2678435) | about a year ago | (#45324001)

Dianne, as chair of the Senate intel committee, don't you already get to see everything Snowden revealed?

Are you upset because he's also blowing the whistle on you?

It no longer matters (5, Insightful)

water-and-sewer (612923) | about a year ago | (#45324019)

The cart has run away with the horse. It doesn't matter what they do now, he's a popular hero whose reputation is growing as fast as popular discontent/outrage is growing against the tactics of the NSA and the failures of the administration to stop it or even come clean about who knows what and when.

This is a huge problem for the government - once the popular hero becomes truly a hero, their every effort to try him or bring him to justice deepens the hole they're in, and god help the US government if Snowden goes to jail - he'll immediately become a demigod.

They should use this as a wake-up call and change tactics or hopefully even policy. But it doesn't seem like that's going to happen.

Run, Snowden, run.

Dianne Feinstein is a filthy cunt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45324099)

Dianne Feinstein will never amount to anything more in life than a filthy, stinking cunt, so why should I give a fuck what it thinks?

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