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6TB Helium-Filled Hard Drives Take Flight

samzenpus posted about 10 months ago | from the building-it-better dept.

Data Storage 297

An anonymous reader writes in with some exciting news if you are a storage array manufacturer with a lot of money to spend on hard drives."HGST Monday announced that it's now shipping a helium-filled, 3.5-in hard disk drive with 50% more capacity than the current industry leading 4TB drives. The new drive uses 23% less power and is 38% lighter than the 4TB drives. Without changing the height, the new 6TB Ultrastar He6 enterprise-class hard drive crams seven disk platters into what was a five disk-platter, 4TB Ultrastar drive."

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Helium Leaks (5, Insightful)

bfmorgan (839462) | about 10 months ago | (#45326475)

Helium love to leak. How long will these have the He pressure they need to work?

Re: Helium Leaks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326525)

oh the humanity

Re: Helium Leaks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326571)

That was hydrogen.

Re: Helium Leaks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326677)

and that was my data

Re: Helium Leaks (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 10 months ago | (#45327141)

That was hydrogen.

Helium was from the huge manatee [wordpress.com]

Re: Helium Leaks (5, Funny)

Guy From V (1453391) | about 10 months ago | (#45327271)

Christ, Sterling Mallory Archer, what part of its helium not hydrogen don't you understand?

Re: Helium Leaks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327273)

I don't want the Hindenburg 2.0 in my computer

Re:Helium Leaks (5, Informative)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 10 months ago | (#45326585)

They do have a 5 year warranty.

Re:Helium Leaks (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326769)

They do have a 5 year warranty.

That's awesome! So, when a drive fails and I lose time/data I can get a replacement drive with an equally high failure rate. I might have to replace the drive every year, but it's under warranty, so the failure rate is acceptable?

Re:Helium Leaks (5, Insightful)

MightyYar (622222) | about 10 months ago | (#45327193)

So, when a drive fails and I lose time/data

I'm not hiring you to set up my systems.

Most sane people would take a spare off the shelf and pop it into the array and drop the bad drive into the dead soldiers pile for later RMA.

Re:Helium Leaks (2)

isorox (205688) | about 10 months ago | (#45327255)

So, when a drive fails and I lose time/data

I'm not hiring you to set up my systems.

Most sane people would take a spare off the shelf and pop it into the array and drop the bad drive into the dead soldiers pile for later RMA.

And when they al start failing at the same time with the same fault, and you lose your 3rd drive in your 8 drive raid 6 in a few hours?

Re:Helium Leaks (3, Funny)

bob_super (3391281) | about 10 months ago | (#45326849)

Can I call this planned obsolescence yet?

I have drives much older than that, and I'm not worried that they are engineered to fail soon (they will, but not by design)

Re:Helium Leaks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327147)

I mean, you could, but five years doesn't seem like an unreasonable life span for this kind of bleeding edge application.

Re:Helium Leaks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326593)

Article says warranty is for 5 years, so either HGST has estimated it will last at least that long or they've factored in enough of a replacement into the selling price. But I don't think anyone will really know for a while.

Re:Helium Leaks (5, Funny)

Big Hairy Ian (1155547) | about 10 months ago | (#45326621)

Now I know where to store all my high pitched MP3's :D

Re:Helium Leaks (5, Funny)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 10 months ago | (#45326823)

You should Rush right out and get one.

Re:Helium Leaks (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326917)

Geedy Lee hates you and your slight. You should consider yourself lucky to ever hear such wonderful music in the first place, loser.

Re:Helium Leaks (5, Funny)

dcollins117 (1267462) | about 10 months ago | (#45326941)

That's the main drawback of these drives. They can make Barry White sound like Alvin and the Chipmunks.

pop quiz hot shot you got a server room with Heliu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326633)

what do you do what do you do?

10 Years of Research & unpressurised (5, Informative)

tomxor (2379126) | about 10 months ago | (#45326655)

They spent 10 years researching how to reliably seal it into an enclosure...

Also it is not under the same requirements of a compressed gas canister. The whole point of using helium is for the advantages of it's fluid dynamics compared to a normal air mixture, that's why it's not pressurised.

I've always wondered why they didn't just use a near vacuum enclosure, but i suppose it's much easier to not deal with pressure difference and use a super low resistance fluid instead at the same atmospheric pressure.

Re:10 Years of Research & unpressurised (0)

PIBM (588930) | about 10 months ago | (#45326863)

How's a thermos built again ? Oh yeah, a vacuum, because air is a good conductor and vacuum isn't. So, your hard drives could appear cool while they toast inside. Are you sure that's what you want ?

Re:10 Years of Research & unpressurised (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327201)

There are many ways to measure heat in a vacuum, ever heard of telescopes? Outside that, you can mount the sensor to the heat sink. Your explanation is silly. There are better ones bellow. Don't be right for the wrong reasons.

Re:10 Years of Research & unpressurised (5, Informative)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 10 months ago | (#45326935)

They don't work in vacuum.

Fluid interaction between spinning platter, gas and the heads creates an air bearing effect that holds the heads at a precisely determined (for a given linear velocity) height away from the disc. It's a stable system, so any slight vibration will be quickly compensated. Without a fluid filling, the heads would crash into the platter.

Re:10 Years of Research & unpressurised (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327215)

Without a fluid filling, the heads would crash into the platter.

It seems the universal secret to success, whether you're throwing a ball or building a hard disk drive, is to bring the liquor out early and keep it comin'!

No Vacuum (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326939)

I've always wondered why they didn't just use a near vacuum enclosure

The heads have to have air or some gas to make them "fly". In a vacuum, the heads grind the oxide off the platters.

Re:10 Years of Research & unpressurised (5, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 10 months ago | (#45326971)

I've always wondered why they didn't just use a near vacuum enclosure

Because the head would crash. The head does not just magically float a few micrometers above the disk platter. There is no way that any machine could be build so precisely. Instead of floating, it flies. The head is shaped like a tiny airfoil, and it use the ground effect of the air/helium/whatever to maintain the proper distance from the platter. This would not work in a vacuum.

Re:10 Years of Research & unpressurised (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326989)

They don't use a vacuum because they rely on the gas's behaviour to give the read/write head just enough lift to not plant itself in the disk.

Re:Helium Leaks (0)

retep (108840) | about 10 months ago | (#45326947)

Provided that atmospheric pressure works the fact that helium leaks is irrelevant: helium leaks into the harddrive just as easily as it leaks out of the harddrive. All you have to do is make sure that the harddrive is leak-tight for everything but helium - fortunately this is pretty easy to do as helium is the only gas that leaks as easily as it.

Great... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326489)

another way to squander our helium reserves :s

Re:Great... (3, Funny)

bobbied (2522392) | about 10 months ago | (#45326779)

Well, we could use just plain H. Wouldn't Hydrogen be better? After all it's lighter. It could make a drive failure a bit more obvious and fun...

(Sarcastic grin)

Re:Great... (3, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 10 months ago | (#45326953)

It's also even harder to contain than helium - and that's quite an achievement. Hydrogen is quite happy to leak through solid metal, given a bit of time. The atoms are so small, they fit *between* the atoms of a metal, and in the spaces between crystal grains.

Re:Great... (1, Informative)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 10 months ago | (#45327125)

Hydrogen easily permeates the crystal lattice of many metals, often causes them to become brittle (or otherwise changing their mechanical and dynamic properties), and easily passes through the tiniest microfractures. I don't see a way of manufacturing a reliable hydrogen-filled hard drive under these conditions.

Re:Great... (2)

Plazmid (1132467) | about 10 months ago | (#45327277)

Except that hydrogen can do some [a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_damage#Shatter_cracks.2C_flakes.2C_fish-eyes_and_micro_perforations"]rather nasty things to metals[/a].

Although, hard drives don't get very hot or experience high stresses, so it might not effect it.

Disks with helium? (5, Funny)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | about 10 months ago | (#45326495)

Finally a real cloud drive!

Re:Disks with helium? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326799)

Finally a real cloud drive!

Clouds eh? It's all pretty and fluffy until you find your PC tech behind the workbench huffing hard drives all day.

Re:Disks with helium? (2, Informative)

Andrio (2580551) | about 10 months ago | (#45327127)

If they're taking flight, then they used too much helium.

Re:Disks with helium? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327263)

Actually more helium in the same volume would make it heavier.

What took so long? (0)

snsh (968808) | about 10 months ago | (#45326501)

Surprised it took the industry 30+ years to figure out how to do something so deceptively simple.

Re:What took so long? (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about 10 months ago | (#45326531)

Thanks for the armchair analysis. It was so obvious to you, that you just never bothered to speak up for the last several decades, because you figured everyone knew, right?

Re:What took so long? (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326955)

Welcome to Slashdot... where every advance is obvious and every technology is attempted to be debunked by high school level science knowledge.

Re:What took so long? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327275)

Welcome to Slashdot... where every advance is obvious and every technology is attempted to be debunked by high school level science knowledge.

Hey! You forgot the middle school level sociology and politics! Those of us in the clickbait political articles need some love too, you know!

Re:What took so long? (5, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | about 10 months ago | (#45326671)

Actually it's deceptively hard. Helium has a way of diffusing right through an air tight seal.

Re:What took so long? (1)

hackertourist (2202674) | about 10 months ago | (#45327225)

Even if that leads to the pressure inside the container being lower than outside? If the seal is airtight, there's nothing to replace the lost helium.

helium (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326507)

I guess all that helium is what makes it so light

First Post! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326515)

Also, after reading the subject I wondered why they would strap harddisks onto a helium-filled balloon and send them into the sky...

Re:First Post! (1)

MarioJE (978915) | about 10 months ago | (#45327173)

Me too. I feel so deceived.

What the helium actually does (5, Informative)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 10 months ago | (#45326517)

Here is a relevant portion FTA on what the helium actually DOES (unfortunately not mentioned in the summary):

At one-seventh the density of air, helium produces less drag on the moving components of a drive - the spinning disk platters and actuator arms -- which translates into less friction and lower operating temperatures.

The helium-drives run at four to five degrees cooler than today's 7200rpm drives, HGST stated.

Re:What the helium actually does (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326611)

Thanks.

But why is Helium superior to a vacuum?

My brain instantly kicks me and reminds me that drive heads float above the platter and that air pressure may be a way of controlling how closer they come to touching. No idea if that's how it works now, if it did ever work like that...

Re:What the helium actually does (0)

Sique (173459) | about 10 months ago | (#45326667)

Because you can maintain a low helium pressure more easily as a high vacuum.

Re:What the helium actually does (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326711)

As a diver, I have learned never to fill a drysuit with helium because helium conducts heat incredibly well. In addition to the lower drag, having a gas that sheds heat as fast as possible on "air" is probably a benefit. Any sci-fi fan will be quick to tell you that vacuum is an insulator.

Re:What the helium actually does (1)

Guido von Guido II (2712421) | about 10 months ago | (#45326719)

My assumption is that either the helium performs some other function (as you said) or that it's just cheaper to use some kind of gas instead of a vacuum.

Re:What the helium actually does (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 10 months ago | (#45326973)

There's a fluid bearing effect holding the heads at optimum height.. Plus a lot of things - like plastics, and lubricants - tend to sublime under vacuum.

Re:What the helium actually does (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 10 months ago | (#45327033)

Heat.

Re:What the helium actually does (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326641)

If less air resistance is the reasoning for using helium, why not have the drive internals run inside a vacuum? Wouldn't that be less expensive than helium as well?

Re:What the helium actually does (1)

Big Hairy Ian (1155547) | about 10 months ago | (#45326643)

Wow so how much could we fit on a vacuum drive?

Re:What the helium actually does (1)

WalksOnDirt (704461) | about 10 months ago | (#45326851)

Last I heard, hard drive heads flew over the disk surface on a thin film of air. It's hard to see that working in a vacuum.

Re:What the helium actually does (2)

pla (258480) | about 10 months ago | (#45326721)

At one-seventh the density of air, helium produces less drag on the moving components of a drive - the spinning disk platters and actuator arms -- which translates into less friction and lower operating temperatures.

Or even better, a vacuum of 0.147psi has one-one-hundredth the density of air. Both a vacuum and filling it with helium require making the drive air tight; and at least with 3.5" drives, they have an impressively strong frame that could certainly withstand a modest vacuum. Or better yet, do both! Fill it with low pressure helium, saving helium and getting even more reduction in friction.


All that aside, though, I don't quite get the capacity boost - Drive capacity results from the number of platters and the areal density of bits on a platter. Friction has nothing to do with either of those constraints.

Still, not complaining - About time I upgraded the drive size in my home file server. Funny how that works - Every year or so I add another drive, and then every five years or so I replace the whole array with two new drives having more total capacity than what I replaced.

Re:What the helium actually does (4, Informative)

dcw3 (649211) | about 10 months ago | (#45326865)

This might help you... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_height [wikipedia.org]

Heads fly, and you don't "fly" in a vacuum.

Re:What the helium actually does (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 10 months ago | (#45327069)

Just means we need to strap tiny rockets to our hard drive heads.

Re:What the helium actually does (1)

pla (258480) | about 10 months ago | (#45327163)

+5 insightful. Thank you!

Re:What the helium actually does (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327007)

I would assume that the drag of the moving parts would decrease efficiency and accuracy of head placement and distance thus requiring the bits to written on larger sectors to avoid overwriting neighbors.

Re:What the helium actually does (1)

khallow (566160) | about 10 months ago | (#45327313)

Vacuum doesn't help you with heat dissipation. What I wonder is whether hydrogen would be even more effective since it is even lighter? I guess it'd react with the metals in the hard drive (eg, hydrogen embrittlement) and have even more leakage problems.

Re:What the helium actually does (1)

Deadstick (535032) | about 10 months ago | (#45326727)

Why use helium to get a low density when vacuum has a density of zip point diddley and is easier to contain than helium?

Re:What the helium actually does (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326829)

Because hard drive heads "fly" over the disk surface, using microscopic ground effect to keep them at optimal reading height.

Re:What the helium actually does (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326837)

They can charge more for helium than nothing

Re:What the helium actually does (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 10 months ago | (#45327053)

Since when does not selling anything stop anyone from charging more?

Re:What the helium actually does (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326855)

The heads on the disk rely on a cushion of some gas (typically air, helium in this case) to keep from impacting the platters when the thing is spun up. A vacuum drive would require different technology.

still a few kinks to work out (5, Funny)

Thud457 (234763) | about 10 months ago | (#45326527)

all the MP3 sound like The Chipmunks.

Re:still a few kinks to work out (0)

freeze128 (544774) | about 10 months ago | (#45327149)

Of course the bitrate of your MP3's that are stored on this drive will not change, so they will *NOT* sound like chipmunks.

OTOH, imagine a technical conversation in the clean room where these drives are assembled. Now *THAT'S* funny.

Re:still a few kinks to work out (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327293)

My first worry too

Well of course they take flight (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326539)

They're filled with helium.

I can envision the advertisement for this product. (2)

Applehu Akbar (2968043) | about 10 months ago | (#45326557)

The message would of course be delivered by Melissa Rauch:

"I was so tired of having to vacuum around Howard's RAID drives. Now we just keep them on the ceiling!"

Meh. I'm waiting for the hydrogen filled version. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326565)

I wonder if they will explode when punctured?

Re:Meh. I'm waiting for the hydrogen filled versio (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 10 months ago | (#45326833)

Only when landing in Lakehurst NJ... Oh the Humanity...

Helium hard drive technology limitations... (4, Interesting)

Robotbeat (461248) | about 10 months ago | (#45326567)

Helium tends to like to leak out of things. One has to wonder if the power consumption and reliability and speed of the drives will worsen after, say, a decade deployed in the field as the helium gradually is replaced by air. I suppose that has the added benefit for the hard drive manufacturer of a pretty firm drop-dead (or at least significantly reduced performance) date.

But the increased complexity of the technical approach, i.e. cramming more platters (and using fancy technical tricks like using helium) versus just increasing platter areal density, portends an end to the incredibly fast reduction in storage costs over the last three decades.

Another option may be to operate the devices in a soft vacuum (back-filled with a little bit of helium, perhaps). That may further reduce drag. However, I believe the heads rely on an air cushion in order to avoid contact with the platters, so there would be a limit to this.

Re:Helium hard drive technology limitations... (4, Interesting)

sjames (1099) | about 10 months ago | (#45326757)

Depending on the seal, the drives likely will end up in a soft vacuum as the helium diffuses out but air cannot diffuse in as quickly. That might cause a head crash or it might cause a heating problem for internal components. Helium is a decent thermal conductor.

Re:Helium hard drive technology limitations... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327081)

I'm going to bet that these aren't stand alone drives that you can buy and use off the shelf, but units that are installed as part of a system that has a helium supply.

No hard drive is sealed. Not a single one you own or have ever seen. If they were then big changes in elevation would make them break due to ruptured seals and deformed geometry.

Thus, these drives probably have a port for helium inlet so the internal atmosphere can be maintaned. (It would not take much. I'd imagine)

This is concept is actually not new. I've seen old hard drives that were used in commercial storage systems that had an inlet for an inert gas (Argon I think) The storage system had a supply of gas to maintain the atmosphere inside the hardrive, presumably to control moisture and prevent corrosion.

Re:Helium hard drive technology limitations... (1)

Robotbeat (461248) | about 10 months ago | (#45327221)

I'm going to bet that these aren't stand alone drives that you can buy and use off the shelf, but units that are installed as part of a system that has a helium supply.

No hard drive is sealed. Not a single one you own or have ever seen. If they were then big changes in elevation would make them break due to ruptured seals and deformed geometry.

Thus, these drives probably have a port for helium inlet so the internal atmosphere can be maintaned. (It would not take much. I'd imagine)

This is concept is actually not new. I've seen old hard drives that were used in commercial storage systems that had an inlet for an inert gas (Argon I think) The storage system had a supply of gas to maintain the atmosphere inside the hardrive, presumably to control moisture and prevent corrosion.

No drives I've ever owned have ever been back-filled with helium, either. Or have ever had 6TB a pop.

Of course I know drives aren't usually sealed. But I find the idea of an external helium supply completely untenable. No one would buy it except maybe a few people who care nothing about cost and all about looking high-tech. It would increase maintenance and upfront costs while adding another single point of failure to the whole system. Way too expensive for dubious gain.

No, there are two approaches that seem reasonable:
1), there's a diaphram or piston which moves (passively) to maintain ambient pressure inside the device while maintaining a helium-tight seal.
or:
2) the drives are built mechanically to withstand whatever pressure differentials are necessary. The easiest way to do this (for the least mass) would be to slightly pressurize the drive above 1 atm.

Re:Helium hard drive technology limitations... (2)

Dracolytch (714699) | about 10 months ago | (#45327197)

"portends an end to the incredibly fast reduction in storage costs over the last three decades."

Disagree, it's just taking a turn you're not looking at. Solid state has just really started to take off in the mainstream. As the years go on, it will continue to get faster, cheaper, and more reliable. In a couple short years, we've already broken the $1/gig barrier.

After that... Well, it's hard to tell. Many consumers are already running out of things to store on their computers. Heck, I'm in basically the same boat. Even corporations are getting comfortable "big data" setups for reasonable prices. I wonder how much longer until our storage systems get "big enough" for all but the most intense scientific and global data-mining applications...

Silly question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326569)

Why not pump at least a partial vacuum out? Would it be too hard to do mechanically?

Re:Silly question (1)

Mr D from 63 (3395377) | about 10 months ago | (#45326761)

Helium also has the added advantage in that it is better than many other gases at transferring heat, something evidently overlooked in the article. A vacuum would minimize heat transfer to the case.

Re:Silly question (0)

wiredlogic (135348) | about 10 months ago | (#45326995)

You need air inside to provide convective cooling. A partial vacuum would also make fluid bearings difficult or impossible to maintain.

Silly answer (1)

Minwee (522556) | about 10 months ago | (#45327075)

Inside the drive a thin film of air is the only thing standing between the drive heads and platters. If the drive head gets too close to the surface, the air is compressed and pushes back on the head. Take that away and you'll be carving the platters like a pumpkin the first time anything bumps or shakes the drive.

Fuck everything, we're going to 7 platters. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326583)

And helium. Shut up I'm telling you how it works.

Re:Fuck everything, we're going to 7 platters. (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 10 months ago | (#45327087)

What? No lasers, no sharks? I'm sorely disappointed!

I'll wait for the hydrogen model. (0)

Anonymous Crowbar (692255) | about 10 months ago | (#45326607)

I hear it's going to explode on the market

Re:I'll wait for the hydrogen model. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326717)

I hear it's going to explode on the market

Nah, it'll go down in flames.

Re:I'll wait for the hydrogen model. (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 10 months ago | (#45326847)

I hear it's going to explode on the market

Nah, it'll go down in flames.

For sure in New Jersey...

Re:I'll wait for the hydrogen model. (1)

Guido von Guido II (2712421) | about 10 months ago | (#45326745)

I can't imagine that the amount of hydrogen in even a warehouse full of these things is much of a safety risk unless it all leaks out at once. But in the factory...

Actually the problem with leaking hydrogen... (1)

voss (52565) | about 10 months ago | (#45326881)

The problem with leaking hydrogen inside a computer case when it mixes with oxygen and forms water vapor. Condensation inside a computer would not be pleasant

Re:Actually the problem with leaking hydrogen... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327233)

The problem with leaking hydrogen inside a computer case when it mixes with oxygen and forms water vapor. Condensation inside a computer would not be pleasant

The hard drive is full of Helium, not Hydrogen. Helium doesn't mix with anything. It's a noble gas.

Also, Hydrogen doesn't just spontaneously become water in the presence of oxygen (at normal temperatures). It needs to be run through a fuel cell or ignited to do that.

Re:Actually the problem with leaking hydrogen... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327261)

Oops. Just saw the subject line in your comment. I retract my first point above, but the second point remains valid.

Sorry!

A new spin on 'my hd exploded' (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45326645)

This is going to put a whole new spin on the term, my hard drive exploded!!

Re:A new spin on 'my hd exploded' (5, Funny)

Jody Bruchon (3404363) | about 10 months ago | (#45326665)

You're thinking hydrogen. This is HELIUM!

H = OH THE HUMANITY

He = OH THE CHIPMUNK HUMANITY

Re:A new spin on 'my hd exploded' (2)

Minwee (522556) | about 10 months ago | (#45327093)

<CHIPMUNK> Madness? THIS IS HELIUM! </CHIPMUNK>

Shipping, but price not announced? (1)

crow (16139) | about 10 months ago | (#45326647)

So when they say "shipping" do they mean they mailed themselves a demonstration model? They haven't announced the price yet.

Wake me up when you can order them from NewEgg.

(Though the technology is interesting.)

Coming soon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45327237)

Taloraan storage.

Clowns (1)

Tim12s (209786) | about 10 months ago | (#45327241)

My First thought....A clown running around with helium filled disks... brain:WTF.

IT people will start talking like Emo Phillips (1, Funny)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about 10 months ago | (#45327301)

With all that helium leaking in the server room.
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  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>